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The Adversary PDF, ePub eBook In the 3rd book of the multi-author SUNDERING series kicked off by New York Times best-selling author R.A. Salvatore, the award-winning Erin M. Evans throws her signature character Farideh into a maelstrom of devilish politics and magical intrigue. Captured by Netherese agents and locked away in a prison camp, Farideh quickly discovers her fellow prisoners are not simply e In the 3rd book of the multi-author SUNDERING series kicked off by New York Times best-selling author R.A. Salvatore, the award-winning Erin M. Evans throws her signature character Farideh into a maelstrom of devilish politics and magical intrigue. Captured by Netherese agents and locked away in a prison camp, Farideh quickly discovers her fellow prisoners are not simply enemies of Netheril, but people known as Chosen who possess hidden powers, powers that Netheril is eager to exploit—or destroy. As Farideh’s friends and sister race across the landscape on a desperate rescue mission, Farideh is drawn deeper into the mystery of the Netherese plot alongside two undercover Harper agents. But will her closest ally turn out to be an adversary from her past?  

30 review for The Adversary

  1. 5 out of 5

    Shadowdenizen

    Not much development for Farideh (but that may be a side-effect of being part of a "RSE" (Realms-Shaking-Event, which happens in every edition of the Forgotten Realms D+D RPG.) But at least we learn a little about the Sundering event (which is basically just to upgrade the Forgotten Realms fiction from 4E to 5E.)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Fisk

    Originally published at Tales to Tide You Over This is the third of the Sundering series I’ve read, and I’m thinking it comes in as my favorite. We’re thrust into disaster after disaster from the very start because the main focus is on a tiefling, Farideh, who never looks before she leaps, so determined to do what’s right that she doesn’t take the time to think things through. Of course, she’s rarely given the time she needs either. Then there’s the Harper Dahl who comes with a history rich with Originally published at Tales to Tide You Over This is the third of the Sundering series I’ve read, and I’m thinking it comes in as my favorite. We’re thrust into disaster after disaster from the very start because the main focus is on a tiefling, Farideh, who never looks before she leaps, so determined to do what’s right that she doesn’t take the time to think things through. Of course, she’s rarely given the time she needs either. Then there’s the Harper Dahl who comes with a history rich with disaster and a self-destructive streak miles wide, Lorcan who is a devil half-blood driven by emotions he doesn’t believe he can have, Farideh’s sister with her own issues, and more. Sure, this is an adventure fantasy with horrible things happening, people needing a rescue, people forced to do things they would prefer not to and suffering the consequences should they balk. It’s complex, complicated, and twisty. Deals with devils are rarely simple, and all the clauses in the world won’t cover every eventuality. But ultimately this is a people novel. It’s about the kind of trouble that comes through rash choices, and learning to live with the consequences at the same time as trying to mend what went wrong. It’s rare that a novel can startle me into a laugh, and I wasn’t expecting it of this one as much of what happens falls into the dark paths of choosing the best of the worst when lives are at stake, but still there have been several times when the characters’ interactions just hit me the right way. There are things the characters say that stand out as poignant or telling, and yet though they have broader implications, are also perfect for the moment and that character. Though Farideh is known in the Forgotten Realms universe, she’s new to me. What I came out of this book with is a wish to check out more of Erin M. Evans’ stories, and a sense of a rich history of which I know enough to make this book solid just in the glimpses offered, and yet I’m intrigued to discover more. The characters are complicated, well-rounded, and faced with the kinds of choices that make black and white a simple world for simple people who have never experienced anything more difficult than whether to share their breakfast meats or hoard them. I’ve already recommended the book to my son, and I suspect he’s not the first to hear about how much I enjoyed the rich characters and events put into play here. P.S. I received this title from the publisher through Net Galley in return for an honest review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Morrow

    You can find this review and others on The Nomadic Reader. Book three in The Sundering series was a welcome change from the incredible doom and gloom that I felt in the first two books. You’re introduced to two tiefling, Farideh and her sister Havilar. While the book is third in the series you’re more than welcome to read it out of order, the books (like the previous ones) only loosely tie together (they all take place in the same ‘world’). The world is still filled with doom and gloom but there You can find this review and others on The Nomadic Reader. Book three in The Sundering series was a welcome change from the incredible doom and gloom that I felt in the first two books. You’re introduced to two tiefling, Farideh and her sister Havilar. While the book is third in the series you’re more than welcome to read it out of order, the books (like the previous ones) only loosely tie together (they all take place in the same ‘world’). The world is still filled with doom and gloom but there are hints of romance and characters that I didn’t absolutely disdain which always helps. Farideh makes a pact (or two, or three) with a devil in order to keep those she cares about safe from harm. Of course making pacts with devils never turns out the way you want it to, and she soon finds herself in over her head, serving a wizard who is rounding up the Chosen of the Gods for a purpose that she can’t figure out. Her sister is bent on rescuing her, along with her old patron, a group of harpers who think she is a traitor, and a red wizard. Each person has their own reason for finding Farideh, with their own outcome of the events. I can honestly say this third book is my favorite so far. The characters were colourful and came alive in a way that I didn’t see in the previous books. It was nice to see characters that were not all good or all evil; they made mistakes, and paid for those mistakes. I found myself ‘rooting’ for each character as they neared their goal and while the ending may have been predictable, I was satisfied with how it carried out. This book released in December, so it’s a great time to pick it up. I received a copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review, and I thank NetGalley as well as the publishers for the opportunity. 4/5 stars

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dianne

    An epic series, epic authors, dark fantasy that is detailed and deep, book three of The Sundering, The Adversary by Erin M. Evans is following in step with its predecessors! , Farideh is drawn into a world of deceit, magic and mayhem as she is taken prisoner in Netheril, only to discover that the Chosen of the gods are being held and exploited for their secret powers. Will she make it out alive? Can she be rescued? Can she trust those who claim to be her ally? Is this one more time the fates hav An epic series, epic authors, dark fantasy that is detailed and deep, book three of The Sundering, The Adversary by Erin M. Evans is following in step with its predecessors! , Farideh is drawn into a world of deceit, magic and mayhem as she is taken prisoner in Netheril, only to discover that the Chosen of the gods are being held and exploited for their secret powers. Will she make it out alive? Can she be rescued? Can she trust those who claim to be her ally? Is this one more time the fates have dealt her a wicked hand? In keeping with the pace of the previous books, this is does not race across the pages, but does rely on very intense detail and intrigue. The characters were flawed, and not always completely likable, but there is the sense of inner strength that comes through in the expansive dialogue throughout. Erin Evans has done a very good job of adding to the depth of the series, with a sense of darkness and chaos throughout, sure to assist in the revival of the Forgotten Realm! I received an Arc edition from Wizards of the Coast in exchange for my honest review. Series: The Sundering, Book 3 Publication Date: December 3, 2013 Publisher: Wizards of the Coast ISBN: 9780786963751 Genre: Dark Fantasy-Adults Page Count: 432 Available from: Amazon | Barnes & Noble

  5. 4 out of 5

    Daphne

    This is a helluva a good series in the FR universe. I really enjoy Evan's writing style, and the book narration is great. Highly recommend this series for any FR fans or those that just dig good fantasy.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kiernan

    tw: self harm

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dr. Trent

    In reading Erin Evans contribution to the The Sundering series, her book The Adversary turned out to be a mixed bag. Evans does a masterful job of sharing setting and action with the reader through her use of imagery and choice of diction. Her character development however is a long and painful process that detracts from the plot as a whole. In the opening of the book, as well as at several points throughout the book, Evans does a superb job of using all five senses to create a tableaux vivant fo In reading Erin Evans contribution to the The Sundering series, her book The Adversary turned out to be a mixed bag. Evans does a masterful job of sharing setting and action with the reader through her use of imagery and choice of diction. Her character development however is a long and painful process that detracts from the plot as a whole. In the opening of the book, as well as at several points throughout the book, Evans does a superb job of using all five senses to create a tableaux vivant for the reader. This quality allows the readers to feel as if they are actually experiencing what is being described. This is a wonderful and rare trait that only a few fantasy authors have mastered. Additionally, Evans has a well-developed vocabulary which she also uses to good effect. In several places, it is obvious that she chooses to use the best word rather than a simpler, less descriptive word that would be more easily understood by the reader. Both of these qualities drew me in early on and provided excellent moments of respite throughout the novel. The great detractor in this book was the far too overly developed scenes where the characters’ relationships are introduced and explored. Now some of this may have to do with the fact that Evens is the only female writer in The Sundering series. Her style may too sharply contrast the other masculine writers. Along that same line of thinking, it may be that she is following in the footsteps of to highly accomplished authors. More likely, it is my dislike for the penchant of female fantasy authors to wax romantic rather than adventurous in this genre of writing. There are exceptions of course, but this seems to be an unfortunately common trait. When I find myself skipping ahead pages to get past the deluge of motivations, feeling, and interpretations of each character examined in a myriad of minute details, there is a serious problem. If, as a reader, you are looking for wondrously good description wrapped around intricate character development through interaction and relationship this is likely the book for you. If you are more into a plot that steadily moves forward in a non-brooding fashion that can interconnect earlier elements of the series, you may wish to look elsewhere. Dr. Nicholson reviews academic, Christian living, and fiction books for a variety of publishers in an array of formats. He is never paid for any of his reviews. For more reviews or information, visit Dr. Nicholson’s blog at drtnicholson.wordpress.com. The book for this review was provided free of charge by Wizards of the Coast through NetGalley.com. This book was provided without the expectation or requirement of a positive response. Thank you to both the publisher and NetGalley.com for the opportunity to both read your advanced copy and to provide this unpaid evaluation. All opinions in this review reflect the views of the author and not NetGalley.com or the publisher.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Star Bookworm

    I am getting a little more settled with this series. Ms. Evans did a better job pulling the plot lines that came before her into her installment. This book really felt like it was supposed to be one of the series while being a standalone story. However, (don't you just hate those) I stumbled to get into this story from a writing perspective. Paul Kemp so far has had the best writing. For this installment, I was back to the internet for research on the vast races that appear in the D&D landsca I am getting a little more settled with this series. Ms. Evans did a better job pulling the plot lines that came before her into her installment. This book really felt like it was supposed to be one of the series while being a standalone story. However, (don't you just hate those) I stumbled to get into this story from a writing perspective. Paul Kemp so far has had the best writing. For this installment, I was back to the internet for research on the vast races that appear in the D&D landscape. Our main protagonist is a tiefling. Completely foreign to me, but I wanted to know what the background of the race was to understand how they fit into the relationship. I also took a brief look at what other stories these main characters had come from. They are the closest in the relational timeline to the plot point of the entire series, so far. Ms. Evans didn't need to "jump" her characters so far forward into time. I do feel the manner in which the time warp occurred was quite clever. The initial chapters are a solid attempt at bringing some of the past story to the current reader. Unfortunately, I found the experience stumbling and choppy. I had a hard time distinguishing between moments of foreshadowing with moments of flashbacks despite the different fonts from the font (couldn't resist some wordplay and I promise it will make more sense when you read it). I forced myself to march on through the first third of the book. Then it started to simmer. The heat of the Hells warmed the story line and I found myself vested in the characters. Then the concluding third of the novel absolutely boiled over. The action was smooth and quick and got my heart pumping for the characters. There was a clear wrap up while leaving the ending open to the next author. I give this book a mid-level review. The price tag is once again hefty and the first third is slogging but the conclusion makes it very much worth the read. Buy it to own the whole set but rent it from the library by itself. Check out more from Erin M Evans and The Adversary at her blog or the excellent Wizard of the Coasts product page.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    The Adversary by Erin M. Evans is one of the more frustrating and infuriating fantasy novels I have ever read, even other Dungeons and Dragons novels. That's a good thing. In fact, it is a very good thing. Evans turns everything you think you know about Farideh and Havilar on the head and leads you through a series of twists and turns that keep you riveted and anxious. Some of these twists are expected, but some take you by surprise and may cause you to tear frantically back through the pages you The Adversary by Erin M. Evans is one of the more frustrating and infuriating fantasy novels I have ever read, even other Dungeons and Dragons novels. That's a good thing. In fact, it is a very good thing. Evans turns everything you think you know about Farideh and Havilar on the head and leads you through a series of twists and turns that keep you riveted and anxious. Some of these twists are expected, but some take you by surprise and may cause you to tear frantically back through the pages you already read to see if you missed clues that would have allowed you to have seen them coming. A great plot is not without great characters, and there again Evans delivers. In fact, The Adversary is arguably Evans' greatest work when it comes to character development. In addition to Farideh and Havilar, the richly developed cast includes a broad spectrum of family and friends, uneasy allies, bitter enemies, and everything in between. The heroes are not always clearly good. The villains are not always clearly evil. In fact, Evans seems to delight in developing characters that fall clearly in shades of grey and who can be both hero and villain as the situation dictates. Better yet, in The Adversary we often get glimpses into the reasons why the characters are the way they are. Only two other regular authors in the Dungeons and Dragons universe do this as well; R. A. Salvatore and Elaine Cunningham. It is fairly easy to imagine that if the Harpers subseries had continued that The Adversary could easily find a place sliding in place next to Cunningham's work. It is also fairly easy to imagine that if Salvatore and Evans ever co-wrote a Dungeons and Dragons novel together in a way that combined their talents it would probably set a new standard for the series.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Maxine

    The Adversary is the third book in the multi-author Sundering epic fantasy series. Like the previous two books, this is the first I have read by this author and also like the first two books, it continues the story of characters from another series by the author. As a result, it took me a while to orient myself and really get into the tale. However, unlike the previous two books in this series, The Adversary felt like once I got to know the characters a bit, I wasn’t as handicapped by lack of pre The Adversary is the third book in the multi-author Sundering epic fantasy series. Like the previous two books, this is the first I have read by this author and also like the first two books, it continues the story of characters from another series by the author. As a result, it took me a while to orient myself and really get into the tale. However, unlike the previous two books in this series, The Adversary felt like once I got to know the characters a bit, I wasn’t as handicapped by lack of previous knowledge. The story felt less tied to author Erin M Evan’s previous series and more to the other books in this Sundering series. It finally felt like there really is an over-arching storyline here and not just a showcase for the different authors’ works. At times, I found the pacing a bit slow. But that was okay – there’s a lot going on here and a whole lot of characters to keep track of and, by taking it slow through some of the build-up to the real action, it prevented the reader from getting lost. It also gave me a chance to get to know the characters and to care about what happens to them. With this novel, I finally feel like I’m starting to understand what is happening in the Forgotten Realms and where this is all heading. It kind of feels like the previous two books were meant to set the parameters of the series and, with The Adversary, we are finally finding our way to the core of the story. I look forward to reading the rest of the books in the series to find out where it will take me.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl M-M

    The third in the Sundering event and it is getting better book by book. Farideh and Havilar are heirs to a very powerful warlock and because of this they are very important to all demons from the Underworld. The twin sisters couldn't be more different and some of the decisions made by Farideh threaten to break their tight bond. It is irrelevant why she makes those choices, because in the end everyone perceives her deeds to be those of traitor. The two women also have romantic interactions going on The third in the Sundering event and it is getting better book by book. Farideh and Havilar are heirs to a very powerful warlock and because of this they are very important to all demons from the Underworld. The twin sisters couldn't be more different and some of the decisions made by Farideh threaten to break their tight bond. It is irrelevant why she makes those choices, because in the end everyone perceives her deeds to be those of traitor. The two women also have romantic interactions going on throughout the book. Fortunately those relationships never overshadow the spectacular plot. Farideh is actually bound to a devil called Lorcan. He isn't exactly Mr Charming but then that is exactly what makes him so interesting and attractive. The ultimate bad boy attitude with the powers of hell to back him up. He also has this completely psychotic sister called Sairche, she and her brother spend all their time trying to out-do, out-bargain and even out-kill each other. Havilar is attracted to someone who is unobtainable to her, due to her social class and this problem takes her attention away from her own powers and the strife her sister has placed them both in. There is so much intricate plot-weaving going on from the start to the end, which made this an extremely good read. I highly recommend it and look forward to the next book in the Sundering series. I received a copy of this book via NetGalley.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Dj

    This is the third book in the Sundering series, but you don't have to read the first two in order to enjoy this one. As with the other books, the theme of the story is Forgotten Realms/D & D, a sub-genre (if you want to consider it as such) of fantasy/sci-fi. The three books do have some interrelated parts, but not to the extent you must read all three to understand what is going on-this is a standalone story, and can be read as such. Out of the three released so far, this was probably my leas This is the third book in the Sundering series, but you don't have to read the first two in order to enjoy this one. As with the other books, the theme of the story is Forgotten Realms/D & D, a sub-genre (if you want to consider it as such) of fantasy/sci-fi. The three books do have some interrelated parts, but not to the extent you must read all three to understand what is going on-this is a standalone story, and can be read as such. Out of the three released so far, this was probably my least favorite. Part of it is primarily because more romantic themes are introduced as part of the book than the previous two, but I suspect most of it is because the author decided the characters contained within required much more substantial background information than the other books in the series. Well, perhaps required is a bit strong of a word-the author decided to recite a lot of the background for her characters, and I found it to detract from the story. Even though this was my first Erin Evans book, I really didn't want to read soooo many pages worth of what happened previously to the primary character in the book, a tiefling. Don't get me wrong-tieflings make great characters to stick within stories, and I did LIKE the book. I just didn't enjoy it as much as the first two in the series.

  13. 5 out of 5

    MartyAnne

    http://martysreads.blogspot.com/2014/... As near as I can tell, the books of the Sundering are united by one thing only: each a stanza of prophecy in the place called Faerun. Different authors and different players, all in a world full of Gods, godlings, and those plotting to become godlings -- and the demon counterparts of the same. Faith in a god, when in Faerun, imparts some magic to the believer. In each book, this is manifestly different. Faerun might be a world or a universe, when you acco http://martysreads.blogspot.com/2014/... As near as I can tell, the books of the Sundering are united by one thing only: each a stanza of prophecy in the place called Faerun. Different authors and different players, all in a world full of Gods, godlings, and those plotting to become godlings -- and the demon counterparts of the same. Faith in a god, when in Faerun, imparts some magic to the believer. In each book, this is manifestly different. Faerun might be a world or a universe, when you account for all the differences. In this book, minor deities and demons create pacts with people. Pacts are the surest thing to ever be described as "be careful what you wish for." The details of a pact run 30 clauses and better, every word potentially losing your life or your soul. And this book works with many pacts, all participants trying for an advantage. Tangled webs of pacts in process -- oh yes, that's a big part of this book. It took me awhile to like this book. But, it had a clear plot, interesting characters, Havi and Fari easy enough to remember, and I ended up liking it far more than the previous Sundering stories. The last pages had a startling surprise, too!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    While this is the third book in The Sundering series, it's also the continuation of the series of stories Erin M. Evans told with these characters before. As such, it's entirely possible there are plenty of other readers like me who had never read any of her other stories and are only reading this one because they started the series with the first entry by R. A. Salvatore. Unfortunately, it seems no one told Evans that, as the first third or so of this book is a jumbled mess of poorly-explained While this is the third book in The Sundering series, it's also the continuation of the series of stories Erin M. Evans told with these characters before. As such, it's entirely possible there are plenty of other readers like me who had never read any of her other stories and are only reading this one because they started the series with the first entry by R. A. Salvatore. Unfortunately, it seems no one told Evans that, as the first third or so of this book is a jumbled mess of poorly-explained exposition that is only effective at telling the audience absolutely nothing about these characters and their relationships other than that they know each other. It picks up a bit after that once the book's story picks up and becomes more important than the backstory; there's decent action and a fun, twisting plot, and the characters are enjoyable. It's a little over-long and drags in places, but the end picks up. Overall I felt like this book was effective as part of The Sundering, but it didn't do anything at all in terms of making me want to read any of this author's other stories with these characters.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Steve Mumford

    Erin M. Evans' latest Brimstone Angels novel is also the third in WotC's world-shaking event called The Sundering, and The Adversary does a brilliant job of bringing those storylines together and driving them forward. Readers of the previous Brimstone Angels books will feel shoulder-to-shoulder with the characters from the outset, but Erin has done a marvellous job of welcoming new readers into the fold without any awkward story-slowing blocks of exposition; the book starts at a cracking pace an Erin M. Evans' latest Brimstone Angels novel is also the third in WotC's world-shaking event called The Sundering, and The Adversary does a brilliant job of bringing those storylines together and driving them forward. Readers of the previous Brimstone Angels books will feel shoulder-to-shoulder with the characters from the outset, but Erin has done a marvellous job of welcoming new readers into the fold without any awkward story-slowing blocks of exposition; the book starts at a cracking pace and doesn't let up. Erin creates engaging characters as well as whipping up a thrilling tale, and The Adversary is no exception; there's sibling rivalry, devilish deals, intrigue and espionage, despicable villains, and a real sense of overarching menace that grows throughout the book. Most importantly, all of this fits together wonderfully into a multilayered plot; Erin creates tough situations for her characters and doesn't offer any easy escapes, meaning each resolution is hard-won and all the more satisfying. The Adversary is enthralling, exciting and almost impossible to put down. Definitely recommended.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brandon L. Hatcher

    A dialogue heavy fantasy themed romance novel Let me start by saying I have not read much of this author. I typically stick to Ed Greenwood, R.A. Salvatore, Richard Byer, Patricia Briggs, Paul Kemp, and Curtis Jobling. I mention the authors because it is important to understand my background before I start my review. I didn't care for this book. I found it to be dialogue heavy without much substance. The two main characters were annoying and constantly complaining about their situation. They com A dialogue heavy fantasy themed romance novel Let me start by saying I have not read much of this author. I typically stick to Ed Greenwood, R.A. Salvatore, Richard Byer, Patricia Briggs, Paul Kemp, and Curtis Jobling. I mention the authors because it is important to understand my background before I start my review. I didn't care for this book. I found it to be dialogue heavy without much substance. The two main characters were annoying and constantly complaining about their situation. They come off as frustrated teenagers trying to save the world. Don't get me wrong I usually go for that type of thing, I am a huge fan of Percy Jackson but the constant inner monologue and this needless self sacrificing attitude bothered me to no end. The books saving grace were the side characters that were infinitely more interesting and the occasional funny dialogue written for everyone's favorite devil. Again not my favorite book and enough to turn me away from this author in the future.

  17. 5 out of 5

    George Ramos

    Third book of The Sundering series left me with mixed feelings. First, there were way too many details that were lost on me throughout the book, all the way through the very end. Lots of names (particularly from the Hells) that mean nothing to someone who just met these characters. Second, there is way too much "teen angst" in this book. Does he love me, do I love him, how can we love each other, etc. It's minimal, but this isn't my thing. Finally, on a positive note, I loved exploring this "infer Third book of The Sundering series left me with mixed feelings. First, there were way too many details that were lost on me throughout the book, all the way through the very end. Lots of names (particularly from the Hells) that mean nothing to someone who just met these characters. Second, there is way too much "teen angst" in this book. Does he love me, do I love him, how can we love each other, etc. It's minimal, but this isn't my thing. Finally, on a positive note, I loved exploring this "infernal" side of Dungeons & Dragons. Pacts, schemes, portals, planes, etc. It was actually quite a bit of fun! As with the previous two Sundering books, I'm curious to read more about the Brimstone Angels. All in due time. On to the next book of The Sundering...

  18. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    This book was a struggle to finish. It took me three times as long to complete because it was so bad! It was as if I were given bits and pieces of a much larger book that passed as this one novel. I know there are more books in the series by the author, but you can't just write a novel assuming that the reader has read them already. The story was so freaking convoluted it made no sense. I just power read through the last hundred pages just to finish it!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Maxyne Haybron

    There are way too many characters in this book for me to keep track of! Not real happy with this one. :/

  20. 4 out of 5

    Leslie V

    I gave this story two stars, which, actually, made me rather sad. I really enjoy Evans' prose, and her characters, but this book fell flat, especially if you came into it on the heels of Lesser Evils (Brimstone Angels #2). I read the series in sequence, and the reason the Adversary really disappointed me, was because I don't feel any character has transitioned beyond their original archetype... at least not enough for my liking. The story consists of Farideh making multiple decisions without any I gave this story two stars, which, actually, made me rather sad. I really enjoy Evans' prose, and her characters, but this book fell flat, especially if you came into it on the heels of Lesser Evils (Brimstone Angels #2). I read the series in sequence, and the reason the Adversary really disappointed me, was because I don't feel any character has transitioned beyond their original archetype... at least not enough for my liking. The story consists of Farideh making multiple decisions without any forethought, and honestly, the first decision she was seduced by Sairche - I totally bought that. But when everything continuously blows up in her face for every decision she's made since book one, the kid doesn't even bat an eyelash, just says "don't come for me." or something of the like. She has the potential to be such a great heroine, and this is her sophomore year, I expected more than freshman mistakes. Especially when it came to Lorcan - which - every time he was on the page, I could barf. He is so predictable and still Farideh desires him. So, sweetie, either sleep with him or don't, but don't not do it because of your "moral character" don't do it because he is a complete jerk. Also, a character with wasted potential. I really feel the potential Lorcan and Havilar bromance that should have happened in this book completely got derailed by romance plotlines, which was a shame - because I have been waiting for the two fighters to throw down and have some beers since book one. Then there's Havilar's plotline... I have to drop a complement first, I think the seven year time jump, was done exquisitely. I loved the tension that boiled from it with Havi and Brin, I would have left Lorcan out of it too though, and seen what kind of cambian he'd become in Farideh's absence, but that's just me. But back to Havi and Bryn. You cannot have it both ways, you cannot have this boy (who is supposed to be a man, but honestly still behaves like the boy from book one with a beard) who loves Havi and follows her around but lacks the balls to approach her and say he loves her first - he waits until she's literally so emotionally overwhelmed and tells him to reciprocate. Bleh. Then, he boo-hoos about missing her, loving her, waiting for her... but he DIDN'T. He got engaged, albeit politically, and slept with three other people - I am so, so sorry. But if he had any inkling or desire for her to be alive - c'mon bro. Seven years is not a long time, in any fantasy setting, for someone who loves someone to wait. Look at Mahen - he waits for his love and shows through actions. He also waits until after they have sex to drop the engagement mic, poor choice. Brin was another character I had such high hopes for. But again, missed the mark by a mile. I wish he would have been killed in this book, he doesn't really propel the plot in any way and is just an anchor to a character who has more potential growth than himself. I really enjoyed Dahl, every time he was on the page, and every action he took was the right one. I am a little cheesed that the whole rod thing - the gift Dahl gave to Farideh at the end of the last book, that Lorcan took credit for - didn't come to fruition, but meh. I had a hard time finishing this book, and might not continue the series. If I do, I am skipping the next one, even though it will have some amazing side plot - it is too much focus on the Brin mess, and I adore Havi too much to suffer through X number of pages of that crap.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ingvild

    Perhaps closer to 4.5/5, but I'm rounding up to 5 to support the book. Because this is truly an awesome novel. It's only my second Forgotten Realms novel, but it was such a fresh breath after The Crystal Shard. Finally women exist, and do things apart from running away in fear and getting fucked by men! I know, I know, the bar is incredibly low, but I really am happy to be reading about women, by women. So... Devils and schemes, creepy wizards, divine powers, love triangles, sisterhood, parental Perhaps closer to 4.5/5, but I'm rounding up to 5 to support the book. Because this is truly an awesome novel. It's only my second Forgotten Realms novel, but it was such a fresh breath after The Crystal Shard. Finally women exist, and do things apart from running away in fear and getting fucked by men! I know, I know, the bar is incredibly low, but I really am happy to be reading about women, by women. So... Devils and schemes, creepy wizards, divine powers, love triangles, sisterhood, parental love, the powers of the Hells, and the goodness within an unfortunate tiefling who keeps getting things wrong... What more could a girl ask for? Farideh is a likeable, if somewhat tragic protagonist, and her sister Havilar is truly lovely. I also came to really like Dahl, Brin, and Mehen, and I had no trouble liking Lorcan. I should be honest here: I have a very weak spot for tieflings, and an even weaker spot for pairs of sisters, and I absolutely adore the Devils of the Forgotten Realms. So I suppose this book was practically made for me. However, even if you don't obsess over these things as much as I, The Adversary still has exciting battles, shocking twists, and really juicy inter-personal drama. It's a truly awesome fantasy novel. (view spoiler)[Having the villain be a serial rapist who constantly creeped out the main character felt a bit... unnecessary and uncomfortable, however. This would be my main criticism. (hide spoiler)] It is the third book in the Brimstone Angels series, but the most easily accessible one. I picked it up at a nerdy bookstore, having read nothing else of the series, and I had very little trouble keeping up. If you have a basic grip on the Forgotten Realms, or even if you don't, I think you'll be okay starting with this one if you fancy it. It is also the third in The Sundering series, but as I understand it, this isn't really a series, but rather an anthology of stand-alone books, so don't be scared off by the fact that The Adversary is the third book in two different series.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bethicus

    NOTE: I have not read the previous books in this series. I picked this one up from a family member and didn't actually realize it was the third book until quite a bit into it, otherwise I would have put it aside and looked for the first two books. As it is I'm glad I didn't, I'm okay with jumping in to the third arc of this campaign. I enjoyed this book, as the characters were engaging, and the world of the Sundering is an interesting one (borrowed from the Wizards of the Coast RPG Dungeons and D NOTE: I have not read the previous books in this series. I picked this one up from a family member and didn't actually realize it was the third book until quite a bit into it, otherwise I would have put it aside and looked for the first two books. As it is I'm glad I didn't, I'm okay with jumping in to the third arc of this campaign. I enjoyed this book, as the characters were engaging, and the world of the Sundering is an interesting one (borrowed from the Wizards of the Coast RPG Dungeons and Dragons). I believe I was able to enjoy it mostly because I'm familiar with many of the book's character types/creatures due to having watched over 100 episodes of the Critical Role D&D show. I think a lot of the details of the situations would have been lost on me had I not already been familiar with the creatures (drows and erinyes' were particularly glossed over in the book). I recommend the read if you are familiar with D&D, or are looking for something interesting to kill some time with. Otherwise, check out the podcasts of actual D&D games (Critical Role, The Adventure Zone, etc) as the critical successes/failures of the player characters and non-player characters drive the story much more unpredictably and therefor enjoyably (at least for me). BUT that being said, the epilogue was surprisingly interesting. As a person that dislikes typical prologues/epilogues, I usually don't read them. But I'm glad that I read this one. I may seek out the next in the series, solely because of the information revealed in the epilogue, so well done there.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jeremiah Mccoy

    So, here is book three... I still like the main character and her friends. I do. That is the best plus for this book and the series. That said, I hated most of this book and it was a slog to get through. The plot starts with Farideh yet again defending her abuser, but beyond that, there is another fatal flaw. The plot depends, hinges on, her being just dumb. She makes a deal with a devil early in the book. She repeatedly demonstrates a lack of understanding that Devils will trick you. She also d So, here is book three... I still like the main character and her friends. I do. That is the best plus for this book and the series. That said, I hated most of this book and it was a slog to get through. The plot starts with Farideh yet again defending her abuser, but beyond that, there is another fatal flaw. The plot depends, hinges on, her being just dumb. She makes a deal with a devil early in the book. She repeatedly demonstrates a lack of understanding that Devils will trick you. She also doesn't trust the people around her to be competent, not even her sister who has repeatedly saved Farideh's life. The whole set up is based on her basic failing of decision making, but beyond that, she keeps making false assumptions and bad choices through the whole book. It is not all bad. Dahl is more interesting in this one than the last. The bits with the Harpers are nice. The story of whats going on with the Chosen is also neat. Havilar's struggle to regain her footing is believable and interesting. There are things to like here. That said, the fact the plot hinges on Farideh's bad decision making and the constant trope of finding one's abuser attractive just wore me down. I am not certain I could read any more of this series.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Eileen Dandashi

    About the Author: quoted from Erin M. Evans web site http://slushlush.com/ Who are you? My name is Erin M. Evans. I’m writer and sometime-editor living in Seattle. I wrote the novels The God Catcher and Brimstone Angels, and the short story “The Resurrection Agent” from Realms of the Dead. You should read them. Those are Forgotten Realms books. What does that mean? Am I going to have to read a zillion books to understand this? My current novels are set in the world of Forgotten Realms, which is a v About the Author: quoted from Erin M. Evans web site http://slushlush.com/ Who are you? My name is Erin M. Evans. I’m writer and sometime-editor living in Seattle. I wrote the novels The God Catcher and Brimstone Angels, and the short story “The Resurrection Agent” from Realms of the Dead. You should read them. Those are Forgotten Realms books. What does that mean? Am I going to have to read a zillion books to understand this? My current novels are set in the world of Forgotten Realms, which is a venerable, multi-author shared world created by Ed Greenwood, and owned by Wizards of the Coast. You don’t have to read all the books–but you can, which is the cool part. If you like the Great Game of the dragons from The God Catcher, for example, Brotherhood of the Griffon by Richard Lee Byers has more of that. About the Series: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eE58Pn... I found the video very interesting. It’s only about 4 minutes long, but gives you an idea about the various authors of The Sundering Series. This is book 3 of the Sundering Series that when complete will be six books with six different authors. Now what is interesting in this series is that each of these authors have used characters from their own fantasy worlds created in previous books they have written and in turn wrote them into this on-going epic story of the Forgotten Realms – a world of magic, widespread war and vying of power. The world as known is shifting, things are being shaken up on a higher level and even the gods don’t completely know what is going on. It’s a huge event that spreads chaos across the entire realm. The stories are about how these changes affect the people. Erin Evans says, “It’s not about the gods, it’s about their worshippers.” About The Story: blurb extracted from www.wizards.com/dnd/sundering.aspx Abandoned as an infant along with her twin sister and adopted by an exiled dragonborn warrior, Farideh grew to adulthood acutely aware of the drawbacks of being a tiefling. Even with outcast tieflings and dragonborn as near neighbors in the mountain village of Arush Vayem, Farideh knew they watched for the day one of the twins would show the stain of their devilborn blood. Despite doing everything she could to reassure them, including keeping wild Havilar out of trouble, the villagers focused on Farideh as the one who would embrace the dark side of herself. They weren’t wrong. In 1478 DR at the tender age of seventeen Havilar attempted to summon an imp with a borrowed scroll and wound up calling down a half-devil, Lorcan, instead. For all it seemed a lucky accident, Lorcan had been looking for the twins—or someone like them. As a collector of warlocks, Lorcan needed one of these two to complete his most prized set, a Toril Thirteen. Thirteen descendants of the warlocks whose ritual helped Asmodeus seize the godhood and doomed the tiefling race—and Farideh, as the great-great-great granddaugher of their leader, Bryseis Kakistos, was the last piece. Toying with her affections, her fears, and finally her love for her sister, Lorcan convinced Farideh to accept a warlock’s pact, confirming what the villagers of Arush Vayem had always said and leaving the twins and their adoptive father to roam Faerûn as bounty hunters. Though Farideh draws magic from the Nine Hells, she uses it only to protect her loved ones and the good folk she encounters—especially those caught in the sights of devils. Perhaps she made a mistake taking the pact, but now she has the power to make a difference, rather than bending under the will of those who think she was wicked from the cradle and hiding away. She might be damned for falling under Lorcan’s sway, but that doesn’t matter to Farideh. She can still save those who have a chance. As the Sundering approaches, Farideh has learned still more about her lost past and her daunting future: the crimes of Bryseis Kaakistos and the Toril Thirteen, the rapaciousness of collector devils. The spell of protection cast upon her and Havilar, shielding them from devils’ scrying magic. She’s made more than one enemy in the Hells, but she’s gained allies to match, including Harper agents, a scion of one of Cormyr’s royal families, and, of course, Lorcan. Whether he remains an ally, an enemy, or something else, Farideh is still waiting to see. My Thoughts: This world, The Forgotten Realm is for those fantasy lovers who want to read it and play a video game or board game with the same characters. I find it fascinating, but a little much for my understanding. Orcs and half-orcs, tieflings, demons, gods, etc. keep my head whirling. It probably would have been better if I had started out with some of the characters in other books by these wonderful authors. Make sure you check out the video link above. I felt like I stepped into the land of hobbits! Some of you just love this stuff and eat it up. If fantasy and video games are up your alley, then do read this book. However, that being said, I really did enjoy the book. I had also read book 1 of the series. I’m figuring by the time the series is finished, I would have figured out all these monsters and what they look like. Even if you don’t ‘dig’, (do they use that word anymore?) this type of fantasy there are situations between the characters that are very revealing about life in general. Such as a parent’s love will never lessen. They will always be there for their children, while children may very well turn their backs on their parents. Oh, if you like to purchase a video game for the Sundering, take a look at www.dungeonsanddragons.com

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    The lead character is horrible. First, the name: "Farideh". Sounds like an illiterate attempt at spelling Faraday. Horrible. And she spends the whole book being easily (trivially!) manipulated by everyone around her. Why would someone so easily manipulated, become one of the Chosen? It makes no sense. Thankfully, the rest of the characters in the book are far more interesting. The author should stop writing about brimstone angels and tieflings and start writing stories about her other characters The lead character is horrible. First, the name: "Farideh". Sounds like an illiterate attempt at spelling Faraday. Horrible. And she spends the whole book being easily (trivially!) manipulated by everyone around her. Why would someone so easily manipulated, become one of the Chosen? It makes no sense. Thankfully, the rest of the characters in the book are far more interesting. The author should stop writing about brimstone angels and tieflings and start writing stories about her other characters or basically anything but Farideh.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Carol Bosselman

    Normally I love the Realms books, and was excited to see one about tieflings, but wow, I felt like I came into a long awaited tv series already 2 seasons in. I was completely lost, and I also found all the stuff about the pacts and various ties of Hell confusing. Maybe at some point I'll find the preceding books and catch myself up but this book doesn't work as part of this series if you don't already have the history.

  27. 4 out of 5

    RinaKat

    I did know that it was the third book of The Sundering series, but also that The Sundering books are all basically standalone novels within the same time frame. However, I didn't realize this was the third book of the Brimstone Angels series until after I had read it. There were many events that were alluded to that I didn't know the details of. I found it didn't matter much for my tastes though, and will probably read the first two books like I would prequels.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    In spite of being the middle book in a series I hadn't read, this was a thoroughly engaging book. The characters grabbed me instantly, and just enough background information was given to bring me up to speed on what had happened in prior books without bogging me down with details. Some of the fight scenes were slightly confusing as to who was doing what when, but that might be my own preferred reading style. I'm definitely going to have to go back and begin the series properly!

  29. 5 out of 5

    D.

    This is edging towards 4 stars, as i still love the characters and the writing, but something about this book wasn't as good for me as the previous two. I think Farideh took a hit to her wisdom score to allow the events to occur that trapped her into the plot of this book, which didn't seem right to me. I thought she'd learned to question the things that were told to her, but I didn't see that happening in this book. Still, I mean to continue the series.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    Phenomenal plot and twists. Great character development for Fari. Havi's character development started great and felt like it stagnated. Wish some parts were fleshed out more. But, those are just the criticisms. Overall, great book.

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