Hot Best Seller

The Wrong Man PDF, ePub eBook

4.6 out of 5
30 review

The Wrong Man

Availability: Ready to download

File Name: The Wrong Man .pdf

How it works:

1. Register a free 1 month Trial Account.

2. Download as many books as you like (Personal use)

3. Cancel the membership at any time if not satisfied.


The Wrong Man PDF, ePub eBook When Jason Kolarich accepts the case of a homeless Iraq War veteran accused of murdering a young paralegal, his course seems clear: to mount an insanity defense for a man suffering so badly from post-traumatic stress disorder that he has no real memory of the crime. But as Kolarich digs deeper, he realizes that, unlikely as it seems, his client is probably innocent. Only d When Jason Kolarich accepts the case of a homeless Iraq War veteran accused of murdering a young paralegal, his course seems clear: to mount an insanity defense for a man suffering so badly from post-traumatic stress disorder that he has no real memory of the crime. But as Kolarich digs deeper, he realizes that, unlikely as it seems, his client is probably innocent. Only days before her death, the murdered paralegal had stumbled on something she wasn't supposed to know . . . information that someone would kill to keep secret. Her murder was no random crime but a targeted hit, and the wrong man was charged.As Jason Kolarich races to discover the truth in time to save his client, he finds himself embroiled in a mystery involving the Mob, a mysterious assassin known only as “Gin Rummy,” and a conspiracy of wealthy international terrorists with explosive plans for his city. With thousands of lives at stake, Kolarich has more on the line than ever before . . . and time is running out.

30 review for The Wrong Man

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jeanette "Astute Crabbist"

    I rarely give five stars to books of this type, but this one has superbly intricate plotting and character development. He also brings in some issues about PTSD for veterans of the Iraq War, without shoving it in your face or letting it take over the story. Well done. Call it 4.5 stars. This is the third in a series, but there's no need to have read the first two. I haven't read the second one, and this one worked fine for me all on its own.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    An interesting story that waned the last third. The end was decent. The story could have been better if Ellis had focused more on the positive and less on the negative that contributed little if anything at all. 6 of 10 stars

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    Having just finished Defending Jacob by William Landay (previously reviewed), which was a rather dark and disturbing book, I was looking for something fun to read and this book fit the bill perfectly! You might not think that a book involving an army hero with PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome) who is accused of murdering a young college student, a terrorist plot, and the mafia would be a “fun” read, but trust me, this one is. The plot is so filled with twists, turns, and unlikely connections Having just finished Defending Jacob by William Landay (previously reviewed), which was a rather dark and disturbing book, I was looking for something fun to read and this book fit the bill perfectly! You might not think that a book involving an army hero with PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome) who is accused of murdering a young college student, a terrorist plot, and the mafia would be a “fun” read, but trust me, this one is. The plot is so filled with twists, turns, and unlikely connections that it is impossible to take too seriously. To add to the fun, the bad guys are such bumbling oafs that they seriously reminded me of the baddies in the movie “Home Alone” … you remember - the ones who were outsmarted by an 8-year-old kid. The story begins with the shooting of a chemistry student, Kathy Rubinkowski, in a parking lot late one night. Tom Stoller, once a lieutenant in the army, returned home from Iraq with PTSD and has been unable to function in society since, living as a homeless man on the streets of Chicago. Whoever shot Ms. Rubinkowski planted her purse, keys, and the gun in Tom’s possession, framing him for the murder. This is not a spoiler, as the reader doesn’t seriously entertain the notion for more than about 5 pages that Tom could possibly be the murderer. What I found amazing was that an otherwise intelligent District Attorney was able to even get the case on the court docket. It helped that the judge was an incredibly cantankerous and unyielding one (aren’t most judges in books and on television?) The judge threw out an insanity plea before the trial ever began and refused to allow mention of the defendant’s PTSD, neither of which are believable scenarios but were necessary contrivances in order to take the story where the author wanted it to go. And there are so many twists and turns in this plot that you will wonder if there are actually three separate plots going on here, but Mr. Ellis ties everything up neatly by the end of the book. Of course, this is not great literature destined to be required reading in schools 100 years from now, nor is it likely to ever become a classic, but it is indeed a very fun read that kept me reading until after 3:00 a.m. and had me laughing out loud more than once.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Williams

    Started well but I thought it all became a little far fetched in the latter half.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Marleen

    I love Jason Kolarich. He takes on cases that speak to his heart. Like here, defending a young veteran who’s been arrested for murder of a young paralegal. As Kolarich has been a prosecutor he has a particular understanding of how to proceed; taking into account various scenarios of defense. He’s so savvy, he makes me smile. The longer Jason digs into the case, the more he realizes that his client, the homeless Iraq War vet Tom Stoller, is actually the wrong man being accused of this murder. For I love Jason Kolarich. He takes on cases that speak to his heart. Like here, defending a young veteran who’s been arrested for murder of a young paralegal. As Kolarich has been a prosecutor he has a particular understanding of how to proceed; taking into account various scenarios of defense. He’s so savvy, he makes me smile. The longer Jason digs into the case, the more he realizes that his client, the homeless Iraq War vet Tom Stoller, is actually the wrong man being accused of this murder. For Jason and his team, It’s a race against the clock as they investigate the culpable group of men who are plotting an even bigger crime against human kind. Listening to the audio version of this book was rather enjoyable, although I don’t like how narrator, Luke Daniels does female voices. It’s too sotto voce, it’s irritating. Also I have to admit, I had my suspicions about who Gin Rummy was (I don’t want to give away spoilers). As a legal read, this is definitively satisfying. I give it a 3,5 stars.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chad Sayban

    After young paralegal is murdered and robbed outside of her apartment, police find a homeless Mike Stoller with her purse and the gun. When the Iraq war veteran is questioned, says he doesn’t remember what happened and is otherwise unresponsive, the police believe they have their guy. With only weeks before the trial Jason Kolarich agrees to take the case. However, the judge bars him using a defense of post-traumatic stress disorder that Stoller obviously suffers from. Unwilling to give up on hi After young paralegal is murdered and robbed outside of her apartment, police find a homeless Mike Stoller with her purse and the gun. When the Iraq war veteran is questioned, says he doesn’t remember what happened and is otherwise unresponsive, the police believe they have their guy. With only weeks before the trial Jason Kolarich agrees to take the case. However, the judge bars him using a defense of post-traumatic stress disorder that Stoller obviously suffers from. Unwilling to give up on his obviously sick client, Kolarich tries to put some kind of defense together. But soon he realizes his client is probably innocent and the paralegal was murdered to cover up a conspiracy. Soon is he not only racing the clock to find out the truth before the trial convicts the wrong man, he is racing to keep himself and a lot of other people alive. David Ellis’ novel The Wrong Man begins as a legal who-done-it. Jason Kolarich is a former prosecutor, who has flipped sides and now defends criminals while mourning the death of his wife and child. Ellis does a nice job of bringing Kolarich to life, including his flaws – of which there are many. The writing is tight and visual. The dialog is dynamic, giving the reader a real feel for the characters. However, Ellis constantly jumps between first-person and third-person, and it is very distracting. It is a bit of literary cheating that doesn’t work for me. It would have been better if Ellis would have stuck to third-person if he wanted to show all of the moving parts of what eventually turns into a thriller. I say thriller because about halfway into the story, the courtroom drama becomes secondary to the high-stakes conspiracy that Kolarich is unknowingly sucked into. I really liked how Ellis let Kolarich discover things almost randomly. He has no idea just how deep in the hole he is until he is looking to get out of it. I thought it was a spot-on treatment of how someone would react to the situation – not omnipotent, but not clueless either. The pace of the second half of the book ratchets up with each chapter and it is the best feature of the book. It is too bad that the ending was rushed and became and wrapped up a little too easily. The antagonists were clichéd and their motivations were not well thought out. Finally, the reveal in the last couple of pages was unnecessary and quite boorish. Frankly, it ruined some of the lingering unknowns and was as subtle an ending as a 2x4 to the face. Ultimately, The Wrong Man was a lustrous gem wrapped in a moldy fast-food container. There was so much to like about the story and the protagonist. Unfortunately, it was plagued with just enough writing faux pas and annoying clichés to drag it down to the level of mediocrity. If you want a fun thriller with an interesting protagonist and can ignore problems of both substance and style, you may enjoy this book. If you are stickler for writing convention, have difficulty suspending your disbelief or want something with the least bit of subtlety, look elsewhere.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Versel Rush

    The Wrong Man is the 3rd in the Jason Koraich series by David Ellis but the first I've read. This offering has convinced me to read the first two installments. Jason Kolarich is an attorney who has a soft spot for a sob story and a crying relative. He takes the case of a traumatized vet accused of a senseless murder (but are there any other kind?) of a woman in a park during a robbery. Tom Stoller, the homeless vet suffering from PTSD, doesn't remember what happened, doesn't answer any question The Wrong Man is the 3rd in the Jason Koraich series by David Ellis but the first I've read. This offering has convinced me to read the first two installments. Jason Kolarich is an attorney who has a soft spot for a sob story and a crying relative. He takes the case of a traumatized vet accused of a senseless murder (but are there any other kind?) of a woman in a park during a robbery. Tom Stoller, the homeless vet suffering from PTSD, doesn't remember what happened, doesn't answer any questions from his attorney, and, even worse from the lawyer standpoint, sort of confessed to the crime when arrested. Add a new love interest, a cranky judge, a more than competent prosecutor, and a trial setting just weeks away. Then while Ellis weaves in an intricate conspiracy and a little of old school Mafia, the thrill ride begins. The Wrong Man alternates between first person narrative (Kolarich), which allows an insight into his life and his unraveling of the conspiracy while working on the murder case, and the traditional third person in which Ellis sets out the complex conspiracy and mob plot lines. However, it is done so seamlessly that there is no problem keeping track of the who, what, when, and how involved in the three different sides of this multilayered novel. The courtroom scenes are impressive. David Ellis is a working lawyer (currently special prosecutor in the Illinois senate, having handled the impeachment of Governor Blagojevich). Not only does he accurately set out the essentials of a trial, he also portrays the strategy behind the trial (a lost art since Erle Stanley Gardner perfected his craft with Perry Mason). Ellis' use of dialogue is impressive, his plotting intricate, and his character development strong. There are some bumps along the way. A couple of "surprise" moments are not that surprising. In order to move his story along, Ellis requires Kolarich to act out of character. In addition, the last pages seemed to tie up the loose ends a little quickly. But not all pleasant rides have to be smooth the entire time. And Ellis' The Wrong Man is a joy ride worth taking. I received a free advance copy from Goodreads in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Luanne Ollivier

    David Ellis's latest book - The Wrong Man - is the third featuring recurring character Jason Kolarich. Kolarich is a defense lawyer, with a penchant for taking on seemingly impossible cases. This time he's asked by the family of homeless Iraq War vet Tom Stoller to defend him against murder charges. It seems hopeless - Tom was found with the victim's personal belongings and the murder weapon in his hand. But Tom can't or won't defend himself - he's suffering from severe PTSD and perhaps other men David Ellis's latest book - The Wrong Man - is the third featuring recurring character Jason Kolarich. Kolarich is a defense lawyer, with a penchant for taking on seemingly impossible cases. This time he's asked by the family of homeless Iraq War vet Tom Stoller to defend him against murder charges. It seems hopeless - Tom was found with the victim's personal belongings and the murder weapon in his hand. But Tom can't or won't defend himself - he's suffering from severe PTSD and perhaps other mental illness. It's up to Jason to speak for him. The opening line of the prologue was written to catch and hold a reader.... "Something bad is going to happen to Kathy Rubinowski tonight." And this reader was captured from first page to last. As Jason and his team (I liked the supporting cast a lot) dig further, they come up with an alternative scenario - and what they uncover puts a target on Jason's back. Kolarich is a big, imposing guy with a larger than life personality. The courtroom scenes are interesting and I enjoyed the legal machinations. But Kolarich is not your run of the mill defense attorney. He's out chasing down leads with and without his investigator. I did question his inclusion of a woman he's seeing as part of the team - it just seemed odd. As a lawyer, he skirts the law sometimes and others he outright ignores it - all in the name of protecting his client. He is now sure Tom is innocent. "The rules of ethics in my profession, last I checked, weren't optional. when did I start treating them that way?" Ellis has crafted a really good thriller, combining courtroom drama, conspiracy and more with the end result being a page turner of a read. The plot was a little far fetched in places and I saw the end coming, but I enjoyed the ride. Ellis has the thriller format down pat - lots of action, danger and a compelling plot. I'll definitely be picking up the next in the series

  9. 5 out of 5

    Quentin Stewart

    This my introduction to David Ellis and his work. I look forward to reading more of his legal thrillers. I found the book complex but at the same time easy to read and extremely difficult to put down. It seems to be a story off of the evening news and is very believable in today's world. The story starts with the death of a paralegal on her way home and evolves into a terrorist threat. Jason Kolarich becomes the attorney for an Iraqi veteran who has been accused of the crime and he does not commu This my introduction to David Ellis and his work. I look forward to reading more of his legal thrillers. I found the book complex but at the same time easy to read and extremely difficult to put down. It seems to be a story off of the evening news and is very believable in today's world. The story starts with the death of a paralegal on her way home and evolves into a terrorist threat. Jason Kolarich becomes the attorney for an Iraqi veteran who has been accused of the crime and he does not communicate well with anyone since he suffers from flashbacks to his experiences in Iraq. As Kolarich and his team search for a possible defense and have motion after motion denied by a strict judge they begin to wonder if there was something in the paralegal's past that may have led to the shooting, not the robbery that the veteran is accused of in what appears to be an open and shut case for the prosecution. As the team works they begin to see that there is more to the case then first meets the eye. The book is full of twists and turns right up to the end and is a very good read. I believe readers of this book will begin to look for others by David Ellis. I know I will. Very interesting and exciting to read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    This was one fabulous book, and kept my interest in a way that only James Patterson has been able to do up until now, which is extremely high praise. In this third book in the Jason Kolarich series (and I hope there are more to come), Jason is defending Tom Stoller, a veteran of the war in Iraq who has been very mentally damaged by the events that he witnessed and took part in. Tom has been accused of robbing and murdering a young paralegal in cold blood, and is so nonresponsive due to his menta This was one fabulous book, and kept my interest in a way that only James Patterson has been able to do up until now, which is extremely high praise. In this third book in the Jason Kolarich series (and I hope there are more to come), Jason is defending Tom Stoller, a veteran of the war in Iraq who has been very mentally damaged by the events that he witnessed and took part in. Tom has been accused of robbing and murdering a young paralegal in cold blood, and is so nonresponsive due to his mental illness that he is unable to speak up in his own defense. Meanwhile, aided by Shauna, his ex-girlfriend, forever friend, and legal partner; and Joel Lightner, his private investigator friend, as well as Tori Martin, a new love interest, Jason begins to unravel a detailed plan involving a Corporate bigwig and the Mob that would seem to exonerate Tom and avert a terrorist attack - if only he can prove it in time. The plot and all the ins and outs of this book were well thought-out, and I loved how Ellis tied everything together. The suspense was incredible and kept me turning the pages right up until the surprise ending! I am so looking forward to the next book in this series!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dawn Allen

    The Wrong Man (The right author) by David Ellis A self-deprecating hero, the Mafioso, and homegrown terrorism meld to keep the reader clued into each twist and turn. A broken man after the death of his family, Jason Kolarich, is putting one step in front of the other barely living with the aftermath. Until a brain damaged Army ranger is accused of the brutal murder of a young woman and the man’s aunt enlists Kolarich to defend him. From the minute he takes the case, he is a target of forces that ha The Wrong Man (The right author) by David Ellis A self-deprecating hero, the Mafioso, and homegrown terrorism meld to keep the reader clued into each twist and turn. A broken man after the death of his family, Jason Kolarich, is putting one step in front of the other barely living with the aftermath. Until a brain damaged Army ranger is accused of the brutal murder of a young woman and the man’s aunt enlists Kolarich to defend him. From the minute he takes the case, he is a target of forces that have worked hard to cover their tracks and their true intentions. Kolarich is an easy character to cheer for and the scenarios in the storyline are frighteningly real. However, I figured out the final ‘mystery’ of the book in the first third of the book. I’m not sure if it’s because I read so many thrillers or if the author leads us to know long before Kolarich so that we wait with baited breath for the moment he realizes the depth of personal betrayal.

  12. 4 out of 5

    The Loopy Librarian

    Sometimes a book and a reader just don't mesh, and this is one of those times. I thought as I was reading that the suspense and mystery were well-played. On the other hand, I've been trying on and off for a year to finish the book and finally decided to give up. The writer hooked me, but he didn't keep me on the line and reel me in. Nevertheless, I liked it well enough to keep giving it a go for a long time. In accordance with FTC guidelines, please note that I received an advance copy for revie Sometimes a book and a reader just don't mesh, and this is one of those times. I thought as I was reading that the suspense and mystery were well-played. On the other hand, I've been trying on and off for a year to finish the book and finally decided to give up. The writer hooked me, but he didn't keep me on the line and reel me in. Nevertheless, I liked it well enough to keep giving it a go for a long time. In accordance with FTC guidelines, please note that I received an advance copy for review via LibraryThing Early Reviewers in exchange for an honest review.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Doug

    I love David Ellis, and his Jason Kolarich books are among the best series novels out there. This one has it all -- humor, suspense, politics, cynicism, heart -- and an interesting twist at the end that, while I sort of suspected something was up, still came out of nowhere. Better than that, and testimony to Ellis' storytelling skills, the unexpected ending was completely logical, and he'd set it up perfectly throughout the book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Carl Alves

    The Wrong Man seemed to be an exercise by the author to write a novel with as little believability as humanly possible in a story. I wanted to like this novel, but I couldn’t go more than a few pages without groaning at how utterly ridiculous the plot and character points were. This novel was such a mess that I don’t even know where to start. The novel centers around the most cliché of cliché villains in fiction—the evil cabal of nefarious corporate types out to bring doom and destruction to huma The Wrong Man seemed to be an exercise by the author to write a novel with as little believability as humanly possible in a story. I wanted to like this novel, but I couldn’t go more than a few pages without groaning at how utterly ridiculous the plot and character points were. This novel was such a mess that I don’t even know where to start. The novel centers around the most cliché of cliché villains in fiction—the evil cabal of nefarious corporate types out to bring doom and destruction to humanity. I’ve read a variation of this type of villain so frequently that it astounds me how unoriginal authors can be, speaking as a fellow author. At the middle of it all was the white knight, the All-American American advocate of the downtrodden, Jason Kolarich, representing a mentally ill Gulf War veteran wrongfully accused of murdering a paralegal (to make it painfully obvious they even put it in the title). There’s simply no credibility to this story. Without trying to spoil anything, any of the parts involving the Mafia were groan-inducing. Jason’s relationship with his girlfriend seemed preposterous since they had no chemistry whatsoever. Everything about the girlfriend was painful to read. The diabolical plot was bogus. For some reason, authors have a tendency of ignoring reality and making the perpetrators of terrorism wealthy American corporate types. If they just paid attention to the news, it wouldn’t take a genius to figure out who actually commit acts of terror in the real world. I would like to say something positive about this novel, but I can’t think of a single thing I liked about it. Carl Alves – author of Blood Street

  15. 4 out of 5

    James Casey

    This is the third Jason Kolarich novel that I’ve read and once again I was thoroughly thrilled. Jason is a lawyer who used to work for the prosecution but now prefers to defend and somehow his cases are never straightforward. I like the way David Ellis writes, he builds really good characters, his plots are good, his stories are fast paced and he doesn’t linger too long on anything and so you do not get bored. Unfortunately, because of this, I find that I have finished before I’ve really wanted This is the third Jason Kolarich novel that I’ve read and once again I was thoroughly thrilled. Jason is a lawyer who used to work for the prosecution but now prefers to defend and somehow his cases are never straightforward. I like the way David Ellis writes, he builds really good characters, his plots are good, his stories are fast paced and he doesn’t linger too long on anything and so you do not get bored. Unfortunately, because of this, I find that I have finished before I’ve really wanted to which leaves me wanting more.... and so I look forward to ‘The Last Alibi’ which is the next Jason Kolarich. I think that I might also look for one of his stand alone thrillers.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Greg Dill

    One of the best fictional mysteries/legal thrillers I've read in a long time. The Wrong Man kept me guessing throughout the whole story. Full of twists and turns. Totally unpredictable. The ending was quite the shocker. Ellis is a masterful storyteller. I look forward to reading more by this author.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    Although a little farfetched in parts.... this is definitely Jason Kolarich's best adventure. Good character development, nicely paced & a good (but predictable) ending... resulting in everything that you would want in a novel.

  18. 5 out of 5

    thea Capazzi

    Great Read I loved the story line how it developed and changed into a thriller with a more important travesty possible! Twisting and turning to the very end! Sad ending but another great Thriller!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Neil Carstairs

    This was so close to being four-star, I liked the writing style and the main protagonist, but something in the last third of the book just felt too telegraphed.

  20. 5 out of 5

    June Jones

    Not overly impressed, a good start, but then petered out, disappointed

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sherry Wessman

    ANOTHER THRILLER! Mr. Ellis doesn't seem to disappoint. I've read several now, and want more. Keep them coming. Many more to go.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    Actually 3.5 stars - Another David Ellis page turner. I enjoyed it, but it's the typical murder mystery with 30 characters (I counted them) and I didn't even keep track of them all.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Robert Dunn

    Good book although a bit far fetched regarding how for a wealthy individual will go to try to bring down the government because of some perceived neglect in the past. A good page turner.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

    Excellent audio book read by Luke Daniels. I loved it! 5 stars for both David Ellis and Luke Daniels.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Virginia Trent

    Did not finish book. Well written, just didn't care for subject.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Chinbad

    It was ok, I felt like it took a while to really get into, towards the end it did get better.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Haley

    Another exciting and interesting read.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany Fusco

    I quite enjoyed this series! The author captured a lot of true grit of being a lawyer in a major city.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    4.5 stars. Jason Kolarich is a lawyer who accepts a pro-bono case defending a man with severe PTSD who's accused on murdering a paralegal. The case seems simple enough, even though the defendant is not in a good enough mental state to defend himself, much less talk about anything, but as the case progresses, it becomes clear that there's more to this than meets the eye. Soon, Jason not only believes that his client is innocent, he believes that there's a bigger conspiracy out there, one that per 4.5 stars. Jason Kolarich is a lawyer who accepts a pro-bono case defending a man with severe PTSD who's accused on murdering a paralegal. The case seems simple enough, even though the defendant is not in a good enough mental state to defend himself, much less talk about anything, but as the case progresses, it becomes clear that there's more to this than meets the eye. Soon, Jason not only believes that his client is innocent, he believes that there's a bigger conspiracy out there, one that perhaps the paralegal was on to before she was murdered. The mob's involved, as are a group of homegrown terrorists, and Jason Kolarich has to figure this out to both defend his client and save the city. This is apparently the third book in a series featuring Jason Kolarich, and although I haven't read either of the other novels, it did not hamper my enjoyment. The plot is completely contained within this book; I'm guessing the earlier books may provide more character development. It's a legal thriller, and while much of the book takes place in a courtroom, the author did a good job of keeping the pace up while ordinary events were taking place. His legal knowledge definitely came through in these parts (the author's bio notes that he's a lawyer), and none of these explanations lasted so long that my interest waned. The book really hit its stride probably a third of the way through the book, when the case grew intense and the thriller aspect picked up. The characters themselves were not as developed as they could have been, but this is a book based on a plot, not on characters, and they were developed enough for what needed to happen in the book. I loved the interactions between Jason and the judge overseeing his case, and the way Jason and the others on this case got along. The narration went from first person (Jason's narration) to third person (when the plot veered into what others were doing, like members of the mob), and although this could have been a mess, it actually worked quite well. It helped keep me in the loop about everything going on, but didn't spoil any surprises that were yet to come. Jason's voice really shone through on his parts, having a nice blend of weariness, dedication, and dry humor; he was an easy character to like from the very beginning. The author definitely did a great job keeping the suspense going - and keeping me hooked! - until the very last page of the book. I loved the ending, too, and how everything was tied together. A lot happened in this book, but the pages flew by for me. There seemed to be a mix of everything in here: legal cases, terrorism, underlying family issues, relationships, the mob... Everything fit together well and unraveled at the same time. New obstacles were introduced every so often, and I loved how the obstacles impacted multiple aspects of the plot. Although this was definitely a legal thriller, it had plenty of action in parts, especially near the end when everything came to a head. Readers who like legal thrillers are probably the target audience for this novel, but it's something that I'd recommend to anyone looking for an exciting read that's not too graphic or too violent. The book as a whole made me interested in picking up the other novels in this series. I received a free advanced copy of this book through the First Reads program.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Clausen-greene

    I love a good murder mystery book and let me tell you David Ellis delivers in his latest book The Wrong Man. Filled with suspense, intrigue, unsuspected plot twists, and great character development this book leaves you wanting more! One of the best things for me when I read a good book is the ability to be able to visualize the characters and story in my mind and have the book take the form of a realistic movie playing out. David Ellis does an uber job of giving us just that. Every time you pick I love a good murder mystery book and let me tell you David Ellis delivers in his latest book The Wrong Man. Filled with suspense, intrigue, unsuspected plot twists, and great character development this book leaves you wanting more! One of the best things for me when I read a good book is the ability to be able to visualize the characters and story in my mind and have the book take the form of a realistic movie playing out. David Ellis does an uber job of giving us just that. Every time you pick the book back up, its like a movie starting up after hitting pause and you cannot wait to find out what is going to happen to each character next. The book starts off with the murder of a young paralegal, Kathy Rubinkowski, on her way home from night-school, right before her 24th birthday. Police arrest a homeless Iraq war veteran, suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder named Mike Stoller, who doesn't deny killing the woman, but has no real memory of that night either and was found with the murder weapon. After being approached by the suspect’s aunt, Jason Kolarich agrees to take what appears to be an open and shut insanity case only weeks before trial. With his client unwilling to talk about the details of the murder or any other information that could prove helpful to his case, Jason realizes how much on his own he is. With the help of his legal team: Shauna, Bradley, Joel and a woman Jason meets named Tori Martin, they launch into investigating the background of the paralegal, Kathy Rubinikowski and soon stumble across some profound information that many are willing to kill to keep uncovered. Realizing the young paralegals murder was actually a hit to cover a terrorist conspiracy, the team races against the clock, the mob, an assassin known only as “Gin Rummy” and a wide network of wealthy American terrorist to save the life of not only an innocent man, but the city and countless lives as well from a terrorist strike. Want to learn more about this incredible author? http://davidellis.com/ or at blogging for books here: other book reviews by me: http://pirategrl1014.blogspot.com/201...

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.