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How the Bible Came to Be (Ebook Shorts) PDF, ePub eBook

4.6 out of 5
30 review

How the Bible Came to Be (Ebook Shorts)

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How the Bible Came to Be (Ebook Shorts) PDF, ePub eBook One of the keys to enjoying an in-depth and rewarding experience of reading the Bible is recapturing the ancient world--its cultures, customs, and histories. With this innovative guide, readers can enrich their study with fascinating insights into the Bible and the world in which it was written. The Baker Illustrated Bible Handbook offers the most up-to-date evangelical bib One of the keys to enjoying an in-depth and rewarding experience of reading the Bible is recapturing the ancient world--its cultures, customs, and histories. With this innovative guide, readers can enrich their study with fascinating insights into the Bible and the world in which it was written. The Baker Illustrated Bible Handbook offers the most up-to-date evangelical biblical scholarship in a format that is readable and easy to understand. This book-by-book guide brings the Bible to life with more than 1,100 full-color pages packed with illustrations, maps, and photos, and 112 in-depth articles on a wide range of topics important to students of the Bible. Readers will discover how each part of the Bible fits into and informs every other part, giving them a cohesive understanding of God's Word. No reference collection will be complete without this incredible new handbook to the Bible.

30 review for How the Bible Came to Be (Ebook Shorts)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    Nothing new here, but a brief overview of how the Bible came together, from the Old Testament to the New Testament, to bible translation work, to discussions of inspiration and innerancy. A solid refresher and good book for a Bible study or discipleship focus when someone has questions as to how we came to have the Bible we have.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Larry Meyer

    Don't waste your time with this book. It ignores almost all historical development of the scriptures, and relies on biases and assumptions to support its claims. It misapplied the scriptures to try to justify its claims about the Old Testament Canon. For example, it claims that the test for the legitimacy of any new prophet is whether the prophet adhered to the canonical nucleus of the scriptures. (Deuteronomy 13:1-6) However, that passage tells Israel to reject any prophet that encourages its p Don't waste your time with this book. It ignores almost all historical development of the scriptures, and relies on biases and assumptions to support its claims. It misapplied the scriptures to try to justify its claims about the Old Testament Canon. For example, it claims that the test for the legitimacy of any new prophet is whether the prophet adhered to the canonical nucleus of the scriptures. (Deuteronomy 13:1-6) However, that passage tells Israel to reject any prophet that encourages its people to follow other gods. These verses say nothing about a canon of scripture. Furthermore, the authors approve of the claims of Josephus, a Jewish historian from the 1st Century AD to claim that the Jewish canon was centuries old. This is patently false. Sadducees and Pharisees had different canons of scripture (and Essenes had yet a different canon). There was no settled Jewish canon for a hundred years after Jesus' birth. The worst sin of this book, however, is that it completely ignores the testimony of the early church fathers about the canon. For some reason, the authors prefer to rely on the testimony of Jewish leaders who rejected Christ over the authoritative teachings of the leaders of the early Church. Why should Christians accept the canon of the successors of the Pharisees over the canon relied upon by the Christian disciples of the Apostles.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bria

    I'm certainly no Biblical scholar. I picked this up because in my opinion, a lot of the problems people have in coming to be/remaining believers is that they don't believe the Bible is inspired and therefore not an authoritative text. So I picked this up as a Kindle freebie to educate myself on where the Bible came from and help guide my own discovery of why I think the Bible is inspired and therefor authoritative. So, with that in mind, I did find some interesting thoughts in here, although I w I'm certainly no Biblical scholar. I picked this up because in my opinion, a lot of the problems people have in coming to be/remaining believers is that they don't believe the Bible is inspired and therefore not an authoritative text. So I picked this up as a Kindle freebie to educate myself on where the Bible came from and help guide my own discovery of why I think the Bible is inspired and therefor authoritative. So, with that in mind, I did find some interesting thoughts in here, although I wish there was more commentary and/or Biblical references to back up what is being said. But if there was it wouldn't be so short! Really I kind of felt like I was reading a rather long syllabus for a Bible class. There are some areas I'd like more information on, some that were so over my head I didn't get a thing from it and others that I was not really interested in knowing that much about anyway. All that to say, I'll probably go on a hunt for another book or two to read on the topic as well. However, this book did help me to organize my thoughts enough to know what I'm looking for!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Adam Shields

    Short Review: This fills a needed place in books about the creation of the bible and the cannon. Fairly frequently people ask me for recommendations and I don't have a lot of good suggestions. I have read a number of books but for one reason or another most of them are not that good or too acadmeic or too focused on their narrow theological issues. But this one is decent. I still think it is too narrowly focused on an Evangelical understanding of how the bible came to be. And I did not think it Short Review: This fills a needed place in books about the creation of the bible and the cannon. Fairly frequently people ask me for recommendations and I don't have a lot of good suggestions. I have read a number of books but for one reason or another most of them are not that good or too acadmeic or too focused on their narrow theological issues. But this one is decent. I still think it is too narrowly focused on an Evangelical understanding of how the bible came to be. And I did not think it made the case for spending so much time on the Septuagint for such a short book. But it is a short book that is pretty well written. It will probably be my go to recommendation for a short introduction. Still not perfect. But better than most. My full review is on my blog at http://bookwi.se/how-the-bible-came-t...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Morrow

    "The selection included in this short ebook is an excerpt from the larger work "The Baker Illustrated Bible Handbook" by J. Daniel Hays and J. Scott Duvall, eds." I learned so much about the history of the compilation of the earliest Bibles. I didn't realize there were many Bibles translated before the KJV. As a studier of the KJV-only controversy, I appreciated the common language used to explain the reasons that newer translations were needed, due to discovery of older manuscripts.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ijaz Ahmad

    Foregoing the last chapter, this short book covers some important points about the history of the Biblical text. Daniel Wallace's introduction and explanation of NTTC (New Testament Textual Criticism), is perhaps the best essay in the book and should be considered required reading for anyone looking for a primer about NTTC. Short, simple and to the point. Very effectively written and sensible. Would recommend.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lillie

    I believe this short ebook may be an excerpt from a longer Bible handbook. It is a compilation of articles about the origins of Scripture and how the canon of Scripture came to be. Although none of the original manuscripts exist, I found it very interesting on how scholars determine which later copied manuscripts are accurate renditions of the original.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dh Triplett

    Worth reading A short read that covers much territory. Book gives a thorough overview of how we got our Bible and covers the important events and considerations in translating God's word. I highly recommend this book to anyone who seeks to understand more fully how we got the Bible we hold in our hands today.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mrs. G

    Informative but not excessively scholarly Love the thorough review of the biblical canon. Written, in my opinion, at undergraduate level. Ideal for the Christian who seriously wants to study the topic but does not have an academic theological background

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sherry

    Very interesting!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    Interesting and informative for a layman such as me. A little repetitive in places but served to reinforce basic principles.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lynn's

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sherry R.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Whittum

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

  16. 4 out of 5

    Renee Sprague

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sonia Silverman

  18. 5 out of 5

    Pamela Saylor

  19. 5 out of 5

    Anastasia Kinderman

  20. 4 out of 5

    Timvane Chiwandira

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bob White

  22. 4 out of 5

    Patti Stratton

  23. 4 out of 5

    HughDeLong

  24. 5 out of 5

    Cody

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  26. 4 out of 5

    Laurel

  27. 4 out of 5

    Norman

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Lynn

  29. 5 out of 5

    Quincy Pinedo

  30. 4 out of 5

    Linda

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