Hot Best Seller

Tough Choices: A Memoir PDF, ePub eBook

4.6 out of 5
30 review

Tough Choices: A Memoir

Availability: Ready to download

File Name: Tough Choices: A Memoir .pdf

How it works:

1. Register a free 1 month Trial Account.

2. Download as many books as you like (Personal use)

3. Cancel the membership at any time if not satisfied.


Tough Choices: A Memoir PDF, ePub eBook Behind the headlines, the former CEO of Hewlett-Packard tells her own story, along with her unique perspective on leadership, technology, globalization, sexism, and many other issues.

30 review for Tough Choices: A Memoir

  1. 4 out of 5

    Antof9

    The first half of this book is totally inspiring. It's a great book on leadership, and one that anyone in business should read. It actually made me want to do my job better. However, the second half of this book felt like "Carly's Defense". It seemed like she really felt the need to tell her side, and this book is the vehicle for it. It wasn't bad, per se, but it didn't go with the first half, and in some ways, it took away from the first half. It seemed awfully defensive, and wasn't so much abou The first half of this book is totally inspiring. It's a great book on leadership, and one that anyone in business should read. It actually made me want to do my job better. However, the second half of this book felt like "Carly's Defense". It seemed like she really felt the need to tell her side, and this book is the vehicle for it. It wasn't bad, per se, but it didn't go with the first half, and in some ways, it took away from the first half. It seemed awfully defensive, and wasn't so much about leadership as just the HP business itself. I'm aware that in the same situation, I'd probably feel the need to defend myself, too, but I wish the first half had stopped at the point where it was still inspiring and encouraging and made me want to be a leader as well as just a good employee.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Brian Mcquaig

    Please note I read the abridged audio version of this book. I "read" this book because I was tired of hearing, "I know someone at HP and they hate her because she ruined the company..." blah, blah, blah. ...when it was more than obvious that the majority of people telling me this, 1. Didn't know anyone from HP and 2. They were talking out of their ass...not knowing ANY relevant details of the subject at hand. I find those kinds of people transparent as in finding aggrandizement of themselves in Please note I read the abridged audio version of this book. I "read" this book because I was tired of hearing, "I know someone at HP and they hate her because she ruined the company..." blah, blah, blah. ...when it was more than obvious that the majority of people telling me this, 1. Didn't know anyone from HP and 2. They were talking out of their ass...not knowing ANY relevant details of the subject at hand. I find those kinds of people transparent as in finding aggrandizement of themselves in the eyes & ears of anyone willing to listen. Such is the ignorance that leads you down a path of stupidity and stupid decisions in your own life. Her side of the HP story gave me a lot of clarity on what I heard from the other side. Although I see through some "massaging" of certain situations, it is clear that Carly is an articulate and honest person who also happens to be wickedly intelligent and has a work ethic to match. I urge you to read this and other books to get the entire picture of what actually happened at HP and who Carly Fiorina is, as a person. You'll also find a never-ending source of business analysis of the HP/Compaq merger in numerous iTunesU and MIT Open-Courseware courses.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lorna

    Wow. This woman is extraordinary. Her careers moves at lightning speed from a role as a secretary at a brokerage firm to CEO of HP. She also was one of the three people who spun off Lucent from AT&T, creating the logo, company identity and mission statement. She exhibits spectacular moral courage, ethical conviction, daring creativity and infectious charisma. Never would I have imagined adding to my list of personal heroes the CEO of a major corporation, but there you have it; she's been add Wow. This woman is extraordinary. Her careers moves at lightning speed from a role as a secretary at a brokerage firm to CEO of HP. She also was one of the three people who spun off Lucent from AT&T, creating the logo, company identity and mission statement. She exhibits spectacular moral courage, ethical conviction, daring creativity and infectious charisma. Never would I have imagined adding to my list of personal heroes the CEO of a major corporation, but there you have it; she's been added. This is a story about a meteoric rise to greatness, leadership and stupendous achievement that anyone, whether in business or not, can use as inspiration. She is a dynamo and this is not only an addictively compelling story but supremely well-written and carefully crafted. She was a philosophy major. She studied Ancient Greek and Latin. What more needs to be said? A must read.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    Carly Fiorina wrote Tough Choices: A Memoir (2006), which I read in December 2015. I thoroughly enjoyed it, especially the contributions she made in the field in which I thrived for my entire early career – telecommunications. Both her stint at Lucent and Hewlett-Packard (HP) in leadership positions revealed important lessons many of us learned during the optimistic 1990s and subdued 2000s. Unlike her father’s view that learning was not simply a way to make a living, learning was a goal in and o Carly Fiorina wrote Tough Choices: A Memoir (2006), which I read in December 2015. I thoroughly enjoyed it, especially the contributions she made in the field in which I thrived for my entire early career – telecommunications. Both her stint at Lucent and Hewlett-Packard (HP) in leadership positions revealed important lessons many of us learned during the optimistic 1990s and subdued 2000s. Unlike her father’s view that learning was not simply a way to make a living, learning was a goal in and of itself, Carly, and many of us educated during the 1970s, saw an education as a way of securing a good paying job. Careers in engineering and the sciences “paid off” while those in the arts and humanities did not. I resonated with her book owing to mutual experiences in the workplace. She recalls, “Most of all, I loved the people of business. I loved working with them; I loved collaborating with them and negotiating with them. I learned for the first time that some people in business are driven by facts and numbers, some are driven by judgment and intuition, and most are driven by both. And some are driven by emotion and ego more than others. I loved the camaraderie of working hard and then winning, or losing, together. I even found the politics of office life interesting, because I was often asked to intervene to help people find common ground.” I experienced all of this too at Nortel Networks (just as Carly did at Lucent) and at Cisco Systems (just as Carly did at HP). We share the view that customers and our competitors set the pace of how we conduct business and it’s critical that movement quickly occurs “when the decision is perfect enough.” Carly’s story spoke to me. She writes, “Challenge comes from the reality that your best is required and falling short is possible. Learning comes from rising to meet that challenge.” I always took on new roles early in my career to learn, just as she did at AT&T-Lucent. Carly adds, “Sometimes the riskier the choice gives you a better opportunity to prove yourself to others, and you’ll always prove something important to yourself. You’ll know yourself and those you work with better.” I adopted this mantra and left the security of a large company for a California startup and proved myself there during the late 1990s. Bottom line: Business is about producing results, and if you can’t deliver, you should work someplace else. See how Carly and her colleagues delivered. I encourage you to read Tough Choices about those myriad workplace experiences found in large companies. You’ll learn a lot from her story and enjoy the journey.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I know nothing about HP or management, but I really liked this book. Fiorini was the CEO of HP, and this is her autobiography, focused on her climb through the business world (from AT&T to Lucent to HP). There is a lot on management techniques and her personal philosophies on management and business, and this is interesting to read. I enjoyed the stories of how she overcame particular obstacles at work. What I really liked about it, though, was her frank depiction of the challenges for women I know nothing about HP or management, but I really liked this book. Fiorini was the CEO of HP, and this is her autobiography, focused on her climb through the business world (from AT&T to Lucent to HP). There is a lot on management techniques and her personal philosophies on management and business, and this is interesting to read. I enjoyed the stories of how she overcame particular obstacles at work. What I really liked about it, though, was her frank depiction of the challenges for women in the workplace, and at the same time her refusal to be categorized as a woman in the workplace. She clearly discusses the difficulties she faced because of her gender, and then tells the reader how she overcame those difficulties. The book is sobering and uplifting at the same time.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    This is an autobiography of the former CEO of HP. It chronicles her rise and fall from power. I could relate to a lot of it, of course with quite a few less zeroes in my case! ( I read elsewhere that Carly received $21 million in her HP severance agreement – 2.5 X her annual salary.) I agreed with much of Carly’s philosophy of business. The following quotes resonated with me, primarily in the context of my own situation. “They (the Board) did not thank me and they did not say good-bye. They did n This is an autobiography of the former CEO of HP. It chronicles her rise and fall from power. I could relate to a lot of it, of course with quite a few less zeroes in my case! ( I read elsewhere that Carly received $21 million in her HP severance agreement – 2.5 X her annual salary.) I agreed with much of Carly’s philosophy of business. The following quotes resonated with me, primarily in the context of my own situation. “They (the Board) did not thank me and they did not say good-bye. They did not explain their decision or their reasoning. They did not seek my opinion or my involvement in any aspect of the transition.” “I was utterly devastated, but the next day the sun still came up and life went on. That day, and in the days that followed, I was more hurt than angry. I felt a curious mixture of sorrow and relief. I had worked so hard for so long; I had thought about the company constantly; I’d put everything on the line, and now suddenly it was over. …I thought about the people of a company I had grown to love, and I ached for the chance to say good-bye and reminisce, one last time, about the remarkable journey we had taken together. I was never given the chance.” “As weeks became months I asked myself over and over what had happened. Were there signals I’d missed? Was there something I should have said or done that would have made the difference? “

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jon

    I really enjoyed this book. One of the best leadership and business books I have read and will likely re-read or at the very least borrow wisdom from. Carly's astuteness for business is unmatched. This was a rather quick read that focused on her career and her thoughts on leadership. I read this book to gain some insight into Carly to see if my vote would be her this coming election. She certainly now has it, but what I did not expect in this book and I actually appreciated the book did not go t I really enjoyed this book. One of the best leadership and business books I have read and will likely re-read or at the very least borrow wisdom from. Carly's astuteness for business is unmatched. This was a rather quick read that focused on her career and her thoughts on leadership. I read this book to gain some insight into Carly to see if my vote would be her this coming election. She certainly now has it, but what I did not expect in this book and I actually appreciated the book did not go this way was that she did not mention anyting about her political beliefs. Rather it was strictly business as she provided a chronology of her career, her education, her early beginnings ending in the culmination of her 5.5 year run as CEO of HP. It is unfortunate what happened to her at toward the end of her time at HP, but it is my view she is now destined for elected office. Some highlighting points were her perserverance through the establishment, her guts and her diplomacy through tough situations. I would love to meet her one day.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    I have a confession to make. I am yet another Hewlett-Packard refugee. I was at HP when Carly Fiorina was CEO. Working on a design team that was almost all male, it was exhilerating to have a female CEO. But, like so many other HP employees, I felt that Carly was calculating and immune to the charm of "Bill and Dave" and the HP Way. I agreed with the sentiments of most of my co-workers that Carly Fiorina was a ...(rhymes with witch). Although I was no longer at HP when Carly was ousted, I cheere I have a confession to make. I am yet another Hewlett-Packard refugee. I was at HP when Carly Fiorina was CEO. Working on a design team that was almost all male, it was exhilerating to have a female CEO. But, like so many other HP employees, I felt that Carly was calculating and immune to the charm of "Bill and Dave" and the HP Way. I agreed with the sentiments of most of my co-workers that Carly Fiorina was a ...(rhymes with witch). Although I was no longer at HP when Carly was ousted, I cheered along with the rest of the valley. But, a few weeks ago, I saw Carly speak at the Flint Center. She was warm and engaging and refreshingly honest about her career and especially her time at HP. She impressed me enough to listen to her autobiography, Tough Choices . I'm sure the past several years have improved my perspective on HP, but after listening to the book, my opinion of Carly has changed. She is intelligent, capable, and possibly saved HP from extinction. Now if only I could change her political views...

  9. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Very inspiring. I would want to write a very long review, but if I wait to find the perfect words, it will never happen. So, the bottom line is that I feel rejuvenated. It have set myself my 5 and 10 year goals because of this book. I had never seriously considered management until now, and I owe it all to this book. I feel less intimidated by my own management because the book humanizes upper management. My only issue is how she focuses on metrics as measurement of success (ie # of patents = inn Very inspiring. I would want to write a very long review, but if I wait to find the perfect words, it will never happen. So, the bottom line is that I feel rejuvenated. It have set myself my 5 and 10 year goals because of this book. I had never seriously considered management until now, and I owe it all to this book. I feel less intimidated by my own management because the book humanizes upper management. My only issue is how she focuses on metrics as measurement of success (ie # of patents = innovation). In my experience, employees will find ways around these metrics so that the numbers look good for them, and people who don't play the game look bad. But that's really the only negative thing. She has more guts than me (hence why she's where she is, and I am not), but her story has given me the confidence/courage to stand up for myself more, and for that, I'm grateful to whoever suggested I read this book and will encourage many (men and women) to do the same.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    This was really quite interesting, even though I know little about business and had no idea that she had ever led Hewlett Packard.It chronicles her rise (from a secretary to CEO of HP) and fall (the HP Board fired her) in business. She talks of how she learned management, and the obstacles she faced as a woman in a tech industry in her time and how she overcame them through focus on the work. There is a lot on management techniques and her personal philosophies on management and business, and th This was really quite interesting, even though I know little about business and had no idea that she had ever led Hewlett Packard.It chronicles her rise (from a secretary to CEO of HP) and fall (the HP Board fired her) in business. She talks of how she learned management, and the obstacles she faced as a woman in a tech industry in her time and how she overcame them through focus on the work. There is a lot on management techniques and her personal philosophies on management and business, and this is interesting to read. Additionally, I liked how she summed up what she's learned from each stage or incident at the end of the chapter. It helped me learn from her. This was really quite interesting. I listened to it and she read the audiobook herself and did a good job at it. If I ever had a chance to know her, I would like her.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I liked this book - would even recommend it - but the first half held my interest more than the second half. One of my favorite things about this book is the way Ms. Fiorina closes many of her chapters by summing up what she learned from the particular time or place covered in that chapter. Her stories from the early part of her career were interesting - dropping out of law school, her first jobs, her first encounter with male bias against women. I was surprised at how 'normal' she comes across I liked this book - would even recommend it - but the first half held my interest more than the second half. One of my favorite things about this book is the way Ms. Fiorina closes many of her chapters by summing up what she learned from the particular time or place covered in that chapter. Her stories from the early part of her career were interesting - dropping out of law school, her first jobs, her first encounter with male bias against women. I was surprised at how 'normal' she comes across - she wrote this in a style that makes her seem approachable. I wonder if she really is.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Thanks, Laura, for sharing this book! It is a great picture of a woman driven to the heights of corporate responsibility, with memorable assessments of what leadership consists of. I especially liked how she never once whined about the unique challenges of being a woman in this role, but she never sugar coats it either. I'll reread this book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    This was one of the better business books I've read... up until the last third, when it became purely a defense of Carly's time at HP, filled with tons of unnecessary details that were boring unless you were reading it to understand her firing scandal. I'd higly recommend reading it up until she gets the job at HP, then stopping.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I found this book fascinating but it is definitely not a page turner if you aren't interested in reading an in-depth story of a female CEO in the Valley. Lots of detail about leadership strategy and politics at Lucent and HP, which I loved reading!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    Listened to the audio book that was read by the author and really enjoyed it. It was like listening to "lessons learned" from a mentor.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Julie Salinas

    This book has been out for a while, and was on the discount shelf when I picked it up. I was vaguely aware of Ms. Fiorina, and once in a while foray from my typical reading material into memoirs or biographies. Presently I am in a leadership class, so the subject of business was a plus. The style of the writing reminds me of how our leaders present their "profiles" during our quarterly meetings. She starts by telling us about herself, and the path that lead her to her leadership of HP. Perhaps m This book has been out for a while, and was on the discount shelf when I picked it up. I was vaguely aware of Ms. Fiorina, and once in a while foray from my typical reading material into memoirs or biographies. Presently I am in a leadership class, so the subject of business was a plus. The style of the writing reminds me of how our leaders present their "profiles" during our quarterly meetings. She starts by telling us about herself, and the path that lead her to her leadership of HP. Perhaps most interesting to me is her observations of people, and the culture of a business. I have been blessed with very good leadership at my work environment, but with a recent change in leadership the working atmosphere has deteriorated. What happens at the top truly does roll downhill. This book is well written, and carefully done so with consideration of what perhaps went wrong, in addition of what does work.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Geetanjali

    I finished reading this book last night what should I say was so much in the book can resonate very well with her struggle and her so big expectations from herself and finally fight to come back with a BANG!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mai Pham

    “Sometimes the riskier the choice gives you a better opportunity to prove yourself to others, and you’ll always prove something important to yourself. You’ll know yourself and those you work with better.” Love the first past but unfortunately loose my interest when it reaches the second-half.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kent

    strong woman, inspiring stories, but she could not have made it more boring had she tried - she should be the next US President

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sacha

    The first half of the book was interesting ...the second half was ok

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tim Butzen

    Very well written. A highly valuable read for anyone working in a complex organization.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Stuart H Crepea

    Tough no nonsense professionals Trial of women in business but truly more about a person with strong moral compass and her learning curve and Adventures up the Corporate ladder

  23. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Gordon

    What a brave, courageous, strong woman. I had no idea all that was going on at HP.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Diane Moore

    Respectable. Good insight.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tamara Miner

    Overall, this book seems to be a great guide to leadership and how to run a business effectively, though you can’t always anticipate when or why people are against you. If you’re a CEO, or even a manager, this book is full of great insights. It’s a great read for women, though navigating the tech world as a female leader is not necessarily the same as it was when Carly first entered it (but she more or less acknowledges this). Honestly, it makes me wish she won the 2016 presidential primary... a Overall, this book seems to be a great guide to leadership and how to run a business effectively, though you can’t always anticipate when or why people are against you. If you’re a CEO, or even a manager, this book is full of great insights. It’s a great read for women, though navigating the tech world as a female leader is not necessarily the same as it was when Carly first entered it (but she more or less acknowledges this). Honestly, it makes me wish she won the 2016 presidential primary... a republican who believes in climate change and science! (Okay,she has questionable political views otherwise, but certainly less damaging than Trump) But more importantly, she believes in people and that diversity is important because of the different (more holistic) viewpoint a diverse group brings to the table.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Riley

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The primarily reasons I read biographies is pick up tid bits of wisdom from people in all areas of life. While I approached this book for that reason, I found the account to be quite interesting. I was surprised how open she was about her life. This was especially true during her college years (dropping out of law school), early career (being one of the few women in leadership at AT&T), her thrill of building a company (Lucent’s spin off from AT&T), and leadership – and tough choices – b The primarily reasons I read biographies is pick up tid bits of wisdom from people in all areas of life. While I approached this book for that reason, I found the account to be quite interesting. I was surprised how open she was about her life. This was especially true during her college years (dropping out of law school), early career (being one of the few women in leadership at AT&T), her thrill of building a company (Lucent’s spin off from AT&T), and leadership – and tough choices – being a turnaround CEO (HP). Some notable leadership comments include, - “I’ve found that if you really want to know what’s going on, you have to travel. The farther from headquarters you get, wherever headquarters happens to be, the more you find out about what’s actually going on.” - During her time at AT&T she observed that, “I learned that sometimes you have to have faith in what you know even when most everyone else tells you you’re wrong. I learned that if I focused all my energies on the job I had, and performed to the very best of my abilities, opportunity would knock. I learned, once again, that we can only be diminished if we choose to allow it. I learned that the more difficult challenge is sometimes worth going after. I learned that those kinds of challenges take a whole team.” - Through one of her many roles where office politics played a large role she observed that “office politics, like real politics, are based on power – who has lost it, who wants it, and who’s got it.” Another great tie into this comment is that “(Internal politics) always happens when there is no worthy goal to focus people externally.” Some of her philosophical leadership observations include: - “A boss isn’t paid more than a subordinate because he or she is better. A boss is paid more than a subordinate because the boss has greater responsibilities. One of those responsibilities is to stand up for people when it is necessary to shield them from things they shouldn’t have to deal with. “ - A mission or purpose or strategy is designed to guide decision making for the longer term. It channels people’s energies so the boss doesn’t have to direct every action. An organization that require the boss’s involvement in every decision can’t function effectively over the long term; it’s simply too complex and time-consuming. Besides smart people want to contribute their talents – they don’t always want to be told what to do.” - “One of a leader’s jobs is to assess the capability of the organization. If a leader underestimates the organization, it underperforms. If a leader overestimates its capability, the organization disappoints. A leader’s job is to assess accurately and then to increase the capability of the organization by building skills, building teams and building confidence.” True, being a memoir, the story of the HP days (talk about a dysfunctional company) appear to be somewhat highlighted in her bias. However, it is the examples of a genuine leader that shine through. Talking about her early life she learned that “Character was everything, and character was defined as candor, integrity and authenticity.” One can clearly see that this was important in her life. She closes with “Life isn’t always fair, and I was playing in the big leagues. Yet I realized I had no regrets. I had completed my mandate. I had made mistakes, but I had made a difference. I had given everything I had to a (HP) and a cause I believed in. I had made tough choices, and I could live with their consequences. While I grieved for the people and the purpose I had lost, I did not grieve for the loss of my soul.”

  27. 5 out of 5

    Christian Engler

    Having worked at a Cambridge based business school for a little over seven years as an administrative assistant, the story of Carly Fiorina really caught my interest, because I was curious about the gender dynamics and or biases in the business world, if indeed there really were and are any. But according to Fiorina's intepretative slant, there are. To a certain extent, I believe her; she was a controversal CEO, and in reading some of the reviews, there do seem to be some people who have an axe Having worked at a Cambridge based business school for a little over seven years as an administrative assistant, the story of Carly Fiorina really caught my interest, because I was curious about the gender dynamics and or biases in the business world, if indeed there really were and are any. But according to Fiorina's intepretative slant, there are. To a certain extent, I believe her; she was a controversal CEO, and in reading some of the reviews, there do seem to be some people who have an axe to grind in regards to her leadership, especially in HP's acquisition of Compaq, among some other happenings. With a background in medieval history and philosophy, one would not think that that would be a stable foundation for a life in business, but it was always her obedience to her parents and those around her that prevented her from flourishing into what she ultimately became, and I think that is ultimately what Fiorina's core message is to her readers, that people have to follow their own instincts. People can not always follow the path that others have laid out for them, no matter how good intentioned it may be. The person's individual instincts must come first. Yet with the judgements and bickering aside, Tough Choices is actually a good memoir and very well written, lucid, direct and not overdone with protective hyperbole; the memoir is not suggestive of a pity party or a woman who is trying to find redemption through all the chaos of criticism. What was really conveyed was how Carly Fiorina rose through the ranks to become the CEO of Hewlett-Packard in the first place. She gives illuminating details of her various stints at AT&T, Lucent Technologies and all the various offshoots until she was recruited by HP. She also details her family life, her numerous trips abroad (the meeting in Japan with the assigned geisha brought a smile to my face), to the various firings she had to commit to in order to see the industry through. And there are those moments where she writes about her encounters with sexism. They were not indicative of the companies that she worked for, just certain people who unfortunately did not know any better. That may sound weak, but it is true nonetheless. Overall, Tough Choices was a fine read, and I learned something from it. When a person is in a position of authority, irrelevant of gender, not everybody is going to be pleased. Sometimes it is just what is best for the company? CEOs have to look down the road, not at just the moment, and Carly Fiorina did that, to the best of her ability until the Board decided that new leadership needed to be gleaned from a pool of likeminded candidates. Lastly, I would not take the totality of Tough Choices as one hundred percent truth, as memoirs and autobiographies can always be manipulated so only one side is conveyed. I am sure there were plenty of screw-ups that were not acknowledged, but as a basic memoir, Tough Choices was a worthwhile read.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jared Oliva

    This is one of my favorite books of all time. There's a lot of wisdom to learn from someone of her caliber. I don't think this is a story that any newspaper periodical can do justice. Her career trajectory (first two-thirds) and running a multi-billion dollar enterprise (last one-third) is a complex tale to tell. She's honest, charming, and funny. There's a reason why Carly Fiorina led one of the largest IPOs in history (Lucent) and become the first female CEO of a Fortune 50 company. Here are m This is one of my favorite books of all time. There's a lot of wisdom to learn from someone of her caliber. I don't think this is a story that any newspaper periodical can do justice. Her career trajectory (first two-thirds) and running a multi-billion dollar enterprise (last one-third) is a complex tale to tell. She's honest, charming, and funny. There's a reason why Carly Fiorina led one of the largest IPOs in history (Lucent) and become the first female CEO of a Fortune 50 company. Here are my favorite quotes: "Species that don't adapt become extinct. People who stop learning become old before their time. Companies that stop adapting and learning will fade over time and never regain their former glory" "I need a lot of debate to process and decide. If I push back on you, or make a statement that contradicts you, or ask a question in response to one of yours, I'm not necessarily disagreeing or deciding. I'm thinking out loud. I'm trying to make sure we've talked through all the angles of the problem" "You cannot sell your soul. Don't become someone you don't like because of the pressure. Live your life in a way that makes you happy and proud. If you sell your soul, no one can pay you back." "Executives, and board members must believe that ethical conduct is always more important than short-term results." "Without straight talk, problems may be postponed, but they cannot be solved."

  29. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I used this book to get to know Carly Fiorina before she had aspirations to be president. I felt she was very candid when writing about her successes and failures throughout her career and her voice throughout the book was very genuine. She is a person that does an enormous amount of research and isn't afraid to ask a lot of questions before diving into something. She takes the time to do self reflection before making tough choices. She is continually evaluating decisions based upon what is best I used this book to get to know Carly Fiorina before she had aspirations to be president. I felt she was very candid when writing about her successes and failures throughout her career and her voice throughout the book was very genuine. She is a person that does an enormous amount of research and isn't afraid to ask a lot of questions before diving into something. She takes the time to do self reflection before making tough choices. She is continually evaluating decisions based upon what is best for the company that she is leading, not what is in her best interests. She believes in people and their ability to change and she works hard to enable them to be successful. She puts her heart and soul into the tasks at hand and never looks back. She surrounds herself with debate and vets all options. She is open and adaptable to a change in her leadership style and approach when a situation dictates that is what is needed to build consensus, but she has a strong foundation of principles and ethics from which she does not deviate. She strives to bring people together, because we are always better when we work together toward a common goal. These are qualities everyone should aspire to matter what they do in their lifetime. This book gave me hope that there are more people out there like Carly whose motivations are fundamentally good and they have a desire to execute and make their environments better for all.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    One must wonder in any memoir of the extent to which the author speaking of herself ends up hiding too much, revealing to little, or outright lying. I looked for that here, having engaged a colleague who railed at the idea of this woman being a potential presidential candidate. Having met her, once briefly, and listened to her precursor stump speech, his vehemence about her performance at H.P. set me back. This memoir sounded to me very much like the "real Carly" - if any author can actually tel One must wonder in any memoir of the extent to which the author speaking of herself ends up hiding too much, revealing to little, or outright lying. I looked for that here, having engaged a colleague who railed at the idea of this woman being a potential presidential candidate. Having met her, once briefly, and listened to her precursor stump speech, his vehemence about her performance at H.P. set me back. This memoir sounded to me very much like the "real Carly" - if any author can actually tell their own story. She reveals early her childhood fear of losing her parents, which seems like the most personal part of the entire story. Most of the remainder sticks with her education and business experience, and engages the reader on a personal level while revealing the professional Carly. At the end, I went to search for what others had to say of her firing as the H.P. CEO, and found a video clip of one board member who reflected that in retrospect the board was wrong and Carly was right - although given the circumstances at the time her departure was likely necessary to maintain any semblance of orderly governance at the top of the company. Carly was my first, and early, choice as the best candidate in the extensive 2016 Republican field of Presidential candidates, and I can only hope that we have not heard our last from her.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.