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Terre d'exil: La Légende de Drizzt, T2 (Fantasy) PDF, ePub eBook

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Terre d'exil: La Légende de Drizzt, T2 (Fantasy)

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Terre d'exil: La Légende de Drizzt, T2 (Fantasy) PDF, ePub eBook Drizzt a quitté Menzoberranzan, sa ville natale, pour gagner les régions sauvages de l'Outre-terre. C'est le début pour lui d'une vie d'errance et de traque. Car Drizzt doit devenir un chasseur s'il veut prendre le dessus sur les créatures qui rôdent dans les profondeurs. Il peut heureusement compter sur l'aide de Guenhwyvar, sa fidèle panthère magique. Mais le jeune elfe Drizzt a quitté Menzoberranzan, sa ville natale, pour gagner les régions sauvages de l'Outre-terre. C'est le début pour lui d'une vie d'errance et de traque. Car Drizzt doit devenir un chasseur s'il veut prendre le dessus sur les créatures qui rôdent dans les profondeurs. Il peut heureusement compter sur l'aide de Guenhwyvar, sa fidèle panthère magique. Mais le jeune elfe noir n'est pas seulement confronté à la sauvagerie de contrées hostiles, il doit aussi faire face à une menace bien plus ancienne : sa famille ne l'a pas oublié et sa mère, la maléfique Matrone Malice, tient à resserrer les liens du sang... jusqu'à ce que mort s'ensuive.

30 review for Terre d'exil: La Légende de Drizzt, T2 (Fantasy)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Evgeny

    A buddy read with Kristen, Gavin, and Kaora. This book picks up right where the first one ended. For this reason I cannot give any big details about plot as they will spoil the ending of the first book. Sufficient to say Drizzt is still alive which is not a big surprise as this is the second book of the series about him featuring 15 more. He struggles trying to retain his humanity, or elfinity in his case (hey look, I made up a new word!). He also finally made some real friends. We also get to ha A buddy read with Kristen, Gavin, and Kaora. This book picks up right where the first one ended. For this reason I cannot give any big details about plot as they will spoil the ending of the first book. Sufficient to say Drizzt is still alive which is not a big surprise as this is the second book of the series about him featuring 15 more. He struggles trying to retain his humanity, or elfinity in his case (hey look, I made up a new word!). He also finally made some real friends. We also get to have a fairly good glimpse at a very interesting civilization of guys who came straight from the pages of this book: This book avoids the dreaded Second Book of a Trilogy syndrome: it is not boring. In fact it is much more action oriented than the first one. Drizzt simply does not have much time for brooding. This was a deciding factor in my rating. I saw too many trilogies with interesting world building in the first book, exciting conclusion in the last one and throwaway filling in the second one. I expected mindless entertainment and this is exactly what I got. I am eager to start the last book of the trilogy, especially considering the way this one ended.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carmen

    Reading R.A. Salvatore is a guilty pleasure. As someone who has a college education and has waded through Moby Dick, Ulysses, and The Canterbury Tales reading a book with characters who have names like Pikel Bouldershoulder can be a wee bit embarrassing. For an english major Salvatore’s books often seem like something that should be read under a flashlight in bed at night so no one sees us. Its like Tiger Woods playing a round of golf at a mini golf course. He knows all his skill and experience Reading R.A. Salvatore is a guilty pleasure. As someone who has a college education and has waded through Moby Dick, Ulysses, and The Canterbury Tales reading a book with characters who have names like Pikel Bouldershoulder can be a wee bit embarrassing. For an english major Salvatore’s books often seem like something that should be read under a flashlight in bed at night so no one sees us. Its like Tiger Woods playing a round of golf at a mini golf course. He knows all his skill and experience doesn’t really bear on the challenge of getting the golf ball past the mini windmill blades, but hey its fun anyway. Salvatore’s books can be read in a day or two, or they can be picked up and put down while at the gym, or in between housecleaning chores. They are fun, but they are an acquired taste. Willing suspension of disbelief only goes so far. And some readers suspending disbelief in the face of a cookie cutter plot and stereotyped characters is beyond their understanding of good faith. However, as any reader of Salvatore’s book’s knows, his plots and characters are not cookie cutter. There is a depth to Drizzt as a character that seems to stretch beyond the confines of fantasy. A loneliness as deep and wide as the great underdark he comes from. A need of friendship and understanding to calm the raging winds of madness and despair too much isolation can bring on us. Drizzt’s isolation speaks no doubt well to teenagers who are emerging from their own shadowy self involved world to the world of adults. They must navigate their way through the strange and pitfall laden land of responsibility and loss that makes up every life. But Drizzt’s isolation also speaks no doubt to adults. Most of us, for whatever reason, come to a place in life where we feel we are beyond human. The loss of a love, a child, a career, our life’s work, can often make us feel that we are the misfits or unwanted ones. We become in a word, useless. We can learn to survive, or adapt, but what we crave, what we want most in our deepest, most innermost being, is to belong. To belong to somewhere, someone, some group. And not just be accepted for mutual benefit, or to complete a task, like a corporation or simply just a job. But to have someone look at us, in our darkest and most dangerous hours and know that we make sense to another person. This one was as good as the first and in some ways more poignant. I will hand it to the guy, he calls himself a storyteller and does not presume to talk about art but this book had more than a few moments that made me say: that is life like. Off the top of my head one of the first images that comes to mind is the character Clacker, a former pech ( a race who works with the stone and can ‘listen’ to the rocks). A character who has been changed into a form of life completely alien to him by a mean spirited wizard. The character also knows that he is slowly forgetting that part of himself and will soon become a monster. His friends Drizzt and Belwar try to find a way to save him but can’t. And the poor creature dies and ends his misery in an act of saving his friends. Salvatore knows how to construct counterpoint character arcs. Another image that comes to mind is Drizzt, who after ten years of living in the underdark wild and devolving into a primal and savage “Hunter,” shows up at the gnome city. He has observed their society from afar and sees them as fun loving and well meaning. He wants so much to be a part of that he appears at the gates of the city without weapons and is taken prisoner. His race is the mortal enemy of the gnomes and he knows in all likelihood he will be executed and accepts his fate. How often do we see in fantasy a character really driven by despair? Drizzt is accepted into the society although he suffers from a form of ptsd. Eventually his past, the malicious drow of Menzoberranzan, are looking for him for the insult to their spider goddess. Drizzt is returned to the wilds of the underdark but not without a friend this time. Belwar goes with him. One of the reasons I think these books are so resonant with my students is that they know they do not belong. They have dysfunctional families, they have destructive cultures that see them as merely instruments in power politics. They know they do not matter to the world at large, like Drizzt. But they also know they want the best life has to offer. Frienship, trust, love. All the things a character needs and holds dear. Perhaps the best statement I have heard of this dilemma is by Salvatore himself in the afterword interview in Sojourn, the next book in the series(which I peeked ahead and read). Drizzt is unlike most fantasy heroes in that he occupies a small part in a big world. He is not a savior of the world, nor is he a major player. He just goes on. In a way he invokes the firefly principle. Everyday people just trying to get buy. And I think that is what makes Drizzt one of us. He just wants to go on. For me the primary element in fantasy that makes me stand up and take notice is the invention, or as the ancient rhetoricians call it, inventio. To them the term meant discovery and organization of a literary work. To moderns it means the discovery of an idea or fact, and the arranging of words and ideas in a fresh and arresting fashion. To me invention in a fantasy novel is what I percieve when I realize the way the writer has created his world and the elements in it add something new yet somehow his creation of a fantasy element adds to my understanding, or reframes what I see or know to exist in the world. For example, it is the opposite of the feeling you get when you feel the writer of a fantasy has pulled this structural element “out of his ass.” It is an invention that is somehow deeply imbedded within the framework of the characters before me, there but not visible at all times. Salvatore pulls this off with the Hunter aspect of Drizzt. He emerges as a primal being but also it foregrounds the society he lives in now. What to Drizzt’s world are modern rites and priestesses and societal roles are stripped away when Drizzt reverts to a primal state of being. The author also pulls it off with the Mindflayer culture. Their control and dominance of other races by manipulating their thought processes.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Markus

    Exile picks up (almost) right where Homeland left off (that is to say three decades later, but nothing has happened in that time). Drizzt Do'Urden has spent a long time (we are told) becoming "The Hunter", an (apparently) epic persona, or alter ego, wandering the cavernous corridors of the Underdark with an insatiable bloodlust (except when he's nice, which is most of the time). Despite my making fun of it, I really enjoyed the second book of the Dark Elf trilogy, even more so than the first. Thi Exile picks up (almost) right where Homeland left off (that is to say three decades later, but nothing has happened in that time). Drizzt Do'Urden has spent a long time (we are told) becoming "The Hunter", an (apparently) epic persona, or alter ego, wandering the cavernous corridors of the Underdark with an insatiable bloodlust (except when he's nice, which is most of the time). Despite my making fun of it, I really enjoyed the second book of the Dark Elf trilogy, even more so than the first. This sequel has a more well-constructed plotline than Homeland, and despite the unfortunate fact that most of it is remarkably predictable and self-evident, it is an immensely enjoyable story to read. Bonus points for more Jarlaxle and Zaknafein, two drow who are quite a bit more interesting than Drizzt.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    This was a decent read but it did not quite live up to the quality of Homeland. The story picked up 10 years after the final events of Homeland and found Drizzt hiding out in the Underdark trying to avoid the murderous vengeance of his family. He had to fight against losing himself to the despair of loneliness. It actually started a bit dull as Drizzt was very gloomy and his plodding from place to place in the Underdark meeting random monsters was not all that exciting. Things picked up when he This was a decent read but it did not quite live up to the quality of Homeland. The story picked up 10 years after the final events of Homeland and found Drizzt hiding out in the Underdark trying to avoid the murderous vengeance of his family. He had to fight against losing himself to the despair of loneliness. It actually started a bit dull as Drizzt was very gloomy and his plodding from place to place in the Underdark meeting random monsters was not all that exciting. Things picked up when he encountered people he could actually communicate with. Some of the action scenes were OK, but after a while they all started to blend together a bit. The main problem was that there was no sense of tension during any of the battles as it was obvious it was only a matter of time before Drizzt pulped the monster of the moment. On the plus side I still really like Drizzt as a character. After he recovered a bit from his early despair we got to see a few more examples of his kind and very un-Drow like nature. We did get to meet a few interesting new characters in this installment. Drizzt was in bad need of a friend and found one in the shape of Belwar Dissengulp, the gnome who's life he helped save during the first book. The friendship between the pair saved both from despair and helped them grow as people. The most interesting character we meet along the way was Drizzt's second companion Clapper. Clapper's tale was a surprisingly sad one and one of the few story arcs that managed to engage me emotionally. The happenings back it Menzoberranzan were interesting. Drizzt's family deal with the fallout of falling out of favor with the Spider Goddess. They must fight the usual political scheming while also trying to find and kill Drizzt to appease the Spider Goddess. The negative is that I thought the politics were a bit simplistic this time around. Some characters made some inexplicably idiotic decisions. We did get to meet an interesting new character in the form of the unusual mercenary Jarlaxle. All in all this was an OK read that did not quite hit the heights of the first book in the series. Rating: 3 stars. Audio Note: This was narrated by Victor Bevine who did a good job.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Choko

    *** 3.35 *** A buddy read with the FBR group:) Well, this was not bad, it was even entertaining, but it had waaaaay too much fighting sequences and waaaaaaaaayyyy too little plot. It takes place 10 years after book one and our hero has been living as an exile from Menzoberranzan fighting for survival in the wild. However, he realizes that he is turning into what he hated to begin with without the communication with other thinking beings, so he goes to the gnomes where he makes a friend with Belwar *** 3.35 *** A buddy read with the FBR group:) Well, this was not bad, it was even entertaining, but it had waaaaay too much fighting sequences and waaaaaaaaayyyy too little plot. It takes place 10 years after book one and our hero has been living as an exile from Menzoberranzan fighting for survival in the wild. However, he realizes that he is turning into what he hated to begin with without the communication with other thinking beings, so he goes to the gnomes where he makes a friend with Belwar Dissengulp, whose life he once saved. This puts the little gnome community in danger, because the evil matriarch of Drizzt's family is hunting him and wants him dead to please the wishes of the Spider Queen. So back on the exile's path he goes, this time with a friend. On their run they encounter a ton of different species of creatures and get into never-ending amnont of fights, make new friends, lose some friends, kill many of foe, and Drizzt proves once and again he is a master of the swords... "... “In my stubborn youth, I believed that I could stand alone, that I was strong enough to conquer my enemies with sword and with principles. Arrogance convinced me that by sheer determination, I could conquer helplessness itself. Stubborn and foolish youth, I must admit, for when I look back on those years now, I see quite clearly that rarely did I stand alone and rarely did I have to stand alone. Always there were friends, true and dear, lending me support even when I believed I did not want it, and even when I did not realize they were doing it.” ..." We also had the great black Panther and some of the very few humorous situations were when he would try to cuddle with the gnome... This is when we first learned of this world's very peculiar cursing phrase, Magga cammara:) The Underdark is not a humorous world... "... ".... the cat Guenhwyvar lumbered over and plopped across the burrow-warden’s legs. Drizzt moved away into the shielding entrance of a tunnel to watch. Only a few minutes later, Belwar awoke with a snarl. “Magga cammara, panther!” the deep gnome growled. “Why must you always bed down on me, instead of beside me?” Guenhwyvar shifted slightly but let out only a deep sigh in response. “Magga cammara, cat!” Belwar roared again. He wiggled his toes frantically, trying futilely to keep the circulation going and dismiss the tingles that had already begun. “Away with you!” The burrow-warden propped himself up on one elbow and swung his hammer-hand at Guenhwyvar’s backside. Guenhwyvar sprang away in feigned flight, quicker than Belwar’s swat. But just as the burrow-warden relaxed, the panther cut back on its tracks, pivoted completely, and leaped atop Belwar, burying him and pinning him flat to the stone.” ..." I enjoyed it enough to want to continue with the series and hope for some plot growth as we go along. Will recommend for newbies to the genre and those who like more action in their books:):):) I wish you all Happy Reading and many more wonderful books to come!!!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Forrest

    . . . In which Forrest's children con him into reading yet another book that wasn't originally on his TBR pile . . . Yet another inadvertent social-science commentary, this time of a more psychological bent than sociological. Here we see Drizzt, the renegade drow-elf, struggle to regain his . . . well, his self. It's a lonely life out in the tunnels of the Underdark, worse, even, than the halls of your local middle- or high-school (if you can believe that). You see, the Underdark is full of bull . . . In which Forrest's children con him into reading yet another book that wasn't originally on his TBR pile . . . Yet another inadvertent social-science commentary, this time of a more psychological bent than sociological. Here we see Drizzt, the renegade drow-elf, struggle to regain his . . . well, his self. It's a lonely life out in the tunnels of the Underdark, worse, even, than the halls of your local middle- or high-school (if you can believe that). You see, the Underdark is full of bullies. Not your pudgy, freckle-faced, push-you-into-a-mud-puddle class bullies, but bullies that really want to kill you and eat you (and not necessarily in that order). As a result of this environment, the kind, gentle Drizzt has become a killing machine, a survivor, a bully's worst nightmare. Worst of all, Drizzt has suffered abuse at the hands of his own sisters and mother. No, that's not exactly true. His mother wants to kill him. More than anything else in the world. This does nothing for his self-esteem. I'm no psychiatrist, but it shouldn't take a PhD to figure out that this guy is pretty messed up. Still, he has to have friends, right? Even the most awkward social reject has friends (who are also awkward social rejects). Enter Belwar, a svirfneblin that Drizzt encountered in the first book, Exile. Yes, there was the relationship-limiting issue of Drizzt having ordered Belwar's hands being cut off (if I'm remembering that right), but let's let bygones be bygones. Can't we all just get along? And who better to forgive an outcast, "good" drow who has abandoned the evil ways of his family, than a gnome with a pickaxe and magical hammer for hands? Reasonable, no? While we're at it, let's throw in a Pech that has been polymorphed into a Hook Horror (if I were the wizard who did this think, I would have changed him into a slug or a pudding or a soggy cardboard box or something, but what do I know of wizarding?). Three buddies, all trying to help Drizzt overcome his evil inner self. If that's not enough, let's throw in some foes. Of course, there's Matron Malice, Drizzt's mother. Then there's the undead corpse of his father, Zaknafein, which is being controlled by Matron Malice (who really wears the pants in all this?). Add in a few random encounters with mindless whatnots, and a whole section of Mind Flayers, and you've got a recipe for a pretty good book. Seriously, as much as I mock, I admire. Not the writing. Salvatore has a penchant for using words that don't make sense, though they sound like they should make sense (we call those "malapropisms," children). In the words of Inigo Montoya, "You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means." But other than a bit of grammatical sloppiness, and a touch of overly sappy dialogue (both external and internal), I do like this book. It was written for teenagers, no doubt, and I'm a little older than that. Just a little. But the action was exciting, the characters were good, but not great, and the Underdark is fascinating. What really pushed this from a 3 to a 4 star book, however, was the intrigue between the drow themselves. Homeland set the stage for this, but watching the theory play out into practice was absolutely amazing. Hopefully I'll see more of that when I kowtow to my son's desires for me to read the final book in the trilogy and maybe even take a sidestep into one or two other Forgotten Realms books.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Veronica

    This was light on plot (middle book syndrome?) - unless you consider Drizzt's wanderings through the Underdark a great plot - but it was a quick read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Luke Taylor

    Frightening and fantastic sequel twisting and turning through the wilds of the Underdark, Exile is a tightly wrought tale of humanity, with Drizzt fighting for the values he holds harder than ever. As always, R.A. Salvatore's action is fierce and his world-building flawless, and Drizzt's philosophical reminiscence at the beginning of each new section the rueful highlight of the book.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Buddy read with Chris. I didn't find this quite as good as the first book in the series but it was still a good read. To many fight scenes that we could have done without if you ask me and less of depth. I loved the ending though and will continue with the series.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kaora

    Rtc

  11. 4 out of 5

    Connor

    [3.5 Stars] I really enjoyed this fun romp, but it wasn't anything I was extremely invested in. There was an awesome side character that I enjoyed a lot. He added a lot to Drizzt's personal journey. I would have really liked to learn more about the different races of people that we got introduced to as well even though I expect many of them aren't important to the overall world. I also don't even try to memorize any proper names in this series since they're all so long. I'll definitely be readin [3.5 Stars] I really enjoyed this fun romp, but it wasn't anything I was extremely invested in. There was an awesome side character that I enjoyed a lot. He added a lot to Drizzt's personal journey. I would have really liked to learn more about the different races of people that we got introduced to as well even though I expect many of them aren't important to the overall world. I also don't even try to memorize any proper names in this series since they're all so long. I'll definitely be reading more in this series because it's just so fun, but I do hope we get some female characters that aren't the worst, most evil beings in existence soon.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Traci

    This one slipped a bit for me. I still liked it but to be honest I enjoyed the Menzoberranzan (yeah, totally looked that up) sections more than the Drizzt ones. Drizzt has escaped from his family and has been hiding out in the underdark for the last ten years (too long in my opinion). With the panther Guenhwyvar as his only companion he has lost touch with who he was. Acting almost purely on instinct. Desperate to get back into their goddess' favor his family begins to hunt for their rogue noble This one slipped a bit for me. I still liked it but to be honest I enjoyed the Menzoberranzan (yeah, totally looked that up) sections more than the Drizzt ones. Drizzt has escaped from his family and has been hiding out in the underdark for the last ten years (too long in my opinion). With the panther Guenhwyvar as his only companion he has lost touch with who he was. Acting almost purely on instinct. Desperate to get back into their goddess' favor his family begins to hunt for their rogue noble (better late than never I guess). It's very predictable. Especially to any gamers out there. Wander. Fight. Collect companion. Battle boss character. Not necessarily a bad thing. The first time I read these I was heavily into role playing games (actually that's how I discovered them) and I just loved it. During my reread of Homeland I was a little dismayed by the lack of diversity in the characterization. Very stereotypical. Drow. Evil. No degrees of evil. Of ambition. Most of the characters were much like another. Here there's improvement. It's not great but I did notice a difference. And one of my favorite characters is introduced here. Jarlaxle. The opportunistic Drow mercenary leader. (although why did I hear Zevran from the videogame Dragon Age everytime he spoke) I like these books so I recommend them. If you liked Homeland but not this one I'd still continue. It was kinda weak for me.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    2.5 to 3.0 stars. After really liking the first book in the Dark Elf Trilogy, Homeland, I was looking forward to reading this...and I was disappointed. While okay to pretty good, I did not like this nearly as much as the first one. The first book took place almost exclusively in Menzoberranzan (the City of Spiders) which I thought was fascinating and very well described, especially the social and political aspects of Drow society. The parts in this book that took place in Menzoberranzan were als 2.5 to 3.0 stars. After really liking the first book in the Dark Elf Trilogy, Homeland, I was looking forward to reading this...and I was disappointed. While okay to pretty good, I did not like this nearly as much as the first one. The first book took place almost exclusively in Menzoberranzan (the City of Spiders) which I thought was fascinating and very well described, especially the social and political aspects of Drow society. The parts in this book that took place in Menzoberranzan were also very well done and were my favorite part of this book. I just never really got into Drizzt's journey in this book. I thought the writing was clunky and the plot a bit plodding. That said, the book still had some interesting characters and concepts and I will likely read the last book in the trilogy in the not too distant future.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Aja: The Narcoleptic Ninja

    This is the second book, and so far it’s one of my favorites. The characters are so endearing, even Drizzt’s crazy family has a place in my heart. Well… some of them anyways, because a lot of them, I was just kind of rooting for them to die. Still, it says something when the antagonists make you want to reach into the books and punch them. There was never a dull moment in this book. Seeing Drizzt doing his utmost to escape his family, watching him find his first real friendships, and there’s als This is the second book, and so far it’s one of my favorites. The characters are so endearing, even Drizzt’s crazy family has a place in my heart. Well… some of them anyways, because a lot of them, I was just kind of rooting for them to die. Still, it says something when the antagonists make you want to reach into the books and punch them. There was never a dull moment in this book. Seeing Drizzt doing his utmost to escape his family, watching him find his first real friendships, and there’s also a bit of humor as well. Definitely a solid continuation to a series that is quickly becoming my favorite.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kells Next Read

    Actual 4.75 This is such a good series and bloody addictive. RTC

  16. 5 out of 5

    daisy

    Just finished this on the train, so RTC!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lel

    The books follows on from Drizzt leaving his home and setting out on his own. Drizzt meets some unlikely friends just when he thinks he has nothing to live for. Its a great story of friendship and the power of companionship. But no Drizzt story would be complete without monsters, battles and the internal struggle of a conscious. This is my third or fourth read though of this book and I still get the same enjoyment and level of suspense as the first time.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    4/5 “By the stones, Dark Elf, why have you come?” Drizzt did not know how to answer that simple question. How could he even begin to explain his years of loneliness in the Underdark? Or the decision to forsake his evil people and live in accordance with his principles? The Skinny: Drizzt has alienated himself from his home and vicious family. Alone in the Underdark, Drizzt has carved out a semblance of a life for himself. But, as is the way in the life of Drizzt, all good things must come to an end 4/5 “By the stones, Dark Elf, why have you come?” Drizzt did not know how to answer that simple question. How could he even begin to explain his years of loneliness in the Underdark? Or the decision to forsake his evil people and live in accordance with his principles? The Skinny: Drizzt has alienated himself from his home and vicious family. Alone in the Underdark, Drizzt has carved out a semblance of a life for himself. But, as is the way in the life of Drizzt, all good things must come to an end. Forced to run again, Drizzt must elude a host of new foes, while trying to remain true to himself. The review: I really liked this second installment in the Dark Elf Trilogy. Unlike the first book, I felt more of a connection with the characters. The first book was exceptionally dark, and (maybe) because of this, the characters seemed pretty one-dimensional (Drizzt being the exception). I’m not saying this book wasn’t dark –it still is—but, the characters appear to have more developed emotions/personalities. Because of this development, I felt for some of the characters more deeply (because they were innately good), which made the fact that most of them faced some sort of wrong against them (Drizzt, Clacker, and Belwar) more intense. On top of the emotional connection I felt to many of the character, I also really enjoyed the budding friendship between Drizzt and Belwar. Up until this point, Drizzt did not have many people in his life that he could trust. Belwar became that someone to Drizzt, and I enjoyed seeing how their friendship developed. I would love to have a friend as fiercely loyal and understanding as Belwar. I would be remiss to not mention Clacker in the way of friends. Although Clacker is a new character that enters and exits the story relatively quickly, he can also be counted as a good friend to Drizzt. Both Clacker and Belwar help Drizzt to see that there are indeed good friends to be had. I thought the villains (and ‘villains’) in this book were well done. I found the mind flayers to be extremely eerie, particularly how they were able to take control of others. The ‘brain’ was also a creepy touch. The other ‘villain’ in the story added an interesting element to the plot. I would mention this villain further, but it would spoil a large part of the book. Overall: I liked this better than book one. I typically like reads where I feel emotions towards the characters and situations (who doesn’t?), and this book had a lot more of that in it. Looking forward to book 3 :)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jared Beiswenger

    I was hoping the story would ramp up in book two, but Drizzt's adventures seem to be a random series of encounters with underground monsters, where Salvatore stretches to find some way to make each encounter different. The idea of Drizzt is great. Out of a vicious, immoral society comes a hero who fights against his dark past and redeems his many dark powers by using them for good. Unfortunately, it's executed completely wrong and unbelievable on so many levels. It feels like a boring, cookie-cut I was hoping the story would ramp up in book two, but Drizzt's adventures seem to be a random series of encounters with underground monsters, where Salvatore stretches to find some way to make each encounter different. The idea of Drizzt is great. Out of a vicious, immoral society comes a hero who fights against his dark past and redeems his many dark powers by using them for good. Unfortunately, it's executed completely wrong and unbelievable on so many levels. It feels like a boring, cookie-cutter hero was neatly punched out of some other book and pasted on top of Drizzt. First of all, he remains morally impeccable despite being raised surrounded by horrible people. Only after he leaves them and goes off on his own does he become a savage killer? His "high morals" are also completely messed up, and he actually comes off as a coward. He repeatedly allows evil-doers to continue doing evil because he believes that killing is always wrong unless you work yourself into a corner where you have no other choice. I wanted to breeze through this book, knowing it's light and not expecting too much, but I kept getting distracted by the previously mentioned poor execution, and other dumb stuff like Drizzt forgetting that HE CAN FLY when he's dangling from a cliff or being chased by a monster... The premise of the book should have made it a home run with just mediocre execution, but it fell way short.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Wanda

    The books in this series have the virtue of being quick & easy to read, perfect for a Friday evening after a long work week. This is book two of Drizzt’s back story—wherein he lives by himself in the tunnels of the Underdark until he can’t take the solitude anymore and seeks companionship with mixed results. As one of my cousins pointed out to me, Salvatore writes great fight scenes and they are very much on display in this installment. In fact, the book is basically a series of fights, stitc The books in this series have the virtue of being quick & easy to read, perfect for a Friday evening after a long work week. This is book two of Drizzt’s back story—wherein he lives by himself in the tunnels of the Underdark until he can’t take the solitude anymore and seeks companionship with mixed results. As one of my cousins pointed out to me, Salvatore writes great fight scenes and they are very much on display in this installment. In fact, the book is basically a series of fights, stitched together with a very little bit of plot. I will also give Salvatore credit for inventing some great Underdark creatures and cultures for Drizzt to fight with. Book number 274 in my Science Fiction & Fantasy Reading Project.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    Exile, the second book in the Dark Elf Trilogy, begins where the first left off. Drizzt is exiled from his homeland, Menzoberranzan, with Matron Malice hot on his heals. The drow takes to the Underdark and experiences new horrors and old faces as he evades Malice’s attempts to catch him. I found this book to be more lax than the first. Where the first rocked in every way, Exile was more of “the escape” tale. It also delved more into Drizzt’s psyche in his attempt to push back the Hunter in himse Exile, the second book in the Dark Elf Trilogy, begins where the first left off. Drizzt is exiled from his homeland, Menzoberranzan, with Matron Malice hot on his heals. The drow takes to the Underdark and experiences new horrors and old faces as he evades Malice’s attempts to catch him. I found this book to be more lax than the first. Where the first rocked in every way, Exile was more of “the escape” tale. It also delved more into Drizzt’s psyche in his attempt to push back the Hunter in himself—the brutish nature he learned from his evil family. I liked the supporting characters in this book. I really loved Belwar, and of course Guenhwyvar. Nothing is cooler than that panther! I found Clacker’s story to be very sad and I felt bad for him, hoping he would find some healing. I do, sadly, believe that I have seen the last of Belwar, unless he appears in later books but not sure. The book started out great but soon slowed down for the middle but picked up by the end as everything came to a head. I didn’t expect what was going to happen until about twenty pages before the event did take place. The only negative thing I have to say about these books is that Salvatore’s writing is something to be desired. He can write an action scene with vivid detail but he uses a LOT of “ly” words to describe, and some of his sentence structure doesn’t flow at times. Other than that, the Legend of Drizzt is becoming one of my favorite fantasy series!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Holden Johnson

    Almost a 3 as there were large portions of the book that felt like filler. I had to go with a 4, however due to some great friendships and character growth. I'm also super excited to finally be out of the Underdark. Wasnt a fan of that place.

  23. 4 out of 5

    David - proud Gleeman in Branwen's adventuring party

    While I enjoyed “Exile”, I can’t say I liked it as much as Book 1 of the Dark Elf Trilogy. Don’t get me wrong, there’s plenty to like about “Exile”…it’s filled with action (much more than “Homeland” had), and features a compelling story and interesting characters. However, I couldn’t help but feel that the second chapter of the Dark Elf Trilogy was too dark for its own good, but more on that in a moment… What Salvatore does well in “Exile”, he does very well. I was afraid Drizzt wandering the Und While I enjoyed “Exile”, I can’t say I liked it as much as Book 1 of the Dark Elf Trilogy. Don’t get me wrong, there’s plenty to like about “Exile”…it’s filled with action (much more than “Homeland” had), and features a compelling story and interesting characters. However, I couldn’t help but feel that the second chapter of the Dark Elf Trilogy was too dark for its own good, but more on that in a moment… What Salvatore does well in “Exile”, he does very well. I was afraid Drizzt wandering the Underdark would get old quickly, but Salvatore never ran out of imaginative creatures to throw at Drizzt and his allies. Also, I’ve always said one of Salvatore’s greatest strengths is his incredibly detailed action sequences, and he does a great job with that here (sometimes TOO good a job, as some of the gorier moments are definitely not for the squeamish). Also, Drizzt’s dysfunctional family makes a return, and they are so deliciously evil, they make for great antagonists. Wicked Matron Malice, cruel Briza, manipulative Dinin, they’re all in rare form and their machinations are captivating to behold. I can certainly say I was never once bored reading “Exile”! But, as I said before, the overly dark tone did detract from my enjoyment. One major problem for me is that Salvatore’s trademark humor is almost completely absent this time around, and without a little levity thrown in, the book just feels grim and depressing. Drizzt himself spends the first few chapters as “The Hunter”, which has him reacting almost solely by instinct and displaying very little personality. Later, Drizzt encounters some allies, which introduces more likeable characters to the mix, but also adds to the grimness of the tone…one character in particular is so mired in tragedy, that I wouldn’t be at all surprised if more than a few readers were reduced to tears! I can’t deny Salvatore’s effectiveness as a writer, as his ability to make me empathize with his characters is a testament to his talent. However, despite “Exile” being a great novel, I can’t say I’d recommend it to anyone looking for any kind of “feel-good” story.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mark Halse

    I can barely stop yawning and/or barfing long enough to write a proper review. R.A. Salvatore books suck. Drizzt sucks. 'Nuff said. RECOMENDATION: Skip it. Hard.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Shaitarn

    3 stars. Drizzt Do’Urden has been wandering the tunnels of the Underdark for ten years after fleeing his home city of Menzoberranzan, alone save for Guenhwyvar, the magical panther. Hunted by his family who wish to see him dead to restore their standing with the spider goddess Lloth and fearing that he is losing his self to the savage instincts of the hunter he needs to survive, Drizzt desperately needs a friend. Dark elves, of course, have no friends, but maybe the deep gnomes of Blingdenstone w 3 stars. Drizzt Do’Urden has been wandering the tunnels of the Underdark for ten years after fleeing his home city of Menzoberranzan, alone save for Guenhwyvar, the magical panther. Hunted by his family who wish to see him dead to restore their standing with the spider goddess Lloth and fearing that he is losing his self to the savage instincts of the hunter he needs to survive, Drizzt desperately needs a friend. Dark elves, of course, have no friends, but maybe the deep gnomes of Blingdenstone would be prepared to stretch a point? Exile suffers a little from second-book-in-a-trilogy syndrome. Its plot is, putting it politely, pretty thin, and it shows after the events of Homeland. Drizzt spends a lot of time wandering around the tunnels of the Underdark, killing monsters and angsting about his lonely life. Things pick up somewhat when he goes to Blingdenstone, but to be honest the ‘meanwhile, in Menzoberranzan’ sections showing Drizzt’s family dealing the fallout of events in the first book are far more entertaining. I hope that book three will move up into another gear and Drizzt will get into his stride. I also hope we’ll see more of the Underdark and the continuing adventures of brother Dinin!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Allison ☾

    I loved the introduction of other races that weren't evil and I loved Drizzt's interactions with his new friends. The meat of this story was amazing but there were a few too many fight scenes for my taste. The battle scenes had me skimming pages which I really don't like to do, but I knew if I didn't skim I would never get through them. That ending was great and I'm excited to see what happens next.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Diana Stormblessed

    Unpopular opinion: I could barely finish this book. If it wasn't for a buddy read challenge I never would have finished. Boring from start to finish. Bad writing style. 2 dimensional characters smeared with lots of angst so you won't notice their flatness. I think me and this series need to part ways.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Micheal

    I've come to the conclusion that reviewing and critiquing is mostly irrelevant since the wide range of opinion over a book or movie or music make and individuals perspective moot. So i'll call what Im doing here merely reflection, adding yet one more opinion to the cacophony of rhetoric. Reading a bit of pulp fantasy, trying to sate the hunger awakened by Song of Ice and Fire. Not meeting with success. Can't seem to suspend disbelief as easily as I could years ago when sword and sorcery was my st I've come to the conclusion that reviewing and critiquing is mostly irrelevant since the wide range of opinion over a book or movie or music make and individuals perspective moot. So i'll call what Im doing here merely reflection, adding yet one more opinion to the cacophony of rhetoric. Reading a bit of pulp fantasy, trying to sate the hunger awakened by Song of Ice and Fire. Not meeting with success. Can't seem to suspend disbelief as easily as I could years ago when sword and sorcery was my staple. Back then, if concept and character intrigued me I cold ignore writing style, fantastical monsters and the easy magical solutions to plot. Today, not so much. For someone who is touted as one of the premier fantasy writers of the day, and a best selling author at that, I find R. A. Salvatore lacking. His prose is simplistic, fraught with telling instead of showing, indulgent with internal exposition on what characters are thinking and feeling, leaving no suspense concerning what direction they might go. His habit of mixing point of view within chapters and even from page to page is clunky and confusing. Following Drizzt through the bland setting of the underdark in battle after battle took on the monotony of an endless D and D game (IDK, maybe that's the intent or model). I found it hard to visualize many of the supernatural creations because of vague description. I plodded through this volume because I like the concept of Drizzt, and I wanted to get to the next book where I know he leaves the underdark and I wanted to see how he fares on the surface world. But like I said above, my suspension of disbelief is callused, and even more so is my ability to wade through bad writing and presentation. Of course, what do I know?

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jen • Just One More Page

    This review is also posted on my blog. (view spoiler)[ I AM SO GLAD I REREAD THIS. Man oh man I don’t even know what I can say. I started rereading this series about a year ago, since I only got to book three when I started it initially back in high school, and it was SUCH A GOOD IDEA cause holy wow it’s been so good already and I’m only two books in. It’s not without its faults - mainly, it’s very pulpy, and stereotypically high fantasy. But it’s SO GOOD. And everything was so well described, and This review is also posted on my blog. (view spoiler)[ I AM SO GLAD I REREAD THIS. Man oh man I don’t even know what I can say. I started rereading this series about a year ago, since I only got to book three when I started it initially back in high school, and it was SUCH A GOOD IDEA cause holy wow it’s been so good already and I’m only two books in. It’s not without its faults - mainly, it’s very pulpy, and stereotypically high fantasy. But it’s SO GOOD. And everything was so well described, and the flow was consistent (if not slow to get going and get into), and there were SO MANY parts that actively made me laugh out loud and just - oh man. This book. THAT ENDING. ZAK. BELWAR. CLACKER. MY HEART. I MIGHT CRY. I’m trying to think of what else I can say about this, but I’m incredibly sleep deprived and currently sitting at an airport terminal typing this and I’m mostly just happy that it’s finally DONE and that it ended up really being SO GOOD even though it took me nearly two weeks to finish and WAAHHH. THAT WAS A GOOD READ. I really, really hope it doesn’t take me another year to get to book three. CAUSE THIS SERIES IS JUST SO GOOD. HAVE I MENTIONED IT’S GOOD? BECAUSE IT’S GOOD. (Though I do look forward to the presence of a female character who isn’t depicted as evil and a villain who just needs to be overcome and eventually ends up getting killed by the morally superior males. That better happen soon. The rest of it is STILL SO GOOD. But if that doesn’t happen soon the series will have some explaining to do.) (hide spoiler)]

  30. 5 out of 5

    Alara

    Better nerf Drizzt.

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