Hot Best Seller

Red Knife PDF, ePub eBook

4.6 out of 5
30 review

Red Knife

Availability: Ready to download

File Name: Red Knife .pdf

How it works:

1. Register a free 1 month Trial Account.

2. Download as many books as you like (Personal use)

3. Cancel the membership at any time if not satisfied.


Red Knife PDF, ePub eBook When the daughter of a powerful businessman dies as a result of her meth addiction, her father, strong-willed and brutal Buck Reinhardt, vows revenge. His target is the Red Boyz, a gang of Ojibwe youths accused of supplying the girl's fatal drug dose. When the head of the Red Boyz and his wife are murdered in a way that suggests execution, the Ojibwe gang mobilizes, and th When the daughter of a powerful businessman dies as a result of her meth addiction, her father, strong-willed and brutal Buck Reinhardt, vows revenge. His target is the Red Boyz, a gang of Ojibwe youths accused of supplying the girl's fatal drug dose. When the head of the Red Boyz and his wife are murdered in a way that suggests execution, the Ojibwe gang mobilizes, and the citizens of Tamarack County brace themselves for war, white against red. Both sides look to Cork O'Connor, a man of mixed heritage, to uncover the truth behind the murders. A former sheriff, Cork has lived, fought, and nearly died to keep the small-town streets and his family safe from harm. He knows that violence is never a virtue, but he believes that it's sometimes a necessary response to the evil that men do. Racing to find answers before the bloodshed spreads, Cork himself becomes involved in the darkest of deeds. As the unspeakable unfolds in the remote and beautiful place he calls home, Cork is forced to confront the horrific truth: Violence is a beast that cannot be contained.

30 review for Red Knife

  1. 4 out of 5

    Phrynne

    Another great episode in this excellent series. Cork involves himself again in police work, although this time he is encouraged by the Sheriff to do so, and he finds himself in conflict between his native Indian and his white cultures. As in the last book there is a lot about Cork's family. This time it is Annie's turn to take centre stage and I enjoyed her story very much. Again Jo and Cork manage to rise above their disagreements and life is good. I was blown away by the ending. I had no idea at Another great episode in this excellent series. Cork involves himself again in police work, although this time he is encouraged by the Sheriff to do so, and he finds himself in conflict between his native Indian and his white cultures. As in the last book there is a lot about Cork's family. This time it is Annie's turn to take centre stage and I enjoyed her story very much. Again Jo and Cork manage to rise above their disagreements and life is good. I was blown away by the ending. I had no idea at all that that was coming. It was shocking but amazing and left me thinking this has to be five stars. William Kent Krueger really knows how to write a good book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jonetta

    Racial tensions reach dangerous levels in Tamarack County when the daughter of a prominent (and volatile) businessman dies while under the influence of meth, supposedly provided to her by a member of Red Boyz, an Ojibwe gang. When the gang's leader, who has protected the man responsible for dealing the drug, is executed along with his wife. Cork O'Connor finds himself thrust in the middle of all sides (including law enforcement) as they look to him to take a side and bring some kind of resolutio Racial tensions reach dangerous levels in Tamarack County when the daughter of a prominent (and volatile) businessman dies while under the influence of meth, supposedly provided to her by a member of Red Boyz, an Ojibwe gang. When the gang's leader, who has protected the man responsible for dealing the drug, is executed along with his wife. Cork O'Connor finds himself thrust in the middle of all sides (including law enforcement) as they look to him to take a side and bring some kind of resolution even though he's no longer the sheriff. There are so many angles in this story I needed to keep cheat sheets to remember all the potential motives. Conflicts abound within and outside of the various groups, and I mean all of them. Cork's reactions were sometimes curious but mostly in character and putting his family first. His daughter Annie has an important role in this story with a poignant ending that almost brought me to tears. To say this story has complicated edges is an understatement. Family ties, those biological, emotional and otherwise, is a strong and prominent theme throughout. The ending is pretty shocking, one I should have seen coming but didn't despite Henry Meloux's prescient warnings. I had a tough time putting this one down, finishing in a day. It was narrated by Buck Schirner who does well except for the female voices but I'm a David Chandler fan and missed him. Good story, though, when you dig beneath the surface.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    Unputdownable addition to the series. Each time I think I have a favourite book in this series, the next book blows me away. Another five star read. What lengths will a person go to in order to do what they believe is right? This is a question Cork O'Connor faces over the course of the book. If you aren't reading the Cork O'Connor series, it's well worth making the time to try the first book in the series Iron Lake.

  4. 4 out of 5

    J.K. Grice

    This was my first William Kent Krueger novel, and it won't be my last. Mystery series are a dime a dozen, but Krueger is a way above average writer, in any genre. He does a superb job of drawing the reader into each one of Cork O'Connor's cases. For me personally, I love the northern Minnesota outdoor locations, as well as the Native American and natural environment connections. You couldn't ask for a more solid mystery series.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    It's always good to connect with Cork O'Connor. William Krueger is such a good storyteller. I enjoy his writing and the characters he creates. This was another good mystery. The O'Connor family figures more in this book and the story line. It's especially interesting to see, Annie, the daughter grow and develop. I'm glad there are more of this series to enjoy.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    This is the eighth book in the series. If you look through the previous seven, you'll see three and four star ratings. This one almost got two stars. I found it less interesting than the others. It's based on vengeance/vigilante type thinking. Having said that, the ending was different from the others, and appealing. There is a secondary story that surfaces at the end, that I have mixed feelings as to its inclusion, but the way it is written (stylization) I found very interesting/compelling. He add This is the eighth book in the series. If you look through the previous seven, you'll see three and four star ratings. This one almost got two stars. I found it less interesting than the others. It's based on vengeance/vigilante type thinking. Having said that, the ending was different from the others, and appealing. There is a secondary story that surfaces at the end, that I have mixed feelings as to its inclusion, but the way it is written (stylization) I found very interesting/compelling. He added a time frame shift that he'd never done before. Also well written. Then he adds a coda in the last chapter that is very poignant. As a father, anyway, the very last sentence of the book, expressed figuratively, was very effective.

  7. 5 out of 5

    William

    Giant cliché. Sadly, Krueger has become a clown.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Lattimore

    I thought part of this book was OK. The Latin Lords stuff felt like a stretch as an outcome. The very contrived massacre to make what I felt was a political statement didn't tie in to the rest of the book. I really disliked that being strapped on. All in all not a great book and definitely the worst of the series so far.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    There is a lot happening in this book, much of it dire and depressing. I understand the vigilantism of the Ojibwa and Whites in the story perhaps because I live in an area with that tension. The ending surprised me. There are changes coming. Although some of the future has been revealed, there is a feeling of dread in my heart.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ronna

    "The LORD is slow to anger, abounding in love and forgiving sin and rebellion. Yet he does not leave the guilty unpunished; he punishes the children for the sin of the parents to the third and fourth generation." (Numbers 14:18) In Krueger's 8th Cork O'Connor novel, many issues cause much violence a small town in Minnesota. Conflicts between the Ojibwe Indians and the white population bring Cork into the conflict even though he is no longer sheriff. Though Cork has promised his family to stay ou "The LORD is slow to anger, abounding in love and forgiving sin and rebellion. Yet he does not leave the guilty unpunished; he punishes the children for the sin of the parents to the third and fourth generation." (Numbers 14:18) In Krueger's 8th Cork O'Connor novel, many issues cause much violence a small town in Minnesota. Conflicts between the Ojibwe Indians and the white population bring Cork into the conflict even though he is no longer sheriff. Though Cork has promised his family to stay out of these situations, someone shooting at him and his 7 year old son, brings him into the middle of everything. Different groups amongst the Ojibwe are in conflict, the whites and Ojibwe don't always trust each other, drugs cause death and violence, revenge causes quick deadly violence, and bulling and neglect causes unspeakable tragedy. Can violence really stop further violence? I continue to find these Cork O'Conner novels more than just entertaining. They are atmospheric, with flawed but honest characters, that also deal with difficult moral and ethical community and personal issues. Love it when a book is good reading, but also makes me think! I listened to this on Audible and really enjoyed the narrator.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Erik

    I am not going to go into a plot synopsis, you can read plenty of those elsewhere. One of my least favorite of the series so far. I thought the show-down with the Latin Lords was a bit on the ridculous side, and I also felt that Cork would never make the decision to stand with "The People" when they were deciding to do what they did. There were a lot of little sub-plots in this book and I thought that was how Kruger hid the truth rather than a good standalone mystery. Hopefully that makes sense.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Linda Branich

    I have read several of Krueger's Cork O'Connor series, and one other stand alone work, and this one surprised me. It is my least favorite; not bad, but not great. This booktook involves drugs, gangs, secrets, prejudice, and murder. Once again, Cork finds himself too Indian for the whites, and too white for the Indians, which is a perpetual problem for Cork. At one point, Cork finds himself in a position where he must choose between the two branches of his heritage. I cannot exactly pinpoint why t I have read several of Krueger's Cork O'Connor series, and one other stand alone work, and this one surprised me. It is my least favorite; not bad, but not great. This booktook involves drugs, gangs, secrets, prejudice, and murder. Once again, Cork finds himself too Indian for the whites, and too white for the Indians, which is a perpetual problem for Cork. At one point, Cork finds himself in a position where he must choose between the two branches of his heritage. I cannot exactly pinpoint why this particular book left me a bit cold. As I said, good, but not great.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    This is Krueger’s 8th novel in the Cork O’Connor murder/mystery series. Here we have the death of teenager due to her meth addiction. Her father vows revenge upon the Red Boyz, a gang of Ojibwe youths accused of supplying the fatal drug dose. Next, the leader of the Red Boyz and his wife are murdered, and the body count just keeps rising. The theme of vengeance and vigilante justice will be disturbing to readers who believe in the rule of law. Pass.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jo

    I have no words for this ending. Paraphrasing here but, WKK profoundly says that tragedies are only tragedies to the survivors. To everyone else they are history. Wow!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Carl Brookins

    So readers know, Mr. Krueger and I are very well-acquainted. This is his eighth entry in a powerful award-winning series about Corcoran O’Conner, family man, ex-sheriff, sometime private investigator, and an upright and very moral man. O’Connor’s life is complicated by his staunch roots in both Native American and Caucasian ethnicity. His life is also complicated by his two daughters, a son, and his feisty, bright and somewhat uptight wife, Jo. Their communication at times seems as obtuse as bet So readers know, Mr. Krueger and I are very well-acquainted. This is his eighth entry in a powerful award-winning series about Corcoran O’Conner, family man, ex-sheriff, sometime private investigator, and an upright and very moral man. O’Connor’s life is complicated by his staunch roots in both Native American and Caucasian ethnicity. His life is also complicated by his two daughters, a son, and his feisty, bright and somewhat uptight wife, Jo. Their communication at times seems as obtuse as between strangers from different worlds. There are times in this story when this reader would like to reach out and kick O’Connor in his well-shaped backside. Krueger has carefully shaped each episode in this long family saga to explore significant and troubling aspects of our modern society. Red Knife is no different. It begins with a significant and violent episode in the life of a young Ojibwa boy. The story then commences to explore in some detail the influences of violence in our society. The genius of this storyteller, aside from his consummate storytelling skills is that he is careful to avoid sweeping polemical statements. The novel examines some of the causes of violence in intimate and personal ways. Then it goes beyond the acts themselves, almost always leaving to reader to sort out her or his own reactions to the violence. Red Knife commences to also explore how violence can affect individuals not directly engaged in the violence itself; family members, friends and even enemies, members of the law enforcement community, and those on the periphery. And always there is that layer of intimate struggle for understanding and connection between Jo and Cork O’Connor. I don’t wish to suggest this is a heavily violent novel. It is not. It is, rather, a smoothly written, carefully plotted and laid out examination of an intimate group of individuals, some of whom are family members, some not, and their responses to the violence they experience and observe. Krueger has produced a thoughtful, richly textured human novel, one that most readers, I suspect, will remember and think about long after they close the book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Vastine Bondurant

    I'm hooked on the Cork O'Connor series. Absolutely hooked. But this contribution? So far removed from Krueger's usual powerful fare. I found it extremely contradictory and---well---hypocritical for O'Connor to participate in a highly over-dramatized scene (the showdown with the Latinos)(view spoiler)[the good guys literally ambush the bad guys and blow them away without there being a chance for a true fight, and then for O'Connor to even point-blank kill off one of the Latino members by shooting I'm hooked on the Cork O'Connor series. Absolutely hooked. But this contribution? So far removed from Krueger's usual powerful fare. I found it extremely contradictory and---well---hypocritical for O'Connor to participate in a highly over-dramatized scene (the showdown with the Latinos)(view spoiler)[the good guys literally ambush the bad guys and blow them away without there being a chance for a true fight, and then for O'Connor to even point-blank kill off one of the Latino members by shooting an additional bullet into the already-fallen man's head (hide spoiler)] and then make an about-face at the end and give a lengthy (and extremely unnecessary) political diatribe about gun control (complete with statistics). And, to top that off in this novel that seemed to be full of cheap tricks to try and stun the reader. The contrived (as another reader referred to it) ending masquerading as a 'taut' rendition of the Columbine tragedy. Complete with the long black coat and Goth teen. For some reason, I found this addition (which added NOTHING to the story) to be an insult to the actual tragic incident. And...oh, if this all weirdness wasn't bad enough...the author continued on to sort of give a universal spoiler to the rest of the series. What the girls would be doing and how (Annie in particular) would spend the rest of her life. It was almost as if (I wondered) the author had not planned to continue the series and was attempting to wrap up the whole shebang. I truly loved some of the supporting characters. Will and Luci! Boy, oh, boy, would I love to know more about them. Will was very complex and I DID appreciate the author's thoughtful and very insightful handling of a subject seldom approached in mainstream fiction: sexual domination, S & M. All that being said, I love the author's work and this strange side-step from his better works won't stop me from reading the rest of the series.

  17. 4 out of 5

    S.D.

    Cork O'Connor is no longer a cop but still gets involved in cases. Since he is part Ojibwe he is able to ease the friction between the races. This time it explodes when a teenager dies from a drug overdose and her father blames the gang from the Ojibwe Reservation. I especially like Henry Meloux, an elderly member of the Grand Medicine Society, who spews words of wisdom which need an interpreter to decipher. This time he sees a darkness. And the prediction comes true in an explosive ending that Cork O'Connor is no longer a cop but still gets involved in cases. Since he is part Ojibwe he is able to ease the friction between the races. This time it explodes when a teenager dies from a drug overdose and her father blames the gang from the Ojibwe Reservation. I especially like Henry Meloux, an elderly member of the Grand Medicine Society, who spews words of wisdom which need an interpreter to decipher. This time he sees a darkness. And the prediction comes true in an explosive ending that I never saw coming. Kent Krueger has a great sense of place and is one of the most under-appreciated authors today. It's a toss up as to whether Red Knife or I Shall Not Want (Julia Spencer-Fleming) is my best read of the year.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Keely

    William Kent Krueger’s "Red Knife" is set in Minnesota on and near an Ojibwe Indian reservation. The central character is Cork O’Connor, a prior sheriff and current private investigator who is part Ojibwe. The plot revolves around the drug-related death of a local white girl, and the Indian gang suspected of hiding the man responsible for selling her meth. Krueger obviously knows his subject well, but this crime thriller suffers from occasional syrupy lapses into the realm of morality tale, some William Kent Krueger’s "Red Knife" is set in Minnesota on and near an Ojibwe Indian reservation. The central character is Cork O’Connor, a prior sheriff and current private investigator who is part Ojibwe. The plot revolves around the drug-related death of a local white girl, and the Indian gang suspected of hiding the man responsible for selling her meth. Krueger obviously knows his subject well, but this crime thriller suffers from occasional syrupy lapses into the realm of morality tale, something that the storyline itself seems ill-equipped to handle. Philosophical and melodramatic musings aside, this is a murder mystery peppered with rather cheap thrills, nothing more. Entertaining enough, but hardly the soul-searching look at human violence that it purports to be.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Pat

    Kent Kueger's work has always had a friendly, down home quality to it. Cork O'Connor is decent, do-the-right-thing-even-when-no one-is-watching values.In Red Knife he no longer sheriffbut is called on to head off a brewing civil war within the Ojibwe tribe. As always, Krueger's descriptions of Cork's family life, his devotion to finding peacful answers to violent questions, his internal toughness are fascinating as they depict a man who is examining himself as he investigates others. Krueger als Kent Kueger's work has always had a friendly, down home quality to it. Cork O'Connor is decent, do-the-right-thing-even-when-no one-is-watching values.In Red Knife he no longer sheriffbut is called on to head off a brewing civil war within the Ojibwe tribe. As always, Krueger's descriptions of Cork's family life, his devotion to finding peacful answers to violent questions, his internal toughness are fascinating as they depict a man who is examining himself as he investigates others. Krueger also takes secondary characters and brings them to life, giving them a vibrancy that makes them human, flawed and sympathetic. The plot of Red Knife keeps you guessing throughout the book until the end. The story evolves in places you don't expect. With a very touching ending.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    People who like Tony Hillerman particularly for the setting in Navajo country may enjoy Krueger's Cork O'Connor mysteries. The book is set in Northern Minnesota. The Ojibwe play a role in each of these mysteries that I have read. I thought I had the various killings figured out early on, but was fooled repeatedly. The ending to one of the stories that runs through the book is tragic. I prefer more "happy ever after" or "riding into the sunset" to something as realistic and grim as the ending. I People who like Tony Hillerman particularly for the setting in Navajo country may enjoy Krueger's Cork O'Connor mysteries. The book is set in Northern Minnesota. The Ojibwe play a role in each of these mysteries that I have read. I thought I had the various killings figured out early on, but was fooled repeatedly. The ending to one of the stories that runs through the book is tragic. I prefer more "happy ever after" or "riding into the sunset" to something as realistic and grim as the ending. I would recommend this book if you are looking for a good mystery that will keep you interested until the end.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Eadie

    The Cork O'Connor mysteries are always consistently very good. But, this one seems the best so far. There are lots of twists and the book was very hard to put down. The plot was well-structured and the story was told well. I highly recommend this series but they should be read in order as the stories build one upon the other.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jane Brant

    I did not like this book as well as I did "Iron Lake" because of the makeshift gang motif and staged Columbine type ending. The plot fell flat in places. You can read a lot of the other reviews and basically find out what worked and what didn't. But I will still continue reading his books....but won't recommend this one to friends as a place to begin tasting this author's work.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kris - My Novelesque Life

    RATING: 4 STARS (Not Reviewed on Blog) Listened to on audio Racial and cultural tensions are at a high in this novel, especially with the violence that it brings. Cork - being mixed in both finds himself at odds with both sides. This novel was high action, suspense and emotions. I find myself really getting swept up with the characters' emotions.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    When I see what's coming and the book's protagonists aren't privy to all the details and foreshadowing, it's a disappointing book for me. Tough book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    An unrealistic plot. An abundance of dysfunctional characters. Actions from beginning to end that simply would not happen, from the initial disappearance of a young man by tribe-pressured suicide, to the sniper attacks on innocents in misguided vigilante justice, to an almost ridiculous final confrontration with drug warlords who will now stay away from the reserve...or not. Secrecy and loyalty on the reserve that are above the law and keep the law looking for murderers who have already been dea An unrealistic plot. An abundance of dysfunctional characters. Actions from beginning to end that simply would not happen, from the initial disappearance of a young man by tribe-pressured suicide, to the sniper attacks on innocents in misguided vigilante justice, to an almost ridiculous final confrontration with drug warlords who will now stay away from the reserve...or not. Secrecy and loyalty on the reserve that are above the law and keep the law looking for murderers who have already been dealt a unique form of their own "justice" on the reserve. And a final ending of a school massacre unrelated to the major plot, as if the author just wanted to fill pages. Undertones that subtlely attempt to endorse SM as a "therapy". Overdrinking, adultery, rebellion against authority, illogical thinking and lack of impulse control, unhappy marriages and families, inconsistency and confusion... it was almost depressing reading this novel. True, a good book makes imagination seem real. But this was too much. An argument against killing and a man who eventually gets rid of his guns and is tired of killing, yet in the novel, a school is saved by a person who kills the killer, the reserve is supposedly saved from drugs by an ambush and deceit, and people use guns to defend themselves against the fear of unknown killers. No consistency in characters. I am amazed that this book and series have had so many positive reviews. Perhaps it is just not my style of book. But when a novel occurs in our time period and our geographical area, I expect the plot and characters to be realistic. I also think, and I am hesitant to say this, that some people might find this book offensive to native American cultures. Others might find it complimentary. I personally do not think it is a realistic representation of native American reserve life and behavior. This is simply my opinion, but if I were a native American, I think I would be insulted by some of the representations in this book. And those native Americans who wish to restore their old cultural paths to the younger generation can do it but I don't think they would do it in the ways represented in this novel. Of course, it is always a goal to bring the older and younger generations together in any culture. You will need to read the many highly positive reviews to get a balanced viewpoint of this book. I am not insulting those who enjoyed this book. Some people like shrimp; others like steak. I don't like shrimp... that doesn't mean that there is anything wrong with shrimp. I just don't like it and don't eat it and have stopped trying it. I have eaten it in expensive restaurants in Paris and fresh from the ocean in Seattle. Some of the best shrimp in the world. But I don't like it. Excellent chefs, excellent recipes. But they still couldn't get me to like shrimp. Personal preference. But I don't criticize people who enjoy shrimp. Same with this book and series. You might enjoy this book.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Hagen

    Red Knife, by William Kent Krueger. A. narrated by Buck Schirner, produced by Brilliance Audio, downloaded from audible.com. This is the latest in the Cork O’Connor series, a man with mixed heritage, White and American Indian, who lives in a small town, Aurora, Minnesota. A White girl dies of a meth overdose. Her father blames The Red Boys, (a young gang of American Indians) for getting her hooked on meth. Cork is asked by the head of the Red Knives to arrange a meeting between him and the girl’s Red Knife, by William Kent Krueger. A. narrated by Buck Schirner, produced by Brilliance Audio, downloaded from audible.com. This is the latest in the Cork O’Connor series, a man with mixed heritage, White and American Indian, who lives in a small town, Aurora, Minnesota. A White girl dies of a meth overdose. Her father blames The Red Boys, (a young gang of American Indians) for getting her hooked on meth. Cork is asked by the head of the Red Knives to arrange a meeting between him and the girl’s father. Everyone knows who was responsible for the girl’s addiction and for her death, and for some extremely humiliating pornographic pictures of her, and people are very angry that the head of the gang is protecting the man involved. But the same night that Cork talks to the man, and after not finding the father, he finds out that the Indian and his wife were killed execution style leaving their very young infant alive and abandoned. People believe of course that the father had the couple killed, even though no one can really see them being that brutal. But Cork believes there are drug cartels involved. He brings the White sheriff and deputies and the elders of the Ojibwe tribe together to solve this problem before more people get killed. But, unknown to Cork, one of the boys who goes to school with his daughter, Annie, is getting ready to stage a school shooting. This is an excellent book drawing somewhat on a school shooting that did occur here in Minnesota a few years ago on the Red Lake reservation. The lesson seems to be that violence begets violence. It is possible that this is the last Cork O’Connor book. Krueger certainly finished at a point where the series could be concluded. One of the best books I’ve read this year and up for an Edgar award.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    William Kent Krueger writes the best mystery novels that I’ve read in a long time. My Mother-in-Law loaned me Thunder Bay, which I loved and now Red Knife. Both novels are about former sheriff, now private investigator Cork O’Conner. Cork lives in the remote Northern Minnesota community of Aurora. Aurora is located on Iron Lake and close to an Ojibwa reservation. A new gang called the Red Boyz has formed on the reservation and rumor is that they are running drugs. After a girl dies as a result of William Kent Krueger writes the best mystery novels that I’ve read in a long time. My Mother-in-Law loaned me Thunder Bay, which I loved and now Red Knife. Both novels are about former sheriff, now private investigator Cork O’Conner. Cork lives in the remote Northern Minnesota community of Aurora. Aurora is located on Iron Lake and close to an Ojibwa reservation. A new gang called the Red Boyz has formed on the reservation and rumor is that they are running drugs. After a girl dies as a result of crystal meth, her father vows revenge. When the leader of the Red Boyz and his wife are found murdered, Cork has to use all of his power to prevent an all out war between the Ojibwa and the whites. I really enjoyed this novel. It was action packed all of the way until the end. The multiple storylines and mysteries kept me guessing until the last page. The characters and great setting were my favorite parts of the novel. The characters were well rounded individuals that I could imagine meeting, especially in a small northern community. I lived for six years in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula and now live in Northeast Wisconsin. Although I am not from Northern Minnesota, I loved the remote and beautiful setting. It reminded me a lot of my days in “da” U.P. I have not read all of the Cork O’Conner novels, but I found it easy to pick up without having read the entire series. That being said, I still want to go back and read the ones I haven’t read yet! I highly recommend this novel to all lovers of a good mystery, an action packed story, or live in a small Northern town.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Brent Soderstrum

    This is the 8th installment of Krueger's Cork O'Conner series. Where Kent comes up with his ideas is a question that I would love to hear the answer to. This installment is another in which I just couldn't put it down because I wanted to find out what had happened. Then when I reached what I thought was a satisfying ending Krueger had something else in store in the last couple of chapters which started out as very tangential and ended up being something very big. Kind of like events like that re This is the 8th installment of Krueger's Cork O'Conner series. Where Kent comes up with his ideas is a question that I would love to hear the answer to. This installment is another in which I just couldn't put it down because I wanted to find out what had happened. Then when I reached what I thought was a satisfying ending Krueger had something else in store in the last couple of chapters which started out as very tangential and ended up being something very big. Kind of like events like that really happen. Things that just make you shake your head. Enough of that because I don't want to ruin the feeling the ending generated in me for you. Most of the book deals with racial relations in Aurora, Minnesota. A white girl dies from a meth overdose. She obtained the meth from a young Indian boy who is rumored to be a member of the Indian Redboyz gang. The leader of the Redboyz and his wife are then executed and everyone thinks the party responsible is the girl's father. The father is then shot and killed. The community is ready to go to battle. Cork to the rescue. Being part Ojibwe and part Irish Cork is accepted by both sides but embraced by neither. As with all of Krueger's books, this one is full of twists and turns which I adore. I also enjoyed the ending which will leave you shaking your head. Based up on other reviews, I might be in the minority on that.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    Change is so slow in coming. When we were young we planted the seeds of change is everything common today. In this novel Cork O'Connor is gradually dragged into a potential racial problem between the Ojibwe and the other races in Northern Minnesota when a wealthy man of that area has his daughter killed and her death is centered around drug use and the fall from a cliff. There is a organization within the younger natives the whites believe to be responsible. Shortly after that the leader of the Change is so slow in coming. When we were young we planted the seeds of change is everything common today. In this novel Cork O'Connor is gradually dragged into a potential racial problem between the Ojibwe and the other races in Northern Minnesota when a wealthy man of that area has his daughter killed and her death is centered around drug use and the fall from a cliff. There is a organization within the younger natives the whites believe to be responsible. Shortly after that the leader of the Ojibwe natives is murdered along with his wife. Because Cork has both Ojibwe and white mans blood he is accepted by both sides and as a private investigator becomes employed to help the local police solve this series of crimes before it becomes a race war. This is a very exciting book with every phase of crime and social conflict one can imagine yet as they happen they seen new and original. Also experience the ending that has many parts and makes you think of all those events that are happening yet today and we could be experiencing. Krueger doesn't allow his stories to get one dimensional or brittle, like life itself everyday we experience and read of bad and good things occurring, and we live through the same, and every problem is new, the old may never go away, the new may be gone instantly. His novels have several endings while new problems are cropping up.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey

    The story was interesting, up to a point. Not as engaging as the author's previous books in this series. I'm hoping as I continue this series, they do get better. Also, I'm not sure what is happening with the increase of gun control comments throughout the books, but it was ironic that at the end (SPOILER) at the school, a good guy with a gun stopped a bad guy with a gun (shocker...). It infuriated me that Cork decided to just give away all his guns after that happened. Especially as a retired c The story was interesting, up to a point. Not as engaging as the author's previous books in this series. I'm hoping as I continue this series, they do get better. Also, I'm not sure what is happening with the increase of gun control comments throughout the books, but it was ironic that at the end (SPOILER) at the school, a good guy with a gun stopped a bad guy with a gun (shocker...). It infuriated me that Cork decided to just give away all his guns after that happened. Especially as a retired cop, it absolutely made no freaking sense for the character to do that. The author is clearly uneducated in terms of the use of guns. I will continue this series solely for the fact that the author writes good stories but I do not appreciate him bringing his politics into it.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.