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Windigo Island PDF, ePub eBook When the body of a teenage Ojibwe girl washes up on the shore of an island in Lake Superior, the residents of the nearby Bad Bluff reservation whisper that it was the work of a deadly mythical beast, the Windigo, or a vengeful spirit called Michi Peshu. Such stories have been told by the Ojibwe people for generations, but they don’t explain how the girl and her friend, Mar When the body of a teenage Ojibwe girl washes up on the shore of an island in Lake Superior, the residents of the nearby Bad Bluff reservation whisper that it was the work of a deadly mythical beast, the Windigo, or a vengeful spirit called Michi Peshu. Such stories have been told by the Ojibwe people for generations, but they don’t explain how the girl and her friend, Mariah Arceneaux, disappeared a year ago. At the request of the Arceneaux family, private investigator Cork O’Connor takes on the case. But on the Bad Bluff reservation, nobody’s talking. Still, Cork puts enough information together to find a possible trail. He learns that the old port city of Duluth is a modern-day center for sex trafficking of vulnerable women, many of whom are young Native Americans. As the investigation deepens, so does the danger. Yet Cork holds tight to his higher purpose—his vow to find Mariah, an innocent fifteen-year-old girl whose family is desperate to get her back. With only the barest hope of saving her from men whose darkness rivals that of the legendary Windigo, Cork prepares for an epic battle that will determine whether it will be fear, or love, that truly conquers all.

30 review for Windigo Island

  1. 5 out of 5

    Phrynne

    I enjoyed this book but with some reservations. Fourteen books into the series and I am a Cork O'Coran fan. Now suddenly the author has chosen to view the story through the eyes of Cork's daughter, Jenny. I suppose this would have been okay if I liked Jenny, but I really don't. Anyway, that's my problem and I will look past it and judge the book apart from that. As usual it was full of action, a few people lost their lives in not very nice ways, Henry remained calm, cool and collected I enjoyed this book but with some reservations. Fourteen books into the series and I am a Cork O'Coran fan. Now suddenly the author has chosen to view the story through the eyes of Cork's daughter, Jenny. I suppose this would have been okay if I liked Jenny, but I really don't. Anyway, that's my problem and I will look past it and judge the book apart from that. As usual it was full of action, a few people lost their lives in not very nice ways, Henry remained calm, cool and collected and Cork did not. Krueger obviously feels very strongly about native Indian's rights and his books always reveal ways in which they should be treated better. This one was no exception. On the other hand I always enjoy his descriptions of the beautiful countryside and this was largely missing from Windigo Island as much of it took place in the city. Not one of the best books in the series but still good and very readable.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jonetta

    Two young girls ran away from their homes in Bad Bluff, Wisconsin a year ago and one of them, Carrie Verga, just washed ashore. It’s uncertain what happened to her and where she’s been. Now the family of Mariah Arceneaux, Carrie’s runaway companion, seeks help from Henry Meloux to find her. Mariah is his great, great niece and he asks Cork O’Connor to assist preliminarily in his stead. As Cork makes plans to leave, his daughter, Jenny insists that she accompany him. She believes this mission is Two young girls ran away from their homes in Bad Bluff, Wisconsin a year ago and one of them, Carrie Verga, just washed ashore. It’s uncertain what happened to her and where she’s been. Now the family of Mariah Arceneaux, Carrie’s runaway companion, seeks help from Henry Meloux to find her. Mariah is his great, great niece and he asks Cork O’Connor to assist preliminarily in his stead. As Cork makes plans to leave, his daughter, Jenny insists that she accompany him. She believes this mission is her destiny based on dreams she’s had since finding her son a few years ago. There were so many, many angles to this story, not the kind that make it difficult to follow but the kind that are thought provoking. It also includes a narrative in Jenny’s voice for a portion of the book, which I found important because it’s the first time I’ve learned how Cork’s children perceive him. They seem to get him more than he knows but still not enough for my sensibilities. The subject matter is disheartening as it deals with human trafficking of young girls (under 15-years old) but even sadder are the situations that made them first run from home. Even more insidious was how the girls were seduced into believing their handlers are their family and cared about them. Cork’s moral compass is seriously tested and Jenny gets an opportunity to explore gray areas as she’s now seeing things through a maternal lens. It’s a complex story that unfolded very well and left me pondering some of the issues long after it was over. I’m so glad David Chandler narrated this one as he captured Henry as well as he always does Cork, which was critical as he factors importantly throughout.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Trish

    When I first read William Kent Krueger’s Cork O’Connor series, Iron Lake, I was struck by the coldness between whites and Indian populations in Minnesota and admit to finding it off-putting. Krueger’s latest novel is fourteenth in the Cork O’Connor series, and the coldness between the races is still there, but I have a completely different perception of it. Now I feel so grateful to Krueger for pointing out such a failing in our management of race relations that the treatment of Indians on reservatio When I first read William Kent Krueger’s Cork O’Connor series, Iron Lake, I was struck by the coldness between whites and Indian populations in Minnesota and admit to finding it off-putting. Krueger’s latest novel is fourteenth in the Cork O’Connor series, and the coldness between the races is still there, but I have a completely different perception of it. Now I feel so grateful to Krueger for pointing out such a failing in our management of race relations that the treatment of Indians on reservations and off is still a hideous blemish we have to confront every day in parts of our country. Indian attitudes should be cold. It would be a miracle if they weren’t. Krueger gives us a window into a world many of us will never experience firsthand, shares words, customs, traditions, and details of Indian life that can be mined for the underpinning of Indian heritage and culture. But he also shares his clear-eyed view of what our country looks like—both physically and psychically—from the waterfront in Duluth and waves breaking on the shores of Lake Superior’s rock-strewn islands to the inside of a home for runaways and the attitudes of oilmen living in barracks in boom towns. In this installment, Krueger brings us to North Dakota where some Indians are working to preserve a landscape that is threatened by oil companies dedicated to oil retrieval in the Bakken Formation through the process of fracking. As it turns out, the worthless land the government gave to the Indians way back when happens to be right on top of the Bakken formation which has emerged as one of the most important oil formations in the United States. This must be God’s little joke on the white folk, though I’ll bet the reservation Indians see precious little that will benefit them and a whole lot more that won’t. Besides this important piece of information, Krueger also shares the history of child prostitution on the Great Lakes near and around Duluth, or what is sometimes called the human trafficking of young girls, many from differing Indian tribes and reservations that were all shoved together at some point, and which now experience gang or tribe-on-tribe violence similar to an inner city history of interracial gang warfare. Krueger peoples this modern history with realistic characters including the loving and generous children of lawman-turned-private investigator Cork O’Connor. Though O’Connor himself has a tendency towards hard justice, his children exhibit the gentling influence of their tribal blood and the Indian tradition exemplified by the close family friend “Uncle” Henry Meloux. ”In every human being, there are two wolves constantly fighting. One is fear, and the other is love. The one which will win is the one you feed. Uncle Henry is closing on 100 years old, though no one knows his age for sure. He is of the Anishinaabeg Tribe, or what is sometimes called the Iron Lake Ojibwe. He lives alone in a cabin in the woods by a lake and is considered by his tribe members and many others to be an elder of enormous moral understanding and weight. His thinking is elliptical and his pronouncements often indirect, carrying a hard-won wisdom that puts one in mind of great Buddhist leaders, signaling an inclusiveness in the circle of life that is not typical of "the white man." Krueger introduces a rich cast of characters that seem to have their basis in real life. Sometimes Cork’s twenty-something daughter Jenny seemed not to grasp the menace of the situation in which her crew found themselves while journeying to find men responsible for holding captive some young girls, but she was wily and careful and was forced into action by the end. I tend toward Cork’s end of the spectrum of justice dispensation, but we always need someone questioning those choices. Krueger’s series gives us a very interesting look at the modern Midwest, in all its glorious dishabille.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Diane S ☔

    The unique thing about this series, in which a new one is released every August, is the amazing combination of family, time and place and culture. It is so wonderful to be back inside the world and family of Cork O'Connor. My favorite character though is Henry Meloux, a wise, very elderly Objibwe mide. His quiet persona and his spiritual wisdom serves as the anchor for many in his own family as well as O'Connors. This story takes them from Iron Mountain, Minnesota to Duluth trying to The unique thing about this series, in which a new one is released every August, is the amazing combination of family, time and place and culture. It is so wonderful to be back inside the world and family of Cork O'Connor. My favorite character though is Henry Meloux, a wise, very elderly Objibwe mide. His quiet persona and his spiritual wisdom serves as the anchor for many in his own family as well as O'Connors. This story takes them from Iron Mountain, Minnesota to Duluth trying to track down a missing Indian girl and those who exploit underage girls in sex trafficking. Windingo Island and the Windingo is an ancient Indian myth, when the Winding calls your name, you are said to be in great danger. Love the mix of a modern day problem alongside the spiritual belief systems of the Native Americans. Fighting evil leaves a person changed and so it proves for a few characters in this story. A new very interesting character makes an appearance, Daniel who is very knowledgeable about literature, writes poetry and plays the accordion. I hope we see more of him, just as I hope Henry can stay alive a bit longer. ARC from publisher.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    The Ojibwe Community asked Krueger to write a tale about the sex trafficking problem they face on their reservations—too many of their young women were falling into the clutches of sex trafficking predators. The result is a crime thriller that highlights the issue and includes a number of Anishinaabe characters affected by the scourge. When the body of fifteen-year-old Carrie Verga is found washed up on the shore of Kichigami (Lake Superior), the relatives of Mariah Arceneaux are alar The Ojibwe Community asked Krueger to write a tale about the sex trafficking problem they face on their reservations—too many of their young women were falling into the clutches of sex trafficking predators. The result is a crime thriller that highlights the issue and includes a number of Anishinaabe characters affected by the scourge. When the body of fifteen-year-old Carrie Verga is found washed up on the shore of Kichigami (Lake Superior), the relatives of Mariah Arceneaux are alarmed. The two girls had run away from home together a year ago. Mariah’s cousin, Daniel English, seeks Cork’s help to find her. What results is an odd posse comprised of private investigator Cork O’Connor, his daughter Jennie, Mariah’s mother Louise, Daniel English, and the ancient mide Henry Meloux. They are intent on confronting the Windigo—the monster that preys on the weak. The mide Henry Meloux is one of my favorite characters in the Cork O’Connor series. His focus is on the damage done to the human spirit by the ‘Windigo’. Enjoy!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    Right up front, I want to say this book deals with the abduction and forced prostitution of young children. However, the most descriptive Krueger gets is telling you what the young girls are wearing. The rest will be in your imagination. I felt this was a powerful and emotional book. There is much Native American mysticism with the epitome of evil in the Windigo. Cork is more angry than I've ever seen him. Henry provides a calming, healing nature. Jenny is, well, let's say she's a lot Right up front, I want to say this book deals with the abduction and forced prostitution of young children. However, the most descriptive Krueger gets is telling you what the young girls are wearing. The rest will be in your imagination. I felt this was a powerful and emotional book. There is much Native American mysticism with the epitome of evil in the Windigo. Cork is more angry than I've ever seen him. Henry provides a calming, healing nature. Jenny is, well, let's say she's a lot like her father and I think she's realizing that and it sort of scares her. This is #14 in the series and also the latest. It almost felt at the end that it was the end.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kshitij

    1.5 stars. A very tedious read. The description of plight of girls and degeneration of india society is avery sorry. So many words of native language which i did not understand amd it break the flow. I did not like the book. Some excerpts There was anger in Puck, which he’d channeled in a way that would drive him for a while. At some point, the anger wouldn’t be enough. He might well accomplish what he intended to do, outwhite the white man, but the cost would be great, Cork suspected. Then agai 1.5 stars. A very tedious read. The description of plight of girls and degeneration of india society is avery sorry. So many words of native language which i did not understand amd it break the flow. I did not like the book. Some excerpts There was anger in Puck, which he’d channeled in a way that would drive him for a while. At some point, the anger wouldn’t be enough. He might well accomplish what he intended to do, outwhite the white man, but the cost would be great, Cork suspected. Then again, what did he know? He ran a burger joint and a second-rate detective business and had no ambition beyond that. Still, he considered himself a happy man, and who could put a dollar sign to that? ------- Men never talked. Not about themselves, anyway, not really. They talked about what they’d done, what they were doing, what they intended to do, but they didn’t talk about what was at the heart of them, why they did these things. -------

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kasa Cotugno

    Last night at a in-store visit, Kent Krueger (he likes to be called by his middle name) shared his secrets for maintaining a successful series of thrillers. Beyond the excellent storytelling, which he calls a skeleton on which to hang a story, is the necessity to create a backstory involving characters the reader will love and will care about. He has certainly done this with the Cork O'Connor series. And his joy in his creations is evident. Another element he feels essential is inclusion of a ne Last night at a in-store visit, Kent Krueger (he likes to be called by his middle name) shared his secrets for maintaining a successful series of thrillers. Beyond the excellent storytelling, which he calls a skeleton on which to hang a story, is the necessity to create a backstory involving characters the reader will love and will care about. He has certainly done this with the Cork O'Connor series. And his joy in his creations is evident. Another element he feels essential is inclusion of a newsworthy topic - in this case, the trafficking of young girls by predators preying on their weaknesses and unhappiness with their lives. As with other books in the series, there is a great deal of Native American interaction and spirituality. He is a delightful writer and an even more delightful person.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Connie

    I'm torn by this latest mystery in the Cork O'Connor series. On one hand, I thought the author used the plot line to successfully expose a horrific problem in the Native American community, the sex trafficking of young native girls. On the other hand, I thought there was a lot of unrealistic dialog, thought and action in the book, particularly by O'Connor's daughter, Jenny. For the majority of the book, she just irritated the heck out of me and I wanted to tell her to "grow up" and start thinkin I'm torn by this latest mystery in the Cork O'Connor series. On one hand, I thought the author used the plot line to successfully expose a horrific problem in the Native American community, the sex trafficking of young native girls. On the other hand, I thought there was a lot of unrealistic dialog, thought and action in the book, particularly by O'Connor's daughter, Jenny. For the majority of the book, she just irritated the heck out of me and I wanted to tell her to "grow up" and start thinking how her actions were affecting others.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    Thank you to Kent for humanizing and publicizing the plight of victims of sexual trafficking of Native American girls. He still spins a wonderfully complex story, but I'm so glad he based it on this topic that needs so much more attention.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Skip

    4.5 stars. A dead girl washes up on Windigo Island, one of a pair that ran away from the rez a year earlier. The still missing girl's cousin, Daniel English, seeks help from Midi Henry Meloux, who refuses until the girl's mother comes to see him with the girl's most important possession. Cork O'Connor and daughter Jenny start to investigate, and discover an evil presence, who has become family for these lost runaways as he forces them into prostitution. The underlying reveal about the sexual exp 4.5 stars. A dead girl washes up on Windigo Island, one of a pair that ran away from the rez a year earlier. The still missing girl's cousin, Daniel English, seeks help from Midi Henry Meloux, who refuses until the girl's mother comes to see him with the girl's most important possession. Cork O'Connor and daughter Jenny start to investigate, and discover an evil presence, who has become family for these lost runaways as he forces them into prostitution. The underlying reveal about the sexual exploitation of American Indian women is quite sad, and the O'Connor family once again demonstrate their mettle as ogichidaa (standing between evil and the people.) Recommended.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen (Kat) Smith

    "In every human being, there are two wolves constantly fighting. One is fear, and the other is love. The one that wins the battle? The one you feed. Always the one you feed." "The Ojibwe legend tells of the cursed place called Windigo Island. On Windigo Island, death came in the dark. It came in the form of an awful spirit, a cannibal beast with an insatiable craving for human flesh. Sometimes the beast swept in with the foul odor of carnage pouring off its huge body and a bone-chilli "In every human being, there are two wolves constantly fighting. One is fear, and the other is love. The one that wins the battle? The one you feed. Always the one you feed." "The Ojibwe legend tells of the cursed place called Windigo Island. On Windigo Island, death came in the dark. It came in the form of an awful spirit, a cannibal beast with an insatiable craving for human flesh. Sometimes the beast swept in with the foul odor of carnage pouring off its huge body and a bone-chilling scream leaping from ts maw. Sometimes it approached with stealth and wile, and in the moment before it ripped your heart from your chest, it cried your name in a high, keening voice. It could be unpredictable, but one thing was certain: to set foot on Windigo Island in the dead of night was to call forth the worst of what the darkness there held." (pg 4). When three young boys decide to feed the wolf of fear, they head out late one night to visit island. There was no wind that night with nothing more to light their way than a gibbous moon. The water was like black satin and the only thing they paddled for in the silence was the outline of a small island that was only found on a detailed map. A rough circle a couple of dozen yards in diameter, all of it broken rock. From its center rose a tall, ragged pine, a tree that had somehow managed to put down roots in that humping of stone and had held to it tenaciously through season after season of November gales. The Ojibwe believed the pine was a lightning rod of sorts, a beacon attracting the evil sprits of Kitchigami to that cursed island. Not just the windigo but Michi Peshu, too, a monster that lived in the depths, a creature with horns and the face of a panther and razor-sharp spikes down its back and, some said, the body of the serpent. One thing for sure, they were about to get just what they intended to feed(excerpt). Corcoran O'Connor, or Cork as he is known by family and close friends finds himself in the center of coming to terms with a legend from his Native American people and dealing with the murder of a young runaway girl Carrie Verga. When her family hires him to investigate the reports that Carrie and Mariah Arceneaux, both young Indian girls who had decided to runaway from home, might have been lured away instead. In fact Cork thinks there may be more to this case than simply a murdered young girl and involve a well known but secret group of men looking for willing girls for their sex trafficking ring in Minnesota. The clues keep building as Cork and his daughter Jenny work with other family members of Mariah in hopes of finding her before she winds up dead. I received Windigo Island by William Kent Krueger compliments of Atria Books, a division of Simon and Schuster Publishers for my honest review. I did not receive any monetary compensation for a favorable review and the opinions are mine except where otherwise notated. This is the second novel I've reviewed from William Krueger and love the Native American flair he adds to your standard murder mystery. It lends a suspenseful feel that there is something lurking in the novel besides your standard criminal and the back story of the O'Connors maintains their belief as part of their Native American culture; that stereotypes exist and discrimination still permeates among the Native American tribes. I was completely captivated by this novel since it opens with the legend of Windigo Island and that keeps you glued to the novel to see how it all plays out. Once again, I believe that William Krueger delivered what his readers have come to accept and that is a well-written, captivating and suspenseful novel and thus I rate this one a 4 out of 5 stars.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Charty

    Not Krueger's strongest work. The topic (the exploitation and trafficking of women, Native women in particular) was a difficult one to tackle and unfortunately it came out less like a mystery and more like a treatise on the issue. It's something that should be talked about and I applaud him for his efforts to make more people aware of the issue, I'm just afraid it didn't make for a very good book. For one thing, there wasn't much mystery. From practically the opening chapters, I could Not Krueger's strongest work. The topic (the exploitation and trafficking of women, Native women in particular) was a difficult one to tackle and unfortunately it came out less like a mystery and more like a treatise on the issue. It's something that should be talked about and I applaud him for his efforts to make more people aware of the issue, I'm just afraid it didn't make for a very good book. For one thing, there wasn't much mystery. From practically the opening chapters, I could tell you one of the bad guys, and the romantic interest for Jenny was right there from the first introduction. I need some stuff to not be telegraphed at the outset, otherwise why bother to finish the book? Coming down to it, the biggest issue with the book was Jenny. I didn't care for her in the one where she saves Waboo, and her presence here is not well explained (she had a 'vision') nor is she integrated into the detective work very well. Frankly I found her annoying but I think that is more on Krueger than anything. I don't think he has a good grasp on how to write women and trying to shoehorn Cork's family directly into his investigations doesn't seem to be working too well. She get's about a third of the book to narrate and that didn't make me like her either. The ending felt predictable and the epilogue felt unnecessary and trite. Not a fan of this installment.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kris - My Novelesque Life

    RATING: 4.5 STARS (Review Not on Blog) Listened to on Audio This story was heartbreaking - about sex trafficking - but so well-written. We do get more of Jenny, and this time her point of view. I hope this was just for this novel. I don't mind Jenny, but I just didn't get engrossed in her parts. I find Anne more interesting and what is going on in her mind, lol.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jacque

    I'm not sure how I missed this one in the series, but I'm glad I found it at my local library. The Cork O'Connor series is a good one and Windigo Island is a worthy entry. Cork seemed more hardened and unforgiving in this one, which given the crimes of the bad guys was just fine with me.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kifflie

    Human trafficking is the crime in this latest Cork O'Connor mystery from William Kent Krueger. It's a difficult subject -- Indian girls abused or neglected by their families end up as young prostitutes in the Duluth area. Cork, his daughter Jenny, and the Mide healer Henry Meloux set off in search of one missing teenager from the Bad Bluff Ojibwe. The story alternates between Cork's point of view and Jenny's, and what strikes me is how distant and harsh Cork comes across through Jenny Human trafficking is the crime in this latest Cork O'Connor mystery from William Kent Krueger. It's a difficult subject -- Indian girls abused or neglected by their families end up as young prostitutes in the Duluth area. Cork, his daughter Jenny, and the Mide healer Henry Meloux set off in search of one missing teenager from the Bad Bluff Ojibwe. The story alternates between Cork's point of view and Jenny's, and what strikes me is how distant and harsh Cork comes across through Jenny's eyes. I've read all of the series to this point, and it seems to me that Cork is becoming darker and more ruthless as the years go by. I suppose it's understandable, given all that has happened to his family. But I hope Krueger doesn't take him too much farther down the dark road, as it's always been Cork's spirituality that makes him such a sympathetic and intriguing character. Still, this is an important, if difficult, topic that Krueger is tackling, so I do recommend the book for how it is addressed.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jacqueline J

    Bummer, I am totally caught up with this series. Another lovely read (or listen since I did this series while driving to work.) I love Cork O'Connor. I love Henry Meloux. This book doesn't really need any further review from me. If you've read any of the series, you know what they're like and this is more of the same. This one had some strong secondary characters who I really liked. It's great to see Cork's kids taking part and I sneaked a peak at the plot of the upcoming book due later this yea Bummer, I am totally caught up with this series. Another lovely read (or listen since I did this series while driving to work.) I love Cork O'Connor. I love Henry Meloux. This book doesn't really need any further review from me. If you've read any of the series, you know what they're like and this is more of the same. This one had some strong secondary characters who I really liked. It's great to see Cork's kids taking part and I sneaked a peak at the plot of the upcoming book due later this year and I'm really happy with where Jenny's life is going.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Vicki

    Not as good a read as I have come to expect from William Kent Krueger. In a scene near the beginning of the book, Cork says something to a woman that is so out of character that it almost ruins the entire book for me. And I think with the trailer scene the book just completely falls apart. From that point on, the story becomes unbelievable. That and Jenny's voice just didn't work.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Just not for me. I think you need to read the previous books in this series first, as the characters took me awhile to sort out. Fairly slow-moving plot about runaway girls. Got nearly half way through and abandoned it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lee

    Another wonderful book in the Corcoran O'Connor series. Are these great literature? - No, definitely not, but they sure are engaging and dependable escapist fare. I love the O'Connor family and Henry Meloux. I love the setting, too.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mike Kennedy

    14th entry in the Cork O'Connor series. This is probably one of the more darker books in the series. Cork is hired to find a girl who is gone missing/runaway on the Bad Bluff Reservation in Wisconsin. As he digs deeper, he finds that there is more to the story including a possible underage sex ring. It started off really fast for me because the first third of the novel is set at the Bad Bluff reservation and Bayfield, WI. My parents have a cabin that basically backs up to the Red Cliff reservati 14th entry in the Cork O'Connor series. This is probably one of the more darker books in the series. Cork is hired to find a girl who is gone missing/runaway on the Bad Bluff Reservation in Wisconsin. As he digs deeper, he finds that there is more to the story including a possible underage sex ring. It started off really fast for me because the first third of the novel is set at the Bad Bluff reservation and Bayfield, WI. My parents have a cabin that basically backs up to the Red Cliff reservation that Krueger used to model Bad Bluff reservation. It was interesting to read about Cork going to some of the same places I have been many times in Bayfield. This includes the marina that shares the beach with my parents cabin. I found that as the book continued it got darker and darker I must say this sort of took away from the book a little bit. It was still overall a very good read, but I feel the excessive dark storyline of the book kept me from giving it five stars. I am still looking forward to the next installment in the series, Manitou Canyon. I just hope it is not quite as dark.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Renee

    WKK seems to be changing direction with the Cork O'Connor series in a good way. It's not all about Cork any more. Jenny, Anne and Stephen are finding their voices, and their callings and this is causing some questions deep in the heart of Cork. Cork is becoming a little more human, a little more real. More so, this books did a great job calling out the little discussed, but ugly truth of child sex trafficking in Minnesota and the role of Duluth in that truth. There is great beauty here in my sta WKK seems to be changing direction with the Cork O'Connor series in a good way. It's not all about Cork any more. Jenny, Anne and Stephen are finding their voices, and their callings and this is causing some questions deep in the heart of Cork. Cork is becoming a little more human, a little more real. More so, this books did a great job calling out the little discussed, but ugly truth of child sex trafficking in Minnesota and the role of Duluth in that truth. There is great beauty here in my state that hides a great ugliness and WKK really brought it to light. The truths about how the Indians are viewed by whites, how they have gone through an accepted government pogrom of their cultures and families are spoken through the words of Daniel, Louise and Bea Abiss. I didn't think his books could get any better, but this is, by far, his most meaningful book yet.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Brenden Schaaf

    William Kent Krueger's books really connect with me and I look forward to reading them when they are released every August. The characters are familiar now like old friends and it is always enjoyable to learn more about then. Windigo Island was another great book in the Cork O'Connor serious and I devoured it in a single day. There are some things that were predictable, but mostly the story held my attention and kept me guessing to the end. I'm also impressed that this book highlighted the issue William Kent Krueger's books really connect with me and I look forward to reading them when they are released every August. The characters are familiar now like old friends and it is always enjoyable to learn more about then. Windigo Island was another great book in the Cork O'Connor serious and I devoured it in a single day. There are some things that were predictable, but mostly the story held my attention and kept me guessing to the end. I'm also impressed that this book highlighted the issue of child sex trafficking and I hope that it helps bring attention and resources to that problem in years to come.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Fredrick Danysh

    When a dead Indian girl who has been missing for a year washes up on Windigo Island, Cork O'Connor and his daughter Jennifer becomes involved in trying to locate a girl who disappeared with the dead girl. They uncover a case of incest, human trafficking for prostitution, and bad cops. Henry, the Ojibwe shaman, is also endangered. This is a readable part of Krueger's series about O'Connor and the Native Americans of the North.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    another most excellent 5 star read! I have favorite, mostly local authors that I get their books in hardcover and signed if possible and William Kent krueger is one of them...:)

  26. 4 out of 5

    Peggy

    This is the 14th book in the Cork O'Connor series. We have seen Cork go from unhappily married to happily married to widowed. We have seen him as sheriff to private investigator. All along this journey is his family and what they mean to him. Also is his strong connection to his Ojibwe blood - he is half-Indian. All the books focus on the Indian - White conflicts. In this book the body of a young teenage Indian girl washes up on the shore of a small island in Lake Superior. She ran away from hom This is the 14th book in the Cork O'Connor series. We have seen Cork go from unhappily married to happily married to widowed. We have seen him as sheriff to private investigator. All along this journey is his family and what they mean to him. Also is his strong connection to his Ojibwe blood - he is half-Indian. All the books focus on the Indian - White conflicts. In this book the body of a young teenage Indian girl washes up on the shore of a small island in Lake Superior. She ran away from home with a friend a year ago. Cork and his adult daughter Jenny go looking for the remaining missing girl. Henry, the ancient medicine man and mentor of Cork comes along also. The tale centers on the sex trafficking of young girls; many are Native American. The danger increases as they close in on the evil man "Windigo" who runs the girls. Much of this book is told from Jenny's perspective, which is a shift I am not sure I liked. As an amateur investigator (she is a writer) she is stubborn and defies Cork's expert advice time and time again. She isn't very sympathetic as a main character. Brave or stupid? I think stupid and lucky.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Eadie

    When the body of a teenage Ojibwe girl washes up on the shore of an island in Lake Superior, the residents of the nearby Bad Bluff reservation whisper that it was the work of a deadly mythical beast, the Windigo, or a vengeful spirit called Michi Peshu. Such stories have been told by the Ojibwe people for generations, but they don’t explain how the girl and her friend, Mariah Arceneaux, disappeared a year ago. At the request of the Arceneaux family, private investigator Cork O’Connor takes on th When the body of a teenage Ojibwe girl washes up on the shore of an island in Lake Superior, the residents of the nearby Bad Bluff reservation whisper that it was the work of a deadly mythical beast, the Windigo, or a vengeful spirit called Michi Peshu. Such stories have been told by the Ojibwe people for generations, but they don’t explain how the girl and her friend, Mariah Arceneaux, disappeared a year ago. At the request of the Arceneaux family, private investigator Cork O’Connor takes on the case. This was another excellent read from William Kent Krueger. I have read all his books before this one and he does not disappoint. His books are always riveting and keeps you on the edge of your seat. This one was about young Ojibwe girls and prostitution. We get a lot of information about the history and culture of the Ojibwe Indians and why these girls would turn to prostitution. Krueger's excellent writing makes for a realistic story and a hard to put down book. I look forward to the next book and I would highly recommend this series to those who like mystery in the wilderness and Indian history.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Val

    Windigo Island is an amazing addition in the Cork O'Connor series. Once again the author pays tribute to the land and its people while also delivering a fascinating mystery. He paints a heartbreaking picture of the cycle of poverty, alcoholism, and runaway (and/or throwaway) children on the reservations, along with the evil of men who all too willing to exploit them. In the words of Henry, who has become frail in body but remains strong in spirit: In every human being, there are two wolves constantly Windigo Island is an amazing addition in the Cork O'Connor series. Once again the author pays tribute to the land and its people while also delivering a fascinating mystery. He paints a heartbreaking picture of the cycle of poverty, alcoholism, and runaway (and/or throwaway) children on the reservations, along with the evil of men who all too willing to exploit them. In the words of Henry, who has become frail in body but remains strong in spirit: In every human being, there are two wolves constantly fighting. One is fear, and the other is love. Which one wins? The one you feed. Always the one you feed. It's a powerful message.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    Good book, like most of this series. I like the way you get to experience the family growing up and growing larger. This one takes Cork to Duluth and trying to help find the daughter of one of Henry's nieces. It exposes the fact of human trafficking in the native American population. A problem with is rampant in our society. I recommend you read this book if you're not familiar with the problem and even more, a serious biography by Rachel Lloyd "Girls Like Us". It really is a problem that goes o Good book, like most of this series. I like the way you get to experience the family growing up and growing larger. This one takes Cork to Duluth and trying to help find the daughter of one of Henry's nieces. It exposes the fact of human trafficking in the native American population. A problem with is rampant in our society. I recommend you read this book if you're not familiar with the problem and even more, a serious biography by Rachel Lloyd "Girls Like Us". It really is a problem that goes on literally right under our noses and needs to be addressed.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Davidson

    This book has it all from action and suspense to tradition and love. But most importantly it keeps the tragic situation of young Native women being abducted and prostituted in the forefront of people’s minds as this continues to occur despite the work being done by many, most notably Suzzanne Koepplinger who is mentioned in the preface of the book.

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