Hot Best Seller

Cat Among the Pigeons PDF, ePub eBook

4.6 out of 5
30 review

Cat Among the Pigeons

Availability: Ready to download

File Name: Cat Among the Pigeons .pdf

How it works:

1. Register a free 1 month Trial Account.

2. Download as many books as you like (Personal use)

3. Cancel the membership at any time if not satisfied.


Cat Among the Pigeons PDF, ePub eBook When what looks like an amorous assignation turns out to be an assignation of quite a different sort, a globetrotting murderer leads Hercule Poirot on a breathless chase from a revolution-torn Arab sheikdom to a very respectable English school for young ladies.

30 review for Cat Among the Pigeons

  1. 5 out of 5

    Simona Bartolotta

    3.5 “Everybody always knows something," said Adam, "even if it's something they don't know they know.” Of course, there is a crime (actually, more than one -yay) but there is also espionage and international conspiracies and I enjoyed it far more than I thought I would. Cat Among Pigeons definitely is a quite peculiar adventure for Poirot, but nonetheless our Belgian detective solves it as brilliantly as ever. Besides, I simply adored the epilogue. So cute and poignant.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    3 stars for this slow moving triple homicide mystery which I didn't like as much as others. When I first began this challenge a fellow Goodreads member, paulie, predicted that I would probably solve a case by August! But I was bowled over that I actually had both of the suspects figured out early on the book. Strangely neither of the feline occupants of my couch much cared for my excitement. That's why I feel myself only giving it a 3 star review because A.C. made it too easy and took too long 3 stars for this slow moving triple homicide mystery which I didn't like as much as others. When I first began this challenge a fellow Goodreads member, paulie, predicted that I would probably solve a case by August! But I was bowled over that I actually had both of the suspects figured out early on the book. Strangely neither of the feline occupants of my couch much cared for my excitement. That's why I feel myself only giving it a 3 star review because A.C. made it too easy and took too long exploring the characters that the motives for all were explicit and I feel a bit sad for Hercule Poiriot that he was forced to get himself involved in the case. However his cameo was genuinely enjoyable. What a snob that fella is and I just love the amount of malice that the Inspector in the case had for him. HAHA!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Veronique

    Another entertaining Agatha Christie! This one, although labelled a Poirot case, only features our favourite Belgian sleuth at the end of the story, taking on the mantle of the 'deus ex machina' to sort it all. Instead we get a novel that goes from the exoticism of a tale of international conspiracies to the banality of a private girls’ school in England. The author plays with different strands, focusing on a variety of characters, all with a good dose of humour. I personally rather enjoyed seein Another entertaining Agatha Christie! This one, although labelled a Poirot case, only features our favourite Belgian sleuth at the end of the story, taking on the mantle of the 'deus ex machina' to sort it all. Instead we get a novel that goes from the exoticism of a tale of international conspiracies to the banality of a private girls’ school in England. The author plays with different strands, focusing on a variety of characters, all with a good dose of humour. I personally rather enjoyed seeing all these disparate personalities, from the girls to the teachers, and their various motivations. Fun too :O)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sophie Hannah

    I loved all the detail about the school in this novel, which is why I gave it four stars. The plot is not one of Agatha's best, though it's not bad. But, as in Hickory Dickory Dock, Poirot presents much of the solution without telling us how he came to work it out, and Agatha novels work best when we are able to follow the workings of Poirot's mind more closely. However, all the school stuff makes this novel enjoyable and atmospheric.

  5. 5 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    “No sign, so far, of anything sinister—but I live in hope.”—Adam, in Christie Christie’s Poirot #32, just a few more to go. After a couple of books where (the rich) Christie seems to defer to the poor and minorities in ways not typical for her, she returns for her story to a fairly typical setting, a stunning place filled with rich people! (After reading all these in the gutter noir novels by Cain and Thompson, it is quite a contrast, let me tell ya!). This time it’s Meadowbank, one of the most e “No sign, so far, of anything sinister—but I live in hope.”—Adam, in Christie Christie’s Poirot #32, just a few more to go. After a couple of books where (the rich) Christie seems to defer to the poor and minorities in ways not typical for her, she returns for her story to a fairly typical setting, a stunning place filled with rich people! (After reading all these in the gutter noir novels by Cain and Thompson, it is quite a contrast, let me tell ya!). This time it’s Meadowbank, one of the most exclusive girls’ schools in England, which gives us the opportunity to examine girl/women culture in England in the fifties, standards for which are being shared with minorities who are fortunate enough to attend the school. For instance, there’s a 3-4 page exposition by a Meadowbank teacher on appropriate English brassieres for this period, given for the benefit of a “foreign” student who has more “exotic” tastes for fashion. And wouldn’t you know it, this bit figures into the plot! And yes, Christie writes of rich people, but whereas in earlier books Christie wrote about the rich in a seemingly uncritical fashion, we get a clearer idea of Christie’s view in this book. Oh, some of the rich were shallow and clueless in earlier books, but this was comedy. Poirot was and is always a snob, but a charming snob. In Cat Among Pigeons Christie’s views we get an admirable character to help us see the rich for what they often are, The Bull, Miss Bullstrode, the likeable and strong headmistress who is not a snob, not ethnocentric. Miss Johnson: “We have difficulties with the foreigners sometimes. . . Foreigners are much more precocious than English girls.” The Headmistress thinks this may be the brandy talking, but also chides Miss Johnson not to be “too insular.” But yes, there is more than multiculturalism in Cat Among the Pigeons; there’s also murder at Meadowbank (a better title, I think). At least one. . . “Was Miss Springer well liked?” he [Kelsey] asked. “Well, really, I couldn’t say. She’s dead, after all.” The stories include chapters featuring letters sent home by the girls from school, some of them amusing, cute, I guess. As a teacher beginning yet another fall semester, it was interesting to see the conservative fifties approach to schooling and life, the staff conflicts, and the girls’ reflections on all this. And about the murder! “Dear Mummy, We had a murder last night. I thought you would want to know.” The mystery begins in the Palace of Ramat, with a Prince Ali Yusuf, followed by a couple murders, some missing jewels, leading to Meadowbank, where young (and precocious) Shaista is a student. Follow the jewels and the exotic foreigners! Most of the necessary preliminary investigative work is done by two able inspectors, so Poirot doesn’t even make an appearance until nearly three quarters into the book, which is unusual, but I didn’t miss him. I had Bulstrode to pay attention to, my favorite character in this one, which I ended up liking quite a bit, though the solution comes rather quickly from Poirot, and is not all that interesting compared to other solutions from her. Miss Bulstrode is finally a rather progressive headmistress. I liked her discussion toward the end with her successor, the charmingly disheveled Miss Hill, about the necessity for a democratic approach to schooling and ethnic differences. At the beginning of yet another school year, I like the reminders about how to make schooling more relevant and engaging! From a 1964 mystery novelist!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lata

    I was entertained by this novel with touches of espionage along with lots of murder. I was amused when Poirot sails in only near the end of the story and tells everyone what’s been going on at a respected girls’ school where everyone seems to be after a bunch of jewels. Thank goodness one of the schoolgirls, Julia, is smart, observant and sensible enough to figure enough out of what’s going on to engage Poirot.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    I didn't like this one quite as much as the other two I've read so far, and I'm not sure why. If Mrs. Upjohn recognized someone at the school who she knew from her previous life in intelligence work and knew this person was a trained killer, why would she leave her daughter in the same school and then travel the world? I hate to say that it's a plot hole, but it bothered me slightly.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    Poirot fans will be disappointed that the diminutive Belgian does not come into this one until very late in this story about murders and mayhem at a prestigious all-girls school. This is not a bad A.C. as things go though. Nice set up and an interest international plot. However, I'd just read Dorothy Sayers Gaudy Night and it handles the almost exact same scenario with more finesse.

  9. 4 out of 5

    F.R.

    The main problem with the Hercule Poirot novel, CAT AMONG THE PIGEONS – and I know this is not a criticism that Dame Agatha Christie would have welcomed at all – is that there just isn’t enough Hercule Poirot in it. It’s probably more than three quarters of the way through before the great Belgian detective shows up, but once he does it’s like the elixir of life has been injected intravenously into the page. He’s such a wonderful character that he immediately invigorates the whole book. And a st The main problem with the Hercule Poirot novel, CAT AMONG THE PIGEONS – and I know this is not a criticism that Dame Agatha Christie would have welcomed at all – is that there just isn’t enough Hercule Poirot in it. It’s probably more than three quarters of the way through before the great Belgian detective shows up, but once he does it’s like the elixir of life has been injected intravenously into the page. He’s such a wonderful character that he immediately invigorates the whole book. And a story which was frankly becoming a slog, becomes suddenly a beautiful breeze. Okay, when it comes to solving the case, Christie gives the reader no chance at all. The logical leaps Poirot has to make are frankly beyond any reader, and some of the information he has to unravel the mystery is stuff we simply don’t possess. As such, it’s a bit of a cheat, but by that point I was frankly so happy to see him that I forgave him the trickery. The tale hinges on a murder in a girl’s school, and the first chapter is one of the most bizarrely opaque chapters I've ever read in popular fiction. Not really the kind of thing one expects from Dame Agatha at all. Half a dozen and more lady teachers are introduced, most with little more than a sentence of description, and they charge around while the reader tries to keep them all straight in their heads. It's like Christie, to keep herself amused in the umpteenth Poirot story, has started using alienation techniques. As if what we have here is Agatha Christie in her Samuel Beckett phase. However, more jarring than that was encountering the phrase "sex craved teenager" in a Poirot novel. Really? It's like when P.G. Wodehouse had his Uncle Fred characters "dance the rock and roll". It absolutely feels like a moment that shouldn't be there. Hercule Poirot great detective of country house mysteries of the 1930s should no more be near a sex craved teenager, than he should buy a pint for P.J. Proby. It's an interesting book then, an odd book too – but one that definitely needs more old school Poirot.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kaethe Douglas

    When this was published Christie had already been a best-selling author for more than three decades. She's got it down. Certainly she has fun with the format. Hercule Poirot doesn't appear, isn't even mentioned, until the final act. The girl's school setting is fun: it gives her rein to use all the stereotypes and to demolish them. This particular book was on Natasha's shelf, which is why I didn't get to it during my Christie run. Saturday night she comes to tell me goodnight and to ask if I know When this was published Christie had already been a best-selling author for more than three decades. She's got it down. Certainly she has fun with the format. Hercule Poirot doesn't appear, isn't even mentioned, until the final act. The girl's school setting is fun: it gives her rein to use all the stereotypes and to demolish them. This particular book was on Natasha's shelf, which is why I didn't get to it during my Christie run. Saturday night she comes to tell me goodnight and to ask if I know why the book is there. And even though I can't remember what day it is, I was able to tell her that she picked it out at a library book sale, because she recognized the author. Alternatively, every bookcase is required to have at least one Christie. Or, maybe, a book is just a clever disguise for aliens who've come to observe us. After two hours of increasingly random speculation about space, and teleportation, and replicators, she finally went off to bed, leaving the book with me, because now it felt slightly sinister. Subtle evil plan to acquire all the books is working. "Maniacal laugh, maniacal laugh, maniacal laugh." Personal copy now.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dani

    Another well written, finely crafted classic. Agatha Christie’s books are so timeless. This could have been written 60 days ago, but it was actually written 60 years ago! Poirot doesn’t actually appear until about 60% of the way in - which was fine by me as for some reason I thought this was a stand-alone. Not sure how, but I failed to notice / realise that this was actually a Poirot, so his appearance was a pleasant surprise.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bruce Beckham

    I love the historical and social insight that comes ‘as standard’ with an Agatha Christie – presented, of course, through the prism of the author’s own life experience and privileged background. This novel was published in 1959 – the war and rationing had been left behind, a new world order was emerging, and the Middle East was beginning to flex its muscles. That said – there were certain idiosyncrasies that left me a little bamboozled. In particular, this is billed as a Poirot mystery. But the gr I love the historical and social insight that comes ‘as standard’ with an Agatha Christie – presented, of course, through the prism of the author’s own life experience and privileged background. This novel was published in 1959 – the war and rationing had been left behind, a new world order was emerging, and the Middle East was beginning to flex its muscles. That said – there were certain idiosyncrasies that left me a little bamboozled. In particular, this is billed as a Poirot mystery. But the great detective does not get a mention until chapter 17 of 25. Moreover, his improbable enlistment by a teenage schoolgirl smacked of Enid Blyton’s Famous Five. I rather suspect that Agatha Christie had realised her detectives were stumped, and resorted to Poirot’s super-human powers! Secondly, when the ‘true’ story finally became clear, I did feel it was somewhat contrived. There were just too many coincidences and conveniences for comfort; credibility became incredulity. (That said – it was fun trying to work it out. I just think I’d rather not have known the answer!) For the most part it is a pleasurable reading experience: settle down and enjoy the cozy ride and don't worry too much about the uncertain destination. There is one moderate swear word and one phrase that would surely get the book banned today. Oh, and the outmoded language – how brilliant a paragraph in which knickers and ejaculated are used in the same breath – but I can assure you it is not what it seems! The novel is, after all, set in an exclusively female boarding school.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Laurel Young

    Cat Among the Pigeons is an atypical Agatha with a number of strengths but a couple of odd weaknesses. I really enjoyed the fact that the first 100 pages are more of a novel of manners than a mystery, focusing on the development of interesting characters at a girls' boarding school. I admit, I picture Waverly Academy from Nancy Drew! When murder finally occurs, the motivation thus has more depth. This would be one of her best but for two detractions: first, it is very odd to bring in Poirot 200 Cat Among the Pigeons is an atypical Agatha with a number of strengths but a couple of odd weaknesses. I really enjoyed the fact that the first 100 pages are more of a novel of manners than a mystery, focusing on the development of interesting characters at a girls' boarding school. I admit, I picture Waverly Academy from Nancy Drew! When murder finally occurs, the motivation thus has more depth. This would be one of her best but for two detractions: first, it is very odd to bring in Poirot 200 pages in, as a sort of deux ex machina, especially when one of the students has proved herself an apt amateur detective and put together most of the pieces already. It feels like a forced effort to bring in the popular detective, likely as a selling point so that the cover can say "a Hercule Poirot novel"! Secondly, the political intrigue subplot feels like a throwback to Christie's early WWI thrillers, and is out of place in the stolidly English setting. I far prefer the main plot of the girls' school and the issues seething under its placid surface.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    the very first - from such a long list of - agatha christie's detective novels i've read. quite a 'right' choice because the story reminds me of the more familiar enid blyton's boarding schools' series (i.e. mallory towers), but with such expanded plots that includes romance, theft and murder. very juicy indeed. i could even remember that i skipped sleeping that night just to finish this novel, and succeeded doing so in less than 48 hours. this novel was probably the one that triggered my crave the very first - from such a long list of - agatha christie's detective novels i've read. quite a 'right' choice because the story reminds me of the more familiar enid blyton's boarding schools' series (i.e. mallory towers), but with such expanded plots that includes romance, theft and murder. very juicy indeed. i could even remember that i skipped sleeping that night just to finish this novel, and succeeded doing so in less than 48 hours. this novel was probably the one that triggered my crave (or hunger?) for ms. christie's other works. love "cat among pigeons" much.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Claire

    I was so in the mood for this. Murder at a posh all girls boarding school. Lucky that I found a copy in the library of my hotel for a beach read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jack Heath

    4 Stars. Poirot doesn't appear until 2/3rds of the way into the book, but it's one of his masterworks when he finally intervenes. He gets the call because he was extolled by Maureen Summerhayes, an earlier Christie character from "Mrs. McGuinty's Dead." We meet Prince Ali Yusef, Sheik of Ramat in the Middle East, and his close friend and personal pilot Bob Rawlinson, as a revolution to unseat the Prince is about to happen. To remain alive they must flee the country and ensure a fortune in jewels 4 Stars. Poirot doesn't appear until 2/3rds of the way into the book, but it's one of his masterworks when he finally intervenes. He gets the call because he was extolled by Maureen Summerhayes, an earlier Christie character from "Mrs. McGuinty's Dead." We meet Prince Ali Yusef, Sheik of Ramat in the Middle East, and his close friend and personal pilot Bob Rawlinson, as a revolution to unseat the Prince is about to happen. To remain alive they must flee the country and ensure a fortune in jewels does not fall into the wrong hands. The stones somehow jump to Meadowbank School, one of the UK's leading schools for girls. Christie's humble readers follow along. Sports including tennis is a specialty. It is here that the search for the jewels by one or more nefarious groups leads to murder. And kidnapping. One of the author's more philosophical entries. Through her characters, she expounds on democracy, international relations, progress and education. In the Canadian context, she's a "Red Tory." But her eye is most accurate when analyzing people and their motives which echo even today. Christie really is special. (December 2018)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Clara

    3.5 stars

  18. 4 out of 5

    Obsidian

    Wow. This story took several hundred pages to even get going. I figured out a ton of things before anyone else did. We once again get Poirot in this novel at around the 80 percent mark. I have seen it before, and will say it again. The Poirot books are boring when we focus too much on other people. I wish that we had Poirot involved from the beginning so at least he didn't come in as a side character. The main character in this book from beginning to end was Julia Upjohn. Since this book was pub Wow. This story took several hundred pages to even get going. I figured out a ton of things before anyone else did. We once again get Poirot in this novel at around the 80 percent mark. I have seen it before, and will say it again. The Poirot books are boring when we focus too much on other people. I wish that we had Poirot involved from the beginning so at least he didn't come in as a side character. The main character in this book from beginning to end was Julia Upjohn. Since this book was published in 1959, once again we get some comments about changing times. And you can read at times at how old/odd Poirot is to other people. I often read that Agatha Christie disliked Poirot as a character as she got older. I can definitely see that in her later works. The overall plot really didn't work for me at all. Reading about a mythical Middle Eastern country that is overrun with fanaticism was initially interesting. But to have the whole thing descend into a big conversation on how women get distracted and/or crazy when around jewels I thought was just a bit much. It also didn't help that we had huge plot holes that just baffled me made their way into the final cut. Christie for the most part in my opinion, is much better than this. The pacing was off a lot. Initially things were quite smooth, after the book moved to England things just slowed down to a ridiculous proportion. The setting of a girls school I thought was an interesting choice, I just wish that we had actually gotten to know more of the instructors/students by more than a throwaway line here and there. It lead to just a lot of confusion with such a huge cast of characters.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    This isn't a Christie classic, certainly. I did enjoy the way jewels are smuggled out of a Mid-Eastern country in chaos, and I enjoyed that an English Girl's School is the location for most of the mystery, an unusual locale for Dame Agatha. There are the usual red herrings, the expected plot twists. But for no real reason, the author brings in Poirot about 4/5ths of the way through, while any local inspector/police officer would have served just fine. It feels as if the publisher sent a draft ba This isn't a Christie classic, certainly. I did enjoy the way jewels are smuggled out of a Mid-Eastern country in chaos, and I enjoyed that an English Girl's School is the location for most of the mystery, an unusual locale for Dame Agatha. There are the usual red herrings, the expected plot twists. But for no real reason, the author brings in Poirot about 4/5ths of the way through, while any local inspector/police officer would have served just fine. It feels as if the publisher sent a draft back to Christie to add Poirot simply to increase sales. (No surprise Christie couldn't stand this little detective toward the end of her career.) So for me this is one of AC's lesser works, as it really doesn't even feel like she had full control of the entire story.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Vikas Singh

    I many ways this book is a let down. The plot is weak and there are just too many coincidences. The story to an extent is based on the schooling pattern popular amongst the elite during Christie's time. Halfway through the novel, i started losing interest and it was only the drive to finish it, that i ended up reading the last page. Quite a bore

  21. 5 out of 5

    Shiloah

    Such a good one! Jewel thieves, boarding school, corruption, and murder. Who did it? Not who you think!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Stela

    This is my last Agatha Christie - for now. It was a nice trip down the memory lane, for three of the four novels I read were actually re-readings. Not this one, and a pleasant surprise it was. With a subject so flashy (coup d'état in an Arab state and a legacy of jewels) it would have been easy for the author to slip into kitsch. not Agatha Christie, though, who reveals herself not only a master of mystery but also a skilful observer of the young girls psychology. A very interesting touch was the This is my last Agatha Christie - for now. It was a nice trip down the memory lane, for three of the four novels I read were actually re-readings. Not this one, and a pleasant surprise it was. With a subject so flashy (coup d'état in an Arab state and a legacy of jewels) it would have been easy for the author to slip into kitsch. not Agatha Christie, though, who reveals herself not only a master of mystery but also a skilful observer of the young girls psychology. A very interesting touch was the delay of the main hero (Hercule Poirot, of course), who enters the scene in the second part of the novel. Even the end, somehow syrupy, did not decrease the pleasure of reading. A 3.5-stars book, definitely!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Okay, fine, I amend my last Christie review: preposterous spy shenanigans ARE acceptable but only if ironically juxtaposed with as down-to-earth a genre as the jolly-hockey-sticks school story. I wonder if anyone's written a spinoff of Julia Upjohn, P.I. with the gloriously oblivious Jennifer as her Watson/Hastings.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Paula Sealey

    Not one of my favourite Christie novels it has to be said, not least because Poirot doesn't even make an appearance until the final act. For me, his character was rather redundant, and the mystery could easily have been solved by one of the stronger players already present in the story. The build up is slow but interesting, and the plot solid, as you would expect from Christie. The characters are well formed and I did enjoy the boarding school setting with its raft of mistresses and 'jolly hocke Not one of my favourite Christie novels it has to be said, not least because Poirot doesn't even make an appearance until the final act. For me, his character was rather redundant, and the mystery could easily have been solved by one of the stronger players already present in the story. The build up is slow but interesting, and the plot solid, as you would expect from Christie. The characters are well formed and I did enjoy the boarding school setting with its raft of mistresses and 'jolly hockey sticks' schoolgirls. Such fun!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Part of an Agatha Christie mini review round up. This book is set up slightly differently in that there are a fewer characters to sort through and it's much more straight forward.  Perhaps this is because I've read it a few times but to me, there isn't a clear answer until the end but it's obvious what the motive is.  I did like how foreign countries were brought into it, though!  I do really like the title though.  It's very mystery-like. Final Verdict: Intriguing and compelling mystery although Part of an Agatha Christie mini review round up. This book is set up slightly differently in that there are a fewer characters to sort through and it's much more straight forward.  Perhaps this is because I've read it a few times but to me, there isn't a clear answer until the end but it's obvious what the motive is.  I did like how foreign countries were brought into it, though!  I do really like the title though.  It's very mystery-like. Final Verdict: Intriguing and compelling mystery although slightly less complex than others. 4.5 stars

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lindley Walter-smith

    This book really makes me wish Christie wrote school stories as well as mysteries and thrillers. Really enjoyable thriller/murder mystery set in a boarding school, with intrepid young ladies and an awe-inspiring headmistress mixed up with international intrigue. Poirot comes in right at the end, grandfatherly and kind, to save the day. The best part, though, is the boarding school setting, the students and the teachers.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Clare Snow

    Ah Agatha, the queen of rascist colonialism. Meanwhile the cat's among the tennis playing pigeons and Lady Macbeth hones her wiles. I remember one thing from my first read a quarter of a century ago - not the murderer. While my memory fails me, here's hoping my adjectives have improved. Review from when I was 12: Terrific book, about school girls. I really loved it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Monica

    I haven't read Christie in a long time and I wanted to read something that wasn't topical. I was disappointed. It dragged on once we figured out the jewels were in the tennis rackets and it was slow going until Poirot showed up toward the end. I hated the ending. There were no clues earlier in the book about who the culprits would be and it was just too improbable.

  29. 4 out of 5

    ✘✘ Sarah ✘✘ (former Nefarious Breeder of Murderous Crustaceans)

    I think I could read Hercule Poirot mysteries over and over again and never get bored. I know some of the stories by heart and have seen their film adaptations but I still enjoy reading them very much!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Eh. I definitely didn't love it and found it rather predictable and dull.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.