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Hiding in Hip Hop: On the Down Low in the Entertainment Industry--From Music to Hollywood PDF, ePub eBook

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Hiding in Hip Hop: On the Down Low in the Entertainment Industry--From Music to Hollywood

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Hiding in Hip Hop: On the Down Low in the Entertainment Industry--From Music to Hollywood PDF, ePub eBook Entertainment industry insider Terrance Dean takes a personal, provocative look at stardom and sexuality, through his own experiences of life on the down low.

30 review for Hiding in Hip Hop: On the Down Low in the Entertainment Industry--From Music to Hollywood

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lani

    I tore through this book, but more to get it off of my shelf than anything else. I don't really understand why a man who spends an entire book talking about how secretive his lifestyle is and how coming out would disrupt everything he and his 'down low brothers' are doing would then write a trashy expose slyly outing homosexuals in the entertainment industry. The only aspect of the book that I found interesting was the (shallow) analysis of the black community's ways of addressing sexual topics l I tore through this book, but more to get it off of my shelf than anything else. I don't really understand why a man who spends an entire book talking about how secretive his lifestyle is and how coming out would disrupt everything he and his 'down low brothers' are doing would then write a trashy expose slyly outing homosexuals in the entertainment industry. The only aspect of the book that I found interesting was the (shallow) analysis of the black community's ways of addressing sexual topics like homosexuality and AIDS. The book is poorly written, though this could just be a way to read authentically to a hiphop audience. Sex scenes and descriptions of men and women are endlessly repetitive, and I got sick of hearing about how completely desirable Terrance is to every man he meets. Please learn some adjectives other than fine, golden-skinned, and bodacious. Not really worth the read unless you're up on the hiphop community and can actually identify all the folks who were awkwardly half-outed by the book. I'm not, and so couldn't even get that much out of it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nikhil P. Freeman

    If you want to write a memoir, write a memoir. If you want to write a salacious tell-all book, then do it. However, do not try to mix the two, because when you do it fails miserably. The blind item parts were an absolute mess. His life story was interesting, but I did not like how homosexuality was equated with molestation. Little gay boys and gay girls unfortunately are raped every day. The last thing that needs to happen is that when they find their voices and come of age is for some uninformed If you want to write a memoir, write a memoir. If you want to write a salacious tell-all book, then do it. However, do not try to mix the two, because when you do it fails miserably. The blind item parts were an absolute mess. His life story was interesting, but I did not like how homosexuality was equated with molestation. Little gay boys and gay girls unfortunately are raped every day. The last thing that needs to happen is that when they find their voices and come of age is for some uninformed adult to say that a rape formed their sexuality.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Cate

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Yikes. I know reading it concurrently with James Baldwin was going to doom it anyhow, but this is abysmally written. Nonetheless, I kept reading because I wanted to see how the story ends -- I wanted to see how he unshackled himself from this self-hatred, and got on the path to acceptance. When the book ended, I did a serious "What the f***?!" SPOILER ALERT, I guess, but he doesn't even end up 100% accepting himself. He admits that he's gay, but he is still mostly closeted (out to a few family m Yikes. I know reading it concurrently with James Baldwin was going to doom it anyhow, but this is abysmally written. Nonetheless, I kept reading because I wanted to see how the story ends -- I wanted to see how he unshackled himself from this self-hatred, and got on the path to acceptance. When the book ended, I did a serious "What the f***?!" SPOILER ALERT, I guess, but he doesn't even end up 100% accepting himself. He admits that he's gay, but he is still mostly closeted (out to a few family members and may admit it if you ask him directly). I found myself wondering how and why he wrote this book. You see, writing a book where you completely expose yourself should be cathartic. At the end, there should be some relief. There was none, just another down-low hook-up. Goodness, and the writing was so bad, the sex scenes weren't even hot. I really wanted to like this book, but I seriously did not.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bruh

    If you hope, by reading this, you will find out the "scoop", on who is and is not SGL, in the entertainment industry, you might be slightly disappointed. What he reveals is so cryptic, that it may puzzle you further, than confirm those you may already suspect. Even when he speaks about someone, and you go, "Aha!", he later says something else about the person, that makes you think, "Well, ok, that couldn't have been Missy Elliott then...". Also, I might add, I sort of doubt all these already established If you hope, by reading this, you will find out the "scoop", on who is and is not SGL, in the entertainment industry, you might be slightly disappointed. What he reveals is so cryptic, that it may puzzle you further, than confirm those you may already suspect. Even when he speaks about someone, and you go, "Aha!", he later says something else about the person, that makes you think, "Well, ok, that couldn't have been Missy Elliott then...". Also, I might add, I sort of doubt all these already established superstars were just jumping to get off in his drawz. Terrance, you're an attractive Brotha, but c'mon now! LOL! In my opinion, what makes this a good read, is how he tells of his beginnings, his interpersonal relationships inside his family, and out, and how he got started in the industry, and the resulting experiences he had. I enjoyed this book because of that. If any celebs, Hip Hop or not, were worried about being outed, their fears were unfounded. Still, this book is worthy.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bookworm

    Journey to accpeting oneself hidden within gossip on the film and music industries Terrance Dean is a black man seeking to find himself. Coming from a broken home where his mother was a drug addict and prostitute and never knowing his father, Dean wants to escape. Most of the book is about his time in Los Angeles and New York, making his mark in Hollywood, the media and music industries.    After being sexually molested by a male babysitter and reluctantly engaging in sex with an older female teen Journey to accpeting oneself hidden within gossip on the film and music industries Terrance Dean is a black man seeking to find himself. Coming from a broken home where his mother was a drug addict and prostitute and never knowing his father, Dean wants to escape. Most of the book is about his time in Los Angeles and New York, making his mark in Hollywood, the media and music industries.    After being sexually molested by a male babysitter and reluctantly engaging in sex with an older female teenager, Dean questions his sexuality. He would pray to God to will away his feelings towards men. Compounding this is what appears to be a lack of open discussion in his family about sex, relationships and the molestation he dealt with as a teen.   And so after college Dean moves out to Los Angeles. The book essentially becomes a long list of parties, "fine" men Dean sees, his sexual encounters, etc. It was really interesting to see Dean (who is black) navigate the entertainment industry in the 80's and 90's while keeping the fact that he was not straight (for a time Dean thinks he is bisexual and has emotional and sexual relationships with women) on the "down low."   Eventually, he moves to New York and from there begins to see his life a little differently. He comes to terms with things, after seeing friends, acquaintances and even his own brothers and mother die from AIDS. Dean eventually moves into forgiveness and has open and frank discussions with his family about his sexual orientation. Not all people are so accepting, but he has come to terms with the fact that he is gay and might as well have it in the open.   At the end of the book we see he has left the world of Hollywood and music behind and is trying to empower men of color. Dean notes it's not easy to leave that world behind since many of his network contacts, lovers, friends, etc. all want to participate in some way.   Although the world Dean inhabits is so very different from my own, I couldn't help but be bored with the gossip. There's not a lot to go on for me to make educated guesses, although by now the book has been out for several years and one can easily Google who they think is named by the pseudonyms in the book. I wouldn't really read it for the gossip, although if you follow that world closely it might be fun. I found his overall journey much more interesting, and I wish his publisher had been more willing to have Dean write about that than his many hookups. Bought as a bargain book. Kinda wish I had borrowed it from the library instead.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly Reese

    It is terry first book and i chat with him on fb and i told him i love it but i wish he would gave names

  7. 5 out of 5

    Titus

    Very interesting This book was very interesting, the struggles, the intriguing description of characters, I found myself wondering and highlighting part of the book to go back and review what I read and compare it to the artists he was describing. We've heard stories but it's different reading about these entertainers in the industry.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Trey

    He's not the best writer, but I really like/appreciate his voice. You really get a sense of his experience, as he processed it, and I found that really compelling and educational.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tippy Jackson

    I was all set to give this book a higher rating, but it got really repetitive about 200 pages in. This should have been cut down by about 50 pages. It's fascinating to read as Terrance explains his mental gymnastics that allowed him to be super critical of gay people while being gay as well as the inner turmoil he was dealing with.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly Hicks

    I wasn't really sure how to feel about this book. For starters, I don't feel as though I learned anything new that I didn't already know, however, having said that, I think the biggest disappointment for me was that I found the title of this book to be a bit misleading. Of course, one reading the title would think this is a book about men on the down low in the hip hop industry--and indeed that's what Terrance wrote about, but it was just surface speaking about the matter, and not really talking I wasn't really sure how to feel about this book. For starters, I don't feel as though I learned anything new that I didn't already know, however, having said that, I think the biggest disappointment for me was that I found the title of this book to be a bit misleading. Of course, one reading the title would think this is a book about men on the down low in the hip hop industry--and indeed that's what Terrance wrote about, but it was just surface speaking about the matter, and not really talking about hip hop music as a whole. Just because you name drop a few powerful rappers and their contribution to the hip hop genre, to me, doesn't classify this book as being a tell-all on the down low brothers in the industry. With the exception of two individuals mentioned, everyone was given made up names to protect those brothers who want to remain on the down low and to protect their secret society, if you will. One thing that did open my eyes a great deal is that I'm beginning to wonder if not one out of every five brothers is a down low one. My God, there were so many he mentioned my jaw dropped. I'm like geez is every brother got a hint of this in him? Ummm, that was pretty raw and gritty. The sex scenes were pretty provocative and sexy, as I would definitely advise reader discretion due to some of the content written. This wasn't a bad book by any means, I just felt the story was a bit redundant and I didn't feel as though Terrance gave the reader much, other than the obvious. I suppose had he truly "name dropped," he'd have to be under security 24/7. As it was, I'm sure many of them held their breath when they learned he was writing this novel. I didn't find the book that exciting, but I did learn a few things. One thing in particular I do wonder is when certain traumatic things happens to children, does that bear a huge responsibility as to their sexual preference later on in life? I was always of the mindset from what my gay friends have shared with me that they knew they were gay from the onset. However, if someone commits a heinous sexual act on a small impressionable child, could that possibly alter how they feel about sexuality? Or was it something that was always there? Again, not a bad book, but I find the title misleading. There wasn't much talk about hip hop the way the title suggests. Not a bad read, but not my favorite. It's engaging enough that you'll continue to turn the pages, but I'm not so sure how the reader will comprehend what is being said?

  11. 5 out of 5

    Teri

    So much to say about this book... not much of it is good though. This book reads like a Tyler Perry movie/urban novel/blackbuster. At first, it's funny. It's a page turner. But after so long the redudancy grows annoying. For a while (and I mean A LOOOOONNNNGGG time) the author is in denial. He blames everyone (his family, the church, his job, the opposite sex) when it was him that was really the problem. He is irresponsible, indulgent, and careless. I also don't agree with the title. This books So much to say about this book... not much of it is good though. This book reads like a Tyler Perry movie/urban novel/blackbuster. At first, it's funny. It's a page turner. But after so long the redudancy grows annoying. For a while (and I mean A LOOOOONNNNGGG time) the author is in denial. He blames everyone (his family, the church, his job, the opposite sex) when it was him that was really the problem. He is irresponsible, indulgent, and careless. I also don't agree with the title. This books is not in-depth about hip-hop and doesn't get much deeper when you take it to mean the entertainment industry especially when the author doesn't seem to peak in his career until he works with white people and not in a hip-hop spectrum. He's a queen. He loves attention to the very end and although he makes strides still doesn't learn his lesson in the end. (How can he turn down the hip hop mogul?) But back to his attention whore tendencies. He sees no regret/ sorrow for the things he does, only fear when someone he knows dies from HIV/AIDS. It's aimless because he doesn't write the book to expose the people, the evils of these people, the industry, and doesn't make any significant strides when dealing with any of these things in direct relation to his sexuality. He can bitch & moan all he likes but doesn't do much to change the situation around him and rejects the things that could help him (LIKE CHURCH) Lastly, this was also a hard read for me as a heterosexual woman who believes you can control what you want to get rid of in your life (no matter how extreme). Furthermore, this book did raise the debate in my head about people being born gay or choosing to be so. What else makes it a hard read? THE AUTHOR'S EXCESSIVE EXCUSES. I found his categorical break-down of the gay man disgusting. 3 categories and all I could really say is "YOU'RE ALL GAY. YOU'RE IN DENIAL AND ONLY ONE OF THESE CATEGORIES IS TRUTHFUL!" (the "out" gay man) He talks about how the world has wronged him but what about the marriages & relationships he forsakes. All his exploits with men in relationships are just irresponsible as the community that doesn't understand/accept his sexuality. Pathetic. The slight light at the tunnel within the last 40 pages of the book is the onlt reason this book earns 2 stars.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mel

    I started this months ago. I borrowed it from the library and, had to keep renewing it. It didn't hold my interest. But I decided I had to just finish it. The way it was written... Disjointed. It's an autobiography. Not a well written autobiography. But an autobiography all the same. Then it turns into a Who Is Gay In Black Hollywood And The Music Industry? If you are going to blend the two, there are ways that I'm sure it could have been done seamlessly. Terrance had a hard childhood. Him and h I started this months ago. I borrowed it from the library and, had to keep renewing it. It didn't hold my interest. But I decided I had to just finish it. The way it was written... Disjointed. It's an autobiography. Not a well written autobiography. But an autobiography all the same. Then it turns into a Who Is Gay In Black Hollywood And The Music Industry? If you are going to blend the two, there are ways that I'm sure it could have been done seamlessly. Terrance had a hard childhood. Him and his siblings have different fathers. His mother was mostly absent. She was using drugs and, later died of AIDS. He was molested. He is determined though. He goes off to college and ventures to Cali and NYC to work in the entertainment industry. Trying to hide who you are because of fear of what people will do if they find out is a hard way to live. But, Terrance had to. Because of work and personal reasons. I really wish I knew who he was talking about when mentioning certain celebrities. But, he somewhat managed to make it sound like EVERYONE in rap music is gay. Everyone. Terrance had issues that I hoped he dealt with. Him writing this book doesn't necessarily make that so. Salacious content and all... Not a can't put down read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cookie

    Ha ha I figured all the build-up to "exposing" these folks was a bunch of Bulls*** teasing in order to sell books. All the people who bought this crap were bamboozled. Who gives a rat's cunt "why" he is gay? I could give a fu** about him getting diddled a little as a youngster and his subsequent "struggles". Cry me a river....we all have had bad things happen. And often times much worse than someone touching their little wee-wee a couple of times as a kid. "I'm so confused and traumatized at 30 (and Ha ha I figured all the build-up to "exposing" these folks was a bunch of Bulls*** teasing in order to sell books. All the people who bought this crap were bamboozled. Who gives a rat's cunt "why" he is gay? I could give a fu** about him getting diddled a little as a youngster and his subsequent "struggles". Cry me a river....we all have had bad things happen. And often times much worse than someone touching their little wee-wee a couple of times as a kid. "I'm so confused and traumatized at 30 (and for the rest of my life) because my dick got touched when I was 6. And it's been "Flame on!" ever since!" Gimme a goddamn break. Boo f-ing hoo. Get over it, you f-in daisy. Just admit you love penises and man-ass and leave it at that. Asswipe didn't even have the balls to use his own photo on the cover. He used a model. I guess so people he ripped off with this piece of turd book wouldn't recognize him on the street and kick his ass for wasting their time and money. He promised exposure and did not deliver. All I think of him now is that he is a gutless faggot crybaby jerkoff. Nothing more.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ebony

    There were lots of excuses about why Dean had as much sex as he had. He felt like he had never been loved and God had abandoned him. I admit that my heart hurt to read him talk about how his family died of AIDS because God was punishing him for being gay. I hated that no one talked about his childhood molestation. I hated that the church people failed to deliver him and yet he still believed that God hated him. I wish he had worked that out in the book but maybe that's the point. That kind of se There were lots of excuses about why Dean had as much sex as he had. He felt like he had never been loved and God had abandoned him. I admit that my heart hurt to read him talk about how his family died of AIDS because God was punishing him for being gay. I hated that no one talked about his childhood molestation. I hated that the church people failed to deliver him and yet he still believed that God hated him. I wish he had worked that out in the book but maybe that's the point. That kind of self-hatred doesn't just get worked out that's why men are hiding. I know that there are MSM all over the entertainment industry but the jump off parties he described were pretty salacious. It is an expose of deceptive black male sexuality but it's also an exploration of how tormented individuals can be when they feel like they have to hide themselves in plain sight. The book was a bit preachy and a bit woe is me-y but it did make me want to help create those spaces where black people can just be whatever type of people they need to be without judgment.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jon O

    At some points, I was lost. The author kept going back to an earlier slot of time that I lost track where the author was supposed to be... I thought the author was already in New York and yet, another chapter started with him saying that he was in Los Angeles and was asked to go to New York. It felt like several scenes were repeated, to describe the 'down low' of the gay black community. It was either someone with an altered name to protect the real identity in another gay scene, and another gay At some points, I was lost. The author kept going back to an earlier slot of time that I lost track where the author was supposed to be... I thought the author was already in New York and yet, another chapter started with him saying that he was in Los Angeles and was asked to go to New York. It felt like several scenes were repeated, to describe the 'down low' of the gay black community. It was either someone with an altered name to protect the real identity in another gay scene, and another gay scene, and another gay scene. They were all gorgeous. They were all either popular or on the way up or work with someone famous. It was a wasted effort to reveal famous people without their real names and the reasons given were the same. This book felt draggy because of the same scenarios. That said, it was interesting to see the issues regarding this community. Just that the shallow,-spilled-nothing-more scenes did not have to repeat.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Molly

    Let's face it: books that dish about steamy sexual relationships with celebrities are sordid and trashy but addictive. There's something about reading about famous people and seeing that they have the same issues and weaknesses as us mere mortals that is compelling. That's partly what made Karinne Steffans' franchise so interesting. But this book? With the possibility of being really good, Terrance Dean just disappoints. He's talking about gay men in an industry that thrives on a homophobic image Let's face it: books that dish about steamy sexual relationships with celebrities are sordid and trashy but addictive. There's something about reading about famous people and seeing that they have the same issues and weaknesses as us mere mortals that is compelling. That's partly what made Karinne Steffans' franchise so interesting. But this book? With the possibility of being really good, Terrance Dean just disappoints. He's talking about gay men in an industry that thrives on a homophobic image, yet he never really confronts the issue and the culture surrounding it. I wasn't asking for him to outright out some celebrities, although that would've lent some credibility to it. I think I just wanted to see some humanity in the characters, which I did not. The writing is poor, and the narrative is choppy, but more importantly, the man has a really interesting story- but unfortunately doesn't know how to tell it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Naomi Moore

    I at first thought that it was going to be a tell all but after finishing it I realized that I am happy that he didn't out those who weren't ready to face what is going on. Back in October MTV had Out In Hip Hop and I saw a lot of anger and aggression from the men who were out and seeking validation. After reading this book and seeing how wide-spread the down low culture is I really am hesitant to date a Black man due to fear. Fear that he won't tell me the truth about his sexuality, I can deal I at first thought that it was going to be a tell all but after finishing it I realized that I am happy that he didn't out those who weren't ready to face what is going on. Back in October MTV had Out In Hip Hop and I saw a lot of anger and aggression from the men who were out and seeking validation. After reading this book and seeing how wide-spread the down low culture is I really am hesitant to date a Black man due to fear. Fear that he won't tell me the truth about his sexuality, I can deal better with an uncomfortable truth than I can with a bald lie. Fear that he could infect me, I know that messing with other woman can bring about the same results. This book makes me sad for the fact that he was living in a fantasy world created by his own childish hurt and anger and therefore he missed out on his chance to bond with family.

  18. 4 out of 5

    J

    (FROM JACKET) Everyone wants to know the truth about their favorite celebrities' heart's desires. Within the masculine culture of Hip Hop and Hollywood, there is a well-known gay subculture that industry insiders are keenly aware of but choose to hide. Terrance Dean worked his way up for more than ten years in the entertainment industry from intern to executive, and has lived the life of glitz and bling along with Hollywood and Hip Hop's most glamourous. With a family full of secrets and working (FROM JACKET) Everyone wants to know the truth about their favorite celebrities' heart's desires. Within the masculine culture of Hip Hop and Hollywood, there is a well-known gay subculture that industry insiders are keenly aware of but choose to hide. Terrance Dean worked his way up for more than ten years in the entertainment industry from intern to executive, and has lived the life of glitz and bling along with Hollywood and Hip Hop's most glamourous. With a family full of secrets and working in an industry founded on maleness-where one's job, friendships, and reputation all depend on remaining on the down low and in hiding-Dean writes a revealing account of the journey of coming out from hiding. Full of startling anecdotes and incredible true stories. "Hiding in Hip Hop" is not a traditional tell-all....

  19. 4 out of 5

    J.M.

    I really wanted to like this book, but I can't get past the first few chapters. It's poorly edited and the prose jumps around without any rhyme or reason. Also, one thing that bothers me is that the author claims to be raised in a very religious family but doesn't bother capitalizing the word God or His/Him/He when referring to his deity of choice. Anyway like I said, I put the book down after a few chapters and found I really wasn't all that interested in picking it back up. From the beginning v I really wanted to like this book, but I can't get past the first few chapters. It's poorly edited and the prose jumps around without any rhyme or reason. Also, one thing that bothers me is that the author claims to be raised in a very religious family but doesn't bother capitalizing the word God or His/Him/He when referring to his deity of choice. Anyway like I said, I put the book down after a few chapters and found I really wasn't all that interested in picking it back up. From the beginning very little is said of the author's sexuality and/or feelings about being bisexual, so I wasn't caring about him as the story progressed. People were mentioned at random and disappeared a paragraph or two later, and the plot jumps around without restraint. A good editor might have corralled the book into a decent story, but I lost interest in it as it stands.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Khaleelah

    Very interesting , only if I could have figure out what industry persons he sleep with. Okay yes he was hiding out at MTV, he didn't expose any body. The book wasn't written well at all very repetitive . Terrence had sex with any and everybody. These DL books all have the same back drop they all want love like heterosexual folks , it appears that will never happen. Dean did a good job at revealing the current patterns of these DL brothers. All I have to say these young ladies need to be very car Very interesting , only if I could have figure out what industry persons he sleep with. Okay yes he was hiding out at MTV, he didn't expose any body. The book wasn't written well at all very repetitive . Terrence had sex with any and everybody. These DL books all have the same back drop they all want love like heterosexual folks , it appears that will never happen. Dean did a good job at revealing the current patterns of these DL brothers. All I have to say these young ladies need to be very careful of their selection of men ,these days it's very scary. The reason for the read is the intriguing subject matter. I hope Terrance next book the Mogul reads like a story because his life was like the boy the next door.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Erica

    A rather lackluster memoir to say the least with the usual "I grew up the poor son of a crack-ho and then a mean guy touched me and then I liked dudes" song and dance. It gives kind of a dark view of the entertainment industry based on who you know who you are will to bang to get ahead. I could sympathize a bit with Terreance as a fellow Queer black but for the most part I just wanted him to stop talking about the various dudes he was banging and drop some names. If you too plan on picking up th A rather lackluster memoir to say the least with the usual "I grew up the poor son of a crack-ho and then a mean guy touched me and then I liked dudes" song and dance. It gives kind of a dark view of the entertainment industry based on who you know who you are will to bang to get ahead. I could sympathize a bit with Terreance as a fellow Queer black but for the most part I just wanted him to stop talking about the various dudes he was banging and drop some names. If you too plan on picking up the book expecting him to reveal the names of gay rappers youare surely mistaken. This book was meh, to say the very least, but made for a trashy enough to read while passing the time drivng to see my Baptist family in South Carolina.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Yasmin

    "The question is: what function will this book perform in a culture always eager for yet another reason to demonize Black men as dangerously duplicitous? What are the power differentials in the entertainment world where white lesbians like Ellen are more out than Black lesbians or gay men? Does simply being out solve the problems of an industry that makes enormous profits while paying pittances to some? Ellen’s at the height of her popularity and lauded for her outness. But we forget that she wa "The question is: what function will this book perform in a culture always eager for yet another reason to demonize Black men as dangerously duplicitous? What are the power differentials in the entertainment world where white lesbians like Ellen are more out than Black lesbians or gay men? Does simply being out solve the problems of an industry that makes enormous profits while paying pittances to some? Ellen’s at the height of her popularity and lauded for her outness. But we forget that she was among the first to cross the writer’s strike picket line—that fact should matter more to us than the fact that she’s out." Read the rest of my review here: http://www.yasminnair.net/content/ter...

  23. 4 out of 5

    Bobby Christon-Walker

    This book was interesting. Initially, I purchased it thinking that it would be a scathing tell-all book, like Confessions of a Video Vixen, but it was more of a book about this one guy’s life. There were parts where he bounced around in his timeline. For example, in one chapter, he’d be leaving college and dealing with that, but by the next chapter, he was an accomplished producer for MTV. He should have had a different editor or should have referenced the flashbacks before he went to the next c This book was interesting. Initially, I purchased it thinking that it would be a scathing tell-all book, like Confessions of a Video Vixen, but it was more of a book about this one guy’s life. There were parts where he bounced around in his timeline. For example, in one chapter, he’d be leaving college and dealing with that, but by the next chapter, he was an accomplished producer for MTV. He should have had a different editor or should have referenced the flashbacks before he went to the next chapter. All in all, it was an okay book. The ending was a bit odd because there was no real closing. It was almost like he meant to continue writing but just stopped. Oh well. It was an okay book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ghym

    This book has the wrong title. It's not really an expose of gay men in hip-hop. It's a memoir of Terrance Dean himself. He's lived a complicated life--came from a broken home, there was AIDS, drugs, a struggle to climb up the corporate ladder, too much casual sex and not enough love. Here and there Dean treats us to blind items of who might be gay in hip-hop. It's hard to guess who he's talking about half the time, though. Some are obvious guesses though. Not always well-written (there are sever This book has the wrong title. It's not really an expose of gay men in hip-hop. It's a memoir of Terrance Dean himself. He's lived a complicated life--came from a broken home, there was AIDS, drugs, a struggle to climb up the corporate ladder, too much casual sex and not enough love. Here and there Dean treats us to blind items of who might be gay in hip-hop. It's hard to guess who he's talking about half the time, though. Some are obvious guesses though. Not always well-written (there are several glaring typos, and just a lack of polish throughout), but still a fascinating glimpse into an underground culture.

  25. 5 out of 5

    JaVone Bentley

    I think this man is overly delusional and living in a fantasy. He descriptions are repetitive. The beginning about his upbringing was interesting but beyond that it gets pretty redundant! He almost comes off as a hypocrite. And forget about finding about down low celebs. Names are withheld and descriptions are vague enough that it could be numerous people. I almost feel that some of the things he writes are not true. His numerous sexcapades are described in detail. Its a quick read but I found m I think this man is overly delusional and living in a fantasy. He descriptions are repetitive. The beginning about his upbringing was interesting but beyond that it gets pretty redundant! He almost comes off as a hypocrite. And forget about finding about down low celebs. Names are withheld and descriptions are vague enough that it could be numerous people. I almost feel that some of the things he writes are not true. His numerous sexcapades are described in detail. Its a quick read but I found myself disgusted and ready to be done at times.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Monique

    This book originally caught my attention thinking that it would be a tell-all, but it fell short of the mark. I understand that some anonymity was necessary because of the sensitivity inherent in such a book, but there were not enough clues to even make an educated guess of who these individuals were. Maybe, I'm just too curious. It was mostly about this guy's sexuality, which is fine, but it didn't seem to present itself this way. It was interesting though and well written, but it just sort of This book originally caught my attention thinking that it would be a tell-all, but it fell short of the mark. I understand that some anonymity was necessary because of the sensitivity inherent in such a book, but there were not enough clues to even make an educated guess of who these individuals were. Maybe, I'm just too curious. It was mostly about this guy's sexuality, which is fine, but it didn't seem to present itself this way. It was interesting though and well written, but it just sort of seeemed like false-advertising in my opinion.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sy

    The book was interesting. Made me really question all the men I have dated in the past. Even though of course they aren't in the industry or anything. What I liked about the book is stopping and thinking what actor or rapper he was speaking on in the book. I don't know if I was wrong in my thoughts but I was pretty shocked at what faces popped into my head as possible down low brothers. What I didn't enjoy too much is he was constantly repeating himself over and over. Or even contradicting himse The book was interesting. Made me really question all the men I have dated in the past. Even though of course they aren't in the industry or anything. What I liked about the book is stopping and thinking what actor or rapper he was speaking on in the book. I don't know if I was wrong in my thoughts but I was pretty shocked at what faces popped into my head as possible down low brothers. What I didn't enjoy too much is he was constantly repeating himself over and over. Or even contradicting himself. All in all is was an okay book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Mackintosh

    This was an interesting view into two areas I'm not terribly familiar with: hip hop culture and down low culture. I think Mr. Dean was very open and honest about how his choices affected his life. He was clear about both the temptations and penalties. The book ends on an abrupt note but I suspect that's another example of being true to life. He could have claimed to be over his impulses to hide his sexuality or to have undergone other personal revolutions. Intead, he shows a day to day struggle t This was an interesting view into two areas I'm not terribly familiar with: hip hop culture and down low culture. I think Mr. Dean was very open and honest about how his choices affected his life. He was clear about both the temptations and penalties. The book ends on an abrupt note but I suspect that's another example of being true to life. He could have claimed to be over his impulses to hide his sexuality or to have undergone other personal revolutions. Intead, he shows a day to day struggle to find his path. Worth reading.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    This may not be the best written memoir ever, but Dean is able to be very candid about his life, the problems he had with his family growing up, and what it's like being a down low man. I got great insight into the world of hip hop, and what it's like to be gay or down low in that world. The most intriguing thing about this book were the intriguing hints about famous people on the down low. Some were obvious, others impossible for me to guess!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Seven

    OMG this book is off the hook. He just puts it out there on all the down low men in the hip hop world. The only thing he does not give out there real names of who these actors and hip hop artist are. But he gives you hits here and there on which they might be. And if you are into hip hop you can guess who they are. Women you got to watch you back, shit after reading this. I had to say god how many more down low brothers are there. HMMMMMM!!!.........

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