Hot Best Seller

Jarka Ruus PDF, ePub eBook

4.6 out of 5
30 review

Jarka Ruus

Availability: Ready to download

File Name: Jarka Ruus .pdf

How it works:

1. Register a free 1 month Trial Account.

2. Download as many books as you like (Personal use)

3. Cancel the membership at any time if not satisfied.


Jarka Ruus PDF, ePub eBook Sono passati vent'anni dal viaggio della nave volante Jerle Shannara. Adesso Grianne Ohmsford non si fa più chiamare Strega di Ilse e ha votato la sua vita al progresso delle Quattro Terre mediante lo sfruttamento delle conoscenze dei Druidi, che adesso presiede, e cerca da anni di arrivare a una pace duratura tra i Liberi e la Federazione. Non tutti, però, la pensano come Sono passati vent'anni dal viaggio della nave volante Jerle Shannara. Adesso Grianne Ohmsford non si fa più chiamare Strega di Ilse e ha votato la sua vita al progresso delle Quattro Terre mediante lo sfruttamento delle conoscenze dei Druidi, che adesso presiede, e cerca da anni di arrivare a una pace duratura tra i Liberi e la Federazione. Non tutti, però, la pensano come lei. Sono molti i druidi convinti che il loro destino sia quello di dominare le altre razze. E qualcuno non si limita solo a parlare: Grianne, vittima di un tradimento, scompare senza lasciare traccia. Potrebbe essere l'inizio di una nuova era oscura, ma Tagwen, assistente di Grianne, è deciso a tutto pur di ritrovare la donna e preservare il potere del Druido Supremo. Anche a scendere nelle misteriose terre del Divieto, un mondo dove anticamente gli Elfi esiliarono tutte le creature del male.

30 review for Jarka Ruus

  1. 4 out of 5

    Markus

    She pulled her cloak closer about her, aware suddenly of how cold she was. It was his presence, the nearness of his evil. Even in death, it was there, in the spray off the lake, in the currents of the air, in the darkness pressing down on her. Death, come alive in the form of his shade, gave power to what he was. The dreams of Allanon and Walker Boh have finally come true, and a new power is rising in the world of the Four Lands for the first time since before the forging of the Sword of Shannara She pulled her cloak closer about her, aware suddenly of how cold she was. It was his presence, the nearness of his evil. Even in death, it was there, in the spray off the lake, in the currents of the air, in the darkness pressing down on her. Death, come alive in the form of his shade, gave power to what he was. The dreams of Allanon and Walker Boh have finally come true, and a new power is rising in the world of the Four Lands for the first time since before the forging of the Sword of Shannara. Grianne Ohmsford, Ard Rhys of the Third Druid Council and High Druid of Paranor, has brought back the Druid order in its entirety. Men and women of all races have come to Paranor once more in pursuit of knowledge and magic. But everything is not as glorious as it seems. In the darkest hallways and the deepest catacombs of the ancient fortress, numerous conspiracies are brewing. Every single member of the order appears to have dark secrets and hidden ambitions, and some of the most powerful sorcerers among them are already starting to act. The only thing they all have in common is a strong hatred for Grianne. Just as Sen Dunsidan, now Prime Minister of the Federation, arrives at Paranor for diplomatic talks, the High Druid disappears completely. While the Druid order is thrown into complete disarray, its members bickering over positions and politics, it falls to Penderrin Ohmsford, youngest scion of Shannara, to find and attempt to rescue its lost leader. While Pen goes on his quest, Grianne awakens in the world to which she has been sent by those tho wished her out of the way. When she starts exploring and encounters dragons, ogres and furies, she realises where she is. She has been sent to the world of the Jarka Ruus, the banished peoples. The world inside the Forbidding. This book restored my belief in Terry Brooks after the previous trilogy left me a bit disappointed (a bit tired, even). The old greatness of the world of Shannara is mixed with a darker setting in which intrigue and treachery play important parts. The combination results in a brilliant and complex story. The tale is mostly told from three perspectives. One is Pen Ohmsford. He's the generic Ohmsford hero and in most ways appears to be a reincarnation of Shea, Wil, Par and Bek. His storyline is still good, but it's the other two that made this so enjoyable: Grianne Ohmsford and her desperate journeys through the lands of the Forbidding, and the treacherous Druids who sent her there, struggling to control Paranor while they themselves also are being manipulated by forces unknown. Jarka Ruus kicks off the High Druid of Shannara trilogy with a bang. It is basically the Voyage of the Jerle Shannara without almost all the downsides, and I would say it's the best Shannara book since the Wishsong. Also, it includes perhaps the best scene in the entire series (which I quoted from in the top of the review), when (view spoiler)[Grianne Ohmsford walks down to the alternative Hadeshorn that lies inside the Forbidding, and tries to summon the spirits of Walker and Allanon to ask their advice, but accidentally summons the spirit of someone else instead... (hide spoiler)]

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dirk Grobbelaar

    While I liked this book, I would have enjoyed it even more if the characters weren’t so bland. I can’t help but wonder how the Shannara series would have progressed if Brooks hadn’t replaced Walker Boh (an intense and fascinating character) with Grianne Ohmsford (meh). I’ll say one thing: he isn’t afraid of killing his druids off, but it isn’t always for the greater good. This isn’t a spoiler for this book, by the way, since it happened in a previous story arc. Anyway, that’s neither here nor th While I liked this book, I would have enjoyed it even more if the characters weren’t so bland. I can’t help but wonder how the Shannara series would have progressed if Brooks hadn’t replaced Walker Boh (an intense and fascinating character) with Grianne Ohmsford (meh). I’ll say one thing: he isn’t afraid of killing his druids off, but it isn’t always for the greater good. This isn’t a spoiler for this book, by the way, since it happened in a previous story arc. Anyway, that’s neither here nor there, but a Walker Boh, or even a Truls Rohk, thrown into this tepid mix would have spiced things up considerably. What’s more, Jarka Ruus sorely lacks the epic sweep of the earlier Shannara books. As it were, it’s a fairly familiar storyline in the (fortunately) still fascinating Shannara universe. The best bits are when the magic comes into play, and I liked the summoning in the Hadeshorn-of-the-Forbidding, when a familiar face makes a surprise cameo appearance (and no, it’s not Allanon). It is the first book in a trilogy, and it teeters on a fine line. Hopefully it will go up from here, and not the other way round. If, like me, you enjoy the Shannara books, you will find this entertaining enough, but PLEASE don’t start your Shannara experience here. The earlier books are much better.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ronda Tutt

    Terry Brooks does an Excelent job with the creation of this story. I really enjoyed reading this through out the night. I highly recommend reading this immediately after "The Voyage of the Jerle Shannara" because the story picks back up some of the characters used within the story. The time line also is only 20 years past instead of a thousand or so and I was very happy about that. The book gives a refresher of the characters used in "The Voyage of the Jerle Shannara" and a reminder of what happe Terry Brooks does an Excelent job with the creation of this story. I really enjoyed reading this through out the night. I highly recommend reading this immediately after "The Voyage of the Jerle Shannara" because the story picks back up some of the characters used within the story. The time line also is only 20 years past instead of a thousand or so and I was very happy about that. The book gives a refresher of the characters used in "The Voyage of the Jerle Shannara" and a reminder of what happened: Grianne Ohmsford, once the Ilse Witch who was saved by her brother with the use of the Sword of Shannara in killing her evil mentor, the Morgawr. She was tasked by Walker the Druid before he died to rebuild the Druid's Order by summoning members of all the Races to create a Third Druid Council and form a new order, one in which ditates of a single Druid would no longer be all that stood between civilization and anarchy, between reason and madness. Even though it has now been 20 years since Grianne formed the Druid's order, there were many among the new Druids who still did not trust her because of her past being the Ilse Witch and all the evil she was a part of. These few wanted her dead and look for ways to kill her or out of the picture from being Ard Rhys the leader of the Druids. Sen Dunsidan, now the Prime Minister thanks to the Ilse Witch mentor Morgawr does not trust her due to the past dealings and he teams up with the few within the Druid's order to get rid of her. Sen Dunsidan does find a way and gets his spy and ally Shadea A'Ru to use a potion called Liquid Night to imprision Grianne in the forbidding - the place where all evil is held and held in prision by the Elcrys. With the help of Tagwen, Grianne's faithful assistant who is extremely worried about her and knows what the evil Druid's have done to take over the leadership, goes in search of Grianne's brother Bek Ohmsford for help in finding her. Unfortunately, when Tagwen gets to Bek Ohmsford's place, he is not available for Bek and his wife have taken some customers on a hunting trip and there is no way to find them. The only one who can help is Penderrin, Bek's son who happens to know how to fly a air ship. Tagwen and Penderrin meet The King of the Silver River which further convinces Penderrin to go on the journey to save his aunt and tells him where she is and how to bring her back. The King of the Silver River tells Pen that a talisman is needed to negate its magic and this talisman is a Dark Wand which is a juring stick that must be fashioned by hand from the limb of a tree called Tanequil. The Tanequil is sentient, it is a living, breathing creature that will only give up a limb only if it is persuaded of the need for doing so and must act freely because if it is taken by force, the magic that it bears will be destroyed. The only one that communicate with the Tanequil is Pen since he has a gift of magic power of being able to talk and communicate with plants and animals. This magic was passed on to him through the Ohmsford from the use of the wish song. The place to find the Tanequil is in a forest on an island deep in the Charnal Mountains, so the journey begins and the first place they go to seek aid in this journey is to retrieve Ahren Elessdil, the elf who brought back the Elf Stones to his people who had sailed on the Jerle Shannara. Not only do they recrute Ahren but Ahren's niece Khyber who wants to be a Druid and have a different life from her families. The journey begins. Mean while, Grianne discovers she is no longer in her room when she awakes and discovers that she is in the land of Jarka Ruus - the forbidding, the place that the Ellcrys have shut all the evil away for thousands of years, the place consisted of faery, dragons, and different species of evil. Pen's journey begins with the escape from the evil Druids that are after him. He even finds time to fall in love with a girl named Cinnaminson, who happens to be blind but has the sight to see within her mind. The story is great and full of action and magic, Grianne wonders through out the forbidding and is finally captured by creatures at the end of the book. The story continues in the next book called Tanequil (High Druid of Shannara)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bruce

    Brooks is a great fantasy storyteller. Notice I said storyteller, not writer. Some things about his style drive me nuts - like his incurable compulsion to explain EVERYTHING over and over and over, from every possible angle until you just want to scream, "Get on with it!" His writing style *tells* too much, and doesn't *show* enough. So why did I give this four stars? Because I couldn't give it three and a half. He's got a vivid imagination and a great knack for a compelling yarn. Still, I don't Brooks is a great fantasy storyteller. Notice I said storyteller, not writer. Some things about his style drive me nuts - like his incurable compulsion to explain EVERYTHING over and over and over, from every possible angle until you just want to scream, "Get on with it!" His writing style *tells* too much, and doesn't *show* enough. So why did I give this four stars? Because I couldn't give it three and a half. He's got a vivid imagination and a great knack for a compelling yarn. Still, I don't think many non-fantasy readers would enjoy his books the way any reader could enjoy Tolkien. I listened to this book on CD in the car, and despite its length, I rarely got bored... except when Brooks was on one of his over-explaining sprees.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    My issue with most science fiction, and why I don't read a lot of that genre, is that they never actually FINISH! I had forgotten why I normally stay away from this genre when I picked this up, because a) it sounded really interesting, and b) it didn't have "Book 1" attached to the title, which is normally a dead give-away that the book will end in a cliff-hanger and leave you wondering what happens next. The story of Grianne, the High Druid of Paranor and the politically motivate treachery that My issue with most science fiction, and why I don't read a lot of that genre, is that they never actually FINISH! I had forgotten why I normally stay away from this genre when I picked this up, because a) it sounded really interesting, and b) it didn't have "Book 1" attached to the title, which is normally a dead give-away that the book will end in a cliff-hanger and leave you wondering what happens next. The story of Grianne, the High Druid of Paranor and the politically motivate treachery that uses dark magic to send her into a dark no-man's land so her position can be stolen is good - as far as it goes. Grianne's young nephew Pen turns out to be the only one with the power to find, and rescue Grianne, and the motley band of companions who accompany Pen on the journey, and their own adventures along the way are exciting and engrossing. The problem comes when you get to the end of the book, which is not REALLY the end of the book. You're left with the cliff-hanger, and don't know what happens to any of the characters, so presumably there's a next book in which the story is continued. However, I don't like books that don't actually have an ending. I don't mind leaving openings in the current story for another book, but I irritates me when the author doesn't actually conclude at least most of the current story. I feel like I've been cheated, and wasted my time when this happens. So although what there was of this story was good, because there is no conclusion, I've only given two stars.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jeremiah Johnson

    I wanted to like this book. But I couldn't. The story is severely lacking. The idea of Jarka Ruus seems pretty interesting. Unfortunately, only a few chapters of the book actually deal with it. The rest is made up of a never ending game of cat and mouse that is just boring. There is a lot of conflict between the druids that isn't really accounted for. Some of it is finally explained near the end of the book, but at the start of the book it makes no sense why everyone hates each other. This makes i I wanted to like this book. But I couldn't. The story is severely lacking. The idea of Jarka Ruus seems pretty interesting. Unfortunately, only a few chapters of the book actually deal with it. The rest is made up of a never ending game of cat and mouse that is just boring. There is a lot of conflict between the druids that isn't really accounted for. Some of it is finally explained near the end of the book, but at the start of the book it makes no sense why everyone hates each other. This makes it hard to care about any of the characters as they just come across as petty whiners.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    Not quite as good at the other Shannara books, but still pretty damn good. I felt like it jumped right into the story and did not fill in a lot of the important details that happened in the 20 year story gap that happened between this book and Morgawr. Like all Shannara books by 2/3 of the way in you can't put it down and of course it ends on a cliffhanger going into the next one of the sub-trilogy.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    Terry Brooks' writing style is much improved from his early novels at this point. The novel wasn't for me though. I typically like fantasy, but I didn't like how the characters explained what they had to do a million times. The plot was pretty boring also. I would have no interest in reading the other novels in this series.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Michael Bates

    3.5 stars

  10. 5 out of 5

    Paul Weiss

    Revisit the amazing world of Shannara! Grianne Ohmsford, struggling with the inner demons of her former evil life as the Ilse Witch, also wrestles with the politics of her new role as Ard Rhys, High Druid of Paranor, responsible for the unification of the third Druid Council. Peace and harmony among the races of the four lands seems a distant, faint hope as her enemies on the council, the dissenting druids led by Shadea a'Rhu, refuse to accept the reality of Grianne's redemption and plot to brin Revisit the amazing world of Shannara! Grianne Ohmsford, struggling with the inner demons of her former evil life as the Ilse Witch, also wrestles with the politics of her new role as Ard Rhys, High Druid of Paranor, responsible for the unification of the third Druid Council. Peace and harmony among the races of the four lands seems a distant, faint hope as her enemies on the council, the dissenting druids led by Shadea a'Rhu, refuse to accept the reality of Grianne's redemption and plot to bring her down, each striving to achieve their own ends and bring their own agenda to completion. When Grianne vanishes, seemingly defeated by the circle of treasonous plotters surrounding her and locked behind impenetrable magic walls in the land of the Forbidding, her trusted servant and aide, Tagwen, realizes that his own life hangs in the balance and narrowly escapes Paranor himself. Relentlessly pursued by Terek Molt, another rebellious Druid on the Council and Aphasia Wye, a deadly assassin, Tagwen seeks help from the only people he can think of - Pen Ohmsford, Grianne's resourceful, young nephew and Ahren Ellesdil, a self-exiled elf Druid and master of no small amount of magic himself! The thrilling chase is on as the Druid Council seeks to eliminate the only loose ends that can spoil their nefarious plans and Pen and Ahren seek to release Grianne from her hellish prison in The Forbidding and seal what appears to be a hole in the magic wall that might well see the re-appearance of the evil warlock in the Four Lands! With The High Druid of Shannara, Brooks has once again burst onto the fantasy scene and re-established himself as a master of the genre! As a reader who first fell in love with The Sword of Shannara over twenty years ago, I felt like Brooks was making me the gift of that experience all over again - good vs evil; battles; treachery; magic of a bewildering array of flavours and strengths; love and loyalty; a beautifully crafted landscape replete with its dazzling population of fantasy inhabitants; and the imaginative, unique device of a cruelly, twisted "copy" of the Four Lands called The Forbidding that serves as a magical prison for the banished shade of Brona, the dreaded warlock lord. While Jarka Ruus is primarily a plot-driven book that moves headlong at the pace of the finest thriller, Brooks has not neglected to provide a richly detailed cast with a fully developed range of emotions, strengths, failings, foibles and habits. I smiled as I watched Pen struggle with the conflict between his first young love for Cinnaminson, daughter of the Rover Captain, Gar Hatch, and the duties he knew he had assumed in the search for his aunt. Barely out of girlhood, Khyber Ellesdil, granted the genetic gift of magic and control over the Elfstones, seems overcome with typical teenage doubt and angst over her abilities and her place in the world. Tagwen, brave, loyal and well-intentioned, seems ... well ... simply overwhelmed, over-matched and out of his league! The choice of endings for this novel, the first installment in a trilogy, is unfortunate and ill-conceived! In fact, it is no ending at all and every sub-plot and narrative thread is simply abandoned in mid-stream because, I expect, Brooks and the publishers wanted this novel to be a particular length. A minor aggravation in the overall scheme of things, I expect, because I've already pick up the next part - Tanequil - and started to eagerly read on! Two thumbs up - more if I had `em! Paul Weiss

  11. 4 out of 5

    Maria Rose

    I decided to read another trilogy story by Terry Brooks. This one occurs after the return of the group that went to find the Elfstones. It is twenty years later, the Druid Council has been established by Grianne Ohmsford, who was formerly the Ilse Witch in the last trilogy, but she has people in the Druid Council who resent her being the Ards Rhys, the leader. These people have come under the influence of a dark soul from the Forbidden Zone, who is using them as puppets to get out of the Forbidd I decided to read another trilogy story by Terry Brooks. This one occurs after the return of the group that went to find the Elfstones. It is twenty years later, the Druid Council has been established by Grianne Ohmsford, who was formerly the Ilse Witch in the last trilogy, but she has people in the Druid Council who resent her being the Ards Rhys, the leader. These people have come under the influence of a dark soul from the Forbidden Zone, who is using them as puppets to get out of the Forbidden Zone because it needs an exchange of bodies to enter the real world of Shannara. It does it in several steps, first by mind-control suggestions which lead one of them to develop magic called liquid night, which renders the individual to the Forbidden and allows passage in a spirit form to Shannara, where the spirit takes over a body of one of its puppets. Grianne went to sleep one night and woke up in the Forbidden Zone where once she realized where she went to the Hadshorn to summon a druid shade to get information on how to return. The shade she summoned was the Warlock Druid Brona, who told her that she needs to first wait for the boy who was coming to rescue her and to use her skills learned as the Ilse Witch to both survive and get back with the boy. The boy in the reference is Grianne Ohmsford's nephew Penderrin Ohmsford. He has magic that helps him understand and communicate with all living beings both plant and animal. He comes into the story when Tagwen, a Dwarf who had been on the voyage from the previous trilogy and a helper attendant for Grianne, comes rushing to him while fleeing from the Druids who sent Grianne to the Forbidden Zone. Before he can tell Pen the whole story, the Galaphile shows up with Gnome defenders and the Druid Terek Molt a Druid warrior. So they were forced to flee fast, using Pen's little cat-28, a little shiff boat. They manage to evade the big ship because of the storm and the help of the King of the Silver River, who told Pen that he would the one to rescue his aunt by getting a limb from the Tanequill to form a darkwind. They then go to the area near Emberen, an Eleven village, to consult with Ahren Elessedil, another survivor that voyage who was now a Druid, himself. He is hosting a visit from his niece Khymer, who has the Elfstones with her because she wants to learn how to use them. After allowing the two refugees a night's rest after feeding them, the group together leaves to go where they need to get Pen's darkwind. They found out the destiny by using the Elfstones, which unfortunately gives away their location. They finally get passage on new style airship to get to their destiny but were followed closely by both the Druid ship and another unknown assassin who carries the Steihl knife. The Captain of the airboat deserts them in the swamp but they still manage to get out of the swamp after using the Elfstones to destroy both the Druid ship and all onboard including the Druid Terek Molt. But Ahren is mortally wounded in this battle but last long enough to get Pen and Khymer along with Tagwen to complete the rescue of Grianne. The Jarka Ruus of the title is the name of a group of deviate Elves who had been banished to the Forbidden Zone.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tony

    Grianne Ohsmford, the High Druid of Paranor, is despised and plotted against from within her own order. Her nephew, Pen Ohsmford, inherent of a unique magic of his own, is the only one who can save her. Jarka Ruus, begins another fantasy in the Shannara series with some of the usual Shannara tropes - a young Ohmsford thrust into adventure as the worlds last hope, enemies hunting him down to see that he fails; and yet there are some added elements to keep the story fresh. The founding of the Thir Grianne Ohsmford, the High Druid of Paranor, is despised and plotted against from within her own order. Her nephew, Pen Ohsmford, inherent of a unique magic of his own, is the only one who can save her. Jarka Ruus, begins another fantasy in the Shannara series with some of the usual Shannara tropes - a young Ohmsford thrust into adventure as the worlds last hope, enemies hunting him down to see that he fails; and yet there are some added elements to keep the story fresh. The founding of the Third Druid Council has been a long awaited event for Shannara fans, and the reader gets to see it through the perspective of the High Druid herself. There are a handful of enemies each with their own unique strengths, and they're relentless in their determination to initiate their plan and once fulfilled, tie up any loose ends. Fortunately, there is a druid who carries over from the last trilogy The Voyage of the Jerle Shannara Trilogy who is there to help the Ohmsfords. There's are also two love stories involved, one is puppy love and the other much more morbid. The Druids in the Shannara series may not be what you are accustomed to if you've only heard of Druids through D & D campaigns. Druids in this world are more battle-mage types with powerful destructive magic, earth-type magic, mysterious magical abilities such as telekinesis in some cases and a form of telepathy, as well as longevity; however, no two druids are the same. What makes the High Druid so unique is her inherent ability to use a magic called the "wishsong," as well as her background of once having been the infamous Ilse Witch, capable of the most horrid evil. Not only does she have to contend with those inner struggles of her past, she must watch for schemes against her from every corner. Airships are again prevalent, after their introduction in the Voyage series, although the method in which they fly using "diapson" crystals (a type of solar energy it seems) and radian draws is not fully explained. Even so, the airships serve as a convenient plot element to help the characters get around the world more quickly. Brooks writes his novels with the intention of readers being able to pick up with any book in the series, but it's highly recommended to read the previous books to have the best appreciation for the High Druid trilogy. For being the first in a trilogy, Jarka Ruus still has an ending and answers many questions to the mysteries that were brought up in the beginning; Brooks knows where he is taking the story. He had a plan and it's enjoyable to watch it unfold.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan D

    [Book 65] Terry Brooks is always worth a read. One of the things that keeps me reading Terry Brooks is the familiarity of his writing. His style is always the same and the character designs, plots, archetypes, and tropes are always the same. The story and characters themselves are different, but are similar enough that I instantly feel like I know them. This book works really well as a start of a trilogy. Having Grianne the primary character of the first 100 pages worked well since I remembered her [Book 65] Terry Brooks is always worth a read. One of the things that keeps me reading Terry Brooks is the familiarity of his writing. His style is always the same and the character designs, plots, archetypes, and tropes are always the same. The story and characters themselves are different, but are similar enough that I instantly feel like I know them. This book works really well as a start of a trilogy. Having Grianne the primary character of the first 100 pages worked well since I remembered her from the Jerle Shannara trilogy. This book, compared to the first book in the previously mentioned trilogy, starts off much more quickly. The pacing from beginning to end is amazing. There is no fluff, no extra scenes, no added descriptions present simply to add to the page count(hello Robert Jordan!). Brooks has really refined his ability to write shorter books. Differently from other Shannara series, I liked all of the main characters. I relate to Penderrin and feel that he is similar to every other Ohmsford male character, which made him instantly loveable. The added airship flyer made him more of a fun Luke Skywalker character(which I love). Khyber was interesting in that she was much less of a point of view character until the end of the book. I think Brooks will use her more in "Tanequil" and "Straken". Tagwen was par-for the course Dwarf and Ahren was par-for the course Elf. The one part of the book I didn't like was the love story between Pen and Cinnaminson. I thought they were cute together and I look forward to seeing if Brooks takes them where I think he's taking them. My problem was that their story was rushed WAY too quickly in this book. They shouldn't have started to fall in love until the end of the book or the start of book 2. (Minor Spoilers): The concept of Grianne being banished in the Forbidding and having Pen come rescue her reminded me a lot of the greek tale of Orpheus and Eurydice. In both stories, the female character is spirited down to hell and the male character must come after them, except it's an aunt-nephew relationship here as opposed to lovers in the greek myth. Overall, great book. Awesome start to the trilogy. I think it's as good(and in some ways better) than Isle Witch(which was the start of Jerle Shannara trilogy) and is definitely better than Scions. Small problems, but seriously solid overall. 8.6 out of 10!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jasmyn

    Starting into the next series-set of the Shannara world, we get started with some familiar faces - which I love. Grainne was redeemed in the previous series, and she is now the High Druid. But not everyone has forgiven and moved on. Her past still haunts her, and it's about to lead to some really nasty magic. Her own druids are set against her, and when she disappears mysteriously, there are none that seem to really care. There are a few people loyal to her though, and they instantly set off on t Starting into the next series-set of the Shannara world, we get started with some familiar faces - which I love. Grainne was redeemed in the previous series, and she is now the High Druid. But not everyone has forgiven and moved on. Her past still haunts her, and it's about to lead to some really nasty magic. Her own druids are set against her, and when she disappears mysteriously, there are none that seem to really care. There are a few people loyal to her though, and they instantly set off on the quest to find Grainne's family and friends from her previous story. There's a lot of building blocks in this story, and not a ton of action. It comes in bits and pieces as the druids try to stop Grainne's friends from finding her or finding out what was done to her. But the Ohmsford family has always been a resourceful one, and they slip through tight places by the skin of their teeth. At the end of the story, we're left with a little knowledge, but not a lot was done. I loved some of the characters, especially the new seer Pen meets on the way. There are betrayals and new friends, wins and losses, everything you might expect in a high fantasy story. I'm liking the groundwork laid so far, and this may be one of my favorite sets of characters yet. I'm excited to see what happens to Grainne next.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Derek Gillespie

    Terry Brook's Shannara series is crafted by a repeatable formula that can make you weary or peak your interest for more. At this point, I am gratified by the lore of the Four Lands and there are some moments, like: existing in the Forbidding for a while is very cool. But as I trudge through (do yourself a favor and listen to the audiobook, it's only 6 hours and cuts out a lot of Brook's useless, and endless, character mind-doubt and wordy exposition) I get reminded that I don't like these stories Terry Brook's Shannara series is crafted by a repeatable formula that can make you weary or peak your interest for more. At this point, I am gratified by the lore of the Four Lands and there are some moments, like: existing in the Forbidding for a while is very cool. But as I trudge through (do yourself a favor and listen to the audiobook, it's only 6 hours and cuts out a lot of Brook's useless, and endless, character mind-doubt and wordy exposition) I get reminded that I don't like these stories. I love the cover art and the mysterious start of the tale but (like The Jerle Shannara trilogy) I find that I don't care. His main characters are so flat and just do things to push the story along, not the reverse. Forget about the humor too - there is none! Take the exciting Kelvin of Rudd series as an example of how to properly litter humor throughout a fantasy drama. The world is so small and Brook's writing doesn't stimulate my mind. Alas, I'm am putting this away on my lost interest shelf.

  16. 4 out of 5

    guy

    I thought it was mediocre by Terry Brooks' standards. I really thought the Voyage of the Jerle Shannara trilogy, like his books prior to that series, was outstanding. I really liked the Jerle Shannara trilogy and Grianne Ohmsford's character. I thought the character had so much potential! The way that Grianne, and the other characters from the Jerle Shannara series ended up was terrible. I thought it a huge waste of potential and wildly divergent from what was set up for those characters, at in t I thought it was mediocre by Terry Brooks' standards. I really thought the Voyage of the Jerle Shannara trilogy, like his books prior to that series, was outstanding. I really liked the Jerle Shannara trilogy and Grianne Ohmsford's character. I thought the character had so much potential! The way that Grianne, and the other characters from the Jerle Shannara series ended up was terrible. I thought it a huge waste of potential and wildly divergent from what was set up for those characters, at in the prior series. In addition, I felt like there was a lot of filler in this book. There was some interesting aspects and characters, the druids in particular, but it honestly felt like Mr. Brooks was going through the motions here - writing books just so that he came out with a new one.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Shaun

    I continue to read Shannara even though Terry Brooks continues to never prove to me that he is a really exceptional fantasy author. That being said, he still knows how to weave a fun adventure with heroes and villains, monsters, a magic macguffin to find. It never feels particularly deep or weighty. I wept for the last quarter of Assassin's Fate by Robin Hobb but I could never imagine doing that for a Shannara book. Still, not ever book needs to carry you like that. For a fun fantasy adventure f I continue to read Shannara even though Terry Brooks continues to never prove to me that he is a really exceptional fantasy author. That being said, he still knows how to weave a fun adventure with heroes and villains, monsters, a magic macguffin to find. It never feels particularly deep or weighty. I wept for the last quarter of Assassin's Fate by Robin Hobb but I could never imagine doing that for a Shannara book. Still, not ever book needs to carry you like that. For a fun fantasy adventure full of mostly stock characters Shannara still is a good time. He manages to change the formula just enough to keep it interesting.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ian yarington

    This book surprised me in the time jump and how close to the Voyage books it stayed. I was expecting more of a jump and less of older characters. This isn't a bad thing because I really love Grianne and hope for her to get that redemption that she needs. Of course the new Omsford boy is awesome as well and all of the new characters mesh really well. I like how Brooks does his villains; Sen, the druid order, all very good villains. I'm excited to for this new trilogy and to see where things head!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Abram

    The shannara series was one of the first big fantasy series I read as a kid. I remember doing book reports in them in middle school. When I found out that terry brooks was writing the final trilogy in his world I decided to re - read the last set of books and then read the ones I missed. This book is not bad, if you've read the 9 previous books in this giant set of books spanning something like 1,000 years of history if the Four Lands.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mark Reynolds

    Continuing the adventure Have been reading about the four lands for more years than I wish to remember; it never grows stale, characters still remain fresh, believable and engaging. As you finish you want to move straight to the next volume. Whilst this story stands alone, not overly referencing previous sets, the rich history of the series is maintained. I've been meaning to read for a while, so glad I made the time, didn't want to put it down.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rick

    Jarka Ruus is, in essence, an escape and evasion story that takes place in the middle of the usual fantasy quest. The characters are written well and Brooks easily kept my attention throughout the tale. Terek Molt, one of the more significant antagonists, comes across more like a bumbling, stumbling, dolt than as someone to be really feared, but this never really detracts from the book. All in all a well done part of the Shannara epic.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dejanira Dawn

    This has got to be one of my fav books by Terry so far. I'm in love with Ahren, ever since the last series when he was with Pens father and mother. I also love Pen. And Khyber. I LOVE EVERYONE Also, the DEATH IN THIS BOOK. I NEVER CRIED SO HARD DURING AN AUDIOBOOK ps. I haven't watched the second season of Shannara yet but I am so mad that Ahren is on there. He's not even ALIVE during Wil's time. (view spoiler)[ AHRENS DEATH IM STILL CRYING (hide spoiler)]

  23. 4 out of 5

    April

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The first in the High Druid of Shannara series Jakara Ruus tells the story of a new generation of Ohmsfords. Brooks continues writing about his world of Shannara, where magic, elves, and much more lives. The tale follows young Pen as he seeks to save his aunt, Grainne the Ard Rhys from the Forbidding. Each character is real and well rounded, with surprising character twists. Not everything is as it appears in this adventure.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    I really enjoyed this one!!! I find Grianne Ohmsford a breath of fresh air, her story is very compelling. I honestly just wanted to read about her, and less of everyone else. Although I did find a handful of other characters interesting. The parts with Shadea a'Ru slowed the book/story down for me. All in all this was a very likable read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Eh, I know it was supposed to be a trilogy from the get go, but you're not too far into the book before it's obvious nothing is going to be resolved. Nothing. Not a lot of focus on Grianne here. Her chapters are few and could have been solved with a spirit world email basically. So far this doesn't seem to be the strongest entry in the series of series, but we'll see.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    This was a good, but not great place to start reading a Terry Brooks series. I think most of the recurring characters (just a guess at which they were) were reintroduced sufficiently but I will not be continuing with this series until I go back to the beginning.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    I liked the story line but hated that it ended and I now have to read the other 2 to find out what happens next. I am going to read them next and can't wait to see what is next to the characters. I just wish this one had a map of the forbidding like the other 2 do.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lydia

    There are a few authors I look to, when I want to read a good fantasy fiction- Terry Brooks is one of them. The Shannara books are nothing like the TV series. The TV version is like a 'teen romp' when in actual fact the books are a quest, a slow unfolding of the characters and of the journey.

  29. 5 out of 5

    brent Porterfield

    Classic Terry Brooks! If you like Brooks, then you will like this installment. I enjoy the glimpse into the Forbidding. My only complaint...too many coming of age stories from Brooks.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Data

    Another trilogy beginning that is pretty good. The writing is still better, although I agree with some others that Grianne Ohmsford is not so engaging as a good druid as when she was a bad girl. She seems a little whiney ... but yes, still capable.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.