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One Art PDF, ePub eBook

4.6 out of 5
30 review

One Art

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One Art PDF, ePub eBook From several thousand letters, written over fifty years - from 1928, when she was seventeen, to the day of her death, in Boston in 1979 - Robert Giroux has selected over five hundred and has written a detailed and informative introduction. One Art takes us behind Bishop's formal sophistication and reserve, displaying to the full the gift for friendship, the striving for pe From several thousand letters, written over fifty years - from 1928, when she was seventeen, to the day of her death, in Boston in 1979 - Robert Giroux has selected over five hundred and has written a detailed and informative introduction. One Art takes us behind Bishop's formal sophistication and reserve, displaying to the full the gift for friendship, the striving for perfection, and the passionate, questing, rigorous spirit that made her a great poet.

30 review for One Art

  1. 5 out of 5

    RitaCui

    One Art The art of losing isn’t hard to master; so many things seem filled with the intent to be lost that their loss is no disaster. Lose something every day. Accept the fluster of lost door keys, the hour badly spent. The art of losing isn’t hard to master. Then practice losing farther, losing faster: places, and names, and where it was you meant to travel. None of these will bring disaster. I lost my mother’s watch. And look! my last, or next-to-last, of three loved houses went. The art of losing isn’t h One Art The art of losing isn’t hard to master; so many things seem filled with the intent to be lost that their loss is no disaster. Lose something every day. Accept the fluster of lost door keys, the hour badly spent. The art of losing isn’t hard to master. Then practice losing farther, losing faster: places, and names, and where it was you meant to travel. None of these will bring disaster. I lost my mother’s watch. And look! my last, or next-to-last, of three loved houses went. The art of losing isn’t hard to master. I lost two cities, lovely ones. And, vaster, some realms I owned, two rivers, a continent. I miss them, but it wasn’t a disaster. —Even losing you (the joking voice, a gesture I love) I shan’t have lied. It’s evident the art of losing’s not too hard to master though it may look like (Write it!) like disaster.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Erin Malone

    This is one of those books that brings out the compulsive side of me. I read every letter--even the most mundane, and there were many of those: doctor's visits, housekeeping, etc. Since Bishop is among my favorite poets, I was compelled to read everything, not wanting to miss a shred of her life story. The letters work like puzzles; we have only Bishop's, so we have to piece together what she's responding to. That's partly what's so interesting. As with any real person, though, there are sides o This is one of those books that brings out the compulsive side of me. I read every letter--even the most mundane, and there were many of those: doctor's visits, housekeeping, etc. Since Bishop is among my favorite poets, I was compelled to read everything, not wanting to miss a shred of her life story. The letters work like puzzles; we have only Bishop's, so we have to piece together what she's responding to. That's partly what's so interesting. As with any real person, though, there are sides of her we don't particularly like to see, including racist, elitist attitudes. I was reminded of that saying about heroes--sometimes it's better not to meet them. Overall, though, this comprehensive account is worthy for that idea, exactly: here is Bishop's character, well-developed, rounded, whom we like and dislike at times, and whose loves and losses matter.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    You know you're a reader when you devour the letters: thin paper and volumes of it. I wrote this one out in the Green Notebook in 1994: "It really is fantastic to place so much on the fact that I have wirten a half-dozen phrases that I can still bear to reread without too much embarrassment.But I have that continuous uncomfortable feeling of 'things' in the head, like icebergs or rocks or awkwardly place pieces of furniture. It's as if all the nouns were there but the verbs were lacking--if you k You know you're a reader when you devour the letters: thin paper and volumes of it. I wrote this one out in the Green Notebook in 1994: "It really is fantastic to place so much on the fact that I have wirten a half-dozen phrases that I can still bear to reread without too much embarrassment.But I have that continuous uncomfortable feeling of 'things' in the head, like icebergs or rocks or awkwardly place pieces of furniture. It's as if all the nouns were there but the verbs were lacking--if you know what I mean. And I can't help having the theory that if they are joggled around hard enough and long enough some kind of electricity will occur just by friction, that will arrange everything. But you remember how Mallarmé said that poetry was made of words not ideas--and sometimes I'm terribly afraid I am approaching, or trying to approach it all, from the wrong track." (9/10/40)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    Three months, 541 letters, and 639 pages later — EB was terrified of reading in front of a crowd, loved cats, and had a ping-pong table in her dining room. She wrote to her friends about everything from flowers and books to architecture and her pet toucan Sammy. During a visit to St. John’s in 1932 she wrote: “The streets and houses all fall down toward the water — apparently supported on the masts of the sealers and schooners below.” I’ll miss reading these letters before bed — I think I’ll kee Three months, 541 letters, and 639 pages later — EB was terrified of reading in front of a crowd, loved cats, and had a ping-pong table in her dining room. She wrote to her friends about everything from flowers and books to architecture and her pet toucan Sammy. During a visit to St. John’s in 1932 she wrote: “The streets and houses all fall down toward the water — apparently supported on the masts of the sealers and schooners below.” I’ll miss reading these letters before bed — I think I’ll keep it on my bedside table just in case.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sadia Mansoor

    The art of losing isn’t hard to master; so many things seem filled with the intent to be lost that their loss is no disaster. Lose something every day. Accept the fluster of lost door keys, the hour badly spent. The art of losing isn’t hard to master. Then practice losing farther, losing faster: places, and names, and where it was you meant to travel. None of these will bring disaster. I lost my mother’s watch. And look! my last, or next-to-last, of three loved houses went. The art of losing is The art of losing isn’t hard to master; so many things seem filled with the intent to be lost that their loss is no disaster. Lose something every day. Accept the fluster of lost door keys, the hour badly spent. The art of losing isn’t hard to master. Then practice losing farther, losing faster: places, and names, and where it was you meant to travel. None of these will bring disaster. I lost my mother’s watch. And look! my last, or next-to-last, of three loved houses went. The art of losing isn’t hard to master. I lost two cities, lovely ones. And, vaster, some realms I owned, two rivers, a continent. I miss them, but it wasn’t a disaster. —Even losing you (the joking voice, a gesture I love) I shan’t have lied. It’s evident the art of losing’s not too hard to master though it may look like (Write it!) like disaster.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Zorich

    Elizabeth Bishop's young adult poem, One Art, Bishop uses symbolism to beautifully discuss the theme of loss and the way in which individuals can recognize and build from them. I personally enjoyed this poem and the meaning I took away from it may be different than how others interpret it. This is one of the beauties in poetry and literature is the reality that it can be analyzed and interpreted in entirely new ways based on how it is written and One Art is certainly one of these poems. Poetry

  7. 4 out of 5

    Cherry Ma

    I have always enjoyed EB's poems, particularly for their cool objectivity, their calm impersonality, and their resistance to the confessional style. EB's letters provide a rare glimpse of her struggles with health and loneliness, her tender passions with Lota, and how she coped with Lota's illness and death.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mary Thelma Pulido

    "Its evident the art of losing's not too hard to master though it may look like (Write it!) like disaster." Just worthwhile. A must! "It´s evident the art of losing's not too hard to master though it may look like (Write it!) like disaster." Just worthwhile. A must!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ahlam Oqaili

    The type of book you keep beside your night stand and get back to it , can not say more.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Chess via Email

    I still don't like her or her asshead high school (I had to pump sixteen inches of water out of a basement there last night and am sitting in the basement of her old dorm as I write this (I think)), but a lifetime of letters is almost always an incredible thing. This set got me very interested in Marianne Moore. P.S. I think the choice of last letter was unfortunate--even if it was written on the day of her death. P.P.S. She didn't like Charlotte's Web?!?!?! P.P.P.S. They engraved an E.E. Cummings I still don't like her or her asshead high school (I had to pump sixteen inches of water out of a basement there last night and am sitting in the basement of her old dorm as I write this (I think)), but a lifetime of letters is almost always an incredible thing. This set got me very interested in Marianne Moore. P.S. I think the choice of last letter was unfortunate--even if it was written on the day of her death. P.P.S. She didn't like Charlotte's Web?!?!?! P.P.P.S. They engraved an E.E. Cummings poem on the stone outside of the brand new Walnut Hill Elizabeth Bishop dormitory. It's a hilarious choice since she didn't like him (she says so in one of the letters written towards the end of her life). -Please forgive the pettiness of this review-

  11. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte

    Bishop's favorite show was Sesame Street. This is only one of the many amazing things I found out. While there are long sad sections, many of these letters contain hilarious asides and comments. Her descriptions of Brazil and the many other places she traveled make me want to get on a plane immediately. I love reading this book, and the David Kalstone is a great companion book that explains a lot of biographical details, as well as critically dissecting Bishop's relationships with Moore and Lowe Bishop's favorite show was Sesame Street. This is only one of the many amazing things I found out. While there are long sad sections, many of these letters contain hilarious asides and comments. Her descriptions of Brazil and the many other places she traveled make me want to get on a plane immediately. I love reading this book, and the David Kalstone is a great companion book that explains a lot of biographical details, as well as critically dissecting Bishop's relationships with Moore and Lowell. Quick, someone, write me a letter.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rochelle Melander

    For many years, I have loved the poetry of Elizabeth Bishop. I was delighted to find this riveting collection of her letters. Kirkus reviews said this about the carefully selected collection of letters: "More spontaneous, garrulous, and revealing than her published poetry or prose, ... " The letters offer an intimate portrait of the writer, her struggles with health and loneliness, her great love for her partner Lola, and fascinating details about her daily life.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gord Higginson

    Currently still reading (and have been since Jan 2011)--appropriate time to read her selected letters as Bishop was born 100 years ago! I have been browse-reading this hefty tome since Jan., meaning I just look through it every now and then and read some letters, usually a few times a week, rather than reading it from beginning to end in one go. Fascinating letters.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rita

    I am not sure how long it will take me to finish the book but the letters are compelling. I am in Bishop's early years now and can't wait to see how she will craft her correspondence as she matures. Obviously a woman who knew how to bring out the best in a language.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    I want to read this again, to remember how amazing the world was while I was living in her words.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Celeste

    I started reading this for an Poetry Writing Workshop

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jenni

    Pretty good as far as letters go. The ones between her and "Cal" (Robert Lowell) are the most interesting.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tricia

    not exactly a bio, but a fascinating collection of letters from two seminal 20th century poets.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Fantastic I just read her unpublished poems in a new edition: Edgar Allen Poe and the Jukebox. Also fantastic

  20. 4 out of 5

    Frank

    Great poet and very interesting woman - learning how difficult it is for brilliant talent to survive and flourish.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Deb W

    This is a must read for anyone entranced by the world of literature and artists.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Statmanm

    Maybe best for THE EB fan. But in here is so much deep knowledge not only on the art of reading and writing poetry but the art of understanding how one is living wholly in that lived moment.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

  24. 4 out of 5

    A.M. O'Malley

  25. 4 out of 5

    Julia Fewer

  26. 5 out of 5

    quinn

  27. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Lasater

  28. 4 out of 5

    David

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tom Portwood

  30. 5 out of 5

    EzgiNisan Öztürk

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