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Crossroads of Twilight PDF, ePub eBook In the tenth book of The Wheel of Time from the New York Times #1 bestselling author Robert Jordan, the world and the characters stand at a crossroads, and the world approaches twilight, when the power of the Shadow grows stronger. Fleeing from Ebou Dar with the kidnapped Daughter of the Nine Moons, whom he is fated to marry, Mat Cauthon learns that he can neither keep her In the tenth book of The Wheel of Time from the New York Times #1 bestselling author Robert Jordan, the world and the characters stand at a crossroads, and the world approaches twilight, when the power of the Shadow grows stronger. Fleeing from Ebou Dar with the kidnapped Daughter of the Nine Moons, whom he is fated to marry, Mat Cauthon learns that he can neither keep her nor let her go, not in safety for either of them, for both the Shadow and the might of the Seanchan Empire are in deadly pursuit. Perrin Aybara seeks to free his wife, Faile, a captive of the Shaido, but his only hope may be an alliance with the enemy. Can he remain true to his friend Rand and to himself? For his love of Faile, Perrin is willing to sell his soul. At Tar Valon, Egwene al'Vere, the young Amyrlin of the rebel Aes Sedai, lays siege to the heart of Aes Sedai power, but she must win quickly, with as little bloodshed as possible, for unless the Aes Sedai are reunited, only the male Asha'man will remain to defend the world against the Dark One, and nothing can hold the Asha'man themselves back from total power except the Aes Sedai and a unified White Tower. In Andor, Elayne Trakland fights for the Lion Throne that is hers by right, but enemies and Darkfriends surround her, plotting her destruction. If she fails, Andor may fall to the Shadow, and the Dragon Reborn with it. Rand al'Thor, the Dragon Reborn himself, has cleansed the Dark One's taint from the male half of the True Source, and everything has changed. Yet nothing has, for only men who can channel believe that saidin is clean again, and a man who can channel is still hated and feared-even one prophesied to save the world. Now, Rand must gamble again, with himself at stake, and he cannot be sure which of his allies are really enemies.

30 review for Crossroads of Twilight

  1. 4 out of 5

    Zach

    To help get you through a series that is always setting up future plot movement without a care for current pacing, I have invented the following Wheel of Time Drinking Game Take a drink whenever: * A character makes a comment generalizing the opposite sex * Rand's wounds are described in detail * A woman sniffs or smooths her clothing * Perrin smells an emotion * "Good Two Rivers wool" * Min's clothing's boyish nature is emphasized in a description * Someone plays with their weapon (e.g., easing it from To help get you through a series that is always setting up future plot movement without a care for current pacing, I have invented the following Wheel of Time Drinking Game Take a drink whenever: * A character makes a comment generalizing the opposite sex * Rand's wounds are described in detail * A woman sniffs or smooths her clothing * Perrin smells an emotion * "Good Two Rivers wool" * Min's clothing's boyish nature is emphasized in a description * Someone plays with their weapon (e.g., easing it from its scabbard, running a thumb along its edge) * Mat feels dice tumbling in his head * A member of the White Ajah says something is "only logical" * Totally out-of-character actions written off as "ta'veren influence" * Someone mentions Murandy, Arad Doman, Shienar, or any other nation that we haven't visited in five volumes * Rand reminds himself how hard he must be * More than two pages without any dialogue or action, just pure description * Any mention of Whitecloaks, the Aelfinn, or any other group that Jordan was obsessed with four books ago and has forgotten about * A chapter ends and nothing happened in it Nynaeve seems to have quit tugging on her braid all the time -- although, to be honest, I rather like that particular tic. At least it was intentional on Jordan's part. My award for least rewarding plot line definitely goes to Perrin. He's off dealing with the prophet of the dragon while hunting for the Shaido, who have kidnapped Faile. Incidentally, those three are in a dead heat for which side character I care about the least. Not that he ever attempts a rescue or anything resembling action, but he does smell a lot of emotions, examine the orderliness of his army camp, and spend three chapters going shopping for barley. If you enjoyed The Wheel of Time Drinking Game, you may also be interested in my ironic Wheel of Time fan fiction / review of Book 12, a one-act play titled The Ta'veren Tavern.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    I love being in the minority! Happy Reading! Mel 🖤🐾🐺

  3. 4 out of 5

    Em Lost In Books

    Hope this slog fest is over and things will move forward more swiftly from this point on.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kat Hooper

    ORIGINALLY POSTED AT Fantasy Literature. Crossroads of Twilight was maddening. I read it years ago and ended up giving up on The Wheel of Time after this book. I tried again in my preparation for reading Memory of Light, and I just couldn't manage to do it again. So, as with Winter's Heart, I cheated by reading many of the chapter summaries at Encyclopaedia WOT. I skimmed the chapters involving Perrin's hunt for Faile because I remembered how slow, grueling, and painful they were when I read them ORIGINALLY POSTED AT Fantasy Literature. Crossroads of Twilight was maddening. I read it years ago and ended up giving up on The Wheel of Time after this book. I tried again in my preparation for reading Memory of Light, and I just couldn't manage to do it again. So, as with Winter's Heart, I cheated by reading many of the chapter summaries at Encyclopaedia WOT. I skimmed the chapters involving Perrin's hunt for Faile because I remembered how slow, grueling, and painful they were when I read them the first time. And even though about 25% of the novel was about this storyline, it did not advance at all. I also skimmed a lot of Elayne's campaigning and dealing with the constantly whining Sea Folk because not much happened here, either. There were only two chapters (out of 30) from Rand's point of view. Mat was entertaining, but he didn't get anywhere either. In Crossroads of Twilight, expect more politicking, planning, negotiating, committee discussions, bathing, dressing, shopping, and description of tapestries and seating arrangements than action. THE PLOT DOES NOT MOVE. There were very few significant occurrences -- mostly the characters just talked to themselves and others. Only one major event happened, and that occurred in the last 3 minutes (on audio). Here is a sample of some of the pulse-pounding action you'll encounter in Crossroads of Twilight: "'I see,' Egwene said slowly. She realized she was massaging the side of her head. The throb behind her eyes beat on. It would grow stronger. It always did. By nightfall, she was going to regret having sent Halima away. Bringing her hand down firmly, she moved the leather folder in front of her a half inch to the left, then slid it back." Riveting... But at least we didn't have to hear about Nynaeve's braid... There are 1880 characters in The Wheel of Time and it's impossible for anyone who's not writing a dissertation on the series to keep them all straight. It doesn't help that so many of the names are similar, either. At this point, many of them are all just a big jumble and you have to use a resource like Encyclopaedia WOT (who have all 1880 characters listed, described, and tracked) to even begin to understand all of the politicking. It also doesn't help that Jordan made occasional mistakes along the way (nicely pointed out by Encyclopaedia WOT). If it weren't for Brandon Sanderson's finale, I would absolutely give up at this point (I did once). By the way, let me say here and now (March 2009), for the record, that I don't believe Mr. Sanderson will be able to clean up this mess with only one volume. Read more Robert Jordan book reviews at Fantasy literature.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Choko

    *** 4.65 *** A buddy read with the WoT dedicates at BB&B! This is book #10 of the series and is probably the one with the least action and most politicking of them all. As such, I am not surprised that it is the lowest rated of all the series, since it seems the majority of us are so addicted to the immediate gratification so prevalent in our society today, that anything which demands our brains to concentrate and actually work to figure things out instead of being spoon-fed to us, we find bo *** 4.65 *** A buddy read with the WoT dedicates at BB&B! This is book #10 of the series and is probably the one with the least action and most politicking of them all. As such, I am not surprised that it is the lowest rated of all the series, since it seems the majority of us are so addicted to the immediate gratification so prevalent in our society today, that anything which demands our brains to concentrate and actually work to figure things out instead of being spoon-fed to us, we find boring and tedious.. Well, there isn't any action in this book. No fights, no battles, no big revelations. The main protagonist doesn't even show up until we reach the 65% of the book. It seems like every page is full of POV's of secondary or tertiary characters who on the surface make no difference to the overall story plot. And yet, it is like mountain being built one small pebble at a time. I have said it before and I will say it again - Robert Jordan is a genius of storytelling, a man so in control of the tale he is crafting, that the least of the paragraphs are filled with some information that makes the foundation for something totally visually unrelated, but at the end it all makes sense. Not only sense, but the world becomes so real to us because of all those invisible details, that we surprise ourselves as to how well we are familiar and grounded in it. At times, as we get closer to the last book, the world of WoT seems more richly layered and real than the one we inhabit in our daily lives. So yes, despite the lack of shiny action and developments, this book is still a wonderful addition to the series. The characters, the banter, even the completely idiotic mistakes some of our gang make at this point of the story, all the plotting, betrayals, double-crossing and new connections on all the newly forming fronts, all of them continue weaving one of the greatest sagas of all times!!!! The Wheel weaves as the Wheel wills and may we all find our place in the tapestry of Life!!! Happy Reading:-)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Markus

    We rode on the winds of the rising storm, We ran to the sounds of the thunder. We danced among the lightning bolts, and tore the world asunder. Is Crossroads of Twilight the weakest Wheel of Time book I've read so far? Probably. Is it still amazing? Pfft, it's a Wheel of Time book. Of course it is. In terms of plot development, this book has nothing to offer. Absolutely nothing. But the world and the characters are so fantastic I don't even mind. And since for the first time, none of the protagonists We rode on the winds of the rising storm, We ran to the sounds of the thunder. We danced among the lightning bolts, and tore the world asunder. Is Crossroads of Twilight the weakest Wheel of Time book I've read so far? Probably. Is it still amazing? Pfft, it's a Wheel of Time book. Of course it is. In terms of plot development, this book has nothing to offer. Absolutely nothing. But the world and the characters are so fantastic I don't even mind. And since for the first time, none of the protagonists act like whiny teenagers, I want to read the next one straight away. Wheel of Time reviews: #1 The Eye of the World #2 The Great Hunt #3 The Dragon Reborn #4 The Shadow Rising #5 The Fires of Heaven #6 Lord of Chaos #7 A Crown of Swords #8 The Path of Daggers #9 Winter's Heart #10 Crossroads of Twilight #11 Knife of Dreams #12 The Gathering Storm #13 Towers of Midnight #14 A Memory of Light

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

    This was definitely the slowest WoT book in the series. Not a lot happened in the story arcs of the vast majority of the main characters. As a result this was probably the least enjoyable of the WoT books so far. Not to say it was bad! Jordan is an excellent storyteller and I enjoyed the vast majority of the stuff we did get. What did happen to our favourite characters? Spoilers ahead!!! Rand: After the dramatic events of the last book he made only a fleeting appearance in this one and did little This was definitely the slowest WoT book in the series. Not a lot happened in the story arcs of the vast majority of the main characters. As a result this was probably the least enjoyable of the WoT books so far. Not to say it was bad! Jordan is an excellent storyteller and I enjoyed the vast majority of the stuff we did get. What did happen to our favourite characters? Spoilers ahead!!! Rand: After the dramatic events of the last book he made only a fleeting appearance in this one and did little more than tread water. Mat: The star of this book. He might not have done much but his chapters were pure fun as he started his hilarious courtship of the Daughter of the Nine Moons. Perrin: Just like Mat his chapters were engaging despite the fact that he did absolutely nothing. He is still searching for Faile! Towards the end we also had to suffer an incident that really damaged my opinion of him as a character. Elayne: I usually love the female WoT characters as much as the male ones but their is no denying that Elayne's chapters in this one were a bit slow and dull. Egwene: Just like Elayne her chapters were a bit dull. She was doing more of the same right up until the end were she suffered a bout of the extreme idiocy that our WoT faves catch from time to time. Nynaeve: She was pretty much AWOL in this instalment. Aviendha, Min, Faile, and Tuon: The love interests mostly just hung around batting their eyes at the menfolk or pining for them. Faile was probably the pick of the bunch as she took time from her pining to try and set an escape plan into motion. Probably a good idea considering Perrin has not been much help in that regard for the last few books! Random Secondary Characters: We got a bunch of them. Most were interesting and such POV segments always add an extra level of depth to the world. The downside is that none of the always interesting Forsaken made much of an appearance. All in all I did enjoy this one despite the fact that it had a few slow spots and almost no real advancement in any of the ongoing story arcs. Rating: 4 stars. I was tempted to go with 3.5 stars but I'm going to give this the benefit of the doubt as the good moments were as good as any in the previous books. Audio Note: I praise Krammer and Reading every book and that is because they deserve it. They really are fantastic narrators. It is a massive plus for the WoT series that the pair narrate every single book in the series. The production company should get some credit for seeing that we "readers" got to enjoy such consistent and excellent performance.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kaora

    I keep saying that these have no action until the last 10% but this one missed the last 10% and has 0 action until the very last page. Let me save you some time. -Elayne is fussed over because she is pregnant. Whines about Queen stuff. Aviendha is also there. -Min strides around in her trousers and threatens Rand with a knife. -Rand does a whole lot of nothing except talk to voices in his head and drool over Min. -Egwene pushes around and reads some paper. -Some Aes Sedai in the hall are pretty. Some I keep saying that these have no action until the last 10% but this one missed the last 10% and has 0 action until the very last page. Let me save you some time. -Elayne is fussed over because she is pregnant. Whines about Queen stuff. Aviendha is also there. -Min strides around in her trousers and threatens Rand with a knife. -Rand does a whole lot of nothing except talk to voices in his head and drool over Min. -Egwene pushes around and reads some paper. -Some Aes Sedai in the hall are pretty. Some are not. Also they argue a lot. -Perrin buys some grain and thinks a lot about Faile. -Mat attempts to court Tuon. And the dice roll. Stop. Roll. Stop. Roll. Stop. There. Saved you 7 hours.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Robin (Bridge Four)

    Crossroads of Twilight has: 846 pages 271K words 30 Chapters + Prologue + Epilogue 22 Uniquie PoVs 45 Individual PoVs And the plot arcs only moved forward 2 inches...2 measly inches. HOW????? Even Snails be like… Part of the issue is that the first 55-60% of this book is just about what everyone else was doing while Rand and Nynaeve were trying to cleanse Saidin. The Rundown: Faile is still kidnapped by the Shido and Perrin is pretty much at the end of his tether trying to get her back. Everyone still think Crossroads of Twilight has: 846 pages 271K words 30 Chapters + Prologue + Epilogue 22 Uniquie PoVs 45 Individual PoVs And the plot arcs only moved forward 2 inches...2 measly inches. HOW????? Even Snails be like… Part of the issue is that the first 55-60% of this book is just about what everyone else was doing while Rand and Nynaeve were trying to cleanse Saidin. The Rundown: Faile is still kidnapped by the Shido and Perrin is pretty much at the end of his tether trying to get her back. Everyone still thinks that Perrin has a thing with that bitch Beralain (view spoiler)[This is not resolved in this book they are still apart plus enter Rolan who likes Faile and I see even more angst and people thinking others cheated in the future for them. (hide spoiler)] Elayne is still trying to solidify her claim on The Lion Throne. I’m not sure if it is because she is pregnant but I was totally bored through her chapters. Egwene is still camped outside Tar’Valon waiting to do something. She is still having headaches and she has no idea where they are coming from. *Yawn* Aes Sedae politics are boring now. Siaun and Gareth Bloody Bryne are still pretending they don’t have huge chemistry…It’s minor but I ship them so hurry that arc up. Rand is still missing all of the Maidens. No seriously what happened to them? He went into hiding but that is kind of done now so why hasn’t he reconnected with any of them. Mat Cauthon still has those bloody dice rolling in his head Actually this was the one arc that was at all interesting to me. He kidnapped the Daughter of the Nine Moons *snickers*. I’m pretty sure that she is playing him more than he is playing her and IT IS FANTASTIC! Loial is finally back. I’ve missed that Ogier so much. But he only gets a few token mentions and parts in this book. Maybe in the next he will get a bigger role. The Seanchan are still invading they also aren’t advertising that their precious Daughter of the Nine Moons is missing. But at least some of the Seanchan PoVs were really enlightening and gave some added depth to their culture. The Problem There are SO MANY CHARACTERS. Look we are 10 books in and I can’t remember all the main players anymore. I had to look up on the Wheel of Time wiki who people were because I didn’t remember that so and so rescued Rand in book 5 or that this other Dude has like three different names but he is the same dude. And I’m going in order. I can’t even imagine how this worked for people who had years between books unless they reread them all going into the new ones. I’m so done with Aes Sedea politics…because they are stupid. I want certain characters to meet so we can just resolve a few things. I want the kids that grew up in the two rivers together as best friends to freaking trust each other and not accidentally plot against that other *looks at Egwene*. I want characters that I haven’t scene for books and books to show up and do something or die. There are just too many loose threads everywhere. It is time to start resolving a few things. In all of the last books there is a climax at the end. A build and then the last 10-15% is all action and chaos and stuff happening and so it leaves you feeling the book accomplished something. But the end of this book wasn’t like that at all and it really just fizzled. And some idiot from the Two Rivers ditched all their guards and didn’t tell anyone where they were going only to be captured by the enemy and that was the end. It just didn’t live up to the prior books at all. My Ray of Hope There is ONE more book to go before Sanderson takes over. So I’m holding out for that.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Brimm

    I will keep this short. In this book, absolutely nothing happens. There is no character development. There is no plot. Instead, the reader, who has so generously given Robert Jordan so much of his/her money over the course of the series, is treated to descriptions of dresses of characters whom we don't care about and who have no actual bearing on the plot. My advice to those slogging through this series: Read the last ten pages of this book, and then continue on to Knife of Dreams, a flawed book I will keep this short. In this book, absolutely nothing happens. There is no character development. There is no plot. Instead, the reader, who has so generously given Robert Jordan so much of his/her money over the course of the series, is treated to descriptions of dresses of characters whom we don't care about and who have no actual bearing on the plot. My advice to those slogging through this series: Read the last ten pages of this book, and then continue on to Knife of Dreams, a flawed book, but at least one where something happens. Then, if you're a truly charitable individual, go to your local bookshop, buy all the copies, and get rid of them so that nobody will have to be subjected to this crap.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Evgeny

    I really need to mention the reason for my rating of the book; it is a strange one. The only reason I gave this book 3 stars and not 2 which it deserves more is that I never reread the books I rate with 2 stars while I just finished rereading this one. I mentioned 2 star rating as a big series fan. What exactly happened during 600+ pages? Absolutely nothing, that is what. Another big part of the frustration comes from the fact that the previous book ended with a grand event which would surely cha I really need to mention the reason for my rating of the book; it is a strange one. The only reason I gave this book 3 stars and not 2 which it deserves more is that I never reread the books I rate with 2 stars while I just finished rereading this one. I mentioned 2 star rating as a big series fan. What exactly happened during 600+ pages? Absolutely nothing, that is what. Another big part of the frustration comes from the fact that the previous book ended with a grand event which would surely change the history of the whole world and already changed the power picture among the major players, including the remaining Forsaken. Speaking of whom, I would love to see a POV from any of these just to know how the said event affected them, but it was the first book in a long time which did not have a POV of any of the Forsaken. What remain are mostly 4 subplots which dragged on and on. Mat was the first guy with such subplot. His POV was mildly amusing, but nothing of note happened with him or people around him. He is stuck in a traveling circus and tries to balance his ragtag team with practically everybody doing the things their own way. Perrin's POV is the most dreadfully boring one. He broods non-stop and does not do much except this. I did not suspect in the beginning of the series this guy would need Faile as a wet nurse every single moment and would fall completely apart without her. If I ever get around reading this book again, this is the part I will skip. Elayne still tries to keep the throne while keeping even her more colorful group under some resemblance of control: Aes Sedai, the Wise Ones, the Kin, and last but most definitely not least the Sea Folks. Egwene comes next with her rebel Aes Sedai group. This part is pure about intrigues and double-crossings with nothing being done. Well, not exactly. The bad guys keep killing people in the group left and right, but these seemingly "good" Aes Sedai are too busy scheming to look for a killer. There were several good parts, but they were few and between. The only plot movement worth noticing came at the very end of the book (Egwene). The most interesting development happened to be in the White Tower, of all the places. It did not move the overall plot by much, but was quite satisfying nonetheless. The last thing which needs to be mentioned: Robert Jordan is one of the greatest world-builders in fantasy. It can be clearly seen from the episode where Perrin visited a town to buy supplies; this town gave me creeps. The atmosphere, people and unexplained happenings were great. This was the best part of otherwise completely hopeless Perrin's subplot. This is without a doubt the slowest book of the series. I am happy to say that at least 3 of the subplots which were dragging during several books will be resolved in the next installment of the series. This review is a copy/paste of my BookLikes one: http://gene.booklikes.com/post/804462...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Manveer

    Alright. According to popular opinion, this is the worst book in the series. And it kind of is. It is not bad in the conventional way, it is just very very slow. Like literally nothing happened in this half length book. But as a I explained earlier, I like slow. Heck, I love slow, if it also includes insight into the characters' minds and helps expand the scope of the series. And these things were there. Okay, so this book was about Mat and Perrin, and Rand barely showed up. Well, I don't like Per Alright. According to popular opinion, this is the worst book in the series. And it kind of is. It is not bad in the conventional way, it is just very very slow. Like literally nothing happened in this half length book. But as a I explained earlier, I like slow. Heck, I love slow, if it also includes insight into the characters' minds and helps expand the scope of the series. And these things were there. Okay, so this book was about Mat and Perrin, and Rand barely showed up. Well, I don't like Perrin, not since he married that bitchy excuse of a girl. But my dislike for a character and him being in a book is no excuse to hate the book. He has been written that way. Mat's chapters, I loved.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    Hmmm. Well, the good news is it's not as bad as everyone says it is. The bad news is it's not all that great either. In quickly scanning the last 10 or so reviews of this book, the complaints pretty much boil down to "it moves slowly" and "nothing happens." I rather disagree with the latter.* The former, unfortunately, is pretty spot on. The actual problem with this book, as I see it, is not that nothing happens (see A Path of Daggers, which was great) or that it moves slowly (See The Fires of H Hmmm. Well, the good news is it's not as bad as everyone says it is. The bad news is it's not all that great either. In quickly scanning the last 10 or so reviews of this book, the complaints pretty much boil down to "it moves slowly" and "nothing happens." I rather disagree with the latter.* The former, unfortunately, is pretty spot on. The actual problem with this book, as I see it, is not that nothing happens (see A Path of Daggers, which was great) or that it moves slowly (See The Fires of Heaven, which was really great), it's that a couple of small problems dominate the attention of the reader and obfuscate the actual value of the story. Here's what I mean. Throughout the Wheel Of Time there are a couple of things that happen fairly consistently in each of the books: 1) The prologue visits a few minor or semi-major characters and gives updates on their stories, and usually there's at least one major event that takes place here, which gives momentum to the rest of the book. 2) The book is composed of vignettes that further the viewpoints of a few co-located characters, and these vignettes have a beginning, and middle, and an end (usually a cliffhanger, of course.) 3) There is a major, dramatic, world-changing ending (that usually takes about 80-100 pages). Here's what happens in this book. 1) The prologue covers 7 characters, and a whole bunch of the characters covered are either showing up for the first time, or have been very rarely featured. After the absolutely breathless conclusion to Winter's Heart, I don't want to know what @#$%ing Rodel Ituralde is doing in $%^&ing Tarabon, I want to know whether Saidin is actually cleansed! So this deals an immediate blow to the momentum of the book. Then, as indicated in 2) we continue with the mini-novels advancing the story lines or Perrin & Faile, Mat, Elayne, Egwene, and Rand. And most of these aren't bad. Perrin's story moves briskly along, he figures out where the Shaido are and he galvanizes as a leader. Moreover, the fantastic So Harbor sequence shows that Robert Jordan still has some surprises up his sleeve. Mat's story line is equally compelling,** mostly because of his blossoming relationship with Tuon (which is handled much more interestingly and delicately than Nynaeve and Lan's: "oh, by the way, we're in love, too bad we're doomed" from book, uh, 1? 2?) Rand's section is great as always, no worries there. And even Elayne's political wrangling, although short on actual outcomes does a reasonably effective job of discussing pregnancy, leadership, politics, and how the three interact. The real problem here is Egwene and her storyline. For starters, it's a bad sign when the first thing that happens in your storyline is that someone (in this case Gareth Bryne) says "If you act now, which you have the capability to do all your problems will be solved." and you (in this case Egwene) responds "No, that wouldn't be in character. Let's dither for 200 pages." Now, to be fair, I respect Robert Jordan for this. It certainly is true to Egwene's chracter, and I've even complained (what was I thinking!) about some of the rapid fire decisions made by the characters (well, Rand) leading up to the finales. (Books 5 *AND* 7 both end with what amounts to "suddenly, Rand decided to challenge one of the forsaken...".) But the way it's presented, right at the beginning of the Egwene's storyline, really kills the momentum of the book***, so much so that I left off on page 500 for something like 4 weeks. And finally, remember how I mentioned 3)? The great endings that change the world and leave the reader breathless and wanting more? Well, that's here all right. And it even comes from Egwene's storyline. The problem is, the part of it that's worthy to be called a finale is two paragraphs long. On page 818 of the paperback (out of 822) I still had no idea what was going on, or why I should care. Seriously unsatisfying, especially compared to....any of the other books. I repeat, there is still a lot of good in here. And there are some remarkable things about this book. For example, both Elayne and Egwene's story lines feature almost no male characters whatsoever. Robert Jordan has blown the Bechdel test out of the water. Moreover, by slowing down the pace of the story, the challenges facing the characters seem more difficult, and thus their struggles feel more epic. I like all this very much. I genuinely think that if the prologue had featured a little more action, if Egwene's storylines had been structured in the novel a little differently, and if the finale were better constructed, that this would have been much more comparable to any of the last, each of which I enjoyed more than this. * I stand by this statement, however, having started book 11, I was forced to comment: "More happens in the first 39 pages of Knife of Dreams than happens in the entirety of Crossroads of Twilight." ** Except for one minor detail. Remember how in Fires of Heaven, Elayne and Nynaeve join the circus and it's freaking maddening becauwe Nynaeve can't stop thinking about her scandalous low cut dress and Elayne's too tight trousers? Well, guess what, Mat joins a circus too. THE SAME @#$%ing CIRCUS. I would hold this more against Robert Jordan if I wasn't convinced that this was an intentional self parody... *** Which is too bad, because there's again a lot of good in Egwene's storyline. There are murder mysteries and Age of Legends-esque discoveries! There is intrigue and subterfuge! And the relationship between Egwene and Halima is the creepiest thing in the entire series so far.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Maria Dimitrova

    Buddy Read with the awesome people of BB&B! Ten months ago I would have taken one look at this book, read a couple of chapters and promptly given up because basically nothing happens. It's a testament to Mr. Jordan's ability to spin a web of characters, events and places around the reader, that now after reading all the previous books in the series I didn't find this boring at all. Slow and frustrating at times but not boring. I remember bitching about books 1-3 with their slow build-up and e Buddy Read with the awesome people of BB&B! Ten months ago I would have taken one look at this book, read a couple of chapters and promptly given up because basically nothing happens. It's a testament to Mr. Jordan's ability to spin a web of characters, events and places around the reader, that now after reading all the previous books in the series I didn't find this boring at all. Slow and frustrating at times but not boring. I remember bitching about books 1-3 with their slow build-up and excessive descriptions and I strongly suspect that if I'm to read them now it won't bother me at all. Because compared to this one they were choke-full of action. In a way, here, we take a breath after the explosive end of Winter's Heart. It focuses on manoeuvring and politics, it sets the stage for future events and shows that despite the monumental event that was the cleansing of saidin the world hasn't changed a bit. It's still on a crash course to total annihilation and everyone is scrambling to avoid it but despite their best intentions are making things worse. Our protagonists slip farther towards darkness and madness and you can practically feel the desperation that drives them. The only bright spot was Mat and his attempts to woo the Daughter of the Nine Moons. That was hilarious and a much needed break from all the bleakness. And as we get closer to Tarmon Gai'don I feel we will have less of those funny and light exchanges and more death and desperation.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Eric Allen

    Crossroads of Twilight Book 10 of the Wheel of Time By Robert Jordan A Wheel of Time Retrospective by Eric Allen I love the Wheel of Time series. It is, by far, and despite its flaws, my absolute favorite series of books. Oh, there's plenty of people out there who can point out why this series is awful and has been dragged on far too long. But you know what, I don't care. To me, this series is great. I thought it could do no wrong. And then Crossroads of Twilight came out. This is the series that real Crossroads of Twilight Book 10 of the Wheel of Time By Robert Jordan A Wheel of Time Retrospective by Eric Allen I love the Wheel of Time series. It is, by far, and despite its flaws, my absolute favorite series of books. Oh, there's plenty of people out there who can point out why this series is awful and has been dragged on far too long. But you know what, I don't care. To me, this series is great. I thought it could do no wrong. And then Crossroads of Twilight came out. This is the series that really got me into reading back when I was eleven years old. I've been reading it for so long, and I've read it through so many times, that the characters are more like old friends than characters in a book. The places feel almost real to me, and I can see them in my mind as I read the series. I love the Wheel of Time... but I absolutely HATE this book. For you to understand why I hate this book so much, I'm going to have to explain a few things to put my hatred in context for you. I picked up the first book in the series--The Eye of the World--at the library from the New Releases shelf because it had an awesome picture on the cover over twenty years ago. I was hooked from page one. I have bought each and every one of these books multiple times. First in paperback because that was all I could afford, then when they wore out, I bought more copies of them. I bought them all in hardback for my spiffy bookshelf once I got older and could afford such things. I've bought the audio version to listen to at work, first in CD format, and then in digital. I've spent quite a bit of money on these books throughout the years. I've been an avid fan from the very beginning. No matter what happened, no matter how many books the series dragged on into, I always came back for more, because I just couldn't stop. This series had become a part of my life. When the internet got big, I'd spend hours at a time reading theories on what was going to happen in the next book, or coming up with my own. I put up with the series slowing down. Important things were still happening. I put up with all of the politics, and the boredom, and the stupidity of characters that I disliked. I put up with the stagnating storyline, and the apparent lack of forward progress. I put up with it all, because at the heart, these were still books about my very favorite characters in all of fiction, and I would always come back for more, no matter how dull it got. I'd been promised an epic conclusion somewhere down the line, and I was eager to see it. But you know what, like many a great man before me has said, it's not the destination that's important, but the journey. And though that journey stretched far longer than I would have preferred at times, it was one that I have and still thoroughly enjoy. I cannot count how many times I have read these books. Some of the early ones probably upwards of thirty to fifty times. And then Crossroads of Twilight came out. Until this point in the series, there was always something happening. Someone was always doing something to move along to the next stage, even if it was just moving from one place to another in preparation for a later event in another book. The books still ended with huge, epic climactic confrontations and a sense of something having been accomplished. They still ended with something having been done, and moved forward. And then Crossroads of Twilight came out. At the time that this book was released I was serving an LDS mission in South Chicago. So, not only did I have to wait the two and a half years since the previous book was released, I also had to wait several more months after its release to even pick up a copy to read. Those were hard months full of temptation for me. Knowing that there was a Wheel of Time book out there that I had not yet read, and could, if I wanted to, if only I would just break the rules and go pick up a copy of it. I picked up a copy of it in the airport on the way home, and read it at my first convenience, only to find that this book was a complete and utter BETRAYAL of all of my years of faithfully following this series through the good and the bad alike. Every book before this one, I could say, yeah, it seems like it's been stretched out unnecessarily, but things are still happening. Until this book. This is the book where Robert Jordan stopped telling a story and started milking his fame. This is the book where Robert Jordan said F**K YOU to all of his fans. This is the book where Robert Jordan sold out. There wasn't anything in this book that I could use to justify its very existence with. This was a book that existed for the SOLE purpose of getting another thirty bucks out of me. It did not move the story or the characters at all, and it didn't even give me a mediocre climax at the end. Instead, it ends with a very weak cliffhanger that doesn't even really lead into the next book, because the character it happens to has a single chapter in the next book. At less than half the length of the longest book in the series, Crossroads of Twilight is actually quite short. It's long for a mainstream novel, but by the standards of the Fantasy Genre, and this series in particular, this book is tiny. My first thought upon picking up a copy was that it took the writer over two years to give us the shortest book in the series? How does that work? Years later I realized that the author was suffering from the illness that later took his life, and I am sorry for being an annoying little snot over the wait, but you know what, I'm not THAT sorry. Why? Because this book really isn't much of a book at all. This is the shortest book in the series, but it feels like the longest. And as I've said before, a good story can be told in a single page if that's all it needs to get its message across. A good story doesn't need hundreds of pages of filler to make it better. This book, in NO WAY can be considered a good story. Instead, the entire thing is filler. Filler that can be skipped while missing little to nothing that the next book doesn't explain. This book is Robert Jordan taking three storylines that should have ended in the previous book, and stretching them out needlessly and pointlessly into an utterly superfluous novel that, honestly, can be skipped. You can get everything you need to know about the events in this book from the Wiki plot summary, and that's less than a page long. We begin with Perrin, dealing with the pressures of leading five separate armies that are supposed to be one, but refuse to see themselves as such. This is actually a really good beginning to the book. I really enjoy seeing how Perrin deals with rumors of infidelity, people trying to make him into something that he doesn't think he is, and holding the various factions of his army together through sheer strength of will. This is an excellent beginning to the book. It shows his plight, and it shows how he will have to grow in order to overcome it. Internal struggle is something that Robert Jordan does very well. And then the book runs headlong into a brick wall with an entire third of the page count devoted to Elayne where not ONE SINGLE THING worth noting happens. Yes, that's right, an entire third of the book passes without a single thing worthy of mention occurring. I've said it before, and I'll say it again. This entire storyline of Elayne getting her throne should have been glossed over rather than stretched to fill up large sections of four entire books. I am not a fan of Elayne AT ALL, but I've talked to people who are, and even they hate this storyline. Why? Because it paints a character they like as a petty, childish idiot, and because it's really not important to the overall story at all. What little intelligence Elayne has displayed up to this point, and really she hasn't shown much, just goes straight out the window in this storyline and she basically becomes dumb as a post. It stretches on to agonizing lengths and it really doesn't need to in order to get the point across. It's not important HOW she gets the throne, only that she DOES get it. And you know what, that she DOES get it, isn't really all that important either. I don't like her character because she's really not a character, among other reasons that I've already gone into in previous reviews of other books in this series. She's an heir to the throne. Take that away and she's absolutely nothing. She has no identity or personality as a character other than that. Her losing her only source of identity, as she should have by any and all rights after everything that's happened, and dealing with it would have been far more interesting than this load of crap. It would have transformed a non-character into something that I could care about, someone dealing realistically with something that SHOULD HAVE realistically happened to her. Oh, and another thing that annoys me about her is how every other word out of her is whining about it being Rand's fault she's pregnant. She basically forced herself on HIM, and it's HIS fault she has to deal with pregnancy? Uh, no, it isn't. That's, frankly, just plain irresponsible and childish. I'm sorry if my saying so offends any ladies out there, but it is. I'm sorry that pregnancy sucks, but, I mean, come on, she's the one that tripped him into her bed. I'll never understand why Robert Jordan felt the need to include this storyline and devote so much of FOUR BOOKS to it when literally NOTHING happens for about three of those books. By his own logic, which he used to explain important characters being left out of earlier volumes, this makes absolutely no sense at all. This is something that is not interesting at all, something that even fans of Elayne don't want to read about, and does little but take up massive amounts of space in a series that really doesn't need any extra filler to little point or purpose. I don't get it... WHY!?!? WHY is so much of the latter third of this series filled with a storyline that is almost completely pointless and serves little purpose to the overall plot of the series? I'll tell you why. Because in this book, Robert Jordan sold out. He stopped telling a story, and he started stretching so he could get at least one extra novel out of the story and milk his fans for another thirty bucks each with this piece of crap. After that mind-numbing complete waste of three hundred pages, we shift to Egwene dealing with Aes Sedai politics. If you enjoy Egwene, and the way she has to keep on her toes to hold the rebel Aes Sedai together, and keep them aimed at their goal, you may enjoy this section of the book. Me, I felt it was unnecessary. We already know what she's dealing with as Amyrlin Seat. We don't need a reiteration of things that have already been established, especially when, like with Elayne's section, very little of overall importance takes place during this section. This is basically just copy and paste from any chapter of your choice about Egwene from the previous four books. There are no new revelations given, and nothing happens to advance the plot. There is some foreshadowing given for the end of the book, but at this point, I don't think many people really cared. That event was not really important enough to deserve the foreshadowing in my opinion. We shift back to Perrin in one of the most haunting and tone rich chapters of the entire series where he goes to buy grain in a haunted city. Robert Jordan has always been excellent in giving a good mood and tone for any given scene, and making you, as the reader, FEEL what's going on. Here he's outdone himself. This is probably one of my favorite chapters in the entire series. Ironic, that. Jordan paints a picture of a dark and downtrodden city living in fear of their own dead and it's really spectacularly done. And then we get people around Rand doing nothing, and Rand making plans that really should have been left for the next book for all that's accomplished here in including it. Rand just cleansed freaking Sai'din. Something no one has been able to do for three thousand years. He's put an end to male channelers going mad simply for being what they are. This is probably the most momentous thing that has happened in the entire series thus far, and he doesn't even bother to acknowledge that it even happened. We don't get any of his thoughts or feelings on the matter at all. The entire event is treated as though it's of no import at all, and Rand, as a character has not grown in the slightest over it. Or at least he appears not to have. Most of this section is not even told from his point of view, and he's more of a side attraction to the things other people are doing. I want to know what he's feeling, what he's thinking, what's going through his heart and mind after accomplishing something so incredible. He doesn't even think about the power that could be his if he gets the Choedan Kal Access Key away from Cadsuane, which, by the way, MAJOR PLOT POINT LATER ON. And he can't even be bothered to have a single thought about how god-like it made him feel to channel that much of the power? This portion of the book was wasted on other characters basically doing nothing, and Aes Sedai gossiping about their Warders. Not exactly engaging dialog, or important to the plot. Then the book shifts over to Mat, slooooooowly escaping Ebou Dar. As I've said before, this section of the story has basically just been stretched out to remind us that Mat still exists in this book. His storyline for this book and the previous one really should have been condensed into a single chapter or two. It's like RJ got to this point of the novel and realized it was running short and tossed in a few chapters of Mat being Mat to lengthen it a bit. Not much goes on here except that he starts courting Tuon, whom he is destined to marry, and as he does plenty of that in the next book, his section in this one is completely pointless and really feels sort of tacked on. And then we finish up with Egwene doing more nothing for a couple chapters before the big, epic Wheel of Time clima--oh right, this book doesn't have one. Every single book up to this point has had a hugely epic, over the top climax that has wowed me in almost every way. Every book until now has had a huge, epic throwdown, and has left me with a sense that something important to the story has happened. Something has been accomplished. Something has happened. The story has moved forward. But not here. OH NO. Even in earlier books where not much happened, they still ended with a huge climactic ending that left me with a sense of something having been accomplished. Yes, book eight might have been a little weaker than the others, but it still moved the story forward. Here, what do we get? We get a cliffhanger, and an extraordinarily weak one at that. It's handled with all of the fanfare and excitement as someone pouring salt on their meal. Egwene is captured. The End. It's like a slap in the face after the knee to the junk that this book embodied. I don't know about you, but when a book ends without some sort of climactic event, I feel as though I've been cheated. If there's no payoff at the ending, why am I even reading? The journey may be the most important part, but if it's not leading anywhere, what's the point in even reading the damn book? He couldn't have tossed something superficially flashy in as a reward for slogging through this soulless, vacuous excuse for a Wheel of Time book? Nope, apparently not. The book ends so abruptly that it was rumored for years on the internet that the publisher gave RJ a hard deadline and told him that if he wasn't done by then, the book would be published as it was, whether it was done or not. So, as the rumor went, the book was published without its ending. I'm almost inclined to believe it, if I didn't know for a fact that wasn't the way that RJ used to write. He didn't write linearly. This book was MEANT to end this way. Thanks RJ. The good? This book is not completely without merit. The parts of the book about Perrin are excellent. Not much really happens in them, but Perrin grows tremendously as a character during this book. Plus you get that couple of chapters in the haunted city that are really a perfect example to anyone wishing to learn how to write on how to manipulate tone and setting to spectacular effect. The bad? Almost nothing in this book serves any purpose to the plot. The only character in it that actually develops is Perrin. There are plenty of things that, if you know where to look, point to things that happen in the next book. But not here. Nothing happens here that is really worth the time to read. When I reread this book I typically skip through almost half of it because it's so superfluous that it really serves no purpose at all except to take up space. The ugly? I basically already ranted about everything I wanted to rant about in the summary. This book isn't about telling a good story, continuing the legend, or progressing the characters. It's about one thing alone. Dollar signs. There really are no words to describe what a betrayal to all of RJ's fans that this book was. This was the book where I could no longer delude myself into thinking that he was stretching things out toward any sort of purpose. This was the book where I knew for a fact that this story was being stretched only for the purpose of bringing in more money, and it really shows. When maybe five chapters of the forty or so in the book actually serve any purpose to story or character development and the rest is just filler that doesn't even end in a climax of any kind, I can't make any excuses for the author anymore. For someone that has been with this series through thick and thin from the very beginning I felt that this book was just insulting to me. I can't tell you how many hundreds of dollars I've spent on rebuying copies of these books because I've worn them out, and when I got to this one, it felt as though it was all for nothing. It felt as though the author that I adored, whose fancy car and gigantic house I helped to buy, had no respect for me whatsoever. It was as if he just squatted down and took a gigantic crap all over his entire fanbase with this book. And that is why I hate it. Because this book isn't about really anything except an author betraying his fans and stretching a story out pointlessly to make an extra buck. All sense of anything magical has been stripped away from the story at this point, and the ENTIRE book focuses on politics that really don't need any more focus than they've already been given. This is what you get when you strip all of the action, the magic, and the heart from a work of fantasy fiction. A boring, soulless waste of space. This book gets one star becasue I like Perrin's storyline here. That's ALL that this book has going for it. If you are a completist and wish to read the entire series as a whole, sure, but be warned that you're in for a long and boring read. Anyone else, large sections of this book can be skipped over without missing a thing of importance. I actually recommend for most casual readers to skip this book entirely and check out the Crossroads of Twilight Wiki Page and read the plot summary. It tells you everything that you need to know in a scant eleven lines of text. This book was more about an author seeing dollar signs rather than telling a story. It wasn't enjoyable, it was rather insulting, and I treat it as such. It really is an awful book and illustrates basically every single criticism that people have for the series without giving anything at all that can be used in its defense. It's a bloated and generally pointless piece of trash in an otherwise extraordinary series. Check out my other reviews.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Terrington

    Crossroads of Twilight is an ugly duckling in The Wheel of Time. Parts of the book are chronologically set in the same time span as the previous book and other parts are set in the 'current' time after the ninth book. Adding to the unorthodox chronological timing of this book is the fact that, of all the books in this series, this book is a 'filler' book. That is not to say that nothing worth noting happens in this book. (view spoiler)[After all we see a lot of important character development, E Crossroads of Twilight is an ugly duckling in The Wheel of Time. Parts of the book are chronologically set in the same time span as the previous book and other parts are set in the 'current' time after the ninth book. Adding to the unorthodox chronological timing of this book is the fact that, of all the books in this series, this book is a 'filler' book. That is not to say that nothing worth noting happens in this book. (view spoiler)[After all we see a lot of important character development, Egwene ends up kidnapped and Mat and Tuon develop their relationship. (hide spoiler)] However, I feel that this book could have done better had it been edited and strung together with either book nine alone or with book eight and nine. What keeps me reading these books however is the characterisation, the magic and the general world-building. As I've mentioned several times Robert Jordan was never the greatest word-smith. His turn of phrase is at times clumsy in his books and his word choice under deep examination would perhaps prove quite flawed. However in my eyes the flaws humanise these novels and serve to remove that element of pomposity I sense in other fantasy epics. I'm not saying that at times Jordan doesn't lose track of how big his world is, but I don't sense that in his writing he is suggesting that the reader look at how amazing he is and how good he is. Something that I have sensed in the popular A Game of Thrones. I'm saying that Robert Jordan, while he was alive, was likely a down to earth individual simply judging from his easy going style with writing and that is something that appeals to me, ridiculous as that may sound. One of the major themes of The Wheel of Time is birth, death and rebirth. In many ways, while this is a popularised fantasy epic it also has ideas within it about life, ideas which are important to our reality. That said, this is at its heart, still designed to be a story rather than a lesson in how we are to live. So I can't recommend that you go into these novels expecting anything other than a fascinating story. I feel that I simply happen to see more in the novels than is presented to the casual reader. And yet I make sure that I never read so far into the books that everything becomes a metaphor for some real world event. To go back to the topic of birth, death and rebirth, I find that in this series the characters particularly represent rebirth. There is the element of characters literally being reborn heroes from the past, an idea which resonates with me in that it symbolises how history repeats itself, with old 'archetypes' and scenarios recurring and great leaders/heroes arising. However the other way that rebirth is shown is a symbolic rebirth with characters being transformed from regular farmherds into magic wielding heroes. And, unlike most other books which take this 'heroes' journey' route, the series generally has decent character progression with the exception of one or two exceptions. As said in other reviews I recommend the series with the warning that some of the books are a slow drag compared to others. This is one of the slow dragging novels, and one of the last, with the next book speeding up and featuring many important plot points.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    Normally in my WOT reviews I list things that actually happened (things of significance) in these books so as to illustrate how much space was taken up by non-essential real estate. How much Jordan veered from the idea of ‘the narrative’ as a concept. Quite literally, as of this book, Jordan lost the plot entirely. Nothing. Happens. In. This. Book. And my copy has 822 pages of text, not including the glossary and maps. There is infinitesimal movement on all fronts. Mostly the characters just sit Normally in my WOT reviews I list things that actually happened (things of significance) in these books so as to illustrate how much space was taken up by non-essential real estate. How much Jordan veered from the idea of ‘the narrative’ as a concept. Quite literally, as of this book, Jordan lost the plot entirely. Nothing. Happens. In. This. Book. And my copy has 822 pages of text, not including the glossary and maps. There is infinitesimal movement on all fronts. Mostly the characters just sit around talking about stuff that has happened, and stuff they think is going to happen. They don’t do anything. The most significant thing that happens this book is that Jordan makes sure to have each storyline at one point react to Rand cleansing the taint from Saidin, which is not even something that happened in this book. So, the most exciting thing to be found here is characters reacting to something that happened in another book. Um. There is no indication at all that Jordan has tried to adhere to having conflict, rising tension, a climax or a resolution, as most people would agree are the things that make up a story. If he has, it’s series long, and this book is the bit in between the rising tension and the climax, where he slipped off to have a nap while he tried to figure things out. This is an 822 page status update. The only two things that held my attention were Cadsuane, and Mat and Tuon. Cadsuane, because even I can tell that she’s a badass, and her getting Rand to cooperate is worth noting, even if she hasn’t actually done anything yet with that power. And Mat and Tuon because I was eager to see what the dynamic between the two of them would be. Spoiler: they were prophesied to marry each other, both of them know about this, but neither knows the other knows. This is a great set-up for a romance! Unfortunately, Jordan mostly wastes that opportunity, in my opinion. Their relationship dynamic seems to be yet another in a seemingly endless line of men and women in these books who court each other by being as antagonistic as possible. Yawn. (There were glimmers of something interesting a couple of times. First, when Tuon sees how distraught Mat is at learning Tylin has died, there was something like a genuine human connection. And then again . . . nope. It’s gone. I know there was something else, but I can’t remember it.) Anyway, I’ve been assured this is the worst of the series by far, so hopefully it will only go up from here! [1.5 stars]

  18. 4 out of 5

    Hasham Rasool

    "The Wheel of Time turns, and Ages come and pass, leaving memories that become legend. Legend fades to myth and even myth is long forgotten when the Age that gave it birth returns again. What was, what will be, and what is, may yet fall under the Shadow.". I am on book ten I feel emotional as I know I am nearly finished this series. I have got five books left to complete 'The Wheel of Time'. I really enjoyed Winter's Heart. I personally think book 8-10 could have delivered better storylines or they "The Wheel of Time turns, and Ages come and pass, leaving memories that become legend. Legend fades to myth and even myth is long forgotten when the Age that gave it birth returns again. What was, what will be, and what is, may yet fall under the Shadow.". I am on book ten I feel emotional as I know I am nearly finished this series. I have got five books left to complete 'The Wheel of Time'. I really enjoyed Winter's Heart. I personally think book 8-10 could have delivered better storylines or they could be in one book. This book is really slow and it can be furious but I have to be patient and read it. I must admit 'Crossroads of Twilight' is my least favourite book in the series but I still love 'The Wheel of Time'. Some readers think Jordan has lost controlled on book 8-10 of 'The Wheel of Time' however I don't think Jordan has lost controlled as I still think and always think that Robert Jordan is one of an extraordinary authors. I think Jordan intends to develop storylines from book 8-10. There is some interesting development in the book such as the characters development.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    I consider myself a patient reader when it comes to "The Wheel of Time," but even I have trouble excusing Crossroads of Twilight, Book 10. To be honest, although I recently read Crossroads of Twilight, I can't remember what happens. I actually found a summary on Wikipedia. The current plot summary is worth reading if only because each entry reads: Character / "continues" / To Do / Ongoing Plotline. In short, not only is nothing resolved, but nothing happens. The best that can be said in defense of I consider myself a patient reader when it comes to "The Wheel of Time," but even I have trouble excusing Crossroads of Twilight, Book 10. To be honest, although I recently read Crossroads of Twilight, I can't remember what happens. I actually found a summary on Wikipedia. The current plot summary is worth reading if only because each entry reads: Character / "continues" / To Do / Ongoing Plotline. In short, not only is nothing resolved, but nothing happens. The best that can be said in defense of Crossroads of Twilight is that Mat returns after a two novels long absence. I'm usually a fan of Mat's story. However, if I recall correctly, the climax of Mat's storyline is when a woman disappears, only to reappear shortly thereafter. I may be wrong, but I believe she was looking at dresses... At this point, Perrin is completely lost. I don't mean that he's "sold his soul" to recover his abducted wife, as the dust jacket's summary ominously suggests. I mean that Jordan seems to have completely lost track of whatever Perrin was supposed to be doing to help Rand win The Last Battle. Egwene, Jordan's most admirable Aes Sedai, is stuck as well. And Rand? Absent. Well, it worked in The Dragon Reborn. I remember reading that even Jordan once said this was his weakest work. He was right.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jessica ❁ ➳ Silverbow ➳ ❁ Rabid Reads-no-more

    Reviewed by: Rabid Reads NOTICE: this reread is in preparation for finally biting the bullet and reading book 14. That means I HAVE NOT read book 14 yet. Please be mindful of this in the comments, both for me and for others who may or may not have progressed past this point in the series. Thank you. 3.5 stars CROSSROADS OF TWILIGHT is notoriously many WoT fans' least favorite book in series. It's been years since I last read it, so I let all the negative hype get to me, and I started dreading my re Reviewed by: Rabid Reads NOTICE: this reread is in preparation for finally biting the bullet and reading book 14. That means I HAVE NOT read book 14 yet. Please be mindful of this in the comments, both for me and for others who may or may not have progressed past this point in the series. Thank you. 3.5 stars CROSSROADS OF TWILIGHT is notoriously many WoT fans' least favorite book in series. It's been years since I last read it, so I let all the negative hype get to me, and I started dreading my revisit, but it wasn't half as bad as people made it out to be. I think the main problem is that for more than half of the book, we're reliving how the previous installment ended from numerous alternate POVs. It doesn't help that the key event we're reliving took up less than 10% the first time around. So we spend five times as long on a less exciting version of events. BUT. The fact that we've already experienced this time period is unrelated to all the new things. New things that are important to the End Game, and if you focus on the new material, rather than the lack of forward motion in the timeline, it's still a good installment. I PROMISE. Important/Cool stuff, or all the reasons why CoT doesn't suck: 1. Noal Charin--who is he really? We meet this old guy in WoT #9, and if you're like me, you were quickly smitten with his tales of grand adventures past . . . Then CROSSROADS OF TWILIGHT opens with the usual snippet of prophecy, except in the notation, the translation is attributed to one Jain Charin, also known as . . . wait for it . . . JAIN FARSTRIDER. Is Noel really the famous traveler, originally from Malkier? I don't know, but I'm hopeful. 2. That smarmy Captain in Elayne's guard . . . Gets the set down of his life, from (the usually useless) Elayne no less, and the varying reactions of three Aes Sedai in question give us our first solid lead on the identity of the Black Sister. 3. Egwene figures out how to make cuendillar. Which may not sound like a big deal, but it is. Trust me. Egwene's got a plan. 4. Aes Sedai are bonding Asha'men all over the place. Asha'men are bonding Aes Sedai too, and I predict CHAOS. If for no other reason than the Warder bond doesn't work the same way on men who can channel as it does on men who can't. 5. Halima disappears long enough for Egwene to get her Dream on. And not only does she have a second Dream that suggests Mat will be successful in his endeavor to blow shit up, but she has a dream about a Seanchan woman with a sword and a shifting face who will help her. No specifics on how this mystery woman will help Egwene yet, but I'm hopeful that the shifting face means that she's another Hero attached to the Wheel, spun back into world for Tarmon Gai'don. 6. The Dark One made flesh . . . sort of. *waves at Shaidar Haran* “Do you think Hand of the Shadow is just a name?” The Myrddraal’s voice no longer grated. Hollow, it seemed to boom down caverns from some unimaginable distance. The creature grew as it spoke, swelling in size till its head brushed the ceiling, over two spans up. “You were summoned, and you did not come. My hand reaches far, Mesaana.” Fair warning, this particular scene suggests that rape is being used as punishment. It's left at insinuation, but still . . . FYI. 7+. All the Big Deal stuff I need to spoiler tag. (view spoiler)[A. Logain tracks down Rand b/c Taim is shady. B. Rand calls a truce with the Seanchan. C. Egwene gets captured by Elaida's faction. (hide spoiler)] Once again, there are a multitude of interesting questions raised, the foremost being, who is Norla from the Black Hills? And once again, I heartily recommend this series. #cantstopwontstop My other reviews for this series: The Eye of the World (Wheel of Time, #1) by Robert Jordan The Great Hunt (Wheel of Time, #2) by Robert Jordan The Dragon Reborn (Wheel of Time, #3) by Robert Jordan The Shadow Rising (Wheel of Time, #4) by Robert Jordan The Fires of Heaven (Wheel of Time, #5) by Robert Jordan Lord of Chaos (Wheel of Time, #6) by Robert Jordan A Crown of Swords (Wheel of Time, #7) by Robert Jordan The Path of Daggers (Wheel of Time, #8) by Robert Jordan Winter's Heart (Wheel of Time, #9) by Robert Jordan New Spring (Wheel of Time, #0) by Robert Jordan

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    IIIIIIEEEEEE!!!!!!!! A huge amount of this huge book take place simultaneously with Winter's Heart. The key words in this volume are "trying" and "continuing" as everyone continues "trying" something or is "continuing" with something that never seems to get tied up. We do get a slight move in one plot point...but it only tangles it more, doesn't move toward tying it up. At this point I could have cried. This could have been one of the great Epic High Fantasy Series in the English Language. Instead IIIIIIEEEEEE!!!!!!!! A huge amount of this huge book take place simultaneously with Winter's Heart. The key words in this volume are "trying" and "continuing" as everyone continues "trying" something or is "continuing" with something that never seems to get tied up. We do get a slight move in one plot point...but it only tangles it more, doesn't move toward tying it up. At this point I could have cried. This could have been one of the great Epic High Fantasy Series in the English Language. Instead it turned into a slow moving, repetitive, money machine (as each volume was going to the top of the best seller lists). Although the sales of this series have steadily dropped since the 7th volume. I don't know how they will do as a new writer sets out to complete the story. ******************* UPDATE ********************* Since I reviewed this I have read two of the Brandon Sanderson novels (from the library). The story lumbers on. Some like the Sanderson books better but to me the convoluted plot line has been so stretched out that it can never be what it might have been.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

    The Wheel of Time series represents, for me, the perfect example of a guilty pleasure in the world of fantasy. This series is not actually written very well. Robert Jordan was not a very good wordsmith, and he really only knew how to say and describe things one way. His characters are generally unbelievable, and have ridiculous dialogue. The plot is tremendously predictable, and is heavily influenced (close to the point of being unoriginal) by the fantasy works that came before. The whole story i The Wheel of Time series represents, for me, the perfect example of a guilty pleasure in the world of fantasy. This series is not actually written very well. Robert Jordan was not a very good wordsmith, and he really only knew how to say and describe things one way. His characters are generally unbelievable, and have ridiculous dialogue. The plot is tremendously predictable, and is heavily influenced (close to the point of being unoriginal) by the fantasy works that came before. The whole story is much, much longer than it needs to be and obviously became bigger than Jordan could handle. That being said... I still enjoy these books. I can't rationally explain it, and I've re-read most of them at least a couple times. I shouldn't be so attached to them, yet I'm chained by my own embarrassed desire to periodically dive into the wheel of time. The only explanation I can think of, is that Jordan was a wizard. Not a skillful, subtle, thoughtful wizard; a sneaky, dark, and soul-sucking wizard who has enchanted me by his mediocre writing. Many people despise and look down their nose at these books, and I totally understand that. Many people also love and adore these books, and will forever place The Wheel of Time series upon their list of all-time favorite books. I can understand that impulse too. I realize this review is lacking in helpfulness, but the important thing to take away is this: try these books out. If you hate them, then fine. At least you'll have given them a chance. If you Love them, then great! Good for you, and you have a long, LONG, journey ahead of you filled with something you love. Either way, you'll have exposed yourself to one of the most famous fantasy series of all time.

  23. 5 out of 5

    JDR

    Honestly, I can't. I can't I can't I can't. Do you know how to tell when you are seriously being f'd up? When you are reading one of Perrin's POVs and you NO JOKE start tearing up, not because you feel for his character or anything, but because you're so damn frustrated. That was me. I'm so sad because I started this series, just thinking, just thinking that it might become my favorite series of all time. Somehow, I still believe that. OMG! HOW DID YOU PEOPLE GO THROUGH THIS EVERY 2 YEARS!!?? I ne Honestly, I can't. I can't I can't I can't. Do you know how to tell when you are seriously being f'd up? When you are reading one of Perrin's POVs and you NO JOKE start tearing up, not because you feel for his character or anything, but because you're so damn frustrated. That was me. I'm so sad because I started this series, just thinking, just thinking that it might become my favorite series of all time. Somehow, I still believe that. OMG! HOW DID YOU PEOPLE GO THROUGH THIS EVERY 2 YEARS!!?? I need a break.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Eon ♒Windrunner♒

    This was one of the WoT entries that I found the least enjoyable of the bunch (so much politics - shudders), but it was still good. Mat carried this one for me as his moments with Tuon were some of the best in the series and I am definitely looking forward to the last few books. It can only pick up from here.

  25. 4 out of 5

    YouKneeK

    Crossroads of Twilight is the tenth book in The Wheel of Time. I think what I liked best about this book was that all of the main characters’ stories were given at least a little page time. Many, but not all, of the smaller subplots moved forward a tiny bit also. It seemed like at least one major storyline was always left hanging in the last few books, and I wouldn’t have been happy about letting any of the main stories sit on the back burner during this entire book, so I was happy to see them a Crossroads of Twilight is the tenth book in The Wheel of Time. I think what I liked best about this book was that all of the main characters’ stories were given at least a little page time. Many, but not all, of the smaller subplots moved forward a tiny bit also. It seemed like at least one major storyline was always left hanging in the last few books, and I wouldn’t have been happy about letting any of the main stories sit on the back burner during this entire book, so I was happy to see them all represented. Of course, with several different storylines covered in a “mere” 800+ page book, this means some of them didn’t get nearly as much page time as I would have liked, and there really weren’t many major events or revelations in this book. Everything did move forward a little bit, though, and I was never bored. If I’d waited a couple years for this book, and known I’d have to wait a couple years for the next book, I might have been more disappointed at the slow progress. For me, this was just a few more interesting pages in one really long and really interesting story and therefore no less enjoyable than the earlier pages. I have a few more spoiler-ish comments in the tags: (view spoiler)[That was quite a cliff hanger at the end, with Egwene apparently captured by people in the white tower, who knows which faction, and apparently being forced to drink that lovely forkroot tea. Hopefully she won’t be treated like Mat was a while back and be left hanging for a full book! Speaking of tea, I’m starting to get nervous every time anybody in one of the books drinks tea, wondering if something horrible is about to happen. Even seemingly-innocent scenes involving tea have me on edge. :) I hope Halima gets unmasked soon. It’s easy to understand how “she” has gone undetected all this time, but it seems like her time is growing short with the Aes Sedai talking about allying with the Asha’man against the Forsaken. If they bring an Asha’man anywhere near Halima, the game will be up. I guess she’ll run if/when they arrive. I’m still really enjoying Mat’s story, and he and Tuon are probably the most interesting of the relationship pairings introduced in this series so far, in large part because there’s less angst and more curiosity. I’m also curious what’s up with Noal. Clearly there’s more to him than meets the eye, but I don’t have any definite clues as to what. The references to Thom’s letter drove me nuts because I’ve been wanting to know what’s in that letter, assuming it’s the one from Moiraine, for about five books now. I guess it could be something about Thom’s nephew. Elayne’s storyline has been the least memorable over the last couple of books. I’m not bored by it while I read it, but it’s the story I have to think hardest about by the end of the book to remember what exactly happened. I'm not having that problem with the others. (hide spoiler)]

  26. 5 out of 5

    Phrynne

    Basically the whole book was about very little but I am so invested in these characters now that I enjoyed it anyway. You have to admire Jordan's skill. In seven hundred pages we never find out if Rand cleansed the source or not at the end of the previous book. That's how you make a story last through multiple huge volumes. Excited to move on to the next one of those volumes right now!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sotiris Karaiskos

    The tenth part of the series and we've gotten for good into the final straight. I dare to say that the last 5 parts could have been a single book, which is why we have to judge this as part of a whole. It is certainly the least interesting book of the series as do not happen many things, with the writer simply developing the various threads of the plot without reaching any point at any climax, except perhaps in the end. As part of a whole, however, it is definitely interesting, and anyone who ha The tenth part of the series and we've gotten for good into the final straight. I dare to say that the last 5 parts could have been a single book, which is why we have to judge this as part of a whole. It is certainly the least interesting book of the series as do not happen many things, with the writer simply developing the various threads of the plot without reaching any point at any climax, except perhaps in the end. As part of a whole, however, it is definitely interesting, and anyone who has reached the end of the series understands how necessary it is as it prepares us for everything that awaits us thereafter. Perhaps the author might have put in this book some of the intense scenes that exist in the next to have a balance but I think he finally made the right choice. In this tenth book of the series, things are still getting worse, with the dark forces moving the strings in the background, raising the difficulties our heroes have to face. Nevertheless, in many cases, hope appears on the horizon, although it seems that unconventional thought and breaking of stereotypes is needed to materialize. This, however, requires conflicts with those who do not like changes and intelligent manipulations so that maximum consensus can finally be reached. All this in a book that certainly does not excite the reader with its evolution, but it has the depth that is needed, with the absence of action giving the author the opportunity to deal more with characters, their relationships and intricate power games. At the same time, the story goes as much as we need to get to a point just before the strident developments that come to the next book. Δέκατο μέρος της σειράς και έχουμε μπει για τα καλά στην τελική ευθεία. Τολμώ, μάλιστα, να πω ότι τα 5 τελευταία μέρη θα μπορούσαν να είναι ένα και μοναδικό βιβλίο, για αυτό και αυτό πρέπει να το κρίνουμε ως κομμάτι ενός συνόλου. Από μόνο του σίγουρα είναι το λιγότερο ενδιαφέρον βιβλίο της σειράς καθώς δεν συμβαίνουν και πολλά πράγματα, με τον συγγραφέα απλά να αναπτύσσει τα διάφορα νήματα της πλοκής χωρίς να φτάνει σε κανένα σημείο σε κάποια κορύφωση, εκτός ίσως από το τέλος. Ως μέρος ενός συνόλου, όμως, έχει σίγουρα ενδιαφέρον και όποιος έχει φτάσει μέχρι το τέλος της σειράς καταλαβαίνει πόσο απαραίτητο είναι καθώς μας προετοιμάζει για όλα όσα μας περιμένουν στη συνέχεια. Ίσως ο συγγραφέας θα μπορούσε να είχε βάλει σε αυτό το βιβλίο κάποιες από τις έντονες σκηνές που υπάρχουν στο επόμενο για να υπάρχει μία ισορροπία αλλά νομίζω ότι στο τέλος έκανε τη σωστή επιλογή. Σε αυτό το δέκατο βιβλίο της σειράς τα πράγματα εξακολουθούν να χειροτερεύουν, με τις δυνάμεις του σκοτεινού να κινούν τα νήματα στο παρασκήνιο μεγαλώνοντας τις δυσκολίες που πρέπει να αντιμετωπίσουν οι ήρωες μας. Παρ' όλα αυτά όμως σε αρκετές περιπτώσεις η ελπίδα αχνοφαίνεται στον ορίζοντα, αν και φαίνεται ότι για να υλοποιηθεί χρειάζεται αντισυμβατική σκέψη και σπάσιμο των στερεοτύπων. Αυτό, όμως, απαιτεί συγκρούσεις με αυτούς που δεν βλέπουν με καλό μάτι τις αλλαγές και έξυπνους χειρισμούς για να υπάρχει στο τέλος η μεγαλύτερη δυνατή συναίνεση. Αυτά γίνονται σε ένα βιβλίο που σίγουρα δεν ενθουσιάζει τον αναγνώστη με την εξέλιξή του, διαθέτει, όμως, το βάθος που χρειάζεται, με την απουσία δράσης να δίνει στο συγγραφέα την ευκαιρία να ασχοληθεί περισσότερο με τους χαρακτήρες, τις μεταξύ τους σχέσεις και τα περίπλοκα παιχνίδια εξουσίας που τις χαρακτηρίζουν. Την ίδια ώρα η ιστορία προχωράει όσο χρειάζεται για να φτάσουμε λίγο πριν από τις καταιγιστικές εξελίξεις που έρχονται στο επόμενο βιβλίο.

  28. 4 out of 5

    David

    So....do you want the good news or the bad news? Ok, bad news first. 1) This is mostly a really dull read. The first two-thirds of this book are completely superfluous. Nothing much happens until Chapter 19, which is more than 2/3 of the way through. 2) A large portion of this book has to do with Aes Sedai politics and in-fighting. This is completely unremarkable, especially as it typically does ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to advance the plot. Prepare yourself for lots of passive-aggressive insults and dre So....do you want the good news or the bad news? Ok, bad news first. 1) This is mostly a really dull read. The first two-thirds of this book are completely superfluous. Nothing much happens until Chapter 19, which is more than 2/3 of the way through. 2) A large portion of this book has to do with Aes Sedai politics and in-fighting. This is completely unremarkable, especially as it typically does ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to advance the plot. Prepare yourself for lots of passive-aggressive insults and dress-smoothing. 3) Something huge happens at the end of Winter's Heart. I won't say what it is here, because spoilers, but it is monumental. It changes the direction of the plot and the fates of many characters entirely. Instead of continuing with this very interesting development, however, Jordan barely mentions it here. 4) Mat, Elayne, and Perrin are wasted here. Their storylines are not interesting and pretty poorly written. Rand barely appears. The good news: 1) Nynaeve DOES NOT APPEAR IN THIS BOOK!!! She is mentioned a couple of times but we are spared her braid pulling, her incompetence, and her bitchery. Unfortunately, this also means that Lan is absent, but that's something I'm willing to accept. 2) Once things start happening, they REALLY happen. The last third of this book contained two amazingly good WTF moments that hold a lot of promise for upcoming volumes. 3) When Rand does finally appear, it is very good. His character becomes more and more complicated and interesting with each entry in this series. 4) Very little time is spent in the dream world, which means we are do not have to read extensive descriptions of dresses and Egwene's sex life. 5) Speaking of Egwene: when the book starts cooking, she really comes into her own for (possibly) the first time in the series. She stops being a caricature of a caricature of a woman and becomes a powerful, interesting, intelligent female character. This book is largely about her, and that focus pays off in spades. So, overall, not a book I ever need to read again, but I still look forward to the next installment.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Joby Walker

    Every would be author of epic fantasy (or any long running series) should be required to (prior to being published) document the failings of The Wheel of Time with particular focus on this book. It is really hard to comprehend how in a nearly 700 page book not only nothing happens, but nothing happens to a bunch of people you don't care about. Most of the book is the multitude of secondary threads reacting to the events at the conclusion of Winter's Heart. Instead of reading the book, I'd recomm Every would be author of epic fantasy (or any long running series) should be required to (prior to being published) document the failings of The Wheel of Time with particular focus on this book. It is really hard to comprehend how in a nearly 700 page book not only nothing happens, but nothing happens to a bunch of people you don't care about. Most of the book is the multitude of secondary threads reacting to the events at the conclusion of Winter's Heart. Instead of reading the book, I'd recommend that people just read the chapter summaries on Encyclopaedia WOT. Unless of course you enjoy the mind numbing parade of tertiary characters with extremely similar names twitching shawls or sniffing or snorting. The only good news is that since so much nothing happened in this book, stuff actually happens in Knife of Dreams and we get to see the characters we love kick ass. Or perhaps I've been so addled by the degradation of the series that a mediocre book seems fantastic....

  30. 5 out of 5

    Shobhit Sharad

    It was almost a relief to read this book after hearing so much negative about it. I think this book solved its purpose. The purpose of this book was to show how frustrated and annoyed everyone in this book is. And that is what it does to you, and so you understand them better. That it does it by incredibly tedious and long chapters, with almost nothing happening in them is what describes the story better. Perrin, Elayne and Mat are all waiting for their respective conclusions but there are so many It was almost a relief to read this book after hearing so much negative about it. I think this book solved its purpose. The purpose of this book was to show how frustrated and annoyed everyone in this book is. And that is what it does to you, and so you understand them better. That it does it by incredibly tedious and long chapters, with almost nothing happening in them is what describes the story better. Perrin, Elayne and Mat are all waiting for their respective conclusions but there are so many problems hindering their progress. This is what makes it more realistic, one of the best things about this series. And I know that it is all uphill from here, so glad.

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