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The Maze Runner PDF, ePub eBook

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The Maze Runner

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The Maze Runner PDF, ePub eBook Perfect for fans of Divergent and The Hunger Games, this special movie tie-in edition of the first book in the #1 New York Times bestselling Maze Runner series, The Maze Runner, features an eight-page full-color insert with photos from the film. The Maze Runner movie and its sequel, Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials, feature the star of MTV’s Teen Wolf, Dylan O’Brien, as Thom Perfect for fans of Divergent and The Hunger Games, this special movie tie-in edition of the first book in the #1 New York Times bestselling Maze Runner series, The Maze Runner, features an eight-page full-color insert with photos from the film. The Maze Runner movie and its sequel, Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials, feature the star of MTV’s Teen Wolf, Dylan O’Brien, as Thomas; Kaya Scodelario as Teresa; Aml Ameen as Alby; Will Poulter as Gally; and Thomas Brodie-Sangster as Newt! And look for James Dashner’s newest novels, The Eye of Minds and The Rule of Thoughts, the first two books in the Mortality Doctrine series.   If you ain’t scared, you ain’t human.   When Thomas wakes up in the lift, the only thing he can remember is his name. He’s surrounded by strangers—boys whose memories are also gone.   Nice to meet ya, shank. Welcome to the Glade.   Outside the towering stone walls that surround the Glade is a limitless, ever-changing maze. It’s the only way out—and no one’s ever made it through alive.   Everything is going to change.   Then a girl arrives. The first girl ever. And the message she delivers is terrifying.   Remember. Survive. Run. Praise for the Maze Runner series: A #1 New York Times Bestselling Series A USA Today Bestseller A Kirkus Reviews Best Teen Book of the Year An ALA-YASLA Best Fiction for Young Adults Book An ALA-YALSA Quick Pick   "[A] mysterious survival saga that passionate fans describe as a fusion of Lord of the Flies, The Hunger Games, and Lost."—EW.com   “Wonderful action writing—fast-paced…but smart and well observed.”—Newsday   “[A] nail-biting must-read.”—Seventeen.com   “Breathless, cinematic action.”—Publishers Weekly   “Heart pounding to the very last moment.”—Kirkus Reviews   “Exclamation-worthy.”—Romantic Times   [STAR] “James Dashner’s illuminating prequel [The Kill Order] will thrill fans of this Maze Runner [series] and prove just as exciting for readers new to the series.”—Shelf Awareness, Starred "Take a deep breath before you start any James Dashner book."-Deseret News

30 review for The Maze Runner

  1. 4 out of 5

    Izzy

    This book was recommended for fans of the Hunger Games series, a series that has become one of my favorites. I began The Maze Runner excitedly, hoping for an equally enjoyable, dystopian adventure. I didn't find it. The plot was intriguing and kept me reading; in fact, it was probably the only reason why I kept reading. Some writers are able to seamlessly integrate characterization and good writing with a fast-moving plot; James Dashner is not one of them. The pacing is strange, and Dashner's use This book was recommended for fans of the Hunger Games series, a series that has become one of my favorites. I began The Maze Runner excitedly, hoping for an equally enjoyable, dystopian adventure. I didn't find it. The plot was intriguing and kept me reading; in fact, it was probably the only reason why I kept reading. Some writers are able to seamlessly integrate characterization and good writing with a fast-moving plot; James Dashner is not one of them. The pacing is strange, and Dashner's use of cliches became very irritating. The main character, Thomas, was annoying. Rather than allowing his readers to feel what Thomas feels, Dashner chooses to tell. We are told many times how "frustrated" and "confused" Thomas is, but we can't identify with him. Some of the supporting characters, such as Minho and Newt, could be interesting, but they remain secondary to Thomas. In addition, I was frustrated with the character Teresa. Teresa is the only female main character; instead of making her an intriguing, powerful female, she is christened with flimsy adjectives such as "very pretty" and "smart", becoming yet another 1-dimensional character. I realize that this is a plot-driven story and not a character-driven one, but I would hope that the characters would at least be appealing to the reader. Criticism aside, I found the book enjoyable, and the plot kept me hooked. I felt that the epilogue was well-written and I might seek out the rest of the series when it is published. Ultimately, it's unfortunate that Dashner's poor writing takes away from a good story line; in the hands of a writing master, I believe that The Maze Runner could have been something extraordinary. 2.5/5 EDIT: More than a year later, I have not procured any other books in the series, nor do I intend to. Personally speaking, this is one series better left alone.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tatiana

    This book would have been great IF: 1) the characters had some personality 2) the main character - Thomas - weren't such a Gary Stu and showed some character development and growth instead of conveniently "remembering" important information to advance the plot 3) the book weren't filled with atrocious made-up slang - "shuck-face," really, is this supposed to be cool? 4) the villains - Grievers - were actually scary or dangerous 5) the maze had some kind of mystery about it and not limited to moving w This book would have been great IF: 1) the characters had some personality 2) the main character - Thomas - weren't such a Gary Stu and showed some character development and growth instead of conveniently "remembering" important information to advance the plot 3) the book weren't filled with atrocious made-up slang - "shuck-face," really, is this supposed to be cool? 4) the villains - Grievers - were actually scary or dangerous 5) the maze had some kind of mystery about it and not limited to moving walls and un-threatening prickly Grievers 6) the plot weren't based on constant withholding of information by everyone and releasing it 200 pages later than it should have been 7) the smartest of the smartest kids actually did something smart and uncovered some mysteries of the maze during the 2 years spent there 8) the death of main characters evoked any feeling in readers 9) the book weren't so slow-moving (thanks to constant withholding of info) and BORING! In the present form "The Maze Runner" deserves nothing more than an OK rating for moderately interesting premise. The hype and comparisons to "The Hunger Games" are unwarranted.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    You know how sometimes you're running really fast from a horrible creature and, in a moment of panic, you turn around to see how close it is only to run straight into a brick wall? No? I don't know what that's like either. But that inattention to detail would probably totally screw you over because a.) now you're knocked unconscious and b.) the creature is going to devour you. Good job. I guess this is kind of like Lot's wife looking back on Sodom only to be turned into a pillar of salt. And it is You know how sometimes you're running really fast from a horrible creature and, in a moment of panic, you turn around to see how close it is only to run straight into a brick wall? No? I don't know what that's like either. But that inattention to detail would probably totally screw you over because a.) now you're knocked unconscious and b.) the creature is going to devour you. Good job. I guess this is kind of like Lot's wife looking back on Sodom only to be turned into a pillar of salt. And it is also kind of like reading The Maze Runner. Stick with me. The first half of James Dashner's The Maze Runner maintains a superbly frantic pace. Thomas, our empty-shell-of-a-protagonist is thrust, via the Box, into a curious and unfriendly world populated by dozens of teenage boys. He remembers nothing, and the boys are uncooperative, refusing to reveal any details regarding their home, the Glade. The Glade is surrounded by stupendously tall walls, outside of which lays the Maze. During the day, the Maze is (kinda sorta) safe. But at night, the Grievers emerge. These are half slug/half woodshop tools that enjoy slicing and dicing apart anyone unfortunate to encounter them. They can also sting you, which causes much mayhem and requires the administering of Grief Serum, which triggers the Changing. SIDEBAR! What Is It With Authors Of Dystopian Novels Capitalizing Really Important Words? It's Annoying. Find A New Stylistic Approach That I Can Later Become Exasperated With. Anyway, Thomas' situation is bleak, made bleaker when a number of unfortunate coincidences causes him to bear witness to some truly awful acts of violence. Let's just say one untrustworthy soul is unwittingly tossed into the Maze at night and then a girl (not a boy!!!!!!!!) suspiciously arrives the day after Thomas. All of this, despite the Unnecessary Capitalization and the boys using completely pointless terminology like klunk and shuckface, is totally kitty fantastico. The constant psychological mystery keeps nagging doubts at bay and the variety of personalities that populate the Glade is totally believable. They talk like teenagers, they (generally) act like teenagers, and they form cliques and factions the way teenagers would. (From here on I'm covering up "spoilers", even though I think they're total nonsense and hilariously awful. And because I advise you not to read this book, you should click them. Just keeping the haters at bay.) Then Thomas (view spoiler)[spends a night in (hide spoiler)] the Maze. And the book falls apart. For those of you paying attention, here's where the running into a brick wall metaphor arrives full gale. Dashner, whose prose has heretofore been mediocre but serviceable, completely fails his audience. He writes himself into a corner. He knows it, we know it. Thomas, who has always been slightly unlikeable and jerky becomes even more unlikeable and jerky, and the plot holes start opening up like the really bad similes peppered throughout the narrative. How does Dashner patch them up? (view spoiler)[Telepathy! (hide spoiler)] Seriously. (view spoiler)[Telepathy! (hide spoiler)] Yup. The girl who mysteriously appeared (view spoiler)[communicates with Thomas with her mind (hide spoiler)] and tells him (view spoiler)[all sorts of shit that's supposed to clear everything up (hide spoiler)] . It doesn't. It just creates a frustrating deus ex machina that could have been avoided, but isn't. As Thomas's character stumbles upon more and more unbelievable clues, like (view spoiler)[the moving walls of the maze actually form patterns of letters (that Thomas will eventually and conveniently know what to do with after experiencing the Changing himself), (hide spoiler)] the book loses its momentum significantly. In fact, despite tearing through the first half of the book, I had to put it down. Afterwards, every time I looked at that stupid green cover, I found myself filled with dread - knowing full well that what remained would irritate me. And it did. Sometimes when the first book of a trilogy ends on a cliffhanger, I feel compelled to continue. I don't care what happens to Thomas and the rest of the characters. Maybe they'll smoke lots of pot, form a commune, and grow daisies. Maybe they'll turn into Grievers. Maybe they'll run into Katniss and Peeta and become BFFs. But I will let you, gentle reader, find that out for yourself.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Meredith Holley

    Q: if you could edit this book, what would you take out? A: the words. . . . Have you ever had an eight-year-old kid try to describe to you winning a level of a video game? Have you ever had a middle-aged man try to describe to you completing the games section of the New York Times? Did those experiences involve multiple conversations like this: “What is the maze?” “Stop asking so many questions!” I have to say that this book was more boring than having someone tell you in painful detail about winnin Q: if you could edit this book, what would you take out? A: the words. . . . Have you ever had an eight-year-old kid try to describe to you winning a level of a video game? Have you ever had a middle-aged man try to describe to you completing the games section of the New York Times? Did those experiences involve multiple conversations like this: “What is the maze?” “Stop asking so many questions!” I have to say that this book was more boring than having someone tell you in painful detail about winning a video game or finishing a crossword puzzle. It is more boring if only for the constant, "What are you talking about?" "No! I won't tell you!" This book is astonishingly boring. I know that I am predisposed not to like it because there are no female characters (no, I do not count the leggy, blue-eyed girlfriend as a female character), but, really, I ask you: are there any male characters either? If you say, yes, then I challenge you to prove it. Are Mario and Luigi and Princess Toadstool characters in Mario Kart? What about the ducks in Duck Hunt? Are they characters? We have to draw the line somewhere. And I submit to you that there are no characters in this book. Or, at least, there are fewer characters in this book than there are in Duck Hunt. Also, a couple of things that bothered me throughout: 1. What famous scientist was Minho named after? Okay, I just googled that and apparently Dashner “purposely” named a few characters after scientists who will supposedly exist in the future. Like the only Asian kid in the book. Because there are no Asian scientists today that he could name someone after. *facedesk* And like Zart. Zart and the Asian kid were not named after scientists. *double facedesk* 2. Why can’t the grievers climb over the wall? They obviously can climb. But not over the wall? Did I miss this? At first I thought the kids were in some kind of dome, but then it seemed like it was just a really tall wall. . . . That it was impossible to climb? WHYYY????? 3. What purpose does the telepathy serve? None is the answer. It serves no purpose. 4. Why is this book so, so, so long and boring? So, maybe a third of the way through the book, I developed this false hope that this book would be some kind of pretty metaphor for children going through the grieving process and supporting each other in loss. I thought, “Oh, grievers! Maybe the challenges of the maze and the bonding of the boys in the glade will have some larger message.” No. This book is not about that. It is about doing the NYT games section and then maybe vague talk of zombies later. Total bullshit. I have to think this book came out while LOST was still on and before its terrible conclusion, which forced millions of Americans to face the fact that when it looks like a story will have no purpose, it probably has no purpose. I have to think Dashner thought he could bank on the millions of us willing to suspend our skepticism and keep watching a show whose writers clearly had no plan. I am hoping that in the wake of that disaster, we will have grown up a little and be less willing to stand for bullshit like this. I googled it, and, yes, I was right. Cashing in on gullible LOST audience. Unacceptable.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    Okay so before I start I want to say something.I personally hesitated to read this book because I heard too many bad reviews and things about this book.But let me tell you something.Yeah it has it's problems like the written style but this book has one of the best story plots I have ever read about.And believe,once you get into the book,you will not care about the writing or anything else.I am seriously so angry I haven't read this book early and even more for listening or reading those really Okay so before I start I want to say something.I personally hesitated to read this book because I heard too many bad reviews and things about this book.But let me tell you something.Yeah it has it's problems like the written style but this book has one of the best story plots I have ever read about.And believe,once you get into the book,you will not care about the writing or anything else.I am seriously so angry I haven't read this book early and even more for listening or reading those really bad reviews for this book.I know everyone has their own taste but really I heard things that really discouraged me to read this and they are not true.And one last thing before I continue with my review,this book is awesome without having instalove,or love at all,without having nakedness or anything like that.So if you find this interesting,pick it up and decide for yourself,because for me is totally worth it! ____________________________________________ “If you ain’t scared… you ain’t human.” ____________________________________________ ☆☆☆☆☆4.8 RUNNY STARS!☆☆☆☆☆ You can find the full review and more about this book on my blog! I admire this book,really from the first page to the last.I have been waiting for a dystopian like this.The Maze Runner is a full action pack novel with awesome badass moments and thrilling and suspense scenes. ____________________________________________ “I've been shucked and gone to heaven.” ____________________________________________ The world,the maze is one of the greatest ideas,and it was awesome.The way it was build,with sections and everything,the glade,the grivers,they were all so thoughtful and really well made.I also watched the movie and I must say it is a lot similar to the book,and it has visualized my thoughts. ____________________________________________ “You are the shuckiest shuck faced shuck in the world!” ____________________________________________ The characters were also great.What I liked was the conversations they had with each other.They felt normal and real,exactly according to their age.Thomas is a great main character,but I don't know he has a thing for crying,and somehow he seemed weak sometimes.Newt was my favorite character.I also liked Teresa and Minho. ____________________________________________ “Shouldn't someone give a pep talk or something?" Minho asked, pulling Thomas's attention away from Alby. "Go ahead," Newt replied. Minho nodded and faced the crowd. "Be careful," he said dryly. "Don't die.” ____________________________________________ The reason why this is not a 5star book for me,is because of the writing style.Like a lot of people,I had a problem,a minor problem with it.It was annoying,especially at the beginning.Also annoying were the repeated phrases like the names,and the sentences were somehow short and not very rich.But beside that everything was perfect for me! ____________________________________________ “It's kind of hard to ask a dead guy what he did wrong.” ____________________________________________ The story follows a boy named Thomas who finds in a unknown place,with unknown boys.He doesn't remember anything beside his name.Others don't neither.He learns that he's placed in a maze,and there is no way out,at least not found yet.After his arrival,strange things start to happen,things that has never happened before,things that could bring only destruction and death.There must be a way out,and he has to find it! ____________________________________________ “Just follow me and run like your life depends on it. Because it does.” ____________________________________________ I highly recommend this book to every reader out there,and as I said don't judge it before reading it.For me it was awesome,for someone is not,but you should try for yourself! *Pictures from the review are not mine, I took them mostly from Google images or Tumblr*

  6. 5 out of 5

    Emily May

    “You are the shuckiest shuck faced shuck in the world!” 2 1/2 stars. It's funny how just a few years can change everything - your reading tastes, your expectations, your standards... because when I read The Maze Runner in early 2011, I enjoyed it a lot. It seemed fast-paced, exciting and a little scary. Plus, I thought the slang was a nice touch. Three years and a million dystopian/sci-fi books later and everything about me has outgrown this book. It's not terrible. I can still see why someon “You are the shuckiest shuck faced shuck in the world!” 2 1/2 stars. It's funny how just a few years can change everything - your reading tastes, your expectations, your standards... because when I read The Maze Runner in early 2011, I enjoyed it a lot. It seemed fast-paced, exciting and a little scary. Plus, I thought the slang was a nice touch. Three years and a million dystopian/sci-fi books later and everything about me has outgrown this book. It's not terrible. I can still see why someone who is new to YA dystopias might get caught up in the loosely-plotted (read: nothing happens) drama and think that "shuck" amounts to a clever invention of a new language. But as I was rereading this before seeing the new movie, I realised just how much it pales in comparison to many others in the genre. The thing about this book is that it is so simplistic and... immature, I guess. I'm not here to simply piss off the book's fans - I enjoyed it too, remember! - and I can still see why it might provide some light entertainment. But... the characters and plot are so underdeveloped. The language seems silly now. The scary Grievers no longer seem scary, but cartoon comical instead. Dashner uses that tiresome old writing technique called "withholding information" to propel the non-existent plot along. The whole book is built around a single mystery - that of the maze - and our supposedly intelligent-beyond-belief characters keep the novel going by standing around and scratching their heads. It's so lacking in any depth, layers or complexity. Comparisons to The Hunger Games are frankly quite hilarious when you consider Collins' intricate world, complex characters and clever plot... then consider what Dashner offers up next to it. Not to mention that Thomas is an extremely boring, self-sacrificing MC. In its defense, though, I was still affected by what happens near the end. I would recommend the book - with some hesitation - for younger readers or those who are new to YA dystopian fiction. Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Youtube | Store

  7. 4 out of 5

    Miranda Reads

    To Summarize: Wellllll...that was convenient... Thomas wakes up in the middle of a glen in the center a enormous maze. He (along with all of the other guys in there) have no memory of life outside of the maze. Absolutely blank slates the lot of them...wellll....mostly. Their entire lives were conveniently erased just enough so they'd have language, motor skills and just enough memory to understand irrigation/farming but nothing of their personal lives. Every month, a newcomer arrives to the Glade. To Summarize: Wellllll...that was convenient... Thomas wakes up in the middle of a glen in the center a enormous maze. He (along with all of the other guys in there) have no memory of life outside of the maze. Absolutely blank slates the lot of them...wellll....mostly. Their entire lives were conveniently erased just enough so they'd have language, motor skills and just enough memory to understand irrigation/farming but nothing of their personal lives. Every month, a newcomer arrives to the Glade. After a brief orientation, they are sorted into a job and society continues. The day after Thomas arrives, a girl (Theresa) comes for the first time ever. Thomas and Theresa know each other, but they don't remember how or why. All they have is a cryptic message - WICKED is good and a sinking feeling that they are responsible for this whole mess. After all, this is YA lit, thus the main form of motivation has to be: I just...feel like I need to save everyone. To redeem myself. Anyway, the gladers, Thomas and Theresa spend their time mapping the maze, surviving the wilds and....not much else. I suppose they invent their own slang, which gets a bit annoying after the first twenty pages. “You are the shuckiest shuck faced shuck in the world!” and “I've been shucked and gone to heaven.” Besides that bit literary genius, this book wasn't too bad. The adventure and intrigue of the maze was more than enough to keep me entertained. That being said...Like most memory-absent books, there's a bit of an issue with the longer it goes on, the less believable it became. I mean, what are the odds that the main characters always seemed to know just enough for the situation and the rest was conveniently shrouded in shadows? I was rather annoyed with the twist at the end. (view spoiler)[ Mostly because I'm so fed up with the whole Government-secretly-knew-everything-and-manipulated-every-single-string-to-bring-this-about" (hide spoiler)] It just feels like lazy writing to me. Audiobook Comments Read by Mark Deakins - and he really did a great job with tone and inflection. Despite my annoyance with some of the character's actions, at lest we had a splendid narrator. Blog | Instagram | Twitter

  8. 4 out of 5

    Virginia Ronan ♥ Herondale ♥

    ”Sweat drenched his hair, his hands, his clothes, everything. A fear he had never known filled him to the point of insanity.” Truth be told, I’ve been waiting to read this book for ages! I don’t even know when the first movie came out, but I think it must have been around 2014 or something like that. Anyway, because I didn’t know better back then I just went to the movies and watched the film only to find out that it’s based on a trilogy that was written by James Dashner. Of course I was very int ”Sweat drenched his hair, his hands, his clothes, everything. A fear he had never known filled him to the point of insanity.” Truth be told, I’ve been waiting to read this book for ages! I don’t even know when the first movie came out, but I think it must have been around 2014 or something like that. Anyway, because I didn’t know better back then I just went to the movies and watched the film only to find out that it’s based on a trilogy that was written by James Dashner. Of course I was very intrigued and immediately wanted to read the books before I watched the second movie. Well, you know what they say about good intentions, right? *lol* The road to hell is paved with good intentions. (Love that saying by the way. ;-P) So you can already guess what I did, I watched the second movie before reading the book and then desperately tried to catch up with this series. Unfortunately the book was always borrowed from my library and already pre-ordered by other people. (Seriously, what is it with you guys in Austria that you all want to read the same book?! XD) And then a couple of weeks ago, I already had given up hope, I stumbled over a second copy of “The Maze Runner” in the children’s section! Haha! Imagine my delight when I finally borrowed it from the library! And the rest? Well, the rest is reading review history as you can see! ;-) ”You and Minho get your butts inside, get yourselves checked by the Med-jacks. You look bloody awful. I want the whole story when they’re done and you’re rested up.” Considering when the movie came out it’s been a while I saw it, but reading the book I realized that it seems to be pretty close to the movie or rather the movie seems to stick with the book. If there were some changes they obviously weren’t severe enough to notice them so my reading experience remained intact. (I hate it when they don’t stick with the book and make unnecessary changes. >_< You may call it a personal pet-peeve if you wish. XD) What I found pretty interesting was the fact that in the movie the infected people seem to be like zombies. There was none of that in the book, I mean they are in the maze and don’t have anything to do with people who are infected with the Flare (view spoiler)[at least not yet (hide spoiler)] but as I understood it from the various memories of the Gladers it’s more some sort of sickness that drives people mad. I mean I could be wrong there, the memories of the kids are more than just patchy after all, but I still got the impression that the infected are just people that suffer from some sort of sickness. Guess Hollywood thought zombies would sell better? *lol* Minho snickered and leaned back in his chair. “Man, you are one butt-load of sunshine, let me tell you. I’m with Thomas. I’m with Thomas one hundred percent. If we’re gonna die, let’s freaking do it fighting.” Well anyway, I still enjoyed the book and as expected I loved book Newt and book Minho to bits and pieces. <3 Those two boys are just amazing and I think with Thomas as the third part of the triumvirate they actually made all the difference! ;-) I loved how the characters complimented one another and the dynamic between Minho and Newt was not only entertaining but also a very good addition to the plot. It made them human and relatable and I literally breathed for their conversations. *lol* Poor Newt though, he’s such a laid-back and matter-of-fact guy and then he has to put up with Thomas’s and Minho’s antics. Haha! ”Shouldn’t someone give a pep talk or something?” Minho asked, pulling Thomas’s attention away from Alby. “Go ahead,” Newt replied. Minho nodded and faced the crowd. “Be careful,” he said dryly, “Don’t die.” Thomas would have laughed if he could, but he was too scared for it to come out. “Great. We’re all bloody inspired,” Newt answered, then pointed over his shoulder, toward the Maze. See what I mean? *lol* I still think that was the best pep talk in all history of pep talks though. ;-P The ending was as shocking for me as it was when I watched the movie and I can’t wait to get a hold of the second book. I was warned that the movies differ from the books so I’m really curious how the rest of this series is going to play out. For now all I can say is that I really enjoyed “The Maze Runner” and that I’m already looking forward to read “The Scorch Trials”. =) ___________________________________ PRE-REVIEW: This has to be the first series I never actually read but watched at the movies instead. XD Shame on me, but oh well I’m trying to make amends by reading it now. =) This has to count, right? And technically speaking it’s not even my fault I never managed to read it. I mean I wanted to read this series for ages but only got the book now. If you have to wait ages for a book at your library it just can’t be helped. *lol* It’s mine now though, well at least for 3 weeks, so I’m going to make it count! ;-P Can’t wait to read about “Wicked”, Thomas, Newt and Minho. Boy, I hope Newt is going to be awesome, because he definitely was one of my fave characters in the movies. Let’s hope it will stay that way. *crosses her fingers* Oh and I still didn’t see the third movie so I might even be able to finish the series and watch the last movie knowing it all! *lol* YAY! Wish me luck! ;-)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nataliya

    The last page is turned and all I have to say is this: What for the love of all that's good and pure was this foolishness? ...Aaaaand ..... rant! ----- When I'm sick - the snotty phlegmy febrile kind of sick - and my brain feels sizzlingly fried, I sometimes turn to easy reading "fluff" to give my neurons a break. Sometimes this strategy backfires and the 'fluffy' book actually tries to break my long-suffering brain cells with its sheer stupidity. It's not even mediocre; mediocrity would be elevat The last page is turned and all I have to say is this: What for the love of all that's good and pure was this foolishness? ...Aaaaand ..... rant! ----- When I'm sick - the snotty phlegmy febrile kind of sick - and my brain feels sizzlingly fried, I sometimes turn to easy reading "fluff" to give my neurons a break. Sometimes this strategy backfires and the 'fluffy' book actually tries to break my long-suffering brain cells with its sheer stupidity. It's not even mediocre; mediocrity would be elevating this book to the undeserved heights. It's simply boring, uninspired, ridiculous and poorly executed. ------ Let me sum up the things that I thought were awful, stupid or just plain ridiculous (apparently my febrile brain likes making lists): # The dumbed-down plot full of holes that relies on pointless withholding of any useful information. Seriously. When there is no reason for keeping the characters in the dark, all suspense goes out of the window. There was no reason why nobody could tell Thomas what was going on when he showed up in the Glade or when he saw the Doors or the Maze.While I'm at it, can anyone please explain why the klunky shanking shuckface are the words randomly capitalized? Is the book meant to evoke the thoughts of the German language where the nouns are capitalized? Or was the author too lazy to come up with proper names for places and instead just threw in some capitalization? Foolishness, I say.The frustrating to me approach of never discussing what happened with those who went through the Changing. The lack of curiosity about the only potential exit from the Maze that the boys have found in two (!) years. The pointless doing the same thing over and over again just to come up with the same results, relishing in the special status of the Runners instead of just sitting down to discuss the situation and their findings. # The atrocious unbearable awkward slang. Replacing 'fuck' with 'shuck' and 'shit' with 'klank' for PG purposes does not work when you shove it unto the readers' faces every sentence or so. At least be inventive or make it sound organic, but all that's achieved is sounding like a five-year-old complaining to her Mummy. "You're the shuckiest shuck-faced shuck there ever was." I rest my case in the face of this nonsense. # The silver plate on which everything is handed to the absolutely special protagonist. Because Thomas is so special at fragging everything. He doesn't even need to try. Instead, when we need a proof of his awesomeness, the get the sudden impulses and urges that are never wrong, or if that fails, simply a quasi-recollection that saves the day. Which segues into my next frustration point: # The lack of any character development besides the-author-wants-it-so approach. The author knows what he wants to happen in this book, and he moves the characters along like checkers pieces, just to make plot happen. The characters are just sorta there, are static, and therefore I could never get invested in them enough to care even when some of them died. Especially when the death of at least one of them was pointless. # The pointless villains and scares that should have been comic relief instead. Yes, the Grievers and the strangely non-menacing way they were portrayed. The Maze that is anything but intimidating (that effect is due to the non-spectacular writing, really). The Changing - oh so scary of experience! - that does not really affect Thomas the Special Snowflake, not even a minor inconvenience. # The pointless vilifying of perfectly reasonable characters for the sole purpose of making our special protagonist even more snowflake-ish. It's poor Gally, who's labeled as a "bully" before he's had a chance to do anything even remotely bully-ish except for staring at Thomas with dislike. To cement his unlikeability, Gally is described as physically unattractive - because in shallow books like this one if you look like a villain, you must be one. Gally, whose distrust of Thomas is perfectly logical (if any of the characters would take any time to think about it instead of singing accolades to the Special Snowflake). # The too-stupid-to-live characters. Seriously. Every few pages my reaction was - really? You guys haven't tried that? You haven't thought of this?? You haven't talked about that???? Ugh. # The action scenes that read like a video game narration. This does not work in real life - even the kind of 'real life' that involves a few dozen of teen boys stranded in a few square miles area where they successfully run a farm, a slaughterhouse and an industrial-size kitchen. # The "big reveal" that is simply told to us, without anyone really earning it. No, the characters do not work hard just to get the pay-off; they get told all that's happening, like a cheap trick. # The absolute lack of any suspense or motivation to help propel the plot forward. No, everything is simplistic, childish and therefore strangely light and unconcerning. There is no depth, no real substance, and no complexity. It's page-filler, easy to read, easy to forget. 1.5 stars. Yawn. A frustrated yawn, at that.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Cara

    Reading this book + No sleep= brain shock . Oh more like my brain was blown into freaking little bits. I kept thinking about it after I was done. I finished it into the late hours of the night and I kept circling in my head what was going to happen next. The point is moot but I am definitely going to read the sequel The Scorch Trials. From the start as the reader we have NO idea what is happening. All Thomas can remember is his name. Not where he came from or any specific details of his life. Ne Reading this book + No sleep= brain shock . Oh more like my brain was blown into freaking little bits. I kept thinking about it after I was done. I finished it into the late hours of the night and I kept circling in my head what was going to happen next. The point is moot but I am definitely going to read the sequel The Scorch Trials. From the start as the reader we have NO idea what is happening. All Thomas can remember is his name. Not where he came from or any specific details of his life. Neither do any of the other Gladers who he meets in the beginning of the book. The place is filled with boys whose sole purpose is to try to get out of this place by solving the maze. They haven't had any luck in two years, but that may all change with Thomas's arrival. Strange things start to happen, and people are pointing fingers at Thomas. Will he be the one to get them out, or the boy who will bring them down? At first I was having a hard time getting into this book. Nobody wants to answer Thomas's questions, and I got just as frustrated as he did. I actually still don't completely understand why they didn't want to answer all his questions right away. The plot does pick up speed though and you get to meet Newt, Chuck, Minho, and Alby (all important characters in their own right). The world building is good because I got the creeps just thinking about the grievers, and I can feel the desperation but at the same time the camaraderie the guys have with each other. There is also a unique language setup that was a tad-bit confusing at first but you pick it up as Thomas does. The ending certainly is gonna give the series a big shakeup. I really want to see what Dashner has up his sleeve this time. I read this because of the good reception it was getting, but also because of a display at Barnes & Nobles. They had all these books that were hugely popular within the young adult realm and I had read all of them except, you guessed it, this one. I couldn't have any of that! Added later: Great news guys, there are making this into a movie! Here is a link to the little info that is out about the movie. Basically nothing but hopefully in the coming months that will change! Okay the trailer is out! I am officially excited guys.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Inge

    EDIT 09/05/2013 Holy crap, that looks perfect. -- I am way better at writing reviews for books I hated, but I’m gonna give it a go anyway. -- Okay. Breathe, Inge, breathe. Oh, this is gooooood. The Maze Runner was like a breath of fresh air to me. I needed a nice, clean cut from the typical YA books filled with whiny protagonists, insta-love and love triangles, and I got exactly what I asked for. This book is like a giant puzzle that you solve along with the characters. It is filled with unexpected t EDIT 09/05/2013 Holy crap, that looks perfect. -- I am way better at writing reviews for books I hated, but I’m gonna give it a go anyway. -- Okay. Breathe, Inge, breathe. Oh, this is gooooood. The Maze Runner was like a breath of fresh air to me. I needed a nice, clean cut from the typical YA books filled with whiny protagonists, insta-love and love triangles, and I got exactly what I asked for. This book is like a giant puzzle that you solve along with the characters. It is filled with unexpected twists and turns, full of action and I sighed every once in a while because it was so much to take in at once. It started off highly confusing, but soon took a turn for the exciting and left me hanging with so many unanswered questions; after the last page, I was still begging for more. The Maze Runner had me gripping my seat until the very end. A great and very thrilling read. Thomas was a curious, smart and brave protagonist and basically everything the Gladers needed at the time. I didn’t really connect to any of the characters because they were a bit snappy and unpredictable, but I could definitely understand all the reactions and feelings. I felt all the emotions myself. I felt the sorrow, the despair, the excitement, the need for survival, everything. Though the idea of slug-like creatures didn’t really appeal to me at first, I got used to the image of the deadly Grievers after a while. They ended up being quite gross and I started fearing them as well. The arrival of the girl definitely lightened things up, not much, but enough. The deaths were very predictable but they did add to the story. And that ending! Ooooh, that ending killed me! I was so happy when I read the last sentence, and then I read that freaking epilogue. That was heart-wrenching. I knew it wouldn’t be a happy ending because it’s a trilogy, but I didn’t really know what to expect. I definitely didn’t expect this. Now I must get my hands on the sequel as soon as possible. Damn you, James Dashner. Like the publisher said, ”Thanks, James! It’s not like I wanted to sleep for a week anyway!” And it’s not like I had any studying to do or anything. *whistles innocently*

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nic

    I've just finished and all I can say is holy shuck! This book is awesome! I was a little bit scared when I started this book that I wasn't going to like it as it is my first real dystopia/sci-fi book I've read. After about 110 pages it got to the point where I couldn't put it down for anything even while eating dinner I had it one hand and when bedtime came I wanted to stay up all night and read it. The plot was fast paced, suspenseful and full of suprises. The twists and turns this book took sho I've just finished and all I can say is holy shuck! This book is awesome! I was a little bit scared when I started this book that I wasn't going to like it as it is my first real dystopia/sci-fi book I've read. After about 110 pages it got to the point where I couldn't put it down for anything even while eating dinner I had it one hand and when bedtime came I wanted to stay up all night and read it. The plot was fast paced, suspenseful and full of suprises. The twists and turns this book took shocked me unlike any other book I've read. It also has some creative lingo but I found it easy to understand and I actually think it added to this books charm. The ending was amazing but left me with so many questions that I need answers for RIGHT NOW and I really wish October 12th would hurry up so I can read The Scorch Trials. All I have to say is read this book (especially you, Morgan :D).

  13. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    At first I was a bit put out with this book. I don’t know what it is about male authors, but they can be down right infuriating. Men truly do think on a different wave length and speak another language than women. I was becoming rather frustrated with the lack of information being given, and I wasn’t sure I would be able to endure that sort of aggravation for 300 plus pages. Luckily around page 60 or so, Dashner hit his stride and I became enthralled with this story. It’s so difficult to write a At first I was a bit put out with this book. I don’t know what it is about male authors, but they can be down right infuriating. Men truly do think on a different wave length and speak another language than women. I was becoming rather frustrated with the lack of information being given, and I wasn’t sure I would be able to endure that sort of aggravation for 300 plus pages. Luckily around page 60 or so, Dashner hit his stride and I became enthralled with this story. It’s so difficult to write a review that divulges information about the plot without simultaneously giving the plot away. Dashner mastered the art of dolling out need to know information in spades while maintaining an air of mystery that keeps you immersed in the story, craving for more. The Maze Runner begins with Thomas finding himself memory-less, surrounded by teenage boys of varying ages, in a strange place called the Glade. Thomas immediately begins asking questions, attempting to get his bearings, though answers aren’t forth coming, and the Gladers are none to helpful. Nonetheless, life doesn’t seem too shabby in the Glade. There is a homestead, crops, barns filled with livestock, the sun always shines, and various supplies appear in “the box” each week upon request. There even appears to be order within the Glade, though it is filled with nothing but testosterone fueled teenage boys. There appears to be only a handful of rules, 1. Never threaten your fellow Gladers, 2. Everyone must pull their weight, 3. No one is allowed in the Maze aside from runners, 4. No one is allowed in the Maze after dark. Though the rules are rather self-explanatory, their necessity becomes all to clear once Thomas is allowed to know what lurks behind the stone walls protecting the Glade. While no one knows how they came to arrive in the Glade, why they were sent, or who sent them, they all strive towards a common goal, solving the Maze and leaving the Glade. But once the first ever girl arrives into the Glade, a trigger is pulled, and the stakes for survival are raised. Despite the fact that I didn’t have an emotional reaction (crying when it was clear that I was meant to), I couldn’t set this book down. I wasn’t scared for any of the characters, my heart didn’t race, but I desperately wanted to solve the freakin mystery. Luckily, there is a conclusion of sorts; however, this is clearly a series as you gain new information that tickles your intrigue before coming to a major halt. Grr. So like all the other suckers, I’m sure I’ll be reading the sequel.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Wendy Darling

    A premise full of promise, but after 150 pages, how can there still be no answers? Deliberately withholding information becomes frustrating not only for the protagonist, but for the reader as well. The fact that Thomas does not demand more answers from his fellow captives makes it difficult to sympathize with or care what happens to him. The spoilers for the book make it sound intriguing, but I can't wade through another 200 pages before it gets to the point. Aside from a few physical difference A premise full of promise, but after 150 pages, how can there still be no answers? Deliberately withholding information becomes frustrating not only for the protagonist, but for the reader as well. The fact that Thomas does not demand more answers from his fellow captives makes it difficult to sympathize with or care what happens to him. The spoilers for the book make it sound intriguing, but I can't wade through another 200 pages before it gets to the point. Aside from a few physical differences and "bad" or "good" actions, the boys tend to blend together as well. They're not fully fleshed out or unique in any way, and for a book that's centered around characters in a bleak environment in a desperate situation, this is a most unfortunate weakness.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Shelby *trains flying monkeys*

    Thomas comes to the maze in a box, he has no memories of anything other than his name. He learns that he is the "GreenBean" or the newest boy to arrive. They get arrivals once a month. There's a ton of questions about how he got there and why there is a maze that has walls that move every night. Then there are the Grievers. Which for the life of me I could not find scary. A machine-like slug? Pour some salt on that fucker. The next day a girl arrives. It throws the boys into an uproar. A GIRL! an Thomas comes to the maze in a box, he has no memories of anything other than his name. He learns that he is the "GreenBean" or the newest boy to arrive. They get arrivals once a month. There's a ton of questions about how he got there and why there is a maze that has walls that move every night. Then there are the Grievers. Which for the life of me I could not find scary. A machine-like slug? Pour some salt on that fucker. The next day a girl arrives. It throws the boys into an uproar. A GIRL! and never before has a newbie came through the box the day after another one. Then they realize she has a mysterious note. It's all about to change. I wish it would because I am dang confused. No complete answers are ever given in this book. So a sum up of the whole book could be this very gif: Will I move on in the series? Probably not, it's not the worst book ever but I hate not having answers so I'll just get pissed off if I continue.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte May

    “How could anyone be evil enough to do this to us?” Just as awesome the second time round! Thomas wakes up in the Glade with no memory of who he is or his past. He is surrounded by boys all just like him, no idea why they are there, some have been there as long as 2 years. They all keep the Glade running, they grow food, raise livestock and perhaps the most important job - the runners. The runners go out everyday exploring the giant maze surrounding the Glade, attempting to find an escape. Every “How could anyone be evil enough to do this to us?” Just as awesome the second time round! Thomas wakes up in the Glade with no memory of who he is or his past. He is surrounded by boys all just like him, no idea why they are there, some have been there as long as 2 years. They all keep the Glade running, they grow food, raise livestock and perhaps the most important job - the runners. The runners go out everyday exploring the giant maze surrounding the Glade, attempting to find an escape. Every night the doors close, and no one can get into the maze, or back out! When another Glader arrives, Teresa - the first girl Glader, things go from bad to worse. Eventually they have to decide what to do. It was so exciting to watch everything unfold, with the terrifying grievers that live in the maze! To see all the secrets and answers come out. I also really liked the ‘glader slang’ the characters used, I thought it was imaginative and at times pretty funny! Onto book 2!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brian Yahn

    The Maze Runner is a masterfully plotted mystery. It's intriguing. It draws you in quick and then reveals details at just the right time to keep you turning the pages for more. While many criticize the characters for being flat, which they are, Thomas and his fellow Maze Runners are at the very least likable. They play pranks, they crack jokes, they bond in inventive ways, and most importantly they're just fun in general. You can't help but like characters that are trapped in an almost literal He The Maze Runner is a masterfully plotted mystery. It's intriguing. It draws you in quick and then reveals details at just the right time to keep you turning the pages for more. While many criticize the characters for being flat, which they are, Thomas and his fellow Maze Runners are at the very least likable. They play pranks, they crack jokes, they bond in inventive ways, and most importantly they're just fun in general. You can't help but like characters that are trapped in an almost literal Hell and somehow make the most of it to the point you secretly wish you were part of it. There's something magical in that. A story can only go so far with characters that don't really have any meaningful connection to the plot or the setting, though. Any of these guys could've been replaced for any other personality with barely any notice. I think James Dashner really squeezed the best possible plot he could out of the characters he created. The real pitfall of The Maze Runner is the writing. As Dashner might write, It's really, really bad. So bad, it leaves you feeling nothing in a lot of scenes you should feel loss or adrenaline or relief or... anything.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Zainab

    You know how when people are sad they listen to sad music? I on the other hand read a whole ass sad book. The 'sadness', funnily enough, was the result of watching The Death Cure a thousand times and not getting over you-know-what. You guys were right though. It was wayy different than the movie (not that I'm complaining or anything I love the movie) Gally's character, the whole maze and everything was much more explicit. I love Newt so much man. He deserves all the happiness in the world. He's li You know how when people are sad they listen to sad music? I on the other hand read a whole ass sad book. The 'sadness', funnily enough, was the result of watching The Death Cure a thousand times and not getting over you-know-what. You guys were right though. It was wayy different than the movie (not that I'm complaining or anything I love the movie) Gally's character, the whole maze and everything was much more explicit. I love Newt so much man. He deserves all the happiness in the world. He's like 99 percent of the reason I started reading this series I'm not even kidding. "Shouldn't someone give a pep talk or something?" Minho asked. "Go ahead," Newt replied. ''Be careful,'' he said dryly. ''Don't die.'' 'Great. We're all bloody inspired,' Newt answered. Newt is one of the best, most understanding character ever and no one can tell me otherwise.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    2.5 stars. The Maze Runner isn't all bad, for dystopian YA fiction. That's kind of damning it with faint praise, but I just can't summon up a whole lot of enthusiasm for it. It was reasonably well-written and had a promising setting, but I found it a frustrating read on SO many levels: 1. Other kids keep telling the main character not to ask questions, so, so often. It was incredibly annoying and -here's the capper - it turns out there's no real reason for that. Other than hiding the Big Mystery 2.5 stars. The Maze Runner isn't all bad, for dystopian YA fiction. That's kind of damning it with faint praise, but I just can't summon up a whole lot of enthusiasm for it. It was reasonably well-written and had a promising setting, but I found it a frustrating read on SO many levels: 1. Other kids keep telling the main character not to ask questions, so, so often. It was incredibly annoying and -here's the capper - it turns out there's no real reason for that. Other than hiding the Big Mystery Ball from the reader a little while longer. 2. Gary Stu. 'Nuff said. 3. Lots of teenage boys die, and the reason just isn't compelling enough to justify it. (view spoiler)[The world is going to pot and some people think if they put a bunch of kids through a do-or-die trial where most of them will die, they'll get some tougher, smarter kids who will - somehow - lead them out of some unspecified global catastrophe? Kind of weak. (hide spoiler)] And maybe that's partly because... 4. This is the first book in a series and way too many questions were left unanswered. (view spoiler)[What's the catastrophe? Why would the Powers that Be think a bunch of teenagers, however smart, can solve it? (hide spoiler)] Who knows? I'm just not sure I care about the answers enough to read the sequels. Certainly not enough to buy them. Maybe I'd read them if someone put them in front of my face, but I'm not even sure about that. I gave the book to my older teenage son. He never read it. I tried to talk my younger teen into it. He usually likes this kind of fantasy, but no go. Maybe I just hate to admit I paid full retail price for a book that no one in my family will much like.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kate ♡

    It's 1am, just finished this and it was aMAZEing, see what I did there ;) Review to come!! Review (more like gush): Where do I even start this review... Okay, so, The Maze Runner is absolutely incredible! I loved it so much! This book instantly sucked me in, when I really just got it off my shelf to look at it! Haha, I had always been a bit hesitant to read this book, because I didn't think I'd like it much... Boy, was I wrong. I even broke a book-lover rule and saw the movie first, because I was nev It's 1am, just finished this and it was aMAZEing, see what I did there ;) Review to come!! Review (more like gush): Where do I even start this review... Okay, so, The Maze Runner is absolutely incredible! I loved it so much! This book instantly sucked me in, when I really just got it off my shelf to look at it! Haha, I had always been a bit hesitant to read this book, because I didn't think I'd like it much... Boy, was I wrong. I even broke a book-lover rule and saw the movie first, because I was never actually sure if I'd read this! Yet, I still enjoyed the book so much, even though I knew what was going to happen! (Makes me so excited for book 2, because I don't know what's gonna happen) Reading this made me feel like it was Christmas morning, all jittery and happy. It gave me nostalgic feels even though I'd never read it before... maybe I felt a bit like I did while reading the hunger games... Idk, it's hard to place. This book caused me severe lack of sleep, not even just by reading late into the night, but also because when I wasn't reading, I was thinking or dreaming about this book! I even read it at every break I got on my biology excursion! I've never said 'just one more chapter' more in my entire reading life! Which I think is fair to say I'm pretty obsessed with it! I'm SO happy that I loved this book the way I did, because it's been soo long since I've completely and utterly enjoyed a book! Go read this if you haven't already! Might go read Scorch Trials now... See ya Goodreads people <3

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ellie

    3.5 Well. There was....well, first of all, I have to get a cup of water because I have a major headache. *Goes to get cup of water* *Returns* Aah. Much better. Okay, first second of all, my friend recommended this book. So I requested it, and (foolish me) left it lying on the table where I do my homework, in plain sight of my parents. Oops. So THEN my dad says, at dinner: "Oh, Ellie, by the way--I borrowed that book of yours, Runner? Or something?" *gulps nervously* "The Maze Runner?" "Yeah, that's it. 3.5 Well. There was....well, first of all, I have to get a cup of water because I have a major headache. *Goes to get cup of water* *Returns* Aah. Much better. Okay, first second of all, my friend recommended this book. So I requested it, and (foolish me) left it lying on the table where I do my homework, in plain sight of my parents. Oops. So THEN my dad says, at dinner: "Oh, Ellie, by the way--I borrowed that book of yours, Runner? Or something?" *gulps nervously* "The Maze Runner?" "Yeah, that's it." "Oh. Um. Howw...are you liking it?" "Well, it's keeping me turning the pages." And I was freaking all about this to my friend. Lucky me, there isn't any sex or even kissing. ;D And even if there IS in the second one, it won't matter, because this was his comment to me a week or so later: "Oh, Ellie, I finished The Maze Runner, by the way." (He says "by the way" a lot.) "Oh? How was it?" "It was....grim, gritty, cheerless, joyless, unrelentingly....unrelentingly dark.," he said in a leaden, hopeless tone. (Yes, he actually said that.) So there is pretty much ZIP chance of him reading #2. :D Hoorah! Seeing my dad reading fantasy was just too weird. On another note, I liked it. Except Teresa, who, from her description, reminds me of a vampire. And the fact that my friend, who read it first, claimed Minho. Harumph.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Whitley Birks

    See the chapter x chapter breakdown on my blog As if the simplistic and "tell-y" writing in this book weren't bad enough, we also have to content with some truly atrocious pacing, inconsistent characterization, logic gaps out the wazoo, a Gary Stu of a main character, and an ending that kicks this book up into whole new levels of WTFery. The majority of this book is people jealously withholding information that gets revealed a few chapters later, which makes it painfully obvious that all the not-t See the chapter x chapter breakdown on my blog As if the simplistic and "tell-y" writing in this book weren't bad enough, we also have to content with some truly atrocious pacing, inconsistent characterization, logic gaps out the wazoo, a Gary Stu of a main character, and an ending that kicks this book up into whole new levels of WTFery. The majority of this book is people jealously withholding information that gets revealed a few chapters later, which makes it painfully obvious that all the not-telling going on is just for the sake of dragging things out. The "puzzle" of the maze should have been solved in the first week (or at least, parts of it should), the "monsters" were so easy to beat that I'm still confused as to why the boys didn't kill them all sooner, and Thomas got way too much praise for merely existing. The rest of the cast had to be dumbed down to some truly paint-eating levels in order to make him look good, but the book went ahead and did that. (At one point, Thomas was actually praised for his "brilliant" tactic for getting around the monsters, which consisted of "fake right, dodge left." Toddlers can figure that one out.) And I really have no words for that ending except: no one involved in this project should be allowed anywhere near an environmental debate. Clearly, too many lessons facts about how the planet works need to be re-taught first. To cap off the fail-cake that is this book, we also got the lovely message of "if anyone disagrees with you and gets angry about it, call them insane. Once they're declared insane, it's perfectly okay to ignore every single thing they say, because as we all know, insane people cannot ever say a true thing; they just spout off nonsense 24/7 are are good for absolutely nothing."

  23. 4 out of 5

    Neal Shusterman

    I enjoyed the Maze Runner, but not as much as I wanted to. It was a great concept, and the story was compelling, the characters and plot twists interesting, and there was no limit to Dashner’s creativity. My big problem was that the characters were manipulated by the story, and not the other way around. There were so many times when the characters would have figured things out. They’re supposed to be brilliant kids, and yet they are continually clueless about things that are pretty obvious to th I enjoyed the Maze Runner, but not as much as I wanted to. It was a great concept, and the story was compelling, the characters and plot twists interesting, and there was no limit to Dashner’s creativity. My big problem was that the characters were manipulated by the story, and not the other way around. There were so many times when the characters would have figured things out. They’re supposed to be brilliant kids, and yet they are continually clueless about things that are pretty obvious to the reader. And it’s not like the reader has information they don’t. The only reason the characters don’t figure things out is because the author doesn’t want them to. I think Dashner should have trusted his characters a little more, and let the story flow from them, rather than letting them be constrained by the plot he wanted to maintain.

  24. 5 out of 5

    mark monday

    | oblique spoilers ahead | A is for Apocalypse! A modern craze; a timeless fantasy. What shall bring us to this place? Can there be life after such an event? And if so… what kind of life would that be? B is for Banzai! “Banzai” is a traditional Japanese exclamation meaning “ten thousand years”. A Banzai charge is a last, desperate charge. C is for Cube! “Cube” is a 1997 film by Vincenzo Natali. The characters in this film are trapped in a kind of maze, and must pass from one cube-shaped room to | oblique spoilers ahead | A is for Apocalypse! A modern craze; a timeless fantasy. What shall bring us to this place? Can there be life after such an event? And if so… what kind of life would that be? B is for Banzai! “Banzai” is a traditional Japanese exclamation meaning “ten thousand years”. A Banzai charge is a last, desperate charge. C is for Cube! “Cube” is a 1997 film by Vincenzo Natali. The characters in this film are trapped in a kind of maze, and must pass from one cube-shaped room to another. The characters do not know why they are in this place. They must escape or die. D is for Despair! As Thomas Jefferson once said: “My theory has always been, that if we are to dream, the flatteries of hope are as cheap, and pleasanter, than the gloom of despair.” E is for ESP! Extrasensory Perception involves reception of information not gained through the recognized physical senses but sensed with the mind. ESP includes TELEPATHY! F is for Flare! A solar flare is a sudden brightening observed over the Sun's surface, which is interpreted as a large energy release of up to 6 × 1025 joules of energy. G is for Goethe! Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was a German writer and politician. He believed that “in the totality everything redeems itself and appears good and justified” … but do the means justify the ends when it comes to reaching that redemption? A timeless question! H is for Hybrid! A cross between a giant slug and a killing machine equipped with pincers & needles would be considered a sort of hybrid. Machine-animal hybrids often appear within genres such as science fantasy, steampunk, and the post-apocalyptic young adult adventure novel. I is for IQ! The Intelligence Quotient is a score derived from standardized testing in order to assess intelligence. Some have questioned its use… J is for Janissary! As children, the Janissaries were taken from their parents to become elite soldiers in the Ottoman Empire. They revolted against their masters during the “Auspicious Incident” of 1826. K is for Killing Zone! Strictly speaking, there is no actual “kill zone” in The Maze Runner. But the phrase just really fits. L is for Lord of the Flies! A bunch of boys stranded in a dangerous environment! They revert into savages! Murder and Mayhem and Malice, Oh My! But why was it so hard for them to maintain their own sort of society, to stay civilized? They should have consulted the lads of The Maze Runner! M is for Maze Runner! see A-L & N-Z. N is for No Exit! “No Exit” is an existentialist play by Jean-Paul Sartre. The play is about three deceased characters who are punished by being locked in a room together for eternity. Hell is other people! O is for Ouroboros! It goes around & around & around! P is for Pandemic! A pandemic is an epidemic of infectious disease that has spread through human populations across a large region; for instance multiple continents, or even worldwide. Q is for Quotient! In mathematics, a quotient is the result of division. R is for Runner! “The Runner” is a song by Ian Thomas, covered in 1984 by Manfred Mann’s Earth Band. S is for Survivor! “Survivor” is a ‘reality’ game show created by Mark Burnett. Contestants attempt to outwit, outplay, and outlast each other; the key goal is to not be voted out. T is for Tenacity! I would say that running around in the same maze for two years is pretty damned tenacious. U is for Unanswered Questions! Some readers felt frustration or anger at the end of The Maze Runner – too many questions left unanswered, too abrupt of a cliffhanger. I felt quite a bit of frustration as well, but for the opposite reason: I would have appreciated less questions answered, more ambiguity. I wanted less of a plunge into a rather typical post-apocalyptic adventure and more running about in a maze for reasons unknown. Although I did enjoy the actual cliffhanger. V is for Vendetta! The characters in The Maze Runner use the idea of Vendetta to fight back, to inspire themselves, to fling themselves into the unknown. “V for Vendetta” is a graphic novel by Alan Moore. The movie adaptation of that comic contains this quote: “There are no coincidences, only the illusion of coincidences” … which of course is an approximation of Albert Einstein’s quote: “God does not play dice with the universe” … indeed! But who is this “God” in Maze Runner's universe? W is for Waiting for Godot! “Waiting for Godot” is a play by Samuel Beckett in which two characters wait in vain for a person named Godot. The characters wait for answers that never appear. Beckett, describing his creation: “It is a game, everything is a game”… the game of life? X is for Xbox! The Xbox and its various successors are video game consoles. I trust you can connect the dots here. Y is for Young Adult! I think that many of our classic and modern young adult stories together form the fables of our times. A handful of narratives that are repeated and reshaped, told through hundreds - thousands? - of different books and read by millions of readers. Their prose is usually transparent and their meanings overt. The reader and the protagonist are given clear lessons to learn. But the reader may, in turn, choose to project their own meanings onto these archetypical stories. Z is for Zarathustra! “Thus Spoke Zarathustra” is a philosophical novel by Friedrich Nietzsche. It deals with ideas such as ‘the eternal recurrence of the same’ and the Übermensch, or Overman – a goal in which human life would be given meaning by how it advanced a new generation of humans. | 12 letters taken directly from my best friend Wikipedia. thanks, pal! I truly do love you |

  25. 5 out of 5

    Forrest

    Preamble: I apologize up front about the spoilers in this review. They are hidden, but if you don't want to know some of the spoilers, don't click on them! Fair warning! Review: I read this at the encouragement of one of my kids, who dearly loves this book. So let me state right up front, buddy, I'm glad you loved this book. Now I'm going to express my opinion. Please remember that we're all allowed to have our opinions, even if mine is wrong. Now, I didn't hate The Maze Runner by any means. But Preamble: I apologize up front about the spoilers in this review. They are hidden, but if you don't want to know some of the spoilers, don't click on them! Fair warning! Review: I read this at the encouragement of one of my kids, who dearly loves this book. So let me state right up front, buddy, I'm glad you loved this book. Now I'm going to express my opinion. Please remember that we're all allowed to have our opinions, even if mine is wrong. Now, I didn't hate The Maze Runner by any means. But I didn't love it either. It was . . . likable. Likeable, but not loveable. Perhaps I'm just too jaded to really appreciate YA fiction (though I did love The Amulet of Samarkand. Speaking of which, I really need to reread it and write a review). Maybe I'm getting too old to appreciate YA characters (though I really connected with Ender of Ender's Game). In any case, I think the real problem is that Dashner got some things backwards. I was frankly put off by the blatant foreshadowing or, more appropriately, "backshadowing" that Dashner used like a blunt object to hit readers over the head with information. The (view spoiler)[memory-wipe trick (hide spoiler)] that provides so much of the impetus for the plot could have been carefully employed to maneuver the reader's thoughts and emotions into place for a brilliant ending. But I felt that Dashner used it as a cheap parlor trick. He also misses the opportunity to really make the reader care deeply about (view spoiler)[Thomas and Teresa's (hide spoiler)] relationship, not to mention the relationship between Thomas and Chuck, (view spoiler)[whose death did very little to tug at my emotional heartstrings when I wanted to be ripped apart with grief (hide spoiler)] . Rather than allowing Thomas to love deeply and passionately, which would have endeared readers to him (and others), the (view spoiler)[memory trick (hide spoiler)] got in the way of us getting to know and love him, flattening him out as a character. The plot itself is strange and intriguing. Because this is the first book in a series, I found the ending unsatisfactory. I sort of want to read the next book, since I'd like to understand some of the mysteries, and I want to give Dashner the chance to redeem himself, but time being what it is, I'm not rushing to the bookstore to add the sequel to my TBR pile. I suspect that if you're willing to go the distance, and if you're not an over-educated snob like me, you might love this book. Again, I'm not in love with it, but I'm in like with it. Maybe, some date in the future, if/when I read the sequels, I might bump the star rating up. But for the meantime, The Maze Runner remains stuck in the maze at 3 stars.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Claudia Ramírez

    WHAT DID JUST--- OMG.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ariel

    My experience with this book turned out to be a unique one: for most of the book I was thinking that it had some redeeming ideas but that it just wasn't good enough, but the last third really turned everything around. Let's discuss. I bought this book over a year ago because of the Dystopia craze.. having read so much dystopia though, I wasn't able to pick it up. It's been a while though, and I picked it up at a time where I was excited for it which turned out for the best. I was first stricken wi My experience with this book turned out to be a unique one: for most of the book I was thinking that it had some redeeming ideas but that it just wasn't good enough, but the last third really turned everything around. Let's discuss. I bought this book over a year ago because of the Dystopia craze.. having read so much dystopia though, I wasn't able to pick it up. It's been a while though, and I picked it up at a time where I was excited for it which turned out for the best. I was first stricken with how fascinating the whole world concept for this books is: it's very reminiscent of The Lord of the Flies in that you have a bunch of kids desperate for life but not knowing what to do. I've always enjoyed reading and thinking about how bodies of people govern themselves, and this made an interesting study. Also, of course!, you have this epic arena: a huge maze infested with giant lizard-robot creatures and no seeming escape, it's great! But here lies my problem with this book: you understand the world within the first few pages, you pretty much understand what's going on. Therefore, I expected "Okay, I get it! Cool.. what's going to be the plot in this interesting setting?" .. and you don't find out for 300 pages. SERIOUSLY! Most of this book is the main character, Thomas, asking questions and NEVER getting answers. It was infuriating! I felt all this potential for the story, it honestly has such an exciting prospect, but then you learn nothing further about the world and the plot goes nowhere. A couple of people have told me that this was all necessary information needed for the sequels, and I completely disagree. It's always good to set an over arching idea with details for a series, but that shouldn't take up over 2/3rds of this book! I will not budge on my feelings that this book had a lot of wasted time merely standing around the Glade that should have been cut out to make the story an actual story: I want plot, something to follow! However, and this is where I was so happily surprised, the last hundred or so pages of this book WERE exactly what I wanted (expected). They were completely action packed, very suspenseful, and absolutely thrilling to read. I at first wondered if it would be "too little, too late" but my final verdict is no.. it was so very exciting that although it was close to not being good enough, it definitely brought the whole book up for me. The writing in this book was overall enjoyable: one thing I HAVE to praise is the descriptions... they were never too lengthy or distracting and they always left a clear image in my mind. A lot of the time when action scenes are described in books I'm really confused as to who is kicking who/where someone is running/what is attacking them but this writing really nailed good description. However, I do have to point to the lack of suspensefulness: I could feel that the James Dashner wanted things for the first 2/3rds of this book to feel suspenseful, but instead they felt slow, dragged out, and actually kind of annoying. Overall, it was a tough read for most of the way through, but the ending portion really made up for it. I DEFINITELY want to read the next book, The Scorch Trials, and look forward to seeing where this story progresses.. I'm scared that the slow world building won't be eradicated though because we are completely changing arena's, but we will see! I have my fingers crossed! At least I know to push through the slowness because I'll probably have an exciting ending waiting for me! Note on the epilogue: IT WAS PERFECTION. I really appreciate when an author ties of a book well, especially when it's part of a series: I don't want to be left completely hanging having no closure at the end of a book. This book did sum up really well though, it had a conclusion, this chapter ended. The epilogue gave the perfect twist though, absolutely unexpected and brilliant.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    Okay so I saw the movie when it came to dvd and I loved it, but here is the faces I got when I said I hadn't read the book yet ↓ I know right? I loved the book. I will say I watched the second movie and didn't like it but I'm going to keep on with the books and see. Welcome To The Maze! Imagine, if you will, you wake up in some elevator thing and you have no idea what is going on or your past. You just end up in some place with a bunch of dudes that are calling you greenie until the next person c Okay so I saw the movie when it came to dvd and I loved it, but here is the faces I got when I said I hadn't read the book yet ↓ I know right? I loved the book. I will say I watched the second movie and didn't like it but I'm going to keep on with the books and see. Welcome To The Maze! Imagine, if you will, you wake up in some elevator thing and you have no idea what is going on or your past. You just end up in some place with a bunch of dudes that are calling you greenie until the next person comes up out of the ground. This is how Thomas came into this world. It would suck arse! But Thomas keeps getting vague thoughts and memories of people places and things. Not memories per se, more like feelings that he has been there before. I loved so many of these boys and Teresa when she gets there. <--- part of that sentence didn't sound right, but I digress. There seems to be one main jerk of the group and his name is Gally. He tries to cause a lot of trouble for Thomas and he does do something I will never forgive him for in the end. I will cut him down! Anyway, so they have this little farming structure set up. Everyone has jobs like the crop keeper, or the cook, or the butcher, or runner and etc and so on. At one point they bumped Thomas up as a runner because he saved some peeps and stuff. But you know I can tell you that I would be changing my mind after dealing with all of the crazy stuff in the maze. You have to run through and try to find new ways to get out and not get eaten. Here are two examples why I would not want to be a runner. ↓ But you have to do what you have to do I guess. And then some bad stuff happens and the whole group have to get out. Get out now! Some more good and bad stuff happen and they end up finding the CREATORS, or JERKS in my opinion, and they are taken off to go on another mission of sorts. Either way this book and movie was so amazing. Even if I don't like the rest of the series, I will always have THE MAZE RUNNER ♥ MY BLOG: Melissa Martin's Reading List

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sana

    I DNF this like 5 pages in. No joke fams

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rusty Grey

    4.5 stars BECAUSE IT ALL STARTED DUE TO THIS ONE . I was never much of a reader as a child . The thought of wasting my precious free time , by reading a book , which I may or may not like , was simply appalling for my childish mind. And while I was in middle grade I was pretty busy with cricket and football. So I never even gave a thought to reading till a friend suggested me 'The Maze Runner' in 9th grade. I am really glad he did. Yeah . This will always be my first read. And I loved it . A gu 4.5 stars BECAUSE IT ALL STARTED DUE TO THIS ONE . I was never much of a reader as a child . The thought of wasting my precious free time , by reading a book , which I may or may not like , was simply appalling for my childish mind. And while I was in middle grade I was pretty busy with cricket and football. So I never even gave a thought to reading till a friend suggested me 'The Maze Runner' in 9th grade. I am really glad he did. Yeah . This will always be my first read. And I loved it . A guy with no memory of his past , who is sent in a prisonesque glade, which is surrounded by a maze, to live with a group of teenagers . How could I not love that ? Dashner's novel has almost all the essential elements of a brilliant young adult novel . It has an interesting protagonist like, our Thomas . Then the supporting characters are important (especially Newt , Chuck and Minho) . There are some cute , vicious monsters (like grievers). A good dystopia theory. Some fast paced writing and adventure . Everything in this novel is remarkable . And only because of it did I start reading other novels (especially YA and dystopia).

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