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The Essential Iliad PDF, ePub eBook

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The Essential Iliad

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The Essential Iliad PDF, ePub eBook

30 review for The Essential Iliad

  1. 4 out of 5

    David Bates

    Last week the family and I went to a friend’s house for dinner. We talked while our daughters screamed across the lawn and wasps bled from the forest to threaten the late afternoon. He's also a fan of the Iliad – the Stanley Lombardo translation. I maintained the greatness of Robert Fitzgerald’s translation, which I had read around this time last year. After some tense moments blows were averted, but he lent me his copy. It feels like so much more than a year since the wet sand of the Greek camp Last week the family and I went to a friend’s house for dinner. We talked while our daughters screamed across the lawn and wasps bled from the forest to threaten the late afternoon. He's also a fan of the Iliad – the Stanley Lombardo translation. I maintained the greatness of Robert Fitzgerald’s translation, which I had read around this time last year. After some tense moments blows were averted, but he lent me his copy. It feels like so much more than a year since the wet sand of the Greek camp gripped my feet. But I guess this is how it is with classics – our little lives come and go, beating at the rocks of more permanent stories. So - Sing, Goddess, Achilles rage, Black and murderous, that cost the Greeks Incalculable pain, pitched countless souls Of heroes into Hades’ dark, And left their bodies to rot as feasts For dogs and birds, as Zeus’ will was done. (Lombardo) I don’t know if I’m ready to follow all the way through with a re-reading, but I’m going to do some side by side comparisons, because I find those to be annoyingly rare on the internet when you need them. Battle Scene - The end of Book IV (Lombardo) Diores, though, was skewered by Fate. Peirus, the Thracian leader, had caught him Just above the ankle with a jagged stone That crushed both tendons and bones. He fell backward into the dust, hands stretched Toward his friends, gasping out his life. Peirus ran up and finished him off With a slicing spear thrust near his navel. Hi guts spilled out, and everything went black. As Peirus jumped back, Thoas the Aetolian Hit him in the chest above the nipple. The bronze caught his lung. Thoas closed, Pulled the spear out, drew his sword And slashed his belly open. This finished him, But Thoas did not get to strip off Peirus’ armor Because his men, top-knotted Thracians With long spears in hand, drove him off, Big as he was, and sent him reeling. (Fitzgerald) The next on whom fate closed was Diores Amarungkeides, hit by a jagged stone Low on the right leg near the ankle. Peiros threw it, Peiros Imbrasides, a Thracian captain, One who had come from Ainos. With the bone itself, the vicious stone crushed both leg tendons utterly, and the tall man tumbled down into the dust, flinging his arms out wide to his companions, panting his life away; but on the run the man who hit him, Peiros, came with a spear to gash him by the navel. His bowels were spilled, and darkness veiled his eyes. Then Thoas the Aitolian lunged at Peiros, Hitting him with a spear above the nipple, So the bronze point struck in his lung; and Thoas At close quarters, wrenching the heavy spear, Pulled it out of his chest, then drew his sword And killed with him a stroke square in the belly. His gear he could not strip, though; friends of the dead man, Topknotted Thracians, closing round with spears, Repulsed him, huge and powerful as he was, A noble figure; staggering, he gave ground. Agamemnon’s moment of doubt - Book IX (Lombardo) So the Trojan’s kept watch. But Panic, Fear’s sister, had wrapped her icy fingers Around the Greeks, and all their best Were stricken with unendurable grief. When two winds rise on the swarming deep, Boreas and Zephyr, blowing from Thrace In a sudden squall, the startled black waves Will crst and tangle the surf with seaweed. The Greeks felt like that, pummeled and torn. Agamemnon’s heart was bruised with pain As he went around to the clar-toned criers Ordering them to call each man to the assembly, But not to shout. He pitched in himself. It was a dispirited assembly. Agamemnon Stood up, weeping, his face like a sheer cliff With dark springwater washing down the stone. (Fitzgerald) So Trojans kept their watch that night. To seaward Panic that attends blood-chilling Rout Now ruled the Akhaians. All their finest men Were shaken by tis fear, in bitter throes, As when a shifting gale Blows up over the cold fish-breeding sea, North wind and west wind wailing out of Thrace In squall on squall, and dark waves crest, and shorward Masses of weed are cast up by the surf: So were Akhaian hearts torn in their breasts. By that great gloom hard hit, the son of Atreus Made his way amid his criers and told them To bid each man in person to assembly But not to raise a general cry. He led them, Making the rounds himself, and soon the soldiers Grimly took their places. Then he rose, With slow tears trickling, as from a hidden spring Dark water runs down, staining a rock wall The final battle of Hector and Achilles – Book XXII (Lombardo) Great Hector, helmet shining, spoke first: I’m not running any more, Achilles. Three times around the city was enough. I’ve got my nerve back. It’s me or you now. But first we should swear a solemn oath. With all the gods as witnesses, I swear: If Zeus gives me the victory over you, I will not dishonor your corpse, only Strip the armor and give the body back To the Greeks. Promise you’ll do the same. And Achilles, fixing his eyes on him: Don’t try to cut any deals with me Hector. Do lions make peace treaties with men? Do wolves and lambs agree to get along? No, they hate each other to the core, And that’s how it is between you and me, No talk of agreements until one of us Falls and gluts Ares with his blood. By God, you’d better remember everything You ever knew about fighting with spears. But you’re as good as dead. Pallas Athena And my spear will make you pay in a lump For the agony you’ve caused by killing my friends.” (Fitzgerald) Hektor was the first to speak. He said: I will no longer fear you as before, Son of Peleus, though I ran from you Round Priam’s town three times and could not face you. Now my soul would have me stand and fight, Whether I kill you or am killed. So come, We’ll summon gods here as our witnesses, None higher, arbiters of a pact: I swear That, terrible as you are, I’ll not insult your corpse should Zeus allow me Victory in the end, your life as prize. Once I have your gear, I’ll give your body Back to Akhaians. Grant me, too, this grace. But swift Akhilleus frowned at him and said: Hektor, I’ll have no talk of pacts with you, forever unforgiven as you are. As between men and lions there are none, No concord between wolves and sheep, but all Hold one another hateful through and through, So there can be no courtesy between us, No sworn truce, till one of us is down And glutting with his blood the wargod Ares. Summon up what skills you have. By god, You’d better be a spearman and a fighter! Now there is no way out. Pallas Athena Will have the upper hand of you. The weapon Belongs to me. You’ll pay the reckoning In full for all the pain my men have borne, Who met death by your spear. So. Make of that what you will.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    I listened to the audiobook for Stanley Lombardo's translation of the Iliad, and it was surprisingly fun. Lombardo must have taken some liberties with the source text because I can't imagine a totally faithful translation would be this accessible. Lombardo opts to make the conversations seem more modern and colloquial, and this makes it a good choice for someone who wants to hear the tale without delighting in the meter of it (which to be fair, I'm not a very good judge of anyway). It's really in I listened to the audiobook for Stanley Lombardo's translation of the Iliad, and it was surprisingly fun. Lombardo must have taken some liberties with the source text because I can't imagine a totally faithful translation would be this accessible. Lombardo opts to make the conversations seem more modern and colloquial, and this makes it a good choice for someone who wants to hear the tale without delighting in the meter of it (which to be fair, I'm not a very good judge of anyway). It's really interesting to see which tropes from thousands of years ago still stick around and which ones are gone. There are a few things the Iliad has in common with the Aeneid that would be unusual today- heroes killing opponents who already surrendered, every single slain character gets a name, tons of literal deus ex machina... On the other hand, the battle sequences and flow feel decidedly relevant to today's storytelling. After reading the Iliad, I'm retroactively less impressed with the Aeneid. It copies many sequences from the Iliad beat for beat. While I still like it, it's clear that the Aeneid is largely a retread, following the Iliad and the Odyssey. I like the concept of all of these epics though- both sides of the conflict have names and faces, and neither side is really "bad." I'm looking forward to visiting the Odyssey next, and maybe then I'll branch out into some of the classic epics from other parts of the world.

  3. 5 out of 5

    natalie

    honestly i really enjoyed that! i found that even though some of the scenes became tedious at times, the focus on both the Trojans and Greeks in a both a positive and negative light to be refreshing. the story doesn't really paint either as more heroic or better than the others - despite the eventual win of the Greeks, Achilles is almost dehumanized by the end of the story and in fact it is the Trojans that are painted as more human and emotional. i found achilles' character to be especially int honestly i really enjoyed that! i found that even though some of the scenes became tedious at times, the focus on both the Trojans and Greeks in a both a positive and negative light to be refreshing. the story doesn't really paint either as more heroic or better than the others - despite the eventual win of the Greeks, Achilles is almost dehumanized by the end of the story and in fact it is the Trojans that are painted as more human and emotional. i found achilles' character to be especially interesting, from both his position on vengeance and glory and how his character arc changes from one to another.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    I have found the Iliad hard work on previous reads, and never sure that I had absorbed the key moments. this translation is so direct in it's choice of words and rhythm, I found myself moved to tears at several points

  5. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Devastating and so beautifully written. Raises important questions about war and humanity. What this edition included was enough to give me full understanding of the plot and keep me engaged the entire read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Arda

    This was a very decent, concise version of the Iliad. That being said, I hope that I never have to read another version of the Iliad for school again, let alone two semesters in a row.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Stricklin

    This was a book for class. I thought it was really interesting how the Gods interacted with the mortals.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nic

    A enormous amount of monologuing. Interesting to see older styles of writing. Not bad but I have a hard time recommending. The English translation was great.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Realini

    The Iliad by Homer Another version of this note and thoughts on other books are available at: - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... This is not just a masterpiece. It is a fundamental work. Classics of literature keep referring to it. And yet, I did not enjoy it, even on this second or third taking. We all know about Achilles, Hector, Paris and all the other heroes- mainly- and heroines involved in this tragic tale. Without knowing about the Iliad and all that is involved in it we would probably no The Iliad by Homer Another version of this note and thoughts on other books are available at: - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... This is not just a masterpiece. It is a fundamental work. Classics of literature keep referring to it. And yet, I did not enjoy it, even on this second or third taking. We all know about Achilles, Hector, Paris and all the other heroes- mainly- and heroines involved in this tragic tale. Without knowing about the Iliad and all that is involved in it we would probably not be able to read classic works. The Achilles heel is a well-known frailty and myth, so much so that we refer to it in common language and say: - This is his Achilles heel On the other hand, there is so much violence that it turned me off, even in the abridged format of a play. Yes, one can see the grandiose, spectacular confrontation of Greeks against Trojans and be mesmerized by it. Or repelled. I hesitated between the awe and the disgust provoked by the gory scenes of clashes in magnificent and yet gruesome battle scenes. And it was the same some years back. To compare with, I am including the notes written some years ago, on the same classical subject as left to posterity by Homer. The Iliad by Homer…a note from 2012, added to a recording from 2017, with, alas, about the same lack of enthusiasm The first time I‘ve read The Iliad, some 30-35 years ago; it must have been an abbreviated version. The version included in the Guardian top 100 list and on which should be on the must-read list of any serious reader is way too complex for an ordinary teenager, in my view. My teacher of Literature, Chevorchian was an excellent man and extraordinary mentor. Among the many wonderful things he taught us was that we need to start reading with mythology, in order to understand the references made in Any of the great books. I do not remember all the short list of great books he insisted upon, but my guess is that the Iliad was on it. I know that Chevorchian insisted on Flaubert. Back then I did read, but without any system, I did not consult the internet (there wasn’t any). Now I try to read and re-read the best books ever written. The Iliad is a very complex, tough book. In the future, if political correctness I all the rage, some books will fall from the top lists. Homer is describing with great talent the epic battles of Troy. Many men die, an outrageous number of animals are mutilated, sacrificed. I did not count for an accurate statistics, but there might be a beheading on every other page. That being said, the book is indeed extraordinary… the bravery, the beauty of the fights is sometimes shadowed by the cowardice of defeated fighters. I felt very sad when Hector dies. Disappointed by the way his corpse was treated by the “brave, unique” Achilles- dragged through the dust. There would be much more I’d like to write about it, making my impression as long as the book itself, but I’m no Homer so I better stop here.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sasha (whispersofthesilentwind)

    Note: I had to read for school “Let me not then die ingloriously and without a struggle, but let me first do some great thing that shall be told among men hereafter.” This version of the Iliad was very pleasing to read, I loved the prose of it. The plot of the Iliad itself is very interesting, I have a basic knowledge of it from other literature works or television. The dynamics of the characters were great, I felt what they felt and was sucked into the story. I was a bit sad that some of the ' Note: I had to read for school “Let me not then die ingloriously and without a struggle, but let me first do some great thing that shall be told among men hereafter.” This version of the Iliad was very pleasing to read, I loved the prose of it. The plot of the Iliad itself is very interesting, I have a basic knowledge of it from other literature works or television. The dynamics of the characters were great, I felt what they felt and was sucked into the story. I was a bit sad that some of the 'unnecessary' parts were cut for quicker reading. Essentially this version was a enjoyable read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Shoes

    I never read the Iliad before, because I assumed it would be in stilted, obscure language (as apparently some translations are). The Stanley Lombardo translation, however, is very accessible and brings you straight into the action. From a historical, anthropological, cultural standpoint, the Iliad is fascinating, for example the interactions between gods and men. It's impossible for a modern reader to see Achilles as a hero. He's petulant, selfish, and psycho-level violent. Yet despite all the m I never read the Iliad before, because I assumed it would be in stilted, obscure language (as apparently some translations are). The Stanley Lombardo translation, however, is very accessible and brings you straight into the action. From a historical, anthropological, cultural standpoint, the Iliad is fascinating, for example the interactions between gods and men. It's impossible for a modern reader to see Achilles as a hero. He's petulant, selfish, and psycho-level violent. Yet despite all the machismo and gore, there are beautiful, moving moments in the story.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Taylor

    Reading this for a college course and really taking time to understand the events changed my perspective of this epic poem. The short version I read in high school was very hard for me to get into and understand. I was dreading reading this at first but the translation is very easy to understand. I also took a lot of notes which helped me keep track of all the characters. I enjoyed the plot and relationships and overall the whole poem. Would read again.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Michael Mayer

    Excellent translation. I've always read Fagles and Fitzgerald but we read this for a class and I enjoyed it immensely. I give it only three stars to discourage you away from this abbreviated version. Read the Iliad and Odyssey whole! As far as an introduction to the Iliad I would give it four stars and I got a lot out of the introduction.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Lakly

    This is my new favorite translation! I hate that it look me so long to find it. It's current and compelling. This edition of the story is great too. It cuts out the boring bits, and it emphasizes why this is a story that's stood the test of time.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    I didn't understand half of what went on in this book, it just didn't make sense...After reading the Odyssey, this book was just disappointing.

  16. 4 out of 5

    bridget trinkaus

    i love the greeks!! but i really felt for hector.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    Nice translation

  18. 5 out of 5

    Terra Widmyer

    This edition is wonderful.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    I read the full Lombardo translation, not this abridged version, but can't find it on goodreads. 4 stars for the translation, 2 for the story.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Zain

    I don't think the translation does the storyline any justice.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nora

    I love Lombardo's Homeric translations, because they truly capture the personalities of the stories and characters.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Marian Flum

  23. 5 out of 5

    Stacey

  24. 5 out of 5

    Leonardo Francisco

  25. 4 out of 5

    Pen

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rachael

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nor

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tory S. Anderson

  29. 4 out of 5

    Geoffrey Bunting

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

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