Hot Best Seller

The Wishsong of Shannara PDF, ePub eBook

4.6 out of 5
30 review

The Wishsong of Shannara

Availability: Ready to download

File Name: The Wishsong of Shannara .pdf

How it works:

1. Register a free 1 month Trial Account.

2. Download as many books as you like (Personal use)

3. Cancel the membership at any time if not satisfied.


The Wishsong of Shannara PDF, ePub eBook Horror stalks the Four Lands. The Ildatch, immemorial book of evil spells, has stirred to eldritch life, sending its foul Mord Wraiths to accomplish at last Mankind's destruction. Once again Allanon, ancient Druid Protector of the Races, must seek the help of a descendant of Jerle Shannara. Brin, daughter of Wil Ohmsford, born with the magic of the Wishsong which alone can Horror stalks the Four Lands. The Ildatch, immemorial book of evil spells, has stirred to eldritch life, sending its foul Mord Wraiths to accomplish at last Mankind's destruction. Once again Allanon, ancient Druid Protector of the Races, must seek the help of a descendant of Jerle Shannara. Brin, daughter of Wil Ohmsford, born with the magic of the Wishsong which alone can open a way to the Ildatch, reluctantly joins him on his perilous journey east; meanwhile her younger brother Jair learns that Brin will fail and die, unless he can reach her in time. And as Brin walks into the trap the Ildatch has set, Jair must travel through the very heart of evil to reach her...

30 review for The Wishsong of Shannara

  1. 4 out of 5

    Evgeny

    It is definitely not a sign of trouble when druid Allanon visits Ohmsford family; it is just a sigh that the end of the world is near. This time it is not an exception. An ancient (I mean: really ancient) evil raises its head in the Four Lands and Allanon alone cannot fight it. He needs help from Brin Ohmsford, a daughter of Wil Ohmsford from the previous book. Brin reluctantly leaves her brother Jair behind as she starts on a long and perilous journey with the druid. What is really surprising a It is definitely not a sign of trouble when druid Allanon visits Ohmsford family; it is just a sigh that the end of the world is near. This time it is not an exception. An ancient (I mean: really ancient) evil raises its head in the Four Lands and Allanon alone cannot fight it. He needs help from Brin Ohmsford, a daughter of Wil Ohmsford from the previous book. Brin reluctantly leaves her brother Jair behind as she starts on a long and perilous journey with the druid. What is really surprising about this book is that Jair's plot line is much more interesting than Brin's despite the fact that he is supposedly much safer in his village. His plot line also happened to take more than half of the book; he is thrust into practically non-stop action from the first pages - literally; while Brin's journey was relatively boring and filled with her self-doubt and attempts to double-guess Allanon. Jair also meets all kinds of interesting characters along the way while Brin's first encounter with one takes place sometime after the first two thirds of the book. This is the best book of the trilogy; I already mentioned some very interesting characters, there were several plot twists I did not see coming, and this is probably the most tragic tale of the trilogy. A lot of people were put off by the first book and its resemblance of Tolkien's classic, but the quality of writing improves with each book as Terry Brooks finds his own voice. The final rating for the book and the whole series is 4 very solid stars.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tijana

    I read the previous sequel in 6th grade. Remember imagining myself as Amberle and William Moseley as Wil. For some reason I was convinced the two of them would end up together and the fact they didn't crushed my little 12 year old heart. I took this book and tried reading it, but the moment I found out it was about Wil, his stupid new wife and kids, I threw it across the room. I mean, it's my Wil after all! It might the about time for me to pick up this book again. Let's see if I got over it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chris Thomas

    The best of the original trilogy. Unpredictable, good characters and action all the way. Had me hooked from the start. If Brooks can just go back and edit out all of the "wordlessly's" "soundlessly's" and "abruptly's" and make the writing style a little less like a 10th grader then this book would have got 5*

  4. 4 out of 5

    Squire

    #12/29 in my Epic Shannara Quest. The Druid Allanon shows up unexpectedly again in Shady Vale twenty years after the events of The Elfstones of Shannara with another dire prediction of evil plotting against the Four Lands. The conclusion of the Shannara trilogy begins like the other two, which is probably why Brooks doesn't spend much time in getting his questers on the road to Culhaven--we've seen this before. But this time around, Brooks is more confident in his storytelling--the scene that see #12/29 in my Epic Shannara Quest. The Druid Allanon shows up unexpectedly again in Shady Vale twenty years after the events of The Elfstones of Shannara with another dire prediction of evil plotting against the Four Lands. The conclusion of the Shannara trilogy begins like the other two, which is probably why Brooks doesn't spend much time in getting his questers on the road to Culhaven--we've seen this before. But this time around, Brooks is more confident in his storytelling--the scene that seems ripped off from Tolkien is actually a rip off of a scene in Elfstones--and the story in Wishsong is his strongest yet. Exciting and engrossing, this quest is all his own. And, for the first time, Allanon is a 3-dimensional character, not the cardboard mentor of the first two books. Brooks' prose is still rather juvenile, as evidenced by the fact that in extended scenes of no dialog the story's momentum starts to lag, but for the most part, the book is well-written. Brooks wouldn't hit his narrative stride until his pre-Shnnara books, but here his writing seems more limited by the style of story he is telling than his ability. Over all, this is a very enjoyable read. NOTE: Arguably, this is the most important book of the whole Shannara saga, as it introduces the wishsong--the ultimate form of magic the Ohmsford family is cursed with. Every book after Wishsong chronologically references the events within.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    I have read 7 or 8 Brooks books over the years and have decided to read the entire Shannara series starting from the beginning. This was a re-read for me, first read it 30 years ago (or so). More descendants of Jerle Shannara go to save the world, this time a magic book. Terry Brooks has definitely matured as a writer over this trilogy, the writing and character development is much better but the plot of this book is kind of childish. Enjoyable but nothing great. Looking forward to the next series a I have read 7 or 8 Brooks books over the years and have decided to read the entire Shannara series starting from the beginning. This was a re-read for me, first read it 30 years ago (or so). More descendants of Jerle Shannara go to save the world, this time a magic book. Terry Brooks has definitely matured as a writer over this trilogy, the writing and character development is much better but the plot of this book is kind of childish. Enjoyable but nothing great. Looking forward to the next series as I seem to remember (it's been a while) that the quality of the writing really jumps by the time we get to the Heritage of Shannara.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ricky

    Mr. Brooks' challenge: write a worthy follow-up to The Elfstones of Shannara. Challenge: met. The next generation of Ohmsfords produces their best fighter yet - the tough-as-nails Brin, who follows in her father's footsteps and goes on another epic quest to save the world. This time, though, the forces of evil will come this close (picture my thumb and forefinger a millimeter apart) to corrupting her beyond repair, should they have her way. It's the end of the original Shannara trilogy, but not the Mr. Brooks' challenge: write a worthy follow-up to The Elfstones of Shannara. Challenge: met. The next generation of Ohmsfords produces their best fighter yet - the tough-as-nails Brin, who follows in her father's footsteps and goes on another epic quest to save the world. This time, though, the forces of evil will come this close (picture my thumb and forefinger a millimeter apart) to corrupting her beyond repair, should they have her way. It's the end of the original Shannara trilogy, but not the end of this world, not by a long shot. I've still got a long ways to go on this series. But I really hope that if MTV's Shannara Chronicles comes back for a second season, that they'll base it on this book. It'll be a very nice and welcome change after the first season, the Elfstones adaptation, inevitably reaches its end.

  7. 4 out of 5

    gabi

    Well, I don’t think that any of these books fully lived up to the first book in the trilogy. Or maybe it’s just at the time I’m reading them. The Ildatch has been found. The one thing behind all the evil and dark magic in the world. Now it has brought the Mord Wraiths who will bring down the destruction of all mankind. Allanon, protector of the Races, has come to Brin. Her magic, known as the wishsong, may be the only power that can help him destroy the Ildatch once and for all. So off they go, Well, I don’t think that any of these books fully lived up to the first book in the trilogy. Or maybe it’s just at the time I’m reading them. The Ildatch has been found. The one thing behind all the evil and dark magic in the world. Now it has brought the Mord Wraiths who will bring down the destruction of all mankind. Allanon, protector of the Races, has come to Brin. Her magic, known as the wishsong, may be the only power that can help him destroy the Ildatch once and for all. So off they go, to save the world. But Jair finds out that their mission is doomed to fail unless he helps them. He leaves his home and the world he knows to find Brin and save her if he can. But the only way that he’ll even have a chance to reach her is if he gets some help. Will any help him? Will he save her in time? Or will he be too late? The characters. There seems to be a trend in these books. And that is the fact that there are a wide cast of characters. We have Brin Ohmsford who is quiet, calm, and collected. She knows reason and is stubborn to stick to it. She is brave, but not without fear. Her younger brother, Jair, is also stubborn. He has temper and isn’t at all afraid to speak his mind. He won’t back away from something he disagrees with. Jair wants to help, even if it endangers himself. Brin and Jair have a bond that is stronger than anything else. Rone Leah is a close friend to Brin. Well, he’s more that that to her. He’s her protector. He cares about her so much. Rone is headstrong and more likely to get himself killed that Brin herself. Slanter is a Gnome, but at the same time he’s not. He pretends not to care about anything, but he does. He is tough, hard, and cold, but that’s all for show. Garet Jax is a man with only one purpose in life. Only one that satisfies him. He’s a mystery. Quiet and quick, you’d never see him coming. He doesn’t talk much, and definitely not about his past. Elb Foraker is as much of a Dwarf as a Dwarf can be. He believes in Jair’s mission and is willing to help him, but he the Dwarves do come first if he can help them. He’s a natural leader, if need be. Edain Elessedil is young, but willing to sacrifice himself to save the world. He’s smart and caring. Helt is a sort of father figure. Not much is known of him. He’s thoughtful and big and strong. Then, of course, there is the Druid, Allanon. He will always be my favorite characters. He keeps many secrets, but feels it is his duty to do so. We see a bit more into him in the book. I was so happy about that. He is like a coming storm, just waiting to unleash its fury. He does not play games. He acts as though he needs no one and really cares for no one, but that’s not true. He does care, but doesn’t want to show it. He needs someone to truly care for him. The plot was for the most part pretty fast. There were parts that were slow, but not a lot. I enjoyed it. The danger levels was high. The battles were heart stopping. The terror was real. Many people died, but a good many survived. There were parts that I wanted to scream in agony over. There was the plot twisting ending (which I have come to expect from this author). I kind of guessed it, but still loved seeing it played out. It was really good. The writing style reminds me of The Lord of the Rings, but it is much easier to read and stay focused on. I’m not totally sure why, but it is. There were a few times that I was confused by the way they described the landscape or a certain setting. I couldn’t picture it for some reason, but I didn’t let it bother me. I didn’t notice any bad content. There is a lot of violence and it is quite creepy, but that was fine. There were a few kisses, but nothing else in that category. I will say that this series does dwell on magic (dark magic and good magic) and such things like that. I really did love this book. I just wished it hadn’t taken me so long to read. I hope to read more by this author soon. You can check out this review on my blog too, at: https://aheartredeemed.wordpress.com/... Thanks!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Webb

    Hello normal person living a relatively happy life, There is a great darkness rising. You must leave with me immediately if we are to stop it. I want to be upfront with you, you are likely to die and I'm not even going to pretend that I'm telling you everything I know right now. Nonetheless, we must depart immediately or your family and home will be horribly destroyed within the week anyway. I'm sorry but this is simply the state of things. Allanon Yes, this book begins in a similar fashion to th Hello normal person living a relatively happy life, There is a great darkness rising. You must leave with me immediately if we are to stop it. I want to be upfront with you, you are likely to die and I'm not even going to pretend that I'm telling you everything I know right now. Nonetheless, we must depart immediately or your family and home will be horribly destroyed within the week anyway. I'm sorry but this is simply the state of things. Allanon Yes, this book begins in a similar fashion to the first two Shannara books (and Lord of the Rings, and many other similar stories) but it is a worthy conclusion to the trilogy. Much more than simply another sequel, the conclusion of this story reveals and resolves much about events dating back to the first installment, "Sword of Shannara." I am being deliberately vague to avoid spoilers, but if you long for an adventure of Allanon leading unlikely heroes to their probable doom which tops the original, this one delivers

  9. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    I wasn't a big fan of this third and final book in the Shannara trilogy. While it isn't necessary to read the first two books before this one as it can be read as a stand-alone, I would recommend reading them just for some background. Actually, I'd probably read the first two and skip this one as it is not nearly on level with them. Brin Ohmsford and her brother Jair are greatly surprised when the mysterious and well known druid Allanon comes to their home to seek them out. You see, the two are a I wasn't a big fan of this third and final book in the Shannara trilogy. While it isn't necessary to read the first two books before this one as it can be read as a stand-alone, I would recommend reading them just for some background. Actually, I'd probably read the first two and skip this one as it is not nearly on level with them. Brin Ohmsford and her brother Jair are greatly surprised when the mysterious and well known druid Allanon comes to their home to seek them out. You see, the two are able to use the wishsong, elven magic that responds only to them, and in Jair's case, only as an illusion. A new evil is on the rise in the form of the Mord Wraiths who are controlled by a dark book far to the east. Allanon requests (and demands as is his nature) that Brin come with him to destroy this evil as only she has the power to. She is accompanied by her friend Rone Leah who is to be her protector and they set off with the druid to try to put an end to this evil. Meanwhile, Jair, who is left behind to warn their parents, is taken by a roaming pack of gnomes who were searching for Allanon and they discover he holds the magic. After a rescue and then strange meeting with the Guardian of the Silver River (which has been poisoned) he is set out on a quest to cure the river and also assist his sister. This can only be accomplished by reading his destination before she can reach hers and then help her with his magic before she can fail in her task. With five helpers, he has to journey as well through the treacherous eastlands, not knowing what he may encounter. The characters in this had the potential to be interesting but were never really given a chance. They are not fully developed and I didn't even really like the main characters, Brin and Jair which made it hard to care about what happened to them in this novel. Once again, major motivations were not explained satisfactorily either. Brooks even makes note of one of my biggest problems with the series (the fact that Allanon doesn't share information) yet doesn't produce a good answer to why he makes his character do that (he does provide an answer, just not a good one). The writing drags in this book due to overuse of description and scenes that could have just been cut out. I found myself putting the book down multiple times just to get away from it and take a break, and since I read for fun, this didn't sit well with me. It just gets plain boring through most of the book and tedious in other parts. There is a redeeming feature to this book, however. I loved the idea of the wishsong and devoured any parts of the book that mentioned it. It was a neat idea for magic and well thought out and saved this book from being too much of a mess. I'll probably avoid Brook's books for awhile. He just isn't consistent on how well done or original they are and I like to try to choose books to read that I'll enjoy. Great fans of Brooks or the fantasy genre might appreciate this book, but most others probably will not. The Wishsong of Shannara Copyright 1985 504 pages Review by M. Reynard 2011

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jonel

    Brooks’ vivid yet clear writing was the perfect backdrop for this epic story. The graphic yet picturesque action sequences came to life throughout. The intertwining storylines add a complexity to the novel that changes it from a simple tale to an epic journey and the adventure of a lifetime. Brooks takes his readers on an epic journey across a vivid world that comes to life as if you were looking at an interactive 3D map. Not only does Brooks bring the story to life, he also brings some well-dev Brooks’ vivid yet clear writing was the perfect backdrop for this epic story. The graphic yet picturesque action sequences came to life throughout. The intertwining storylines add a complexity to the novel that changes it from a simple tale to an epic journey and the adventure of a lifetime. Brooks takes his readers on an epic journey across a vivid world that comes to life as if you were looking at an interactive 3D map. Not only does Brooks bring the story to life, he also brings some well-developed and unforgettable creatures & races to life. He pulls on the deepest parts of your imagination and makes it so very real. I enjoy how the magic of the wishsong is gradually developed as Brin explores it, and to some extent the very different manner Jair manifests it. The unique magic present in this world permeates everything in very unique manners. The explanation of how magic works was astounding. It definitely added a lot to the tale and mad Brin’s character and plight even more complicated. I love how it was done as well. I love the ties with the Elfstones of Shannara but how it also stands on its own. The ever-changing political alliances of this series serve to both tie the novels together and to illustrate the ever-changing world with the passage of time. I loved how I could recognize locales from past novels but also got introduced to new ones. I loved the close relationships between the characters here. It really humanised the entire story. I love Allanon’s storytelling. He’s a master bard along with everything else. His voice brings it all to life. I felt as if I were watching it. I appreciate how we see Allanon being stuck between a rock & a hard place, how Brooks shows how he hides his emotions and fights with himself. I also enjoyed Jair’s story almost as much (if not slightly more than) Brin’s. The King of the Silver River is a fascinating character. He’s both extremely complex and very straightforward. Brooks lets you know what each of his characters is thinking and feeling. I really felt a connection with them because of this. I appreciate how real and natural the characters are. They feel fear, anger, love, and loss. It was a fantastic mix and really allowed me to not only connect with them but also to become part of the tale. Brooks has developed an action intensive plot for this novel that kept me captive while drawing me deep into a true fantasy. It was an epic read on its own and unforgettable as part of this series.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Roman Kurys

    A great ending to the Trilogy that started world of Shannara. This sure was a great read, and I am happy that Terry Brooks decided to follow his gut and write it. I really enjoyed all three books thoroughly, although if I had to pick, I'd say Elfstones (Part2) was my favorite. Only reason for 4 stars rating instead of 5 is that I think Terry Brooks gets a little carried away with his over abundant and over detailed descriptions of everything and too little of dialogue to carry the story forward. A great ending to the Trilogy that started world of Shannara. This sure was a great read, and I am happy that Terry Brooks decided to follow his gut and write it. I really enjoyed all three books thoroughly, although if I had to pick, I'd say Elfstones (Part2) was my favorite. Only reason for 4 stars rating instead of 5 is that I think Terry Brooks gets a little carried away with his over abundant and over detailed descriptions of everything and too little of dialogue to carry the story forward. It's a double edged sword there, since it really at times made for a difficult, in-easy read for no reason. There really is no political intrigue, no Royal houses, no history to study, just a pure adventure of a group of people. You'd think they would talk more, but instead we are described they're thought mostly and environment they're in. Don't get me wrong, it was very detailed and very beautiful and my imagination ran rampant, but it did take a very quiet room to really be able to immerse into Brooks' world. By no means is his a book for someone who's looking for action or a quick paced thriller, it's very much a slower kind of read. If you enjoy Lord of the Rings, I have a feeling you'd like Shannara. They're really seem very similar to me, just take away Tolkien's linguistic inventions and most of his history of the ages, and just focus on the adventure. In all honesty, first book felt like I was reading Lord of the Rings "Light", if you will, but that feeling is quickly extinguished once you progress through Book 2 and 3. All in all, I'd highly recommend it, I will surely be reading the next installment, just be mentally prepared for a very solid wall of text hitting you in the face the entire journey. So grab a nice glass of scotch, a quiet room...and go on a journey of your life! Roman

  12. 5 out of 5

    Evelina

    It is quite interesting how all Shannara books in Brook’s direction start in a same way. 1. Allanon “unexpectedly” comes to a village. 2. Allanon takes Jerle/Wil/Brin & Jair from the village on an adventure because only them have a special, unique power which will help the world to disentangle from the troubled spider web it has gotten itself into and slay a few demons along the way, solving various quests as they advance. 3. Allanon is Gandalf! Joke aside, apart from that predictable settin It is quite interesting how all Shannara books in Brook’s direction start in a same way. 1. Allanon “unexpectedly” comes to a village. 2. Allanon takes Jerle/Wil/Brin & Jair from the village on an adventure because only them have a special, unique power which will help the world to disentangle from the troubled spider web it has gotten itself into and slay a few demons along the way, solving various quests as they advance. 3. Allanon is Gandalf! Joke aside, apart from that predictable setting which we all knew was coming if we read the previous two books, the adventure is once again gripping as we journey along with the protagonists, marvelling the landscapes and dreading the new enemies we know will be introduced. It's a long and endearing travel, which touches something deep in your heart and leaves you reminiscing the old days when you first found a copy of “The Hobbit” in your attic and read its yellowish, enchanthing pages with the haste you never knew existed. This time, instead of one person, Allanon recruits both brother and sister and their stories seemingly go their own ways until they join back together much later in a book. Both of their separate undertakings are equally intriguing, maybe Jair’s a bit more so, even though Brin was supposed to be given more protagon-ish role. There is one thing that can be said about Terry Brooks-he writes better end better with each instalment and his characters wander away from the tolkinesque stereotypes quite successfully.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Branwen *of House Targaryen*

    This book was EXCELLENT! It definately stuck out in my mind as my favorite Terry Brooks book that I've read thus far. Something about this storyline and the characters really just grabbed a hold of my heart! Brin and Jair are my favorite Shannara protagonists so far, espescially Brin. Her journey was so touching and really believable (as weird as that may sound for a fantasy book!). One of the most amazing things I find about this series is how much I find myself caring for the characers. And Mr This book was EXCELLENT! It definately stuck out in my mind as my favorite Terry Brooks book that I've read thus far. Something about this storyline and the characters really just grabbed a hold of my heart! Brin and Jair are my favorite Shannara protagonists so far, espescially Brin. Her journey was so touching and really believable (as weird as that may sound for a fantasy book!). One of the most amazing things I find about this series is how much I find myself caring for the characers. And Mr. Brooks always seems to keep me in suspense worrying whether they will all make it out okay in the end. And the funny thing is, THEY DON'T. Terry Brooks is a genius, in my opinion, because he makes his stories even more emotional and intense by not allowing everyone to survive. That may sound morbid, but believe me, his books are even more amazing because of this. I am really super hyped to start the next one now! If you are a fantasy fan, this is not a series to be missed!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Derek

    This is so awesome. it's on the same magnificent level as Lord of the rings. Terry Brooks is an awesome writer. This is fantasy at its best.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    So it took my husband and I a year to read this out loud together...oops. Anyway, I have now read through the original three Shannara books and I still think The Elfstones of Shannara is the best. I could see myself re-reading that one. The characters are just great. But you came here to read a review of this book, not that one. This is my least favorite book of the original trilogy. It just wasn't as compelling as the other two, the characters weren't as well developed and the story wasn't as gri So it took my husband and I a year to read this out loud together...oops. Anyway, I have now read through the original three Shannara books and I still think The Elfstones of Shannara is the best. I could see myself re-reading that one. The characters are just great. But you came here to read a review of this book, not that one. This is my least favorite book of the original trilogy. It just wasn't as compelling as the other two, the characters weren't as well developed and the story wasn't as gripping. (view spoiler)[Even the death of Allanon felt a little...flat (hide spoiler)] I frequently found myself rolling my eyes at Brin's ineptitude and would often pause in my reading aloud when she was in a sticky situation to make snide comments to my husband; usually along the lines of "If only she had some kind of magic wishsong that would help her out..." Four paragraphs later, after a useless internal monologue, Brin would catch up with the rest of us. I liked Jair somewhat better but my favorite character had to be the rough and lovable Slanter. There should be a whole book dedicated to his story. (view spoiler)[The climax of the story was, well, anticlimactic. I suppose the moral of the story is that love conquers all, but really? Jair shows up says "I love you, Brin" and suddenly she's all better. I mean with the pull the Ildatch had, I feel like it would take a little more than that. Plus, we've been hearing about the Ildatch off and on since the first book. It's kind of a big deal... (hide spoiler)] Since the three books stand on their own, I would only recommend this one if you are a series completionist. If you are only interested in reading one, I recommend Elfstones. The Sword of Shannara isn't bad and has some great moments but Elfstones is still better.

  16. 5 out of 5

    David Giard

    I don't think I am the target audience for the writings of Terry Brooks. The plot lines and characters of his Shannara stories are borrowed almost whole from JRR Tolkien's Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit. There are elves and dwarves and men living in Brooks's world; and there are magical talismans with the power to seduce those who possess them and to identify the possessor to the dark lords who covet them; and there are quests to save the world from evil, powerful sorcerer and his army of dem I don't think I am the target audience for the writings of Terry Brooks. The plot lines and characters of his Shannara stories are borrowed almost whole from JRR Tolkien's Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit. There are elves and dwarves and men living in Brooks's world; and there are magical talismans with the power to seduce those who possess them and to identify the possessor to the dark lords who covet them; and there are quests to save the world from evil, powerful sorcerer and his army of demonic beings; and there are at least 2 creatures who talk like Gollum. In "The Wishsong of Shannara" - the third and final book of "The Shannara Trilogy", Brin and Jair - children of the hero of "The Elfstones of Shannara" and grandchildren of the hero of "The Sword of Shannara" - travel across the Four Lands to destroy an evil book. They armed with the power of the Wishsong - the ability to generate magic and illusion with their voice; and are joined by allies of other races. I think Brooks's books are aimed at teens and young adults who have not yet experienced Tolkien and maybe aren't ready for something as heavy as Middle Earth. Brooks is not nearly as good a writer as writer as Tolkien (who is?); but his narrative is simpler and more straightforward, making it accessible to those who are new to high fantasy. It's a good gateway into this genre. I enjoyed this trilogy enough to complete it, but not enough to read any more books that Brooks has set in this universe. This is a good introduction to high fantasy for those who want something light and easy to read. If you are already a fan of the genre and have read some of its masters, you are likely be disappointed.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Msjodi777

    I have to admit that I started reading Shannara when The Sword of Shannara came out in the late 70's. Don't have a clue how many times I've read it since, and the same goes for both this one and The Elfstones of Shannara. Because of that, I can't possibly give this book any less than 5 stars. While the first book is a bit like the Tolkein books, the second and third books move off into their own world and leave the Lord of the Rings far behind going its own way. Unfortunately, my review of this I have to admit that I started reading Shannara when The Sword of Shannara came out in the late 70's. Don't have a clue how many times I've read it since, and the same goes for both this one and The Elfstones of Shannara. Because of that, I can't possibly give this book any less than 5 stars. While the first book is a bit like the Tolkein books, the second and third books move off into their own world and leave the Lord of the Rings far behind going its own way. Unfortunately, my review of this book boils down to: "This is one of my favorite series, and I really enjoy reading/listening to it.". Is there anything else to say? <><

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sophia

    This took me exactly one month...and one day to complete! I started reading this because it had been so long since reading the other two book and I knew it was time to finish this series - also, I actually had the time to read a book like this this month. As always, Brooks writing is so detailed and unique, however I've always felt that he took the long way in writing a certain situation or took a while to get to a specific point in a story. I always feel like his books could be shorter than wha This took me exactly one month...and one day to complete! I started reading this because it had been so long since reading the other two book and I knew it was time to finish this series - also, I actually had the time to read a book like this this month. As always, Brooks writing is so detailed and unique, however I've always felt that he took the long way in writing a certain situation or took a while to get to a specific point in a story. I always feel like his books could be shorter than what they are if he took, what I think to be, the 'unnecessary' things out and just kept the good, chunky story moving parts. Anyway, onto what actually happened in the book. We first see Shady Vale, home to the Ohmsford's, once the Shannara's. We are introduced to Brin and Jair Ohmsford, the daughter and son of Wil and Eretria, the main protagonists from the last book 'The Elfstones of Shannara'. The parents are leaving to go on a "pilgrimage to the outlying communities south of Shady Vale" where Wil will help the villages with his healing abilities, Eretria acting as his assistant. Soon, after they have left, the strange and mysterious figure of Allanon appears, telling the children that he needs Brin's help to save the Four Lands. As they leave, with Brin's long time friend Rone Leah (great-grandson of Menion Leah who was featured in the first novel 'The Sword of Shannara'), Jair finds himself being hunted by a gnome tracker. He flees Shady Vale and ends up being captured. He travels as a prisoner for a little while before being rescued by Weapons Master, Garet Jax. Now, both Brin and Jair are on similar journeys. Both heading for Graymark, a dark place where Mord Wraiths dwell. But their quests are different. Brin is to find the book of dark magic, the Ildatch and destroy it, without losing herself...or dying. Jair is to go to Heaven's Well before Brin reaches the Ildatch and save the Silver River, then save Brin from herself. It is a long and arduous journey, both Brin and Jair meeting new people who join them in their quests. From around a quarter and most of the middle of the book is actually telling us of Jair's journey. Brin and her adventures are only mentioned in short sequences, not having a full chapter to themselves. That seems so funny to me as the blurb barely mentioned Jair, but he is the one that is mostly featured. Along the way, lives are lost. Lives of friends and new acquaintances. When they finally reach Greymark, they are surrounded by Mord Wraiths, gnomes who are slaves of the dark servants of the Ildatch and the black things that the Wraiths conjure. Even here, when it is so close to the end of their journey, Brook finds a way to stretch out this time as much as possible. It makes the story suspenseful but also unnecessarily long. I won't say too much more about the story at this point because I don't want to spoil the ending but I have to say, that the ending definitely felt like the end of a series, Brooks was tying up loose ends and making sure that questions were answered as much as they could be. Overall, an interesting story line that felt a little too long but was very exciting at the end and closed off a good series of fantasy, magic and good verses evil.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Annina | Blattzirkus

    I want to thank Bloggerportal and Blanvalet for giving me the opportunity to read this novel. They were so great to give me The Wishsong of Shannara in exchange for an honest review. You also are able to read this review on my blog Blattzirkus. -- Abstract An age-old threat returns to the world, sending out its Mord Wraiths to destroy humanity and the elves. To repress and defeat this power, the Druid Allanon needs the support of Brin Ohmsford, the guardian of the Elfstones. Because only Brin contro I want to thank Bloggerportal and Blanvalet for giving me the opportunity to read this novel. They were so great to give me The Wishsong of Shannara in exchange for an honest review. You also are able to read this review on my blog Blattzirkus. -- Abstract An age-old threat returns to the world, sending out its Mord Wraiths to destroy humanity and the elves. To repress and defeat this power, the Druid Allanon needs the support of Brin Ohmsford, the guardian of the Elfstones. Because only Brin controls the magic song of the elves. But evil has foreseen Allanon’s move, and Brin is now waiting for a fate worse than death. Only when she is ready to give herself up, there is still hope for humans and elves … Abstract roughly translated after the German abstract by Random House (July 17th, 2018) Cover It confused me a bit that book 1, The Sword of Shannara, did a style break in comparison to book 2 and book 3. I like both cover arts, but please stick with one style. Else it doesn’t look good on the bookshelf and it seems as if the books don’t belong together. Thanks 😀 The Author: Terry Brooks Terry Brooks is an US-American Fantasy-Author who published his first book, The Shannara-Chronicles: The Sword of Shannara, in 1977. Before his breakthrough as a writer, Brooks was working as a lawyer. He gave up on this job after his sales success with his book. After Terry Brooks’ German Wikipedia page (July 17th, 2018) Book Trilogy In this review I will review Book 3, The Wishsong of Shannara. I have already reviewed Book 1, The Sword of Shannara and Book 2, The Elfstones of Shannara. If anyone is going to continue reading this review – you are warned. This might get spoilery. My Opinion The Wishsong of Shannara was better to read for me than Book 1, The Sword of Shannara. However, I gave the book no more and no less stars than The Sword of Shannara, two stars. How these two books nevertheless differ from each other and what I liked better about The Wishsong of Shannara, I try to explain a little in the next few paragraphs. First of all, it did seem like a cheap rip-off of Lord of the Rings. I could draw a lot of parallels in The Sword of Shannara, which bothered me so much because The Shannara Chronicles should be a fantasy world after all and not a Lord of the Rings copy. But do not worry, that was only the case in Book 1. Book 2 and 3 felt much more like an own world and that’s a good thing. Plot What bothered me about The Wishsong of Shannara is the fact that there never was exciting action, at least in my eyes. Two groups go from A and B, battles are interspersed every now and then, and that’s it. Maybe it’s because of Terry Brooks’ writing style, but I never had the feeling that the characters could not accomplish their mission. There was never the moment in which I was captivated by the story. For me, the plot was just monotone. Characters Character depth, what is this? I know almost as much about the druid Allanon after three books as at the beginning of the trilogy. He is always described as mysterious and secret keeping, because he literally reveals nothing about himself and if, then only the most necessary bits. This is also how it is described in the book. So it does not surprise me so much that I hardly know anything about Allanon, but hey, the reader has been informed that we should not expect too much information. Brin and Jair Ohmsford are the children of Wil and Eretria, from The Elfstones of Shannara, who have had a weak character development, if any. If I had the feeling – oh, they have improved their personalities! – then it was reversed again (see towards the end scene). In any case, my personal highlight was that Wil and Eretria were mentioned again and that Terry Brooks continued to travel with Ohmsford characters. Hardly anyone was unsympathetic, only I just wasn’t able to become friends with them, as they (as already mentioned in the paragraph above) had little depth and seemed very superficial to me. Writing Style Why are the characters most often called or described either by their origin or their race? Okay, in the beginning of the book, some members of the group can’t stand each other, but how should I learn names if only the race or the origin is mentioned most of the time? “Boy!” The gnome called with a mixture of concern and relief in his voice and rushed toward the valley dweller. * Terry Brooks, The Shannara Chronicles: The Song of the Elves, 1986, Chapter 46, p. 497 (eBook). Roughly translated from German to English. Okay, that’s just an extreme example of a few sentences, but still. The hyper-objective salutation and partially swollen language may now be a fantasy element. After a while it became very exhausting for me and I could not really bring myself getting into the story. What a pity, because I like to remember of the good times I had while reading The Elfstones of Shannara. If I remember rightly, I had the problem with The Sword of Shannara and The Elfstones of Shannara, that Terry Brooks likes to describe fights and pretty much everything in a long dragging time. I still had this problem and it did not improve with The Wishsong of Shannara. Not, that I am only complaining… It may seem that I have been pretty hard on the book. There are certainly a lot of people who can be enthusiastic about this book (several reviews prove that). In retrospect, it’s not a bad book, the writing style is clean but it’s just not mine. Although, better to read the writing style of Terry Brooks as one who is incredibly persistent in trying to write beautifully and cumbersome (American YA writers love that). The plot could be better, but also far worse. In addition, I must keep in mind after all that this book has been published in 1977. It would therefore be interesting to read a Terry Brooks book from the present (2018). But until I get that far, I have to take a little distance from the book series. Conclusion I give The Shannara-Chronicles: The Wishsong of Shannara by Terry Brooks 2 out of 5 stars. It couldn’t convince me to like it and I wasn’t able to get into the story. But I can imagine that it’s just me and that a lot of reader will like it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It’s been a while since I visited The Four Lands, but I went into this one really hoping it was going to be a satisfying conclusion to the original trilogy. If I’m honest, book 3 was entertaining but somewhat predictable and similar to a number of conclusions I have read in fantasy books over the last 10 years. At the start of the third adventure, The Ildatch, an ancient source of evil, has begun spreading its dark powers. Following the events of its awakening, the Druid Allanon yet again seeks t It’s been a while since I visited The Four Lands, but I went into this one really hoping it was going to be a satisfying conclusion to the original trilogy. If I’m honest, book 3 was entertaining but somewhat predictable and similar to a number of conclusions I have read in fantasy books over the last 10 years. At the start of the third adventure, The Ildatch, an ancient source of evil, has begun spreading its dark powers. Following the events of its awakening, the Druid Allanon yet again seeks the help of the Ohmsfords. This time it will be children Brin and Jair who must aid the Druid. I found book 3 to be entertaining adventure and action, mixed with sometimes monotonous journeys between two points, something I hoped Brooks would write less of as he continued the series. I also found the characters to be very similar to those in the Lord of the Rings trilogy, much like my experience with the Sword of Shannara. There were a couple of characters that were original, however, improving my experience somewhat. The original trilogy,as a whole I enjoyed, but I don’t think it would have succeeded without Elfstones being the novel it was since I don’t think Sword or Wishsong met the same standard. Wishsong was not quite the conclusion I was hoping for, but I was entertained throughout most sections of the novel. I am happy to award Wishsong 3.5 stars rounded down, this could have been 4 if the book hadn’t been drawn out in its less eventful stages and if it had also been more original. I will continue to read the Shannara series, since I have heard it improves with the later novels, but I will give myself a considerable break before starting the next stage.

  21. 5 out of 5

    *Thea 'Wookiee'sMama' Wilson*

    I've been reading my way through the whole Shannara series a bit at a time, in chronological order as suggested by Terry Brooks himself. I first read the original trilogy when I was a teenager but since then Terry Brooks has written several prequels to the original series so I made the decision earlier this year to start reading them in order starting with The Word and Void trilogy, then The Genesis Of Shannara, followed by The First King Of Shannara which is the direct prequel to the original t I've been reading my way through the whole Shannara series a bit at a time, in chronological order as suggested by Terry Brooks himself. I first read the original trilogy when I was a teenager but since then Terry Brooks has written several prequels to the original series so I made the decision earlier this year to start reading them in order starting with The Word and Void trilogy, then The Genesis Of Shannara, followed by The First King Of Shannara which is the direct prequel to the original trilogy, before finally re-reading the original trilogy itself, there are also many more Shannara books to come too! I have to say that I really enjoyed the trilogy when I was a teenage but re-reading them again, after reading the newer prequels, has been a bit of a revelation and made them a much different read altogether when you realise how things got to be the way they are, and how the people and the world of Shannara are just alternate version of our own Earth's future. I have been a huge fan of Terry Brooks for a very, very long time indeed and one of my favourite series of books is by him, The Magic Kingdom of Landover books! He writes stories that pull you in and keep you there, making you care about the fates of your heroes and waiting to know if they are going to get through to the end of the book, how it will all turn out in the end. You can see the Tolkien influences in the original trilogy books, the biggest influence probably has to be the Mord Wraths of The Wishsong of Shannara (very similar to the Ringwraiths) and you can't help but think of Gandalf while reading about Allanon but all in all they are just influences and have been written to be quite different. Of course Allanon is the glue that holds the three books together despite the fact the each book is about a different generations of the Ohmsford family although if I had been a member of that family I would have runaway at the sheer site of Allanon considering how much trouble he causes for the family everytime he shows up. I am very glad to have taken the time to read the Shannara Sequence so far and there is still plenty left to go as well, next set up will be the Heritage of Shannara and I can't wait to get started at some point after Christmas.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Luna

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. My personal favorite in Brooks' original trilogy, Wishsong shows an evolution in the authors writing. I've often been surprised by the lack of interest this books generates in comparison to it's predecessors. For sure, this book is no where near the standards of Brooks' later works, but it's still a fascinating read with a more complex brood of character than what Brooks had written in his first two works. After reading some reviews on this site I was shocked to find just how many people thought My personal favorite in Brooks' original trilogy, Wishsong shows an evolution in the authors writing. I've often been surprised by the lack of interest this books generates in comparison to it's predecessors. For sure, this book is no where near the standards of Brooks' later works, but it's still a fascinating read with a more complex brood of character than what Brooks had written in his first two works. After reading some reviews on this site I was shocked to find just how many people thought that this book did not live up to Swords of Elfstones, or that Brin and Jair were boring characters. But then I suppose it all comes down to personal prefference. Afterall, one of the greatest things about living a free-thinking existance is that you may choose to say what you feel and you may choose to discard anything views that don't agree with you're personal opinion. Plotwise, I felt that Wishsong was deeper than Elfstones and Swords. Swords used a very,very commonly used plot which Brooks attempted to change with interesting characters. In some ways, I think he suceeded. But the fact remains, you can pick up almost any Epic fantasy written after Tolkien and find the exact same plot being used in one way or another. Elfstones showed Brooks' first steps away from that comfortable go-to plot as he developed his personal mythos. Wishsong was a nice closure to the trilogy. Brin and Jair's isues during the book were in my mind more compelling than Will and Amberle's. Because really, there's was a love that blossomed rather quickly leaving me with very little appreciation for their romantic struggles and journeys. Brin and Jair had spent a lifetime together, and their close bond was showcased very well in the book which made the climax all the more appealing. Allanon, a character I felt was almost too unforgivingly Gandalf in prior books gained new depth in Wishong. He gained frailty, fear, and clear sense of mortality. For the first time the striggle of the Druids that would become a strong theme of the next few series became real.

  23. 4 out of 5

    J Austill

    "And grandfather will miss you, too. Won't you grandfather?" Cogline shuffles his sandaled feet uneasily and nodded without looking at the Valegirl. "Some, I guess," he admitted grudgingly. "Won't miss all that crying and agonizing, though. Won't miss that. Course, we did have some fine adventures, girl- I'll miss you for that." Thus Terry Brooks does me the kindness of summing up my feelings on his Shannara Trilogy. Which is why I like the third book the best of these, there are a couple of char "And grandfather will miss you, too. Won't you grandfather?" Cogline shuffles his sandaled feet uneasily and nodded without looking at the Valegirl. "Some, I guess," he admitted grudgingly. "Won't miss all that crying and agonizing, though. Won't miss that. Course, we did have some fine adventures, girl- I'll miss you for that." Thus Terry Brooks does me the kindness of summing up my feelings on his Shannara Trilogy. Which is why I like the third book the best of these, there are a couple of characters which the reader can really identify with (see Cogline, above). In particular, in one scene a character flat calls out the protagonist for whining too much and not acting, even going so far as to slap some sense into him. It was much appreciated. Ultimately, these are fun adventures but the the writing style makes them a bit tedious for an adult. They are really written as though to be read one chapter a night to one's kids. Each chapter reiterates the goals of the book and what happened before, this gets rather redundant for an adult. I would highly recommend these to anyone in 5th-8th grade for a book report, since the end tends to sum up the events of the book and flat out tell you what it meant. I know I had the tendency to get through a book, at that age, and then not know what to write. Also: these would make a great film/tv show as they are quite action packed and watching something is always a bit easier than reading it. So I'm looking forward to their adaptations.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Markus

    This is Terry Brooks' true masterpiece in my eyes, and still my personal favourite in the Shannara series. I would actually place it in the top three within the fantasy genre, and it even had a scene that put a tear in my eye (everyone who has read the book knows which one). It started out quite weakly. As always, Allanon's appearance to an Ohmsford was repeated, and in contrast to the same scenes in the two previous books, this one was quite boring. Also, that the main "villain" of the story was This is Terry Brooks' true masterpiece in my eyes, and still my personal favourite in the Shannara series. I would actually place it in the top three within the fantasy genre, and it even had a scene that put a tear in my eye (everyone who has read the book knows which one). It started out quite weakly. As always, Allanon's appearance to an Ohmsford was repeated, and in contrast to the same scenes in the two previous books, this one was quite boring. Also, that the main "villain" of the story was the evil book that once corrupted the rebel druid Brona, seemed at first to be rather inadequate for an epic fantasy villain like these books have to have. Deep inside, I feared that this one wouldn't get anywhere near Sword and Elfstones. But despite my worst fears, I kept reading. I'm rather pleased with that decision now. The main characters, the siblings Brin and Jair Ohmsford, are simply perfect. The supporting characters are absolutely brilliant as well, among them Allanon (of course), Garet Jax the invincible Weapons Master and Slanter the Gnome Tracker. The magic system is new and interesting, the villains are mysterious and fascinating, the locations are intriguing and the development of Brin's and Jair's stories is amazingly well done. All in all, the Wishsong is so close to completely flawless that the few downsides don't even make a difference.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dark-Draco

    This is the last book in the original Shannara Series. In the last one, Wil Ohmsford knew that the magic he used had changed him, but it is his children, Brin and Jair, who manifest the change. They both have the Wishsong, Jair to create illusion, Brin to create reality. Once again, it is Allanon who comes for Brin, asking her to travel to the living forest of the Maelmord and destroy the Ildatch, the book of dark magic that has been the teacher of all the dark things threatening the world. Jair This is the last book in the original Shannara Series. In the last one, Wil Ohmsford knew that the magic he used had changed him, but it is his children, Brin and Jair, who manifest the change. They both have the Wishsong, Jair to create illusion, Brin to create reality. Once again, it is Allanon who comes for Brin, asking her to travel to the living forest of the Maelmord and destroy the Ildatch, the book of dark magic that has been the teacher of all the dark things threatening the world. Jair should have the easier task, left behind in the Vale to warn his parents, but when the dark Wraiths come looking, he finds himself caught up in the self same Quest. But he learns that Allanon has been fooled and only he will be able to save Brin as she struggles to destroy the dark magic. Another great story. The action never seems to stop and I loved the jumping back and forth from one story to the other. There are still a few questions left hanging though, so you'd know that there would be more to come (even if I didn't have them all set on my shelf to read!). And, this might sound awful, but it's good to see a fantasy where some of the good guys die too - makes it seem more 'realsitic'!.

  26. 4 out of 5

    J.M.

    Read in middle school. This was one of the first fantasy series I ever read and probably the one that got me onto an epic fantasy kick.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Brecht Denijs

    Yes! It's finally over! Eight bloody months it took me to slog through this thing. Eight! I can't remember the last time it took me so long to get through a book I voluntarily read. Whatever improvements were made in the second book, I'm sad to say, are pretty much gone in this one. It is still a small step up from the first novel in the series if I'm honest. I know I read through that first novel a lot quicker but that was because it was new still and the second one had improvements that kept m Yes! It's finally over! Eight bloody months it took me to slog through this thing. Eight! I can't remember the last time it took me so long to get through a book I voluntarily read. Whatever improvements were made in the second book, I'm sad to say, are pretty much gone in this one. It is still a small step up from the first novel in the series if I'm honest. I know I read through that first novel a lot quicker but that was because it was new still and the second one had improvements that kept me going. This one didn't have any improvements over the second one and by now, after two novels, I was soooo done and fed up with Brooks' writing that I practically had to force myself to keep reading at times. It is so bloody mediocre, tinged with bad scenes and, very occasionally a good one. I have to admit that, plot and pace wise, the ending wasn't all that bad and could have warranted a three star rating if not for the rest of the book dragging it down. I don't think I need to list all of Brooks' shortcomings, suffice it to say, they're still there. The one that annoyed me the most was his lack of character immersion and development. 90% of the characters in this book felt like cardboard cut-outs and I could not get myself to care about them. The other 10% I cared about just a little bit and there was even one where I was glad to see the character go as I had begun to hate it by now. Suffice it to say that I shan't be getting anymore Brooks books. I have one still in my collection. I might get myself to read it someday, but it is not this day! Apparently there are still people that actually love these books, though I cannot fathom why. I will admit that they are not terrible and unreadable. Just bland, boring and uninspired. But hey, to each their own. If you feel like giving these a try I shan't attempt to dissuade you, they are not that terrible, but I most certainly would not recommend them. There is so much better Fantasy to read out there that I’m glad I’m done wasting time with this one.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Cat

    2.5 stars. I know that this is a lot of people's favourite book in the original Shannara trilogy, but I just didn't enjoy it as much as the previous book. This book felt like it was reverting to Lord of the Rings copy-catting again, and, while some things were interesting (the Wishsong, Slanter, Kimber and her grandfather), the main characters fell sort of flat. Part of the problem with these books for me is that it's a consistent structure: cloaked, mysterious Alannon shows up at the Ohmsford re 2.5 stars. I know that this is a lot of people's favourite book in the original Shannara trilogy, but I just didn't enjoy it as much as the previous book. This book felt like it was reverting to Lord of the Rings copy-catting again, and, while some things were interesting (the Wishsong, Slanter, Kimber and her grandfather), the main characters fell sort of flat. Part of the problem with these books for me is that it's a consistent structure: cloaked, mysterious Alannon shows up at the Ohmsford residence; said Ohmsford must go on an adventure to stop the most dangerous evil thing ever equipped with only the elven magic and their lack of personality (excluding Wil), bad things happen... It gets super predictable, unfortunately. I know that Brooks is a better writer than these books let on and I think I might move on to read more of his later Shannara books, where the writing is better and I can care bout the characters and their problems. I maintain faith in Brooks because of the Genesis of Shannara series.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    It took me half a month to finish the book. Usually it takes me 5 days to finish the book of this size, but something kept popping up along the way, demanding my attention. Now, when it is finished I must say that this is the weakest book in the original trilogy, and this is a pity, because I really liked the Sword of Shannara and the Elfstones of Shannara so much. There was something to surprise me with, notwithstanding the fact that those are the trite fantasy novels. But this one was so (yes, It took me half a month to finish the book. Usually it takes me 5 days to finish the book of this size, but something kept popping up along the way, demanding my attention. Now, when it is finished I must say that this is the weakest book in the original trilogy, and this is a pity, because I really liked the Sword of Shannara and the Elfstones of Shannara so much. There was something to surprise me with, notwithstanding the fact that those are the trite fantasy novels. But this one was so (yes, I will say it) predictable and straightforward that my teeth ached. Nevertheless, the language (apart from dialogues), though bumpy at times, was quite beautiful and the setting itself is still enchanting. I really hate to give this book 3 stars, and I would give it 2 if it weren't of Shannara cycle.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Cheri

    These continue to be worth listening to, but Brooks also continues to use language in a way that irks me on a regular basis. Torches lighting "impenetrable darkness." Deafeningly silent screams... I wish Brooks just let the setting and events (which are good enough all on their own) speak for themselves rather than resorting to overblown language that diminishes rather than empowers the text. Otherwise, this is the definition of classic fantasy. Reluctant heroes, valiant protectors, companions f These continue to be worth listening to, but Brooks also continues to use language in a way that irks me on a regular basis. Torches lighting "impenetrable darkness." Deafeningly silent screams... I wish Brooks just let the setting and events (which are good enough all on their own) speak for themselves rather than resorting to overblown language that diminishes rather than empowers the text. Otherwise, this is the definition of classic fantasy. Reluctant heroes, valiant protectors, companions from disparate backgrounds convening to accomplish a task. Still worth reading, after all these years.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.