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Morgawr

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Morgawr PDF, ePub eBook Harrowing confrontations with the merciless Ilse Witch and the monstrous Antrax have taken their toll on the intrepid heroes aboard the airship “Jerle Shannara”. But their darkest adversary now snaps at their heels, in the form of the Morgawr - feeder upon the souls of his enemies and centuries-old sorcerer of unimaginable might with a fleet of airships and a crew of walki Harrowing confrontations with the merciless Ilse Witch and the monstrous Antrax have taken their toll on the intrepid heroes aboard the airship “Jerle Shannara”. But their darkest adversary now snaps at their heels, in the form of the Morgawr - feeder upon the souls of his enemies and centuries-old sorcerer of unimaginable might with a fleet of airships and a crew of walking dead men at his command. The Morgawr's goal is twofold: find and control the fabled ancient books of magic and destroy the dark disciple who betrayed him - the Ilse Witch. Now at the mercy of those who seek vengeance against her, the use Witch's only protector is her long-lost brother, Bek Ohmsford, who is determined to redeem his beloved sister . . . and to fulfill her destiny.

30 review for Morgawr

  1. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    4/10 A poor finish to a series I was never overly interested in. The premise of the first book sounded good to me; little did I know this was steeped in back story from the previous books in the series (of which I had read none). At times I felt lost and it almost felt like when you’re with a group of people and everyone is laughing at a joke and you missed the punch line. By the time I got to this book I was reading it more to complete the trilogy as supposed to wanting to. It didn’t take long i 4/10 A poor finish to a series I was never overly interested in. The premise of the first book sounded good to me; little did I know this was steeped in back story from the previous books in the series (of which I had read none). At times I felt lost and it almost felt like when you’re with a group of people and everyone is laughing at a joke and you missed the punch line. By the time I got to this book I was reading it more to complete the trilogy as supposed to wanting to. It didn’t take long into this one for skimming mode to be engaged. I won’t go into the plot, as I didn’t care for it that much by this point and I won’t go into the characters. Again, I didn’t care for them much either. This became very generic fantasy with no outstanding features or gimmicks. It is series’ like this which put me off fantasy books for a long time until recently where I realised there were plenty of other things to look at which could be entertaining and differ from the mould of young hero beating big bad with group of misfits. The Lies of Locke Lamora springs instantly to mind (one of my favourite reads of 2013 – although boiled down you could say the premise is similar). Whilst the style of writing wasn’t terrible I didn’t think it was anything special but I also put that down to my complete lack of enthusiasm in reading this. I would venture into Terry Brooks other series, Landover, as that premise sounds a little different and intriguing but it won’t be anytime soon. It would take a long time and a real lack of reading material for me to pick up any further in the Shannara series. If you liked this try: “Lies of Locke Lamora” by Scott Lynch for a real rip roaring adventure!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Markus

    Yes! When I wrote my review of Antrax, I was slightly disappointed, but eagerly anticipated an amazing conclusion to the Voyage of the Jerle Shannara trilogy. This is what I was waiting for. The two opening chapters put together make up the best introduction I have read from Terry Brooks so far, and if the first fifty pages were representative for the quality of the book, there could be no way to give this anything below five stars. Sadly, the next two hundred pages or so are more on the level of Yes! When I wrote my review of Antrax, I was slightly disappointed, but eagerly anticipated an amazing conclusion to the Voyage of the Jerle Shannara trilogy. This is what I was waiting for. The two opening chapters put together make up the best introduction I have read from Terry Brooks so far, and if the first fifty pages were representative for the quality of the book, there could be no way to give this anything below five stars. Sadly, the next two hundred pages or so are more on the level of Antrax, with lots of excitement and little of the classic Shannara brilliance; still good, but not great. But then it picks itself up once more, and the last part, with the final confrontation and the ending, is amazing. Ultimately, this book was quite close to deserving five stars from me, but simply not close enough. Four stars is the rating I will apply to both this book and the Voyage of the Jerle Shannara in its entirety. Though not Terry Brooks' absolute best, it's another great fantasy tale from the world of Shannara, and it does make me want to jump into the next trilogy immediately...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Martti

    So finally we get some proper fantasy from Terry Brooks. I was ready to throw Brooks into the recycle bin of fantasy, but this trilogy is definitely the best that Brooks has written. Also it's a proper trilogy, meaning that it's a consistent story simply split up into three books. You cannot read only one of the books and be satisfied, because you won't have the feeling of a completed book. And I don't know about you, but when I start something, I need to finish it - even if it's a zero-star exp So finally we get some proper fantasy from Terry Brooks. I was ready to throw Brooks into the recycle bin of fantasy, but this trilogy is definitely the best that Brooks has written. Also it's a proper trilogy, meaning that it's a consistent story simply split up into three books. You cannot read only one of the books and be satisfied, because you won't have the feeling of a completed book. And I don't know about you, but when I start something, I need to finish it - even if it's a zero-star experience and I will rip the book apart afterwards and set it aflame while hysterically laughing. The fantasy that I said we're gonna get in this one, is the fact that finally we have MAGIC that is actually being used to create some exiting grand changes in the world and by that I mean considerably less whining from the characters and flying fraking ships! Also we get more interesting character building, regrets and betreyal from this trilogy than all the other books put together from the beginning of Shannara. It almost seems that these books were written by someone else or Mr. Brooks went to a writing 101 class, finally.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jesse Whitehead

    There are, in my admittedly limited view of things, four kinds of Western fantasy (disregarding the urban fantasy genre that is so popular lately, I see that as just an extension of the faerie stories that every culture throughout history has created). The four kinds that I am talking about are all Tolkien derivative. None of them is like Tolkien's work but they draw inspiration from it. There are the fantasy histories like Kate Eliot and Steven Erikson. There are the fantasy journeys like David There are, in my admittedly limited view of things, four kinds of Western fantasy (disregarding the urban fantasy genre that is so popular lately, I see that as just an extension of the faerie stories that every culture throughout history has created). The four kinds that I am talking about are all Tolkien derivative. None of them is like Tolkien's work but they draw inspiration from it. There are the fantasy histories like Kate Eliot and Steven Erikson. There are the fantasy journeys like David Eddings, Tad Williams, and Robert Jordan. David Farland and Brandon Sanderson write fantasy that pays homage to Tolkien's work but don't fit an obvious mold. The fourth is what I call Tolkien fan fiction. These are the books by authors who lacked the ability to create their own worlds and stories so they borrowed them. Sometimes this works okay (Weis and Hickman) because of interesting characters. Sometimes it doesn't work at all (Paolini, Goodkind) because it is lifted whole from other works. Terry Brooks belongs to the fourth group, mostly. When I was younger I loved Terry Brooks. I read every one of his novels that I could get my hands on, as many as sixteen of his books. Something changed, either me or him, I don't know which, probably both. Perhaps I have read too many books by better authors. Maybe I've studied to much about writing. Whatever the reason I find it hard to get through any of Terry Brooks novels in a timely manner. Morgawr is the third book of a trilogy called The Voyage of the Jerle Shannara. The first too books I found horribly tedious and only finished them because I was assured that this third volume was significantly better. It was, but that isn't saying much. The story focuses on a group of characters who have survived a horrible attack by some kind of ancient computer that happens to use magic as its power source. Despite the improbability of it being able to do ... any of the things it does... it manages to kill off most of the side characters so that the third book can be more focused. The Ilse Witch, Grianne Ohmsford, has touched the Sword of Shannara which revealed to her the truth about her past. Unable to deal with the bad things she's done she goes semi comatose – she walks around when led but otherwise she is completely unresponsive. Because of her former nature everybody pretty much wants her dead, except her long lost brother Bek Ohmsford. Her old master, the Morgawr, is among those who wants to kill her, along with everybody else – because he's evil and his friends are lizards. People fall in love, friends die, shapeshifters never ever change shape and Grianne stares blankly in front of her, all with almost no emotional impact. None of the characters seem different at all. In fact they don't really feel like characters so much as puppets placed in situations so that things can happen to them. Terry Brooks has, apparently, never heard the old adage 'show, don't tell'. If you want us to believe that a characters is suffering from the effects of PTSD, don't tell us, show us. The story is so consumed with navel gazing and introspective passages explaining that this characters has this emotional turmoil – no really, he does – that the story itself probably takes up a third of the pages. The writing is also difficult to read because Terry Brooks is quite fond of the passive voice. Every sentence is written in passive voice. The effect of this is that everything feels like events happening to characters rather than characters participating in events. Terry Brooks has been writing in this world for over thirty years. I expected somebody with that much experience to think things out more clearly. His monsters are all huge and have lots of teeth and razor sharp claws. Or they are given ambiguous names that mean nothing. Magic has no description whatsoever. Magic users 'lash out' and 'strike' and 'trace down lines of power' without any indication what any of that means. Elves are just humans with pointed ears. They don't have any different culture, or different views. They don't live longer than humans or think differently, they only exist because Tolkien had elves in his books. (Never mind that Tolkiens elves are immortal and kind of creepy and alien and arrogant and different. Immortality changes ones views.) Dwarves are all grumpy and use axes in battle. Shapeshifters are prevalent but they never bother to change shape – maybe there were budget cuts in the special effects department. Anything that looks reptilian is evil, always. Grianne Ohmsford spends six months in a catatonic state and never in all that time has to be fed, given water, changed or bathed. She actually sits in a chair all that time and when she does finally wake up she gets up and goes out to do battle with no stiff muscles or signs of atrophy from six months sitting in a chair. Maybe it was the lack of food that kept her fit. Some characters survive simply because they happened to have hidden things previously that the reader was never told about (Redden Alt Mer just happened to have a single wing glider stowed on his old air ship) or just by plain design from the author (Quentin Leah 'swims' with the rock fall and comes out with only bumps and bruises, while a big animal falls on him later and nearly kills him – so that Grianne and Bek can be the heroes in the end – Quentin was obviously too capable). Terry Brooks still sells a lot of books so there must be something that somebody likes in his writing. A lot of somebodies, apparently. I, however, have given him an honest try. The last four of his books that I read I had to force myself to get through. I enjoy my Calculus books more than these. Whether I have changed as a reader or Terry Brooks has changed as a writer I just can't punish myself with this any longer. I am through with Terry Brooks. (1/10)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    A nice continuation. I still felt like a lot of the action was just movement for the sake of keeping the story going. That being said...again, it was fun action, so it isn't all bad. The ending was not quite what I was hoping for....I kind of wanted something a little more dramatic, especially after the build up of Grianne being mostly catatonic for most of the book. There were a few pieces where there weren't as much closure as you usually get from a Terry Brooks story. I'm wondering if that is A nice continuation. I still felt like a lot of the action was just movement for the sake of keeping the story going. That being said...again, it was fun action, so it isn't all bad. The ending was not quite what I was hoping for....I kind of wanted something a little more dramatic, especially after the build up of Grianne being mostly catatonic for most of the book. There were a few pieces where there weren't as much closure as you usually get from a Terry Brooks story. I'm wondering if that is because those are being set up for the next series. I will find out in a while. :) I think what kept this series in positive territory more than anything else was some great characters. Almost the entire set of characters (there were a lot) had me caring about them. It was very character-driven.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rick Piatt

    Oh my this book has it all happenin'! Action, suspense, an anticipated end but with twists and turns, great magic system, creepy foes, unexpected deaths of many - even some main characters, great -GREAT- character development. Did Terry Brooks really write this series? I enjoy the Shannara setting, it's a classic fantasy setting and I feel comfortable and at home when I'm there. This book (and this whole series) is ... Well if all the other Shannara books are a pan simmering on the stove top, th Oh my this book has it all happenin'! Action, suspense, an anticipated end but with twists and turns, great magic system, creepy foes, unexpected deaths of many - even some main characters, great -GREAT- character development. Did Terry Brooks really write this series? I enjoy the Shannara setting, it's a classic fantasy setting and I feel comfortable and at home when I'm there. This book (and this whole series) is ... Well if all the other Shannara books are a pan simmering on the stove top, this trilogy is a pan boiling out of control. This trilogy started off formulaic. Classic Shannara. Mysterious Druid recruits two young men (any guesses who they might be related to?) and heads out on a journey. Honestly I didn't expect much beyond what I'd read in the previous books in the Shannara world. That was ok because I felt like visiting Shannara anyway so this was going to be like going on vacation to a location I'd visited numerous times in the past - there probably wouldn't be anything shocking but it would just feel good and cozy. But somewhere along the line this hotel was upgraded ... The book kept getting better and better. When the second book came up I couldn't wait to continue the story and holy cow did it deliver. So I rushed forward to this final volume hoping Brooks would somehow pull it off. I had seen a number of 2-star reviews which had me concerned that the book would just fall flat ruining the entire trilogy. That most certainly did not happen. Morgawr was outstanding. Through the years in talking with friends who enjoy the Shannara books I've often, no scratch that, I've ALWAYS heard it said that Elfstones of Shannara is the best of the series. You won't hear me say that. This trilogy on whole outshines Elfstones and in particular Antrax and Morgawr scream "this is how a fantasy book should be". I'm rating Morgawr just a smidgen higher than Antrax because it wraps up much (not all) of the lose ends in a very satisfying way. There are no cliff hangers at the end but you will find yourself wanting more details about how certain characters resolve things ... A very sneaky way to drag me to Shannara yet again in The High Druid of Shannara trilogy that picks up the story about 20 years after the end of Morgawr. Yes Mr Brooks you've taken me on a VERY satisfying vacation here in Shannara and I thank you heatedly for that.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Squire

    Book #20/29 in my Epic Shannara Quest. Thrilling finale to The Voyage of the Jerle Shannara. It doesn't deviate from the Shannara formula (as the best Shannara books do), but it plays very well by it's own rules. There's another budding romance between an Ohmsford and a Rover girl, another Leah moves from a romantic adventurer to a sadder-but-wiser leader and several characters survive who probably shouldn't have. But Brooks gets high marks for making his later Shannara books darkly optimistic.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sallee

    This was the third book in The Voyage of the Jerle Shanara. After reading the second one of the series, Antrax, I wanted to read the whole series even if it meant starting in the middle and then the third ending up with the first book, Ilse Witch. In this last book there was plenty of action, lots of horrible happenings, lots of psyscological thinking, learning to trust others and fantastic escapes. This is what a fantasy should be. Can't wait to finish this series.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Carl Alves

    After having thoroughly enjoyed the first two novels in the Jerle Shannara series, my expectations were quite high for this novel. Perhaps it was those high expectations that I had that led to this novel being somewhat of a disappointment. There wasn’t any one specific thing that I can point to that led me to this conclusion, other than perhaps it just wasn’t as good as either of the first two novels. The biggest flaws that I can point to is that certain points of the novel (somewhere around the After having thoroughly enjoyed the first two novels in the Jerle Shannara series, my expectations were quite high for this novel. Perhaps it was those high expectations that I had that led to this novel being somewhat of a disappointment. There wasn’t any one specific thing that I can point to that led me to this conclusion, other than perhaps it just wasn’t as good as either of the first two novels. The biggest flaws that I can point to is that certain points of the novel (somewhere around the middle) felt very repetitive. Also, in general, I thought this novel was fairly predictable. Whereas, other big characters were fair game to get killed off in the previous novels, in this one, the author seemed very reticent to kill off any protagonist of any consequence. I don’t want to sound overly negative. At its heart, this was a fun epic fantasy adventure. Terry Brooks is a very accomplished and professional author and that was demonstrated here. I’m not even sure that my criticisms are fully warranted, but I came away just a bit like “Meh” from the Emoji Movie. In general, the last volume of a series has a tendency to disappoint, and although this was a solid effort and fairly enjoyable, it did not wow me. So, if you’ve read the previous two novels, you will certainly want to read this one as well, but it may not meet all of your expectations. Carl Alves – author of Two For Eternity

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rick

    Brooks' previous work, Antrax, was full of so much action and so many twists to the plot that this book seems rather weak by comparison. It is a good enough story, but it feels more like filler and where there is some action it is rather boring. Much of the book contains an inactive Isle Witch, heroes that are healing up after getting beat by the villain(s) and just the general angst of Brooks' protagonists. Anti-climatic.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dyane Forde

    Enjoyable read--a good ending to a great story, though I thought the actual ending was a little abrupt. Luckily, the preview of the next book took the edge off. I went out and got it. The one thing I didn't quite buy was the main romantic relationship in the story. It felt forced to me, but I eventually got over it and settled in for the ride. So glad I discovered Terry Brooks and his incredible world.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lucinda

    Intensely gripping, this spellbinding world promises just a taste of the wonders of Shannara. Terry Brooks has to be one of the leading writers for the fantasy genre, with his Shannara series being something truly outstanding, undeniably brilliant and totally original. The voyage of Jerle Shannara is the third book in the Morgawr trilogy (consisting of Ilse Witch as book one and Antrax as book two). This exquisite hardback edition displays one of the most eye-catching and imaginative covers, tha Intensely gripping, this spellbinding world promises just a taste of the wonders of Shannara. Terry Brooks has to be one of the leading writers for the fantasy genre, with his Shannara series being something truly outstanding, undeniably brilliant and totally original. The voyage of Jerle Shannara is the third book in the Morgawr trilogy (consisting of Ilse Witch as book one and Antrax as book two). This exquisite hardback edition displays one of the most eye-catching and imaginative covers, that stands out on the bookshelf as a treasured volume. For fans of Terry Brooks and for those readers who enjoy fantasy at its very best, then I cannot enthuse enough about an exceptional writer who deserves as much accolade as JRR Tolkien or Robin Hobb with his works sitting alongside other greats on the shelf. Continuing the quest in Morgawr this epic saga comes to its long awaited and dramatic conclusion, as forces of good and evil collide for that ultimate victory over all. Harrowing confrontations between a merciless Ilse witch and the menacing Antrax persist, whilst the fate of an ancient magic race hangs in the balance. But a darker and more deadly foe begins to come out of the shadows and into the light, which is all powerful and fearless. Morgawr the master of the Ilse witch and ancient sorcerer of centuries old feeds upon the tainted souls of his enemies to gain power and dominance over all. With a ship and crew of walking dead, Morgawr sets sail in pursuit of the Jerle Shannara. His goal is to not only destroy the Ilse witch, who betrayed him, but also to find and control the fabled ancient books of magic. Confronting the harsh truth whilst exposed to the power emanating from the Sword of Shannara, she flees into her own mind seeking out those who might be able to save her. The destiny predicted for her by the Druid Walker Boh rests on a knife edge as too does the future for all, both good and evil. Memorable, distinctive characters weave together this complex and captivating adventure of a lifetime that is a story of heroism and great sacrifice, love and honor. Fans of the Shannara mythos will be entranced once more, satisfied by this explosive finale and the promise of new wonders yet to come. The last stand between good and evil has to be as exciting as the great battle of Pelennor Fields in JRR Tolkien’s masterpiece The Lord of The Rings, where the great saga that has captivated readers for so long finally comes to such an end as to be remembered for all time to come. Terry Brooks is not only one of my favorite author who never disappoints but whose highly acclaimed series reflects such dedication, time and effort and imagination as to make it so believable and real. Shannara is a place where dreams become reality, where magical beings come to life and where your mind is taken on such a rollercoaster ride that will delight, astonish and amaze.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Aidan Roraback

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. First off, this book is the last book in the Voyage of the Jerle Shannara trilogy. It is a fantasy adventure novel for readers who enjoy magic and monsters, and lots of plot twists. This book finishes off Antrax as a whole, and introduces the Morgawr into the voyage as he tries to destroy the remaining members of the company. Bek runs from danger with Truls Rohk and his sister who is suffering from severe shock of what the Sword has revealed and the possibility of what it would mean, while Red A First off, this book is the last book in the Voyage of the Jerle Shannara trilogy. It is a fantasy adventure novel for readers who enjoy magic and monsters, and lots of plot twists. This book finishes off Antrax as a whole, and introduces the Morgawr into the voyage as he tries to destroy the remaining members of the company. Bek runs from danger with Truls Rohk and his sister who is suffering from severe shock of what the Sword has revealed and the possibility of what it would mean, while Red Alt Mer struggles to keep the expedition together. Ryer faces her destiny while Ahren and Quentin try to become whole again. (Spoiler Alert) This book is a good conclusion to this trilogy and will satisfy the reader with it's deep character arcs. What I liked about this book was how the writer wrote the thoughts of the characters so well that I could follow every decision they made like I was the one making it. The villain of Morgawr, Morgawr, was an excellently written antagonist because he was just pure evil, which gave the reader something to immediately dislike about him. This helped build a lot of tension towards the climax to make it even better. I liked this book very much, and even more than the last one. I also loved Alt Red Mer character because he was very interesting in the fact that he lost his fearlessness at one point, but his luck saved him at the end. (Spoiler Alert) What I didn't like about this novel was the romance between Bek and Rue, because it was too awkward for me, and it felt very unnatural for Rue's character as an untrusting, headstrong person to break down multiple times and "to kiss Bek hard on the lips" multiple times throughout the end of the story. Additionally, I feel like when Grianne finally came back at the end, she overdid her internal conflict with her past of the Ilse Witch and it kind of felt like she was just taking up pages with her dialogue about redeeming herself. The last thing I disliked was that the Morgawr was a little too weak at the end. Overall this is a very good finale to the Voyage of the Jerle Shannara and opens new doors for the next book, Jarka Russ, The High Druid of Shannara.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    So here we are! The conclusion to the most riveting trilogy of all time! I highly recommend you read my reviews on the previous two books in this series before continuing. This is somewhat of a trilogy in-and-of-itself after all. As the trilogy progressed, we learn that a number of our primary heroes (i.e. all of them) possess some form of magic, which under normal circumstances, would establish any one of them as the resident B.A. with virtually untouchable awesomeness. So logically, when they So here we are! The conclusion to the most riveting trilogy of all time! I highly recommend you read my reviews on the previous two books in this series before continuing. This is somewhat of a trilogy in-and-of-itself after all. As the trilogy progressed, we learn that a number of our primary heroes (i.e. all of them) possess some form of magic, which under normal circumstances, would establish any one of them as the resident B.A. with virtually untouchable awesomeness. So logically, when they combined their nigh-unto-invincible powers together as a team, they generally spent their time running and hiding from lizard-men or spindly robots. To the book's credit, however, it never lacked for action and firepower. My theory, is that Brooks must have started to run out of ideas for one-upping himself, so therefore, he brought back the Sword, AND the Elfstones, AND the Wishsong (x2), AND good ol' Druid Fire, and THEN added characters who could see into the future, defy all logic through unfailing luck, and eat people's souls by touching their heads, and THEN add dozens of Jachyra (the most feared creature in all of Shannara-dom), human cyborgs with impenetrable force-shields, AND... a really mean computer! Given the entire known (and unknown) universe of magic (and science), Brooks was free to paint virtually anything imaginable (or unimaginable) onto his canvas. A friend introduced me to the principle of "Deus ex Machina" while reading this series, which I was then able to identify again, and again, and again... To conclude my thoughts on the full trilogy, I struggled with the world without borders concept, the bizarre marriage of magic and science, the adherence to a largely one-dimensional cast-of-characters with a lack of any real character development, and the inconsistencies of the heroes’ presumed abilities. However, the trilogy delivered exactly what I was looking for – a quick read and some therapeutic release to the endless hours at the office. I got what I expected; therefore, 3 stars. And now, it’s back to the classics!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan D

    In this third part of the Jerle Shannara Trilogy, Terry Brooks does a fantastic job tying up all loose ends. He effectively brings in the series' third and final antagonist(Morgawr) and makes the narrative follow familiar tropes without resorting to cliche's. I mentioned in my review of "Antrax" that the theme of Redemption was very prevalent. It is also very evident here. Brooks finishes the plot of Grianne(Isle Witch) and ties it up in a way I was predicting but not expecting. I think that this In this third part of the Jerle Shannara Trilogy, Terry Brooks does a fantastic job tying up all loose ends. He effectively brings in the series' third and final antagonist(Morgawr) and makes the narrative follow familiar tropes without resorting to cliche's. I mentioned in my review of "Antrax" that the theme of Redemption was very prevalent. It is also very evident here. Brooks finishes the plot of Grianne(Isle Witch) and ties it up in a way I was predicting but not expecting. I think that this book is my second favorite example of redemption in storytelling(the first being the redemption of Seven of Nine in Voyager). Bek Ohmsford and Rue Meridian were cute(yes, I said cute) and were fun to read about. It's kind of weird since he's described as a boy/man/becoming a man and she's always considered a woman. I assume that she's like 26 or 27 based off the evidence and he's like 18 or 19, which is slightly weird but I can get past it. I like how Terry Brooks very carefully writes in a way that he never explicitly says if characters are carrying on an immoral relationship. My interpretation is that they aren't, but someone else could make the opposite argument, and I like it when there's a possiblilty for abstinence(as opposed to GOT). I totally called how their arc ended though. One major critism about the book is the villian. Morgawr is horrifyingly creepy, to the point that I almost skipped the scenes with him because of how pure evil he was. He was more evil than the Warlock Lord from "Sword of Shannara" and the Warlock Lord was supposed to be a metaphor for Satan/The Devil. Because of the Morgawr, the book seemed at times more like a horror novel than fantasy(which I don't like). I'm hoping that Brooks' other/future books in the series steer clear of horror. It's funny, this book had one of my favorite moments in the series(Grianne's redemption) and one of my least favorite moments of the series(Ryer Ord Star's fate). Because of this, I don't really know whre it fits. To grade the trilogy, it is definitely the most cohesive story arc of any trilogy/tetrology that Brook's has written up to this point. However, the trilogy had my least favorite villians and this will probably be one I don't pick up again unless reviewing for "The Knights Roundtable" or a Shannara re-read in 5 or 10 years. Therefore, I grade "Morgawr" with an 8.1. For the trilogy, it got a 8.1, an 8.7, and an 8.1, for an overall 8.3!

  16. 5 out of 5

    C.J. Edmunds

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Finally finished this trilogy that has long been on my shelves. Rounding out the Voyage of the Jerle Shannara is this third book that picks up the events of Antrax. I must say that the previous book in trilogy for me was a much faster read and my expectations for this one were rather high. But Terry has always had a strong sense of who his characters were and wanting to know what happens to them, who survives the Quest, who does not and who turns out to be changed after the events, were the reaso Finally finished this trilogy that has long been on my shelves. Rounding out the Voyage of the Jerle Shannara is this third book that picks up the events of Antrax. I must say that the previous book in trilogy for me was a much faster read and my expectations for this one were rather high. But Terry has always had a strong sense of who his characters were and wanting to know what happens to them, who survives the Quest, who does not and who turns out to be changed after the events, were the reasons why I also tore through this one in about 20 days. Morgawr is actually the mentor of the Isle Witch who has tried to stop the druid, Walker Boh, and his band of heroes from taking the quest from Aborlorn to recovering the fabled Books of Magic in Castledown where Antrax lives. But at the end of that novel, she has found out that her mentor, abducted her when she was a child, made her believe that her family was dead and killed by the Druid. She has carried out her plans, manipulated people and killed in order to get her revenge on Walker. But he tricked her into holding the Sword of Shannara and thus shown the truth about who she is. That she is actually, Grianne Ohmsford, sister to Bek Ohmsford, who is also a wielder of the power of the Wishsong; an ability to create change and effect it by the power of their voice, just by singing about it. Since that revelation and mostly throughout the novel, Grianne, was in a catatonic state and thus proved to be useless to everyone up until the very last minute. But if you have read Antrax, I do suggest finishing this one and decide for yourself if Grianne's road to redemption is one that will surely interest you. It sure does for me. That's why the next book, Jakra Ruus, is already in my hands as I type this!

  17. 5 out of 5

    April

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Join the remaining crew of the Jerle Shannara as they embark on their final adventure and struggle to get home. They have faced many dangers and most of their crew and friends have perished only 13 remain to make the long voyage back home. They face new trials and struggles, along with uncertainty in Brook's final volume of the Voyage of the Jerle Shannara. This book is action packed and full of new and exciting adventures, I could hardly put it down. The crew have many questions: Will they make Join the remaining crew of the Jerle Shannara as they embark on their final adventure and struggle to get home. They have faced many dangers and most of their crew and friends have perished only 13 remain to make the long voyage back home. They face new trials and struggles, along with uncertainty in Brook's final volume of the Voyage of the Jerle Shannara. This book is action packed and full of new and exciting adventures, I could hardly put it down. The crew have many questions: Will they make it home? Who can they trust? and most importantly Who will survive the harrowing journey back to the Four Lands and home? Bek must try and regain the trust of his new found friends when he returns with their enemy the Ilse Witch. But his is not the only challenge to be faced Quinten is injured and almost certainly will die unless something or someone intervenes. And the Elven Prince is shattered by the loss of the seer Ryer. Not only do each of the members of the voyage face thier own fears and struggles a new enemy is introduced, the Isle Witch's mentor the feared Morgawr, he seems even more powerful than the Witch. How will they ever survive? Can they trust Grianne or is she still the Witch? Trust is tested and life is risked in this final Voyage of the Jerle Shannara.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Maria Rose

    This is the last of this trilogy in the ongoing battle of good against evil. Walker has died but not before he gives instructions to both Bek and Grianne and Ryer Ord Star which will help them succeed in future days ahead. Panax the dwarf decides to stay at this land with the people he found to live out the rest of his life. Bek has found his sister Grianne who had been the Ilsa Witch but changed once she faced her truth given her by the Sword of Shannara and the consequences of her former action This is the last of this trilogy in the ongoing battle of good against evil. Walker has died but not before he gives instructions to both Bek and Grianne and Ryer Ord Star which will help them succeed in future days ahead. Panax the dwarf decides to stay at this land with the people he found to live out the rest of his life. Bek has found his sister Grianne who had been the Ilsa Witch but changed once she faced her truth given her by the Sword of Shannara and the consequences of her former actions. Ahren has the Elfstones in his possession and he is the last remaining Elf. Quentin Leah is wounded but healing and has his sword. Of the Rovers, about 4 remain and their damaged ship which needs repairs. They also have to deal with Morgawr who has followed them to this land with multiple ships. They decide to face him on the island of Mephitic where they hid the ship in the ruins until they could fix the broken masts. Grianne and Bek using their powers of the wishsong together unit with the spirit of the ruins to defeat Morgawr. Once back at home, Bek and Rue go off together, while Grianne faces the shade of Walker to start her path to becoming the new Druid.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Neville Ridley-smith

    Hmmmmm. Here's the thing: Brooks can write well. The first two chapters are great. Drama and visceral excitement. And the last 50 pages are great too - some good action and fun stuff. But boy, the middle part. It kind of dragged. Various things happened that plot-wise are good and fine. But the execution just isn't that exciting. Mostly it's the internal dialogues everyone is always having. The worst offenders are when we, the reader, know what's happening or what character X's intentions are and then Hmmmmm. Here's the thing: Brooks can write well. The first two chapters are great. Drama and visceral excitement. And the last 50 pages are great too - some good action and fun stuff. But boy, the middle part. It kind of dragged. Various things happened that plot-wise are good and fine. But the execution just isn't that exciting. Mostly it's the internal dialogues everyone is always having. The worst offenders are when we, the reader, know what's happening or what character X's intentions are and then we have to hear how character Y is wondering about those same things and unsure of X's intentions. It does *not* make you sit on the edge of your seat. And that kind of stuff can go for pages. On the whole it was ok but if I ever re-read all the Shannara books, I think I'll skip this trilogy...

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jesse Beringer

    An excellent work of fiction. The characters are well thought out and this is a solid ending to the series. It was a little slow to start but the plot built nicely as the book continued. I would highly recommend this series if you are a fan of fantasy. The Voyage of the Jerle Shannara series are my favorite books I have read by Terry Brooks, which is saying a lot because he does a great job providing great stories that don't feel forced or recycled even though he has written so many books in the An excellent work of fiction. The characters are well thought out and this is a solid ending to the series. It was a little slow to start but the plot built nicely as the book continued. I would highly recommend this series if you are a fan of fantasy. The Voyage of the Jerle Shannara series are my favorite books I have read by Terry Brooks, which is saying a lot because he does a great job providing great stories that don't feel forced or recycled even though he has written so many books in the world of Shannara.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    This one was a fast read for me, which is unusual since this series is as slow as a snail. I was really captivated with the story between the Isle Witch and the Morgawr. I am intrigued to read what happens next for the Isle Witch. I don't get invested in many of the characters in this series, mainly because when I do they die. That seemed to be the case in this book to. However, this book was really good. I wanted to give it a higher rating but I had some issues with it I couldn't let go.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ian yarington

    As always I was pleasantly surprised with the character development and the way that Brooks ended the trilogy. I've come to expect certain things from the Omsford line but Brooks seems to find ways to make them similar but still original and refreshing. They all have their own personalities but they're all so alike, I think this is a trait of a good writer. I'm already onto the next series as I write this!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rose Boyer

    This was a nice little trilogy. Since it had been ten years since I read these books, there was lots of little surprises. Sometimes I would get a little frustrated with contradictions but the story idea itself was fun. I'm glad I read them all in the same couple of weeks. Really held me to where I wanted to go back to reading in all my spare moments.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ben Stivers

    Another good fantasy take from Terry Brooks! I thought this book was better than Antrax, but it also had the same flaw...and ongoing diatribe in characters heads about how inferior they were. I’ve and over again. The action is super at the beginning and the end! In the middle is the middle.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dean Stuart

    Amazing ending Loved this final book of the trilogy, must of read it over a few days and throughly enjoyed it. Love the depth and development of the characters over the three books. Looking forward to the next good read by Terry Brooks.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    Interesting ending to a good trilogy. Check out my book blog if you want to know more about how I feel and what I thought about the book, check out my book blog. www.literarychallenge.weebly.com

  27. 4 out of 5

    Just Bill

    The Voyage of the Jerle Shannara series has been my favorite of the Shannara books so far.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    A great ending to a 3 book adventure.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dejanira Dawn

    I honestly just love all of these books.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Irene

    Brilliant story... when is the next one?!?

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