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Ilse Witch PDF, ePub eBook

4.6 out of 5
30 review

Ilse Witch

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Ilse Witch PDF, ePub eBook When a half-drowned elf is found floating in the seas of the Blue Divide, an old mystery resurfaces. Thirty years ago, an elven prince led an expedition in search of a legendary magic said to be more powerful than any in the world. Of all those who set out on that ill-fated voyage, not one has ever returned. Until now. The rescued elf carries a map covered with mysterious When a half-drowned elf is found floating in the seas of the Blue Divide, an old mystery resurfaces. Thirty years ago, an elven prince led an expedition in search of a legendary magic said to be more powerful than any in the world. Of all those who set out on that ill-fated voyage, not one has ever returned. Until now. The rescued elf carries a map covered with mysterious symbols–and Walker Boh, the last of the Druids, has the skill to decipher them. But someone else understands the map’s significance: the Ilse Witch, a ruthless young woman who wields a magic as potent as his own. She will stop at nothing to possess the map–and the magic it leads to. Thus begins the first volume of a dazzling new adventure in one of the most popular fantasy series of our time

30 review for Ilse Witch

  1. 4 out of 5

    Markus

    "Listen to me. Listen to what I have seen in my dreams. You will make your voyage across the Blue Divide in search of something precious - more to you than to any who go with you. Those who accompany you will be both brave and strong of heart, but only some will return. One will save your life. One will try to take it. One will love you unconditionally. One will hate you with unmatched passion. One will lead you astray. One will bring you back again. I have seen all this in my dreams, and I am m "Listen to me. Listen to what I have seen in my dreams. You will make your voyage across the Blue Divide in search of something precious - more to you than to any who go with you. Those who accompany you will be both brave and strong of heart, but only some will return. One will save your life. One will try to take it. One will love you unconditionally. One will hate you with unmatched passion. One will lead you astray. One will bring you back again. I have seen all this in my dreams, and I am meant to see more." Ilse Witch is the first book in the Voyage of the Jerle Shannara trilogy, which might well prove to be the best Shannara sub-series since the original trilogy. Grumpy old Walker Boh has turned into a Druid of the kind he has always feared, and has become a true successor of Bremen and Allanon. This novel takes him on an epic journey across the sea to find a legendary magic long for millennia. Along comes the most interesting group of character Terry Brooks has ever imagined. The mandatory ones are all here, of course; a couple of legendary swords are included, and someone has to wield them after all, and there's also an Elven prince, as always. But then the awesome people are following one by one: a silver-haired girl who sees the future in her dreams and speaks of it in riddles, a band of Rovers crewing the fastest airship ever to fly, a lonesome shapeshifter who is half human and half Faerie creature, and on top of them all, possibly my new favourite character in the Shannara series - the Ilse Witch herself, the mysterious sorceress shadowing the company. All in all, it's good. Well, it's great actually, but I felt it lacked the little extra that made the originals so incomprehensibly awesome. The writing is good enough, but not poetic, and the development of the story is a little bit weaker than what Brooks can do at his very best. But the concept of Voyage is both intriguing and refreshing, and the trilogy in its entirety seems really promising. At least it's off to a good start for me.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carl Alves

    Some might say that Terry Brooks’s work is formulaic, and they might be right. His series usually go something like this: There is a treasure/magic/evil thing that must be stopped. A druid holds special knowledge on how to do this. He gathers a group of people to carry out this mission. This group must include elves, a member of the Leah family, a dwarf, some humans, and an Ohmsford or two. Use of magic is dangerous and takes a toll on the user. There is a powerful and evil person who is trying Some might say that Terry Brooks’s work is formulaic, and they might be right. His series usually go something like this: There is a treasure/magic/evil thing that must be stopped. A druid holds special knowledge on how to do this. He gathers a group of people to carry out this mission. This group must include elves, a member of the Leah family, a dwarf, some humans, and an Ohmsford or two. Use of magic is dangerous and takes a toll on the user. There is a powerful and evil person who is trying to stop them. This novel has all of those things I mentioned with a new wrinkle. In the future, men have developed the use of airships—not quite steampunk but close enough. Despite this formula, and the fact that I was able to figure out the big reveal at the end of the book very, very, very early on, his novels are like wearing a pair of comfortable shoes. You know you’re going to enjoy the journey, so sit back and relax. I have to say that I really enjoyed this novel. The airships were certainly different, but mostly it’s because Terry Brooks is a master of the epic quest. His characters are compelling and he puts them in very difficult situations, which tests their abilities, fortitude, and ingenuity. Yes, there is a certain level of predictability, but I didn’t mind it a bit, and there is a good level of mystery in this series involving a powerful ancient entity which is guarding some powerful old magic—or is it technology from our modern world? I’ll have to continue reading the rest of the series to find out, and that’s certainly not a bad thing. Carl Alves – author of Two For Eternity

  3. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    6/10 I've had this on my shelf for a while now so in a conscious effort to try and clear the old books to replace with new ones I thought I would tackle this trilogy which had gathered large amounts of dust. The synopsis on the back of the book was appealing, a half drowned elf is found with his tongue chopped off and his eyes pierced but he holds a mysterious map to mysterious lands which hold magic of which the "world" has not seen before. Then add in the fact that to get to this land with mega- 6/10 I've had this on my shelf for a while now so in a conscious effort to try and clear the old books to replace with new ones I thought I would tackle this trilogy which had gathered large amounts of dust. The synopsis on the back of the book was appealing, a half drowned elf is found with his tongue chopped off and his eyes pierced but he holds a mysterious map to mysterious lands which hold magic of which the "world" has not seen before. Then add in the fact that to get to this land with mega-magic you had to get three "keys" from three islands on the way meant this had a fair amount of ingredients to make an enjoyable tale. There were some problems though. The book was overlong by about 100 pages. The fact that the crew going on this journey was 30+ meant you didn't really get enough time to bond with any character or care enough for them. The ones not given a name were similar to a Bond villains henchman; destined for the mouths of ill tempered mutated sea bass. This was tackled a bit in the later half of the book when Bek and Walker seemed to be the main characters and there was just enough mystery into both of their backgrounds to keep things moving along. Add to this the mystery of how a blind, crippled elf could travel about 2 months worth of travelling without the aid of an airship such as the crew used meant there was a slight draw into how that had come about too. My main gripe though was how the trips to the three islands to gain the three keys were about 10 pages long. I thought/hoped this was going to be longer and more fleshed out with a chance for key characters to shine through and some exciting scenes. Alas, it wasn't a great read with a lot of history of the lands (which I didn't care for) and a slow start and a very abrupt end. But I have the other two gathering dust so I will finish this trilogy before it goes to "book heaven/the charity shop". If you like this read: "Talon of the Silver Hawk" by Raymond E. Feist

  4. 5 out of 5

    Cody

    This is a good fantasy book, it is very fun to read and has good imagery. If you enjoy fantasy then you'll most likely like this book. It is fairly easy to read but to not easy for advanced readers.I recommend reading any of Terry brooks' books. They are all very interesting and all throughout will keep you glued to the pages. In my opinion it is much better then a lot of fantasy books and if you're looking for a good series to read then this is a book for you. This is the first book of the Voya This is a good fantasy book, it is very fun to read and has good imagery. If you enjoy fantasy then you'll most likely like this book. It is fairly easy to read but to not easy for advanced readers.I recommend reading any of Terry brooks' books. They are all very interesting and all throughout will keep you glued to the pages. In my opinion it is much better then a lot of fantasy books and if you're looking for a good series to read then this is a book for you. This is the first book of the Voyage series and when you read this one, you wont want to stop until you've read the rest. I love fantasy, and I've read quite a few fantasy books, and this is one of my very favorite series to read. I recommend this book to not only fantasy fans but to anyone. It's really a great book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Squire

    #18/29 in my Epic Shannara Quest. There had to come a time when Brooks' reliance on his formula of a druid seeking out an Ohmsford and manipulating him into undertaking a quest to save the Four Lands would catch up with him and it has in this book. In what is probably the best of the Shannara books (remembering that none of the pre-Shannara books had been published by that point), The Druid of Shannara, Walker Boh emphatically stated that the new druidic order he established would not be based on #18/29 in my Epic Shannara Quest. There had to come a time when Brooks' reliance on his formula of a druid seeking out an Ohmsford and manipulating him into undertaking a quest to save the Four Lands would catch up with him and it has in this book. In what is probably the best of the Shannara books (remembering that none of the pre-Shannara books had been published by that point), The Druid of Shannara, Walker Boh emphatically stated that the new druidic order he established would not be based on secrets and manipulation. Now he is simply known as Walker and he finds that the ways of the old druids were necessary then and they still are. So for 85% for Ilse Witch, Walker gathers his band of adventurers, doesn't tell them everything they probably ought to know, takes them through a myriad of perils, until finally he is forced to reveal secrets that the reader has already guessed. At that point, the story roars to life and continues breathlessly to its cliffhanger conclusion. But the until then, Ilse Witch is a real slog, mostly because we've seen (read) this before and Brooks just seems to be relating these events (in a hurried fashion) to get, hpefully, to a much better story. But 375 pages of lazy backstory is simply too much. At first it was intriguing that Walker would seek out a Leah rather than an Ohmsford--an exciting new direction for this chronicle of the first of the new druids, until it became obvious an Ohmsford was hiding in plain sight. If Brooks would time his reveals to coincide with when his reader is ready for them (which is a difficult task, granted) this book would be much more successful.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    I was ready for some light reading after dredging through David Copperfield for the better part of November and December, and thought, "why not read some more of those Shannara books I used to read back in Jr. High?" So I did. The result? Lukewarm at best. While I certainly purchased "Isle Witch" as part of a trilogy, I still expected it to be largely a stand-alone novel. So it wasn't until after nearly 300 pages of the druid gathering the group together for an epic quest in search of some all-p I was ready for some light reading after dredging through David Copperfield for the better part of November and December, and thought, "why not read some more of those Shannara books I used to read back in Jr. High?" So I did. The result? Lukewarm at best. While I certainly purchased "Isle Witch" as part of a trilogy, I still expected it to be largely a stand-alone novel. So it wasn't until after nearly 300 pages of the druid gathering the group together for an epic quest in search of some all-powerful old world magic, an additional 800 pages crossing the ocean with many-an-adventure along the way, and another 2 billion pages explaining the secretive nature of the druid, that I realized this book didn't have a prayer of reaching any form of satisfactory resolution before I closed the back cover. My apathetic disappointment was rivaled only by my moderate interest in the climactic discovery that the primary antagonist in this world-o'-fantasy was none other than... (drum roll)...(oh, and spoiler alert for the other 6 people out there who may consider reading this)... a computer! Wow. Really? So, I did the only logical thing, and I started reading book 2.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sallee

    The first in a trilogy this book is an introduction to a fantastical story. When an elf is found floating on flotsam in the sea with a map with mysterious symbols, a thirty year mystery is brought to light. The elven king's brother has gone on a expedition in search of ancient magic but never returned. Walker Boh, the last remaining druid persuades the current elven king to finance a new expedition. The people he has chosen to go with him have special skills of their own. The Ilse Witch also wan The first in a trilogy this book is an introduction to a fantastical story. When an elf is found floating on flotsam in the sea with a map with mysterious symbols, a thirty year mystery is brought to light. The elven king's brother has gone on a expedition in search of ancient magic but never returned. Walker Boh, the last remaining druid persuades the current elven king to finance a new expedition. The people he has chosen to go with him have special skills of their own. The Ilse Witch also wants that magic and so begins a tale of evil versus good.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rick

    The Voyage of the Jerle Shannara - Isle Witch is unlike other books by Brooks in that it opens introducing an element of the steampunk genre and this Brooks does very well. However, the book then becomes rather dull, even with the various quests there is really no serious danger or action involved and I was left feeling like I was just reading filler. However, the last 100 pages come with some plot twists and a moment that even feels a bit like you're reading Sherlock Holmes. I also appreciated The Voyage of the Jerle Shannara - Isle Witch is unlike other books by Brooks in that it opens introducing an element of the steampunk genre and this Brooks does very well. However, the book then becomes rather dull, even with the various quests there is really no serious danger or action involved and I was left feeling like I was just reading filler. However, the last 100 pages come with some plot twists and a moment that even feels a bit like you're reading Sherlock Holmes. I also appreciated a great cliff-hanger ending. Like I said, it was the middle portion of this book (at least 200 pages) that just didn't do anything important to the story line. In the end I didn't love it, but I guess I liked it well enough.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Drew Warner

    Where to start? Expecting the first book of a trilogy to be anything other than lead up was my own fault I suppose. Isle Witch starts with an interesting discovery, propels to a great adventure, and then stalls after about one hundred pages. Brooks tries to jump start the novel at a few dramatic/action-packed points which really aren't action packed or dramatic feeling at all. It's hard to believe that anything of great importance will happen to any of the important characters in the first book s Where to start? Expecting the first book of a trilogy to be anything other than lead up was my own fault I suppose. Isle Witch starts with an interesting discovery, propels to a great adventure, and then stalls after about one hundred pages. Brooks tries to jump start the novel at a few dramatic/action-packed points which really aren't action packed or dramatic feeling at all. It's hard to believe that anything of great importance will happen to any of the important characters in the first book so a lot of the "intense action" ends up feeling more like "intense filler". That is not to say that important things do not happen/are not revealed, because they do and are, but it just doesn't bear the worry that I felt while reading the stand alone novels in the Shannara series. Brooks is a fantastic novelist, not strong in the trilogy department. The main characters are good, but also a little weak at times. The Rovers make a strong appearance in this novel, and I have the same problem I have always had with them: they are just so cheesy. I don't want to insult Brooks--as I'm sure he will read this review--because I truly am a fan, but even he must know that swashbuckling pirate-gypsies are rather lame. The science fiction elements of this story are great and incredibly well thought out/detailed. My biggest problem with the novel is the writing. I don't know why, but it just doesn't seem like Terry Brooks to me. It feels--and I cringe when I even think it--that someone else wrote this for him. I know, I know, it hurts me to say too, but the writing just isn't up to his usual level. The word choice is weak, and at some points simply bad. The descriptions lack his usual luster, and the characters--while mostly good--don't have their usual edge. Why you should pick it up: You're a Terry Brooks fan and have a slight masochist streak, you're ready for a trilogy, the storyline is quite enjoyable. Why you should leave it: Terry Brooks wrote a trilogy (bad idea), the writing is not up to his usual strength, the characters aren't his best, the story really goes nowhere until book two.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dark-Draco

    Brooks is such a good author and no matter how many times I read his books, I always enjoy them. This series takes place a hundred or so years after the last. A man is found floating near the shore, his tongue and eyes cut out. He carries a map and the ring of the ruling family of the Elves. Walker Boh, only Druid of the four lands, is asked to translate the map and finds that it points to the location of a powerful magic, far across the sea. So he sets about gathering a group to go find it, all Brooks is such a good author and no matter how many times I read his books, I always enjoy them. This series takes place a hundred or so years after the last. A man is found floating near the shore, his tongue and eyes cut out. He carries a map and the ring of the ruling family of the Elves. Walker Boh, only Druid of the four lands, is asked to translate the map and finds that it points to the location of a powerful magic, far across the sea. So he sets about gathering a group to go find it, all to fly in the airship, Jerle Shannara. The band is an unlikely one - a Rover Captain and his sister to navigate, the gruff builder of the ship, a dwarf, a seer, the younger brother to the new King of the Elves and a strange, half human shapeshifter. And two cousins, Quentin Leah and Bek Rowe. Quentin has his magic sword, but Bek really doesn't know why he has been asked along. But Walker is keeping secrets and they are followed by someone who hates him more than anything, the Ilse Witch, young and beautiful and powerful. And as the secrets are revealed, it is up to Bek to stand against her. Just fantastic. I love the idea of the airship and the giant rocs that accompany them. A great start to the new trilogy. Wonder what will happen next?

  11. 5 out of 5

    Woodge

    Since it's been 24 years since I last read a fantasy from this popular author, I thought I'd give him another go. This is the first book of a trilogy which finds a motley crew of adventures on a mission to find out what happened to an earlier mission and to recover some artifacts and hopefully get their greedy little hands on some new magic. There are elves, a druid, a seer, "Rovers" (like a gypsy), and all sorts of magic aboard the airship Jerle Shannara. It's an easy read but moves at a glacia Since it's been 24 years since I last read a fantasy from this popular author, I thought I'd give him another go. This is the first book of a trilogy which finds a motley crew of adventures on a mission to find out what happened to an earlier mission and to recover some artifacts and hopefully get their greedy little hands on some new magic. There are elves, a druid, a seer, "Rovers" (like a gypsy), and all sorts of magic aboard the airship Jerle Shannara. It's an easy read but moves at a glacial pace. For such a popular author, you'd expect a more crackling story. But it seems to rely heavily on -- hey, what's the plural of deus ex machina? machinas? -- it uses magic too often to get characters in and out of trouble. That whole element should be toned down. Regardless, I'm enjoying the character of Truls Rohk, a somewhat minor character but more inventive than the others. The leader of the mission, Walker Boh, the druid, is a bit of a cipher. I'm hoping the second book gets more interesting.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Joe Talbot

    For those who love Terry Brooks this book does not dissapoint. The entire series takes the reader on a journey to the far reaches of the fourlands and beyond, and displays some of the most provocative writing in this series to date. The basic elements of a good Shannara tale abound, but the twists its twists and turns definately keep the reader from dozing off into rehersed repetition. It is a wonderful storyline, and it brings to light some of the practical dilemmas of a character whose persona For those who love Terry Brooks this book does not dissapoint. The entire series takes the reader on a journey to the far reaches of the fourlands and beyond, and displays some of the most provocative writing in this series to date. The basic elements of a good Shannara tale abound, but the twists its twists and turns definately keep the reader from dozing off into rehersed repetition. It is a wonderful storyline, and it brings to light some of the practical dilemmas of a character whose persona switches from dark to light. I especially enjoyed the ending, which I will not spoil, as it brought to my mind that while sacrifice my seem painful to some, and certainly is painful to others, to many it can be a welcome release. No true fan of Terry Brooks can let this series go without missing out on something special.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bill Adams

    A re-read (maybe the fifth or sixth) of Ilse Witch, book one of the Voyage of the Jerle Shannara by Terry Brooks Brief Summary: As a Wing Rider is doing his daily flights over the Blue Divide, he spots a castaway. Turns out, the castaway was an Elf prince who set out 30 years prior to discover a forgotten magic across the ocean. Blind and mute, the castaway carries a map. When the Druid Walker deciphers the map, he brings together a ragtag team of warriors, magic-users and a young boy with a myste A re-read (maybe the fifth or sixth) of Ilse Witch, book one of the Voyage of the Jerle Shannara by Terry Brooks Brief Summary: As a Wing Rider is doing his daily flights over the Blue Divide, he spots a castaway. Turns out, the castaway was an Elf prince who set out 30 years prior to discover a forgotten magic across the ocean. Blind and mute, the castaway carries a map. When the Druid Walker deciphers the map, he brings together a ragtag team of warriors, magic-users and a young boy with a mysterious past. Using the brand new technology of airships, the group undertakes a long and arduous journey to this long forgotten land. During the journey, the young Bek learns the truth about his ancestry and his undiscovered magic. Chasing them the entire journey is the Ilse Witch, who also has a mysterious past and deep hatred for the Druid. Upon reaching the land that time forgot, the group is attacked by the sentient dweller in the ancient city and become separated. What works: Though my first foray into fantasy was Tolkien, Terry Brooks was really the one to fully grab me. I read the original trilogy and the Heritage series in the late 90s, so when this book came out in 2000, I was aching for this series. And it didn't disappoint (and still doesn't). The biggest thing about Mr. Brooks is his attention to detail in crafting a story. While I loved individual books in the aforementioned stories, I really didn't get invested in every single character arc (though after re-reads, I understood them better) until this story. I love every single character POV and care so much about them. This book, this quest, these characters are the exact reason I started forming/writing my own fantasy stories. There is just something so graceful and encouraging in this book/trilogy that I couldn't help myself for wanting to emulate Mr. Brooks. The one thing that sets this series apart for me is the expansion of the world. In the original trilogy there is only the most basic of hints this world is the future of Earth. A bit more is expanded in the Heritage series (I'm thinking of you Eldwist!), but this series really hits home that this is our future. I love the journey to Castledown - which is obvious it takes place in Asia (hence the name Parkasia). It really adds a layer of setting and place. Every time I re-read this series, I find a new character to fall in love with, and that is what makes Mr. Brooks fantastic as a writer in these early series. When I first read it as a teenager, obviously Bek and Quentin were my favorites because they were of a same age to me. Then it became Walker. Now it is Rue and Redden, the Rovers. I always loved Rue because she was an awesome character, but now, I can really see the progression of Mr. Brooks as a writer. In the early stories, only Brin and Wren were main female characters, but they were magic users, family members. They were the ones the story happened to. Not Rue. Rue is not the main character, but her story arc is amazing. She relies on her instincts, her abilities, her charm, her wit. She is a perfect character. I also love the fact that one of the main characters - with that familial connection - is a villain. It is a true flip of the script. The Ilse Witch is great. While I really like stories with major plots and scheme, my favorite fantasy trope is the quest. I just love having characters go to someplace unknown and just grow from that. The Druid of Shannara is pretty much one of my favorite fantasy books because of Walker's journey to the Eldwist. And this trilogy adds another level to an awesome journey story. I absolutely love the journey itself, but also the stuff that happens on said journey - like the growth of Bek, the mystery of the Ilse Witch, who is the spy, what will happen to the group. It is just an overall amazing first book in this trilogy. What doesn't work: While I am a huuuuuuuuuge Terry Brooks fan (I will read the hell out of all his books!), this series starts the formula for all his other books that take place chronologically after this. What I mean is that the same types of characters start to reappear, especially the boy Ohmsford character and the Wishsong. Bek is amazing, but down the road, you see him over and over again, so it really isn't a blight on this book, but it does set the stage. The other thing I never noticed before I tried to become a writer myself was the repeating Mr. Brooks tends to do sometimes. For example, every time the characters meet to discuss their plans, every single character is named in that meeting. It happens a lot! And after a few times, it gets somewhat trite. This also happens with catching characters up to speed, many times the same history is repeated. The biggest thing to me is probably the title. I enjoy how the script is flipped with the Ilse Witch, but really, in the scheme of the trilogy (spoiler), she really isn't the major focus until book 2 and especially book 3. While book 2 is aptly named, I think book 3 should have been called Ilse Witch. The reason this bugs me is because the Ilse Witch isn't a major POV character here, and most of the story revolves around the journey from Walker/Bek's POV. I know it is silly, but I think the title doesn't fit the story, but if you couldn't tell, I really love this book so I am somewhat nit-picking here. Rating: 5 our of 5 Terry Brooks will always be one of my favorite authors and I re-read them quite often to immerse myself in a wonderful story. It is hard for me to rate each book individually because this trilogy is so strong as a whole, there are no let-down books that tend to happen with series. I don't know how anyone who enjoys fantasy could not love this book (trilogy). 

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Brooks really took a change of pace with this novel, as it's pretty clear from the outset that the trilogy is more or less an adventure on a whim. Sure, there are reasons for all the characters to be involved in the journey, but it's not an immediate need as in almost all of Brooks' other novels. It was quite refreshing to see the characters conduct a bit more planning and have a bit more preparation - as the successes seem more earned rather than luck. That, and Walker, one of my favorite chara Brooks really took a change of pace with this novel, as it's pretty clear from the outset that the trilogy is more or less an adventure on a whim. Sure, there are reasons for all the characters to be involved in the journey, but it's not an immediate need as in almost all of Brooks' other novels. It was quite refreshing to see the characters conduct a bit more planning and have a bit more preparation - as the successes seem more earned rather than luck. That, and Walker, one of my favorite characters from the entire Shannara series is a central focus. You really can't beat that.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rocky Sunico

    The Jerle Shannara books are somewhat refreshing but somewhat unfocused in terms of direction. I appreciate the efforts for Terry Brooks to take the Shannara series in a new direction, I'm not entirely comfortable with where he's taken the series so far. The concept behind the Jerle Shannara reeks too much like the Weatherlight from Magic: the Gathering fame. Maybe it's just me, haha.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Brooks once again hits a home run. Not only does he bring some humanity to a typically cold character, he also humanizes someone that appears quite detestable. I am admittedly biased with the Shannara world, as I have enjoyed the Four Lands and all of its tales thus far. I do not anticipate falling away from this world any time soon.

  17. 4 out of 5

    sonicbooming

    It's Terry Brooks. You know you'll be in safe hands when you read a fantasy novel by him. A bit of whimsy, wonder, magic, & daring adventure await. Elves, dark-beings, stones of power, a mysterious Druid, they're familiar and yet Brooks makes them entirely his own with each series he continues to write. :)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Indeneri

    This book is really boring. I know Brooks plot is is signature (it never changes), so I was prepared for the whole 'druid turns up out of the blue etc etc'. but the storytelling is monotonous, the characters are boring and the whole thing drags on and on.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Anna Zollinger

    the storyline was decent, but I felt like I had to force myself to read it after 3 chapters. I didn't end up finishing the book. it wasn't terrible, but it only gets 1 stars from me because it gives you no real motivatoion to keep reading.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Branwen *of House Targaryen*

    Hands down, this is the BEST Shannara book I've read so far!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Maria Rose

    I was prepared to find another repeating storyline but this trilogy series has a surprising view as it has a more positive tone to it. The tale starts with the recovery of a castaway floating in the water, who turns out to be the long lost brother of the current Elven King. He was identified by the bracelet that he was wearing. He was also found with a map. The Elven King called the Druid, Walker to him to discuss the map. After discussion and evaluation by Walker, it was decided that an expediti I was prepared to find another repeating storyline but this trilogy series has a surprising view as it has a more positive tone to it. The tale starts with the recovery of a castaway floating in the water, who turns out to be the long lost brother of the current Elven King. He was identified by the bracelet that he was wearing. He was also found with a map. The Elven King called the Druid, Walker to him to discuss the map. After discussion and evaluation by Walker, it was decided that an expedition would be financed by the Elven nation with Walker in charge of organizing the details. Right after this agreement, the Elven King was assassinated but before his death throes, he had a document drawn up and certified to finalize and insure that the expedition would go forth. (Part of the agreement was that if Walker found the any Eleven magic like the Elfstones, he would return them to the Elves and they, in turn, would help would the re-formation of the Druid council). He, the King did this with his dying breath because he knew his son would not honor the agreement otherwise. Walker gets everything organized, including the limit to the number of people to bring on the expedition which he limits to 30 total. He had to adjust the number of Elven Hunters for the trip to accommodate taking the new Elven King's brother, Ahren. The group consists of Rovers to crew the ship, including the shipbuilder to help with repairs, an Elfen captain, Ard Patrinell, who had been captain of the special group to guard the old Elven-king, about 10 Elven Hunters who were also Trackers, a Healer,Joad Rish, a seer, Ryer Ord Star, a Dwarf tracker Panax, a shapeshifter Truls Rohk a member of the Leah Family, Quentin Leah, who carries the Sword of Leah and lastly Bek Rowe, who unknowingly possess a magic in his blood which he will learn about on this journey. One of the things I liked about this story, besides trying to figure out the mystery about Bek, was Walker's approach to explain things without giving full details. His explanations help the thought process of whom he is dealing with to make better decisions especially when he finally explains to Bek about his background and ability. Bek made have been shocked and angered but after full thought, he realized he needed to hear the explanation and could use Walker's training on how to use the magic properly. The ending paragraph ends on a cliff note with no resolution but to continue the story into the next book in the series.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan D

    [Book #1] As a huge Terry Brooks Fan, I have to say that I wasn't disappointed with Isle Witch. It may seem to most people that Terry repeats himself in some of his books/series(which he kind of does), but he seems to use similar tropes(hero's journey, wise sage, quest, etc.) and he still seems to make it fresh. He does a good job of establishing the world that he writes and he literally expands the world in this novel. In Elf Queen of Shannara, he implied that there was more land past the blue d [Book #1] As a huge Terry Brooks Fan, I have to say that I wasn't disappointed with Isle Witch. It may seem to most people that Terry repeats himself in some of his books/series(which he kind of does), but he seems to use similar tropes(hero's journey, wise sage, quest, etc.) and he still seems to make it fresh. He does a good job of establishing the world that he writes and he literally expands the world in this novel. In Elf Queen of Shannara, he implied that there was more land past the blue divide, and in this novel he expands on that. It's interesting how he sets this book 130 years after the Heritage Series, and as a result every character has passed on(except for Walker Boh). He continues the generational thing with the main characters which I enjoy but I know many people don't. One negative thing I will say is that I called the three biggest "surprises" really early, but that's because he sets everything up so that if you're observant you'll catch it. Overall, I'd rate this a 4.05 out of 5. Really fun, interesting, somewhat predictable, but still great!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    The synopsis is very compelling, which led me to have some expectations that probably led to my disappointment. I think I was hoping for a different story style, because it seems all these Shannara books have the same style. Ilse Witch starts off really great, and I really felt the idea was fantastic. However, it seemed dull after the beginning, with characters that seem plain and boring. The characters I did care about just didn't live up to my expectations. Like I said in the beginning my expe The synopsis is very compelling, which led me to have some expectations that probably led to my disappointment. I think I was hoping for a different story style, because it seems all these Shannara books have the same style. Ilse Witch starts off really great, and I really felt the idea was fantastic. However, it seemed dull after the beginning, with characters that seem plain and boring. The characters I did care about just didn't live up to my expectations. Like I said in the beginning my expectations had more of an influence on this book. Also I have been reading the Shannara books one right after another, so maybe I just need a break.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ian yarington

    Walker is one of my favorite characters from the previous trilogy, I love the way he was a reluctant druid, and the way Brooks related his reluctant nature to the way Allanon operated. He has grown so much as a character and it's great to follow him through his journey's. If I was to make one critic it would be that so much time passed between books that there is more lore and history that I wasn't able to gather, but it does come out in exposition and it all follows the general formula that Bro Walker is one of my favorite characters from the previous trilogy, I love the way he was a reluctant druid, and the way Brooks related his reluctant nature to the way Allanon operated. He has grown so much as a character and it's great to follow him through his journey's. If I was to make one critic it would be that so much time passed between books that there is more lore and history that I wasn't able to gather, but it does come out in exposition and it all follows the general formula that Brooks has set up so it's still fun to read and let Brooks fill in the blanks.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dejanira Dawn

    So last night I read that the audiobook I was reading for this was abridged, which means a lot was left out. This actually makes me sad because i feel like I miss so much. I'm going to reread all the books I've listened to that were abridged after I read all of his books to see how much detail I missed. But other than that, I loved the book! I'm happy to be back in the world of Shannara and seeing Walker again!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Scott Cook

    I tried listening but found myself still unsure of who the different characters were even as I neared the end of the book. For me, that probably meant I wasn't paying the utmost attention throughout the book which implies it wasn't able to strongly hold my attention. I was still entertained though which is a good thing.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alex C.

    Trash, just fucking shit. Sorry for the vulgar language, but the plot was beyond bland, the characters ad NO depth to them and where basically slates with a few scratches on each, and the writing and amount of spelling errors made me want to strangle someone. So overall the effort put into the book made me have a cardiac arrest and manage to get to the brink of death.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rose Boyer

    The start of a new adventure ~ it's been quite awhile since I last read this series. It's nice to have a series with original thought and that which mentions aspects of history from the original books. Time for brother and sister to meet. :)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    I've read a lot of Terry Brooks and although I enjoyed the book - loved the opening setting - no wow factor throughout the rest of the book, which is unfortunate given that it's the first in a Trilogy.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lucía Ramírez García

    This reminded me a lot of LOTR!! It was good, but there were so many characters it was confusing at times and it was probably unnecessarily long. 3,5*

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