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K Is for Killer. Sue Grafton PDF, ePub eBook

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K Is for Killer. Sue Grafton

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K Is for Killer. Sue Grafton PDF, ePub eBook When Kinsey Millhone answers her office door late one night, she lets in more darkness than she realizes. Janice Kepler is a grieving mother who can't let the death of her beautiful daughter Lorna alone. The police agree that Lorna was murdered, but a suspect was never apprehended and the trail is now ten months cold. Kinsey pieces together Lorna's young life: a dull day j When Kinsey Millhone answers her office door late one night, she lets in more darkness than she realizes. Janice Kepler is a grieving mother who can't let the death of her beautiful daughter Lorna alone. The police agree that Lorna was murdered, but a suspect was never apprehended and the trail is now ten months cold. Kinsey pieces together Lorna's young life: a dull day job a the local water treatment plant spiced by sidelines in prostitution and pornography. She tangles with Lorna's friends: a local late-night DJ; a sweet, funny teenaged hooker; Lorna's sloppy landlord and his exotic wife. But to find out which one, if any, turned killer, Kinsey will have to inhabit a netherworld from which she may never return. From the Paperback edition.

30 review for K Is for Killer. Sue Grafton

  1. 4 out of 5

    James

    Book Review 3.5 out of 5 stars to K is for Killer, the 11th book in the "Kinsey Millhone" mystery series, written in 1994 by Sue Grafton. In this one, Kinsey's life is relatively calm, which she is enjoying... until someone shows up begging for help in solving the death of her daughter. Kinsey doesn't think she can do much, given the police haven't found anything in the months-old trail. But the woman is convincing and Kinsey needs the money. Unfortunately, the case turns out to be brutal -- Book Review 3.5 out of 5 stars to K is for Killer, the 11th book in the "Kinsey Millhone" mystery series, written in 1994 by Sue Grafton. In this one, Kinsey's life is relatively calm, which she is enjoying... until someone shows up begging for help in solving the death of her daughter. Kinsey doesn't think she can do much, given the police haven't found anything in the months-old trail. But the woman is convincing and Kinsey needs the money. Unfortunately, the case turns out to be brutal -- and the dead girl had a very tumultuous crop of friends and acquaintances, all who have a different take on the death. And some of them don't believe it was murder. Kinsey knows they're hiding something and takes off on her usual path to solve another crazy case. I enjoyed the book, however it wasn't one of the better ones. It's smack in the middle of the series, slightly above average in the mystery world for 1990s fiction. The series took a minor slump with this book, not because it was bad, but because it just wasn't as powerful as the rest. Still a definite read and no reason to abandon the entire series. About Me For those new to me or my reviews... here's the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you'll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I've visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jilly

    Gah, have I mentioned that I don't like Kinsey? She's such a bitch! And, a loser. She is one step up from a bag lady in the social hierarchy and yet she judges every woman she meets with the attitude of a mean girl from high school. Her impressions of a teenage girl: "Trinny was barefoot, wearing an oversize white T-shirt and a pair of ragged blue jean cutoffs. Judging from the size of her butt, she'd conjured up quite a few homemade cakes in her day." Nice. That is how she describes every femal Gah, have I mentioned that I don't like Kinsey? She's such a bitch! And, a loser. She is one step up from a bag lady in the social hierarchy and yet she judges every woman she meets with the attitude of a mean girl from high school. Her impressions of a teenage girl: "Trinny was barefoot, wearing an oversize white T-shirt and a pair of ragged blue jean cutoffs. Judging from the size of her butt, she'd conjured up quite a few homemade cakes in her day." Nice. That is how she describes every female she meets. Basics on their appearance and then some sort of biting comment about that they look old, ugly, or fat. The males are all described based upon whether she finds them attractive or not. Here's a clue to a mystery for you Kinsey: none of them care if you are attracted to them! Some bitchy spinster who hates dogs and children and cuts her own hair with nail scissors isn't exactly prime material herself. Ugh! And yes, I said she hates dogs and children. Do you know who else hated dogs and children??? ... you think I'm going to say "Hitler", don't you?... But I'm not because even Hitler loved dogs! That's right, I'm saying Kinsey is worse than Hitler. That's not an exaggeration at all. I may need to get out more. In this book, Kinsey is trying to solve a murder that happened about a year prior. She does her usual thing, which mainly involves annoying people at their homes like some creepy church people or creepy magazine sales people or creepy kids trying to sell you shit that their school is making them pimp themselves out for in hopes of some crappy prize that they could get at the Dollar store. And, yes, anyone who comes to my door is creepy in my eyes. Did I invite you to come over? Unless you have an Amazon box in your hand, go away. This sums up how I feel when someone knocks on my door: Not only that, but she flies to San Francisco just to have a conversation with someone that she was already talking to on the phone. She called him and asked if she could fly up there and ask him some questions. I was thinking, why don't you just ask him the questions now, on the phone....that you are speaking to him upon at this moment... you know, instead of making your customer pay for a plane flight and hotel.... It just goes to show just how pathetic her life is that there is absolutely nothing holding her back from doing something so pointless and time-wasting. Speaking of pointless and time-wasting, I'm getting much better at skimming through all of the boring and endless descriptions that fill these books, so yay for that. At one point, Kinsey goes to speak to a guy at a water treatment plant and he offers to give her a tour and the speech about what they do there. I was muttering, "no, no, no, please no, just say no.....oh shit, of course she said yes..." at the book. Alright, this is obscure reference time. If anyone gets it, there will be a prize. "Yes, there are thousands and thousands of uses for corn, all of which I'm going to tell you about right now!" But, I skimmed over all of that like a champ. I will not be learning about water treatment methods today, Satan. Not today. The story ended on a very strange note this time. I liked that, except there were loose ends that didn't make sense. Also, Kinsey was stupid and really deserved to get killed when the magic "reason" and timing stopped it. Anyway, on to the next one. I can churn these mothers out if I skim the filler!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Luffy

    Characters in the book are forgettable. That's unforgivable in a utilitarian book. I didn't know who the murderer was in the book. I felt that I had paused reading this book for a couple of weeks before reprising it again around the whereabouts of the climax. There isn't even pity for the murdered. The links between me as a reader and the main victim was tenuous at best. The culprit evaporates into thin air. "Respectfully submitted" my foot. Kinsey Millhone stops running in this book. She instead Characters in the book are forgettable. That's unforgivable in a utilitarian book. I didn't know who the murderer was in the book. I felt that I had paused reading this book for a couple of weeks before reprising it again around the whereabouts of the climax. There isn't even pity for the murdered. The links between me as a reader and the main victim was tenuous at best. The culprit evaporates into thin air. "Respectfully submitted" my foot. Kinsey Millhone stops running in this book. She instead does a new kind of exercise. Didly-squat. I thought Sue Grafton was on autopilot with the book. She was not inspired, there is no redeeming point for her story. This is a mediocre book. If you haven't read it and it's in your tbr pile, do yourself a favour and ditch this useless book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Phrynne

    This was another good entry in this enjoyable alphabet series. It was a litle bit darker than usual and involved some really serious heavies. Fortunately Kinsey chose to be discreet and let the bad guys sort out the even worse guy! Prior to this though she carried on in her usual manner, knocking on people's doors at all hours of the night and asking the most pointed questions. Her methods seem to work because she discovers all sorts of information and usually solves the case. I enjoy her attitud This was another good entry in this enjoyable alphabet series. It was a litle bit darker than usual and involved some really serious heavies. Fortunately Kinsey chose to be discreet and let the bad guys sort out the even worse guy! Prior to this though she carried on in her usual manner, knocking on people's doors at all hours of the night and asking the most pointed questions. Her methods seem to work because she discovers all sorts of information and usually solves the case. I enjoy her attitude and admire her work ethic. She works endlessly long hours and eats the worst food, but it all makes for an entertaining read. Ready now to move on to L.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

    Maybe it's pointless to jump into reviewing this series midway through, but K is the first book in Grafton's alphabet so far that's seemed much different than the others. I've thoroughly enjoyed the highly devourable mysteries A-I; J is for Judgment left a sour taste in my mouth only insomuch as it trespassed into non-mystery territory at the end, when (spoiler!) protagonist detective Kinsey Millhone discovers, basically out of nowhere, that she has family living not too far away. Her reaction t Maybe it's pointless to jump into reviewing this series midway through, but K is the first book in Grafton's alphabet so far that's seemed much different than the others. I've thoroughly enjoyed the highly devourable mysteries A-I; J is for Judgment left a sour taste in my mouth only insomuch as it trespassed into non-mystery territory at the end, when (spoiler!) protagonist detective Kinsey Millhone discovers, basically out of nowhere, that she has family living not too far away. Her reaction to finding this out is pretty childish and initially in-character, but the open hostility and sustained unreasonableness of the character in the last 40 or 50 pages of the book made me hope for redemption -- or at least further development -- in K. K seems promising in its plot, at first. A bright but stand-offish young woman, Lorna Kepler, is found dead in her tiny cottage. Ten months later, her distraught mother asks Kinsey to look into her death -- in part because someone has just mailed Mom a videotape in which the bright, favored daughter appears in a porn film. The book slowly sinks, though, into tropes and bizarre complications. Lorna's lifestyle -- it turns out she worked part-time for the city's water treatment plant and part-time as a high-dollar sex worker -- is criticized soundly by nearly every character in the book, save one, her best friend (and fellow hooker), Danielle. Thus the book quickly divides into two groups: the fat, jealous women who speak about Lorna's life with disgust, and the thin pretty friend who's a hooker. Oh, and the men, all of whom seem to have wanted her. Kinsey's search for a possible killer leads her to San Francisco to check up on the porn film director and fellow actor. (The actor is one of the only friendly characters in the book, in part because he's one of the only surprising characters). There's really no point to this trip beyond, I can only guess, some kind of editorial advice that "maybe throw in some sex" was handed over. The only fun in the book comes from some banter between Kinsey and a new-to-readers male cop, Cheney Phillips, who spends the first half of the book being strangely seductive and professional. At about the 3/4 mark on the book, he becomes a jerk (and magically gains a girlfriend), in order to slow the progression of the mystery and to force Kinsey into a moral dilemma. By the end, three more people have died. All three die after Kinsey has received the clue that reveals who Lorna's real killer is; none of the three is confirmed to have been killed by the same person. In fact, the book varies completely from form at the end: not only are crimes left unsolved, but Kinsey doesn't even mention her final accounting with the family of the deceased (one of whom is implicated in an illegal act not long before the resolution). The epilogue deals with the (absent) consequences for the questionable moral decision Kinsey's made. I'd like to hope that might be dealt with in L, but this book leaves me no hope. Why? Because J's issues didn't make the cut here. Though the family drama is mentioned, it's only mentioned once, in dialogue. Unfortunately, there does seem to be some form of bitter hangover happening for either the character or the author. The childish, bitter, unreasonable Kinsey of the J finale shows up from the beginning of K. Where the descriptions in earlier books have often found clever ways to categorize new acquaintances, this book seems rife with uncreative and insulting descriptions. An initial meeting with the sister of the deceased leads Kinsey to cunningly observe that, "From the size of her butt, she'd eaten many boxed cakes." That's neither creative nor funny. It's just mean. Her observations of nearly every other woman in the book are similarly critical and hateful. The men, on the other hand, come off nicely -- they're mostly broad-shouldered, sturdily dressed, friendly in their smiles, light in their eyes. (One exception: a stereotypical pimp, whose physical dimensions are basically repeated in a stereotypical john later on). Add to this the fact that the author, for some reason, spends time not only reminding the reader of how many calories Kinsey's daily run burns but also finding the only good quality in any of the women seen to be the bare, flat midriffs of Danielle and an actress named Cherie, and you end up with a book that feels like it's simmering with the repressed bitchy hunger of a character (or writer?) who really, really needs a piece of cake and a day out with some decent girlfriends. So, even though I received H-M for Valentine's Day, it may be a while before I can lift L is for Lawless.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Fiona

    Not a great read. The build up is very slow and the outcome isn’t particularly thrilling. A really quite pedestrian whodunnit. I’ve still got another two from this series on my bookshelves but I don’t think I’ll bother reading them. Better than 2 stars but not quite 3.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ed

    Except for the a little puzzling ending, this was a corker of another read. The procedural parts to the homicide investigation were in-depth and added to the appeal. Kinsey a tough-minded private eye with a sardonic wit makes for a sturdy protagonist throughout the alphabet series.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Karl

    This hardcover copy is signed by Sue Grafton.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dana

    As soon as I read Sue Grafton's earlier Alphabet Series books, Grafton became one of my favorite writers of light chick-lit detective fiction. She can be a terrific storyteller. After being badly disappointed by the skimpy, disorganized "G" and "H" stories, and buoyed by the more substantial "I" and (to a lesser extent) "J" book, I was looking forward to "K." When picking up "K," you have to wonder where the story can go, as Millhone herself admits: how in the world after all of this time is she As soon as I read Sue Grafton's earlier Alphabet Series books, Grafton became one of my favorite writers of light chick-lit detective fiction. She can be a terrific storyteller. After being badly disappointed by the skimpy, disorganized "G" and "H" stories, and buoyed by the more substantial "I" and (to a lesser extent) "J" book, I was looking forward to "K." When picking up "K," you have to wonder where the story can go, as Millhone herself admits: how in the world after all of this time is she going to be able to get to the bottom of a 10-month-old death with no clues? I found much of the book fast-paced and engaging, with diligent, believable legwork. Certain characters and descriptions were interesting. Grafton created two memorable and likable victims. She gives them characteristics and a lifestyle that make them intriguing and make the reader want to know more. The book avoids the pitfall of venturing into out-of-its-depth "social commentary"; aside from a few scattered acerbic or snide remarks about pornography, the book is remarkably matter-of-fact and clinical. There is thus a lot of interest in the interrogations of people who knew the victims. The interviews are matter-of-fact and believable, but they are not terribly informative, and show how much the suspense and interest of the book is driven by making the main victim a girl-next-door-high-class hooker and would-be porn queen. The twists in the plot that Millhone's investigation brings to light are generally believable (for example, one character's tampering with a crime scene and a jealous wife planting an item in a home). The "new" evidence she turns up is generally well-finessed to avoid the obvious question why the detailed police investigation fell flat. But the book grows increasingly frustrating when it becomes clear that the routine interviews are all the book had to offer and that they are not adding up to much. By contrast to the victims, the suspects are poorly explored characters with no motives. A land developer is not introduced until late in the book, as a result of a fortuitous tape recording. The "community meeting" about the development is one of the sketchiest, most exaggerated, least believable descriptions in the book (Millhone supposedly "falling asleep" is a lame excuse for skimping on details). The crucial link between suspects is an awful, improbable gift clue of a photo (why would a killer choose to attack a victim when it would be impossible to thoroughly search the apartment for such items, much less let it be shot in the first place? What good did it do to "kill all the witnesses," a throwaway line explanation, if possibly and glaringly incriminating evidence was left behind?). The payoff is a superficially (if at all) described land development scam with a pool electrocution killing on the side. Because the crime lacks intricacy and cleverness, the detection merely had to be, and is, serviceable and routine, if diligent, to uncover it. And, of course, it is assisted by plot contrivances like a hidden tape recorder, Berlyn's intervention, the photo, and the killer's attempt on Millhone's life. The last two of these are the most disappointing, but the story has too little payoff to offset any of them. The story also includes a regrettable and pointless coincidence (a "kinky sex" relationship between two victims) and depends on unexplained, implausible behavior (the killer blabbing supposedly ingenious murder plans to one of the victims). The melodramatic end scene where Millhone confronts the killer and is blasted with a stun gun, before the intercession of a "man in an overcoat," undermines her professionalism and is an abrupt, anticlimactic conclusion. The last-minute theme-type allusion to "returning from the darkness" of vengeance, tied to the book's leitmotif of "living in the darkness, in the night," is mere atmospherics, not meaningful substance. The bottom line is that the highly charged premise and interesting, entertaining elements along the way come to precious little in the end. This holds the book's rating down to two and a half stars.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mark Baker

    PI Kinsey Millhone’s latest case is a cold one. Lorna Kepler has been dead for 10 months, and when she died she had been dead for two weeks before she was found, so the police couldn’t even determine the cause of death. As Kinsey begins to investigate, she realizes that Lorna had a completely secret life, and the investigation causes Kinsey to become a night owl like Lorna was. Will following her footsteps lead to her killer? This is another great mystery. The cold case quality leads to some inte PI Kinsey Millhone’s latest case is a cold one. Lorna Kepler has been dead for 10 months, and when she died she had been dead for two weeks before she was found, so the police couldn’t even determine the cause of death. As Kinsey begins to investigate, she realizes that Lorna had a completely secret life, and the investigation causes Kinsey to become a night owl like Lorna was. Will following her footsteps lead to her killer? This is another great mystery. The cold case quality leads to some interesting complications to the investigation. Lorna’s life included some things that don’t normally pop up in my cozies, but we didn’t get gratuitous detail, which I appreciated. The ending was a bit rushed, but that’s a minor complaint. We don’t see much of the other series characters, but Kinsey is fantastic as always, and the book is populated with real people that draw us into the story. Read my full review at Carstairs Considers.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lexy

    This book was very interesting it was a detective novel

  12. 5 out of 5

    Obsidian

    Sigh. I needed a comfort read and even though I have read this book many many times, I was happy to re-read it again. I have this book in hardcover so it was perfect to read as I sat by the pool on Sunday afternoon. Grafton takes Kinsey through the nightlife in Santa Teresa. She feels adrift as she investigates who could have killed Lorna Kepler. With Henry being away visiting his siblings she feels even more adrift. I liked how Grafton chose to end this book and the introduction of the characte Sigh. I needed a comfort read and even though I have read this book many many times, I was happy to re-read it again. I have this book in hardcover so it was perfect to read as I sat by the pool on Sunday afternoon. Grafton takes Kinsey through the nightlife in Santa Teresa. She feels adrift as she investigates who could have killed Lorna Kepler. With Henry being away visiting his siblings she feels even more adrift. I liked how Grafton chose to end this book and the introduction of the character of Cheney Phillips. "K is for Killer" is the 11th Kinsey Millhone mystery. Kinsey is paying the bills and doesn't have much going on job wise at the beginning of this book. She gets pulled into looking into the murder of Lorna Kepler after her mother comes to Kinsey asking for her to investigate what happened to her daughter. Lorna's mother, Janice believes that her daughter may have been forced into a life she didn't want or the police were using her to go undercover. Instead Kinsey finds out that Lorna was living a double life where she mostly seemed to exist at night. There's a lot of twists and turns before Kinsey figures out what happens to Lorna. Kinsey was great in this one. Determined to get to the bottom of what happened to Lorna she does what she does best. She interviews people, puts together notes, and starts linking things together. Without Henry around she's a bit adrift though and misses the way he made things homey. We already know that Kinsey was orphaned and raised by her aunt who seemed to bear no maternal instinct at all. However, we get to see that she does like her routines like going to Rosie and really loves her little house that was renovated. Grafton has Lieutenant Dolan appear in this one. She also introduces the character of Cheney Phillips who is working vice in Santa Teresa. It's not to see Kinsey have someone to play off against as she investigates Lorna's death. We get to see his character get further developed in future books. The book also introduces the character of Danielle who Kinsey becomes close to and who leads Kinsey to doing something that she didn't think was in her nature to do. I remember reading this for the first time and being shocked and then when the book leaps towards the end I was left open mouthed. Grafton I thought did a good job pushing Kinsey to a darker side in this one. Looking forward to L.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Darinda

    Kinsey Millhone is looking for who killed a young woman. The death occurred 10 months prior, but the grieving mother shows up at Kinsey's office because the police haven't found the killer. The young woman led a much seedier life than she led some to believe, and Kinsey gets a look into this life during the course of her investigation. The 11th book in the Kinsey Millhone mystery series. This one was a little different than some of the earlier books, mainly because Kinsey no longer worked as an i Kinsey Millhone is looking for who killed a young woman. The death occurred 10 months prior, but the grieving mother shows up at Kinsey's office because the police haven't found the killer. The young woman led a much seedier life than she led some to believe, and Kinsey gets a look into this life during the course of her investigation. The 11th book in the Kinsey Millhone mystery series. This one was a little different than some of the earlier books, mainly because Kinsey no longer worked as an investigator for California Fidelity. She wasn't working for them in the last book either, but the case was tied to CFI. Overall, it was a typical book for the series. I enjoyed the fast-paced plot. The ending of this one was unusual because Kinsey made a decision that was somewhat uncharacteristic of her. I listened to an audio version of this book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Beverly

    This was crazy good. Grafton gets a bit twisty and dark in this installment. Kinsey has to make some hard choices, and then live with the consequences. 4 1/2 out of 5 stars. On to L!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    I would have given this book 3 stars based on the whole book but I gave it two for the ending. It was the worst ending for any of these Sue Grafton books I have read. It was very anti-climatic.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Plot was weak - the reason for killing Lorna wasn't fully developed and left a lot of holes. Who was Lorna's fiance? How did the sisters get the tape in the first place? How did Danielle eventually die - was it murder, or complications? And who attacked her - her pimp or the murderer? Just lots of holes. I didn't like the way the reader read some of the characters. The sisters, especially, didn't jive. These women were supposed to be in their late 20s and they sounded like pre-teens. Danielle flu Plot was weak - the reason for killing Lorna wasn't fully developed and left a lot of holes. Who was Lorna's fiance? How did the sisters get the tape in the first place? How did Danielle eventually die - was it murder, or complications? And who attacked her - her pimp or the murderer? Just lots of holes. I didn't like the way the reader read some of the characters. The sisters, especially, didn't jive. These women were supposed to be in their late 20s and they sounded like pre-teens. Danielle fluctuated from very mature to silly. It held my attention, but wasn't the best.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    Another good Kinsey Millhone story. I love how she never gives up and keeps nosing around until she gets somewhere. I didn't remember anything going in but did have an aha moment in the middle with who did it (and I was right! last time I had that moment I was wrong). As always good story telling and it was fun seeing Kinsey turn into a night person in this book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Quenya

    I admit I have a soft spot for “cold” case mysteries and this book did not disappoint. From the first meeting Kinsey has with the victim’s mother, I was completely enamored with the case and couldn’t wait to see Kinsey get into it. Kinsey delves into this world of the “night” and it has a definite impact on her both emotionally and physically. She seems almost manic with times of extreme energy to times of extreme exhaustion but the big impact is on her emotions and her trip into the darkness. T I admit I have a soft spot for “cold” case mysteries and this book did not disappoint. From the first meeting Kinsey has with the victim’s mother, I was completely enamored with the case and couldn’t wait to see Kinsey get into it. Kinsey delves into this world of the “night” and it has a definite impact on her both emotionally and physically. She seems almost manic with times of extreme energy to times of extreme exhaustion but the big impact is on her emotions and her trip into the darkness. There isn’t a lot of discussion about the dark decisions Kinsey makes and that is a little disappointing because I really wanted to see her fight her way back to the light but it was just glossed quickly. Interesting things about this case are the varying descriptions of the murder victim. For those who knew her in the daytime, the description was very negative versus those who knew her at night. We are also introduced to Detective Cheney Philips who was very much a hot/cold kind of character as it relates to his relationship with Kinsey. I felt like Grafton couldn’t decide where she wanted the relationship to go so she started at one extreme (flirty/interested) and ended on the other end of that spectrum (disengaged). The only disappointment I have for the book is the little impact of Kinsey’s family had on this book after such a huge revelation it was in the last book. There was some discussion but not a whole lot which felt like a huge unresolved storyline was hanging out there.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dianne

    One of the Alphabet series in which Kinsey Milhone is asked to investigate a cold case, the death of beautiful Lorna Kepler. I have read most of the series, and find them light relaxing reading. There is a little too much of Kinsey's life style at the expense of the plot, which can become repetitive. Is there an element of autobiography in her novels ?

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rishi Prakash

    After finishing my last book over a month, I had picked this book with one simple hope/expectation- the story/pace should be fast and furious!! It turned out exactly that so full marks to it on that account for bringing me out of boredom :-)!! The language is fluid and eye for details in every thing is very impressive all through the book. The various characters developed leaves a mark for sure in their own way. The book has all the elements to keep us engaged and build the excitement as it prog After finishing my last book over a month, I had picked this book with one simple hope/expectation- the story/pace should be fast and furious!! It turned out exactly that so full marks to it on that account for bringing me out of boredom :-)!! The language is fluid and eye for details in every thing is very impressive all through the book. The various characters developed leaves a mark for sure in their own way. The book has all the elements to keep us engaged and build the excitement as it progresses and it definitely succeeds in keeping the suspense intact till the very end! Only disappointment was the loose ends left unanswered in the end and left on readers to conclude themselves!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Elyse

    I listened to this over 2 days and fell asleep at one point when Danielle got beat up. I lost about 20 minutes and decided not to go back. I didn't like this one as much. The subject matter wasn't really a big deal but I just didn't want to pay attention to it. I didn't like a lot of the characters and I also didn't like the deceased. And it ended VERY abruptly. It was just a weird kind of story. Dietz is briefly mentioned! I would like him to come back! Next book won't be for 6 weeks unless I A I listened to this over 2 days and fell asleep at one point when Danielle got beat up. I lost about 20 minutes and decided not to go back. I didn't like this one as much. The subject matter wasn't really a big deal but I just didn't want to pay attention to it. I didn't like a lot of the characters and I also didn't like the deceased. And it ended VERY abruptly. It was just a weird kind of story. Dietz is briefly mentioned! I would like him to come back! Next book won't be for 6 weeks unless I Audible it or go to the physical Library. E-library has 3 holds and 1 copy.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Scoats

    Another rock solid noir-ish one from Sue Grafton. I've read most of the series so far (well the ones my wife has) and have only been disappointed once. Like reading an Erle Stanley Gardener Perry Mason novel, with Sue Grafton and Kinsey Millhone you know what you are going to get and that it will be a good ride. We have a gap in the series; the next book we have is Q. Guess I'll have to renew my library card today.

  23. 5 out of 5

    PepperP0t

    Janice Keppler can't believe her daughter Lorna met such an end and can't rest without getting to the bottom of what caused Lorna's death. Kinsey's heart goes out to Janice and soon she is off to end one mothers suffering. The series itself is rather by the numbers with no real surprises to the format. This entry however starts with a film noirish quality in how the case comes to Kinsey. It seems as if this is going to be a great twisty read but it seems there is where we parted ways and it actu Janice Keppler can't believe her daughter Lorna met such an end and can't rest without getting to the bottom of what caused Lorna's death. Kinsey's heart goes out to Janice and soon she is off to end one mothers suffering. The series itself is rather by the numbers with no real surprises to the format. This entry however starts with a film noirish quality in how the case comes to Kinsey. It seems as if this is going to be a great twisty read but it seems there is where we parted ways and it actually does offer some good twists but sometimes feels jerky. Too many things seem to come from nowhere that made me wonder where?; why?; how?; what?; and once again why? enought that they became mini-mysteries in and of themselves. As Kinsey delves into the dark parts of Lorna's life things are exposed that cause anguish, character bashing and judgmental comments from additional characters of her life that we meet who made other choices. The book moves quickly and still works for a rainy afternoon or beach read and the writing is still fun - but this one installment wasn't as enjoyable to me, possibly because I didn't enjoy all of the characters. The ending was also different than I'm used to for the series. Normally I can count on Kinsey to make me smile with her black dress and the secondary characters bringing so much life to her life. This time not so much.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rosabelle Purnama

    This is my first Sue Grafton book that I read. Her book starts with the alphabet A, but I wasn't able to get my hands on the first book, so I started with this one, to get a feel of whether I like her books or not. The story is about a private detective, Kinsey Milhone. In this book, Kinsey was approached by a mother whose daughter was found dead and would like to hire a private investigator to find her daughter's murderer. The book started out okay. I quite enjoy it actually. It's kind of diffe This is my first Sue Grafton book that I read. Her book starts with the alphabet A, but I wasn't able to get my hands on the first book, so I started with this one, to get a feel of whether I like her books or not. The story is about a private detective, Kinsey Milhone. In this book, Kinsey was approached by a mother whose daughter was found dead and would like to hire a private investigator to find her daughter's murderer. The book started out okay. I quite enjoy it actually. It's kind of different from a murder mystery book told from the perspective of either the detective or the FBI. This is a mystery told from a private investigator's point of view of researching the case without the usual resources that a normal police detective has. However, I got a little bit confused towards the end. I kinda lost interest towards the last quarter of the book. And was definitely dissapointed towards the end. I would have given this a 3 stars if it wasn't for the end part.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jaret

    Another good episode in the Kinsey Millhone series. The storyline was interesting and didn't have a lot of distractions taking away from it. I enjoyed following the cold case clues along with Kinsey and Grafton did a great job of sticking to the point. The ending was not what I expected, but gave a great view into Kinsey's developing character and I really liked it. My only complaint was that the motive behind the murder was not crystal clear and if you blinked you missed it. (Not good when your Another good episode in the Kinsey Millhone series. The storyline was interesting and didn't have a lot of distractions taking away from it. I enjoyed following the cold case clues along with Kinsey and Grafton did a great job of sticking to the point. The ending was not what I expected, but gave a great view into Kinsey's developing character and I really liked it. My only complaint was that the motive behind the murder was not crystal clear and if you blinked you missed it. (Not good when your listening to the audioversion). Still, everything did make sense in the end!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    "K" was a fun mystery, maybe the only one so far that left me feeling like I needed another chapter at the end. It did not detract from the story at all, but there were so many characters, suspects, and unknowns in this book, and I wanted to see a few more pieces of info, that's all. A really good read, and Kinsey definitely got involved with some characters in this tale of the nighttime world. **SPOILER ALERT** I had wondered whether something might happen between Kinsey and Cheney.....

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ashley FL

    This one was four stars for me all the way to the end . . . and then it just ended. No explanation for why the murder had been committed. Many of the plot threads were left hanging, and they weren't things that will come up again in later books. So I'm going with three stars: would definitely have been four if there had been a few pages that explained rather than just naming one of the characters as the killer.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Alondra

    4 Stars Another satisfying mystery with our favorite busy-body, nosey, wise-ass; Kinsey Milhone. I must say, this ending was most satisfying. Nice twists and turns throughout the story, with most of the characters being less than desirable and unrelatable... at least to me. I like tidy endings, especially when murder is involved. :)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    The 11th book with Kinsey Millhone. This one has a lot of classic crime detective elements to it. A mother comes to Kinsey's office and begs her to take the case of her dead daughter. Dead daughter had a secret life where she was a prostitute. Kinsey has to submerge herself in the night life of said prostitute in order to find out what happened.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mike Mcnamara

    I'm addicted to these books lately, having read a couple when I worked as a summer librarian years ago and picked up E is for Evidence at a used book sale a few years back, and starting again at G once I got my Kindle. Though they're "easy readers" and I've been mainly reading them as my "airplane"/"relaxation" fiction , there's something about Grafton's style that puts her more than a cut above other popular genre authors. I can't quite nail what it is, but if I could, maybe I'd be the successf I'm addicted to these books lately, having read a couple when I worked as a summer librarian years ago and picked up E is for Evidence at a used book sale a few years back, and starting again at G once I got my Kindle. Though they're "easy readers" and I've been mainly reading them as my "airplane"/"relaxation" fiction , there's something about Grafton's style that puts her more than a cut above other popular genre authors. I can't quite nail what it is, but if I could, maybe I'd be the successful published authors. Because of this addiction, you should consider this graded on a curve -- almost all of them start out with a 3 to begin with and if I enjoy them without major complaints, they go to 5. And like Roger Ebert and other critics I enjoy, I tend to rate books within their own type. Short, summary review, no spoiler take: Though formulaic, all of Grafton's Alphabet Mysteries have a hook. In this one, 6 AM jogger Kinsey becomes a night owl while solving the cold case of possibly murdered wild girl Lorna Kepler. Night time Kinsey is a bit darker than her daytime version, in a way that doesn't really become noticeable until the end. Though there have been complaints that it seems rushed or somehow unexplained, the ending worked very well for me - especially given the 1st person (possibly even slightly unreliable) narrator all the Kinsey Millhone novels have. Major Spoilers Below - there's no point in reading the book if you read beyond this point: (view spoiler)[ Despite them being formulaic, each of the Kinsey Millhone stories so far is unique. What makes this one special is that it strips much of the formula away. Kinsey is tasked with solving the cold case murder of Lorna Kepler, a murdered wild child who was working as a high class escort and one time porn actress for her grieving mother (after she receives the unreleased tape in the mail anonymously from her not-so-grieving other daughters); the police aren't sure it was even a homicide and their investigations turned up nothing (thanks, in so small part, because Lorna's body sat decomposing in her cabin for weeks before she was discovered) , the mom's in denial, the father indifferent, at best, hostile at worst, to re-opening the case, and the sisters, as mentioned, are jealous that the victim is still Mom's favorite from the grave. The $200,000 in Lorna's account seems like a good motive, but the family, though imperfect, never seems like a real suspect (even though I've watched enough Law and Order:SVU to suspect the dad of having molested her), and the sister's biggest crimes are stealing money from their already dead sister. But, as usual, I've gotten off track, what I was trying to say -- what makes this entry in the series special is that in order to better understand the night own tendencies of the murdered lady of the evening, Kinsey turns from being a 6:00 AM jogger to a night owl herself. The characters and situations she comes across along the way: Lorna's crippled friend - the overnight jazz DJ with the protective dog, Danielle - the teenage hooker Lorna was mentoring, the porn producer in San Francisco and her well-hung co-star who ends up being a transsexual(revealed in one of the novel's best scenes - never played for shock or laughs - which sad to say is pretty fucking impressive for a book published in 1994 -- and taking place in 1985 or so), the night nurse wife with the well connected old father who also employed Lorna as a house sitter (and discovered the body) -- each of them is well illustrated for the amount of time a book this short allows us to spend with them, especially given the fact that the story is told, like all of the Alphabet mysteries, in first person. Perhaps wisely, Grafton has removed, for the most part, all of the secondary regular characters that populate Kinsey's role: beloved landlord Henry is visiting his family in Michigan for the entirety of the novel along with his pest of a brother, who has, of late, been engaged to other regular barkeep Rosie. By keeping Kinsey isolated, she becomes even more like Lorna, and the parallels are easy to draw, without beating us over the head with it. A thread that was started in the last novel -- Kinsey having relatives she did not know existed -- is mentioned but really wouldn't have had a place in this story, so Grafton wisely didn't try to shoehorn them in. This change in tone and character which is created from Kinsey's change in lifestyle is most shocking at the end, when Kinsey, in a somewhat-but-not-entirely out-of-character action, takes an action which seems to lead the death of the murderer -- Lorna's employer at her day job at the water treatment plant, Roger Bonney, who has stumbled across blackmail material -- his former father-in-law, a higher-up on the water reclamation board, was one of Lorna's clients, and Roger hoped to use it to get the old man to change his vote on a development deal which would make him and another man some money. When the blackmailing wouldn't work, he and his partner thought to electrocute the old man (which they ended up doing) but had to kill Lorna to secure her silence. Kinsey's evidence is all circumstantial, but after the death of Danielle (also at Roger's hands), frustrated and angry, she lets the Mafia-type (a mobster who was scheduled to marry Lorna the day of her death), who has asked Kinsey to keep him appraised of her findings, know of Roger's guilt, which causes him to "disappear." This happens rushed at the end, and while I understand while others might not like it, it seems realistic (enough) given that Kinsey is telling the story and isn't going to dwell on her own guilt -- though it does put the beginning of the story -- in which she talks about legal definitions of homicide - in a new light. All and all, I enjoyed the tale and the solution. The tie in to the water reclamation project seemed... not obvious, but something that would be explored when it came up at all (and especially when so much time was spent with it.) There should be a word for that in mysteries... almost like an anti-McGuffin. On the flipside, I was very impressed the description of the man who was tailing Kinsey for Lorna's mafia fiancee -- as, like many such clues in Grafton's books, it slides in in a way so that it doesn't seem too important, but you still remember it when its true importance is revealed. So I give this one 5 stars when reviewing -- though like I said before -- all of these series so far probably start out with 3 to begin with, so consider it a graded curve. (hide spoiler)]

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