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The Wheel of Osheim PDF, ePub eBook From the international bestselling author of the Broken Empire Trilogy, the thrilling conclusion to the Red Queen’s War...   Mark Lawrence’s “epic fantasy” (The Washington Post) continues as a reluctant prince returns from the bowels of Hell to engage in his greatest battle yet—among the living and the dead.   All the horrors of Hell stand between Snorri Ver Snagason and th From the international bestselling author of the Broken Empire Trilogy, the thrilling conclusion to the Red Queen’s War...   Mark Lawrence’s “epic fantasy” (The Washington Post) continues as a reluctant prince returns from the bowels of Hell to engage in his greatest battle yet—among the living and the dead.   All the horrors of Hell stand between Snorri Ver Snagason and the rescue of his family, if indeed the dead can be rescued. For Jalan Kendeth, getting back out alive and with Loki’s key is all that matters. Loki’s creation can open any lock, any door, and it may also be the key to Jalan’s fortune back in the living world.   Jalan plans to return to the three w’s that have been the core of his idle and debauched life: wine, women, and wagering. Fate however has other plans, larger plans. The Wheel of Osheim is turning ever faster, and it will crack the world unless it’s stopped. When the end of all things looms, and there’s nowhere to run, even the worst coward must find new answers. Jalan and Snorri face many dangers, from the corpse hordes of the Dead King to the many mirrors of the Lady Blue, but in the end, fast or slow, the Wheel of Osheim always pulls you back. In the end it’s win or die. From the Hardcover edition.

30 review for The Wheel of Osheim

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mark Lawrence

    I'm not going to beat around the bush - this is a towering work of literary genius. Allow me to demonstrate with a paragraph from the prologue: “Fuck! Fuck Fuck!” The man, bent over now, started to hop from one bare foot to the other. “Hot! Hot! Hot!” An infidel, clearly, tall, very white, with the golden hair of the distant north, a man from beyond the desert, from across the sea. “Fuck. Hot. Fuck. Hot.” Pulling on a boot that must have spilled out with him, he fell, searing his bare back on the I'm not going to beat around the bush - this is a towering work of literary genius. Allow me to demonstrate with a paragraph from the prologue: “Fuck! Fuck Fuck!” The man, bent over now, started to hop from one bare foot to the other. “Hot! Hot! Hot!” An infidel, clearly, tall, very white, with the golden hair of the distant north, a man from beyond the desert, from across the sea. “Fuck. Hot. Fuck. Hot.” Pulling on a boot that must have spilled out with him, he fell, searing his bare back on the scalding sand and leaping to his feet again. “Fuck! Fuck! Fuck!” The man managed to drag on his other boot before toppling once more and vanishing head over heels down the far side of the dune screaming obscenities. & from the ThatThornGuy art contest (2017) Marshal Jalan by Lily Yearwood Join my 3-emails-a-year newsletter #prizes .

  2. 4 out of 5

    Petrik

    3.5/5 Stars The Wheel of Osheim is a great installment to say good bye to 'The Red Queen’s War' trilogy. Like 'Prince of Fools', 'The Wheel of Osheim' brought my love for the series that were missing in the second book. 3 chapters in and it’s better than the entire experience I had with 'The Liar’s Key' already. The plot started out magnificently gripping, fun and compelling. In 'Emperor of Thorns', there were two timelines to follow, Jorg at his twenties and the flashback sequence. One of the tim 3.5/5 Stars The Wheel of Osheim is a great installment to say good bye to 'The Red Queen’s War' trilogy. Like 'Prince of Fools', 'The Wheel of Osheim' brought my love for the series that were missing in the second book. 3 chapters in and it’s better than the entire experience I had with 'The Liar’s Key' already. The plot started out magnificently gripping, fun and compelling. In 'Emperor of Thorns', there were two timelines to follow, Jorg at his twenties and the flashback sequence. One of the timeline in Wheel of Osheim took place during the same timeline in Jorg’s flashback sequences in 'Emperor of Thorns.' Same as 'Emperor of Thorns', there are two timelines to follow here. One that took place months after the end of 'The Liar’s Key' (this is the one that coincides with 'Emperor of Thorns') and another, that started straight after it. The narrative doesn’t shifts that often and it worked wonderfully in capturing my attention. The latter timeline gave me so many things to think about on the topic of Life and Death, Heaven and Hell. It was a scary and realistic thought, powerful and for this, I salute Mark Lawrence. Picture: The Wheel of Osheim (French edition cover) One thing to note though, my experience reading this book has increased significantly because I finished Broken Empire already. The cameo encounters that Jalan met here filled me with glee and satisfaction cause all of them gave a great culmination to all 6 books that Mark wrote in the same setting. One specific drunk encounter with someone from Broken Empire gave a superbly written character development to Jalan. Although until now Mark’s books are a hit and miss for me, there’s no doubt that imo, Mark knows how to write amazing main characters. All three series of his that I read all contained a compelling main character, with two of them being the one of the most unique protagonists I ever read in the market. Fun fact for you, in Indonesian language, all three MC's name that Mark wrote has a literal translation that matched their personality. (Probably just a pure coincidence, which made it even better.) Jorg = Jorok, pronounced Jo-rogue (literal translation = dirty, matched with Jorg’s sociopathic behavior.) Jalan = Jalan, pronounced the same (literal translation = walk, Jalan love to walk away from his troubles.) Nona = Nona, pronounced the same (literal translation = lady, her personality in caring for her friends.) Jalan’s character development here was amazing for almost the entirety of the book, because of his personality, there are a lot of rooms for his character development and Mark almost delivered perfection here. Jalan has to make a lot of tough choices, face a great war against the undead and decide the fate of the Broken Empire behind the scene, contrary to Jorg. I also love that despite the contrast personality between him and Jorg, they both actually have a lot of similarities in fate. “Nothing paralyses a man so well as choice.” Although Snorri doesn’t make an appearance as much as the first book, it didn’t bother me as much as the second book. Unlike the second book, Snorri’s disappearances in the story are done sparingly other than for a long period of time at once. Plus, the fact that his story did reach a proper conclusion here, with all the Norse mythology tidbits and Jalan was so interesting to read compared to how he was in the second book, made me accept his missing spotlight. The flow of the prose this time, like 'Prince of Fools', was so pleasant to read. A combination of elegant and simplicity that I really want from Mark’s prose, unlike his usual writings. “Your dreams are what will tear you apart. Every man is the victim of his own imagination: we all carry the seeds of our own destruction.” Honestly, there was almost no glaring problem for me in this book, in fact, just from the first 85% of the book, it was without a doubt shaping to be a completely 5 stars read. I’ll let you know now, all the praises I gave doesn’t apply to the last 15% of the book. The problems I had with the book all lies all in the last section, specifically almost everything that happened in Osheim. First, the climax section was really messy, all characters that were nowhere to be seen popped up suddenly, this made the last part almost like an impromptu cocktail party. Second, the whole shifting direction into a far fetched Sci-Fi that combined with the Post Apocalyptic Earth (I will never shut up about this) setting, just didn’t work at all for me. Finally, all the evolution and character development that were done towards Jalan, brought him back to how he was in the beginning of 'Prince of Fools', with the exception of some minor changes. The Wheel of Osheim is a great read that if it wasn't for the disappointing conclusion, would’ve been included in my favorite shelves. With this, I have read all the currently available 7 books written by Mark Lawrence, 'Prince of Fools' is definitely the best one for me but I would like to recommend this trilogy for anyone that's looking for a unique MC and story to read. It was overall very enjoyable to read for me. The conclusion didn’t work for me, doesn’t mean that it won’t work for you and trust me if you do enjoy the climax sequences, I’m 90% sure this will certainly be a 5 star read for you. Series review: Prince of Fools: 4.5/5 Stars The Liar's Key: 2.5/5 Stars The Wheel of Osheim: 3.5/5 Stars The Red Queen's War trilogy: 10.5/15 Stars You can find this and the rest of my Adult Epic/High Fantasy & Sci-Fi reviews at BookNest

  3. 4 out of 5

    James Tivendale

    By all means, check out my reviews of book #1 and #2. This is just a quick review as I do not wish to spoil anything critical to this story or repeat my previous reviews. www.youandibooks.wordpress.com The Wheel of Osheim was the only book I could have possibly read next following on from the ultimate cliffhanger at the conclusion of the previous story. So, apologies to other authors whose books I have still to review but I simply had to find out what events would follow the prior outing and als By all means, check out my reviews of book #1 and #2. This is just a quick review as I do not wish to spoil anything critical to this story or repeat my previous reviews. www.youandibooks.wordpress.com The Wheel of Osheim was the only book I could have possibly read next following on from the ultimate cliffhanger at the conclusion of the previous story. So, apologies to other authors whose books I have still to review but I simply had to find out what events would follow the prior outing and also, to see how The Red Queen's war against a mirror floating mage lady concluded. In addition, to review how the two ladies movements of the pieces on the world's chess game would lead to a culmination and how the developments would affect The Broken Empire. I was suprised by how The Wheel Of Osheim threw us into the action and the way it started. I expected to find our companions traipsing through the netherworlds. Instead, we are reintroduced back into the mind of Jalan in his world as he falls out of a desert's sky being pursued viciously by a succubus. His self-centered self-interest, his immense luck, and his personally misunderstood bravery lead him through this dilemma and he finds himself trekking across these heated wastelands with an entourage of important occupiers of the local city. This left me slightly confused. What happened in Hell? Where is Snorri? This leads to the narrative being split into two distinct proportions. The modern day Jalan adventures and also after about ten percent into the book we begin to taste the precisely placed flashback sections that carry on throughout the majority of the tale, into the adventures that took place in Hel/Hell. The pacing and placements between the two sections are exquisite and although I was surprised by the way the story commenced, it works wonders in fitting the puzzle together as both of the storylines progress. The flashbacks themselves are told in two different ways. The scenes in Hell are despondent and thrilling. These segments had an Epic feel to them as the characters traversed through unspeakable horrors in the barren inexistence as Aeneas and Odysseus had walked through similarly composed chaos in their times. The history researched by Mark in creating this world including religions, mythology, military factions etc... needs to be acknowledged and appreciated. The current day happenings see Jalan sharing drinks with some dude named Jorg, Jalan acting as a Marshall for the Red Queen during an intense siege scene and in addition, highlights certain confrontations that are computer game boss battle-esque. The highly intricate action sequences made me feel like I was playing The Legend of Zelda because I could picture the action, environment, and the involved characters pending difficulties so clearly. Some of the composed battles are huge and certain revelations/ plot progression made it so I couldn't take my eyes from the pages. At the start, with how #3 began, for some reason, I thought this tale would be quite linear but I couldn't have been more wrong. A huge amount of the World's map is covered again and such a great amount of action takes place that I could probably write a 5000-word review yet, this would include spoilers, notes about emotions and characters destinies/outcomes. I could have extended what I have written here, however; because I don't want to reveal the direction the story takes, which of the players are involved, which enemies cross paths, what the results of characters ultimate goals are or what happens to this world that is, unfortunately; speeding out of control due to the magic being used. There is a larger science fiction influence in this segment of the trilogy, with the destruction of the world looming due to the mechanics of the empire. Although I would love to talk about what characters turn up here, I will not, because that is where a lot of my enjoyment came from so I don't want to take that experience away from others. I thought that all the threads tied themselves up nicely. I loved reading this trilogy and believe a TV series combining the actions of The Red Queen's War and The Broken Empire which could run concurrently would be exceptional. The mind in these books is perhaps the most powerful, but also, the most dangerous weapon. Mark's work is excellent. The Game of Thrones comparisons are there due to both being complex, character-driven narratives within a Medieval-like fantasy world but I prefer this trilogy to A Song of Ice and Fire, and it is concluded! Absolutely stunning book and series.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Petros Triantafyllou

    ***STOP PRESS*** The book of the year is out! Mark's second trilogy is now complete, and you may as well vote for him as the best fantasy writer of the decade. The Wheel of Osheim is an undisputed high point of the series so far. The storytelling is great and unique, offering a cinematic vignette rarely seen in modern fantasy.The architecture is delicate and refined, offering a tender humanism at the book's core. There were one or two predictable events but they were easily overshadowed by the gr ***STOP PRESS*** The book of the year is out! Mark's second trilogy is now complete, and you may as well vote for him as the best fantasy writer of the decade. The Wheel of Osheim is an undisputed high point of the series so far. The storytelling is great and unique, offering a cinematic vignette rarely seen in modern fantasy.The architecture is delicate and refined, offering a tender humanism at the book's core. There were one or two predictable events but they were easily overshadowed by the great characterization (worth mentioning is the outstanding depth of it, present in even minor characters as Lady Blue & Taproot), masterful story, and wonderfully built suspense. "Out of the corner of my eye I saw the scorpion on my plate jitter toward me on stiff legs, six glazed feet scrabbling for purchase on the silver. I slammed my goblet down on the thing crushing its back, legs shattering, pieces flying in all directions, cloudy syrup leaking from its broken body. All nine al’Hameeds stared at me in open-mouthed astonishment. “Ah . . . that’s . . .” I groped for some kind of explanation. “That’s how we do it where I come from!”" All in all, The Wheel of Osheim is the perfect conclusion befitted to an awesome trilogy, and something every fantasy reader MUST eventually read. Bonus: a rare gif of Prince Jalan facing the Unborn Prince: You can find more of my reviews over at http://BookNest.eu/

  5. 5 out of 5

    TS Chan

    Snorri misses him already. A grin creases his face. Even in Hel Jal can make him smile. I'm also missing Jal already. *Sob* And you know what, I am still reluctant to write a thorough review for this book as it felt too much like saying goodbye to this Prince of Fools. I might do so after a reread when I need a pick-me-up again. The closing line of the entire trilogy echoed wonderfully with the opening ones, summing up the character growth that Jalan Kendeth undertook. So I'll just summarily asse Snorri misses him already. A grin creases his face. Even in Hel Jal can make him smile. I'm also missing Jal already. *Sob* And you know what, I am still reluctant to write a thorough review for this book as it felt too much like saying goodbye to this Prince of Fools. I might do so after a reread when I need a pick-me-up again. The closing line of the entire trilogy echoed wonderfully with the opening ones, summing up the character growth that Jalan Kendeth undertook. So I'll just summarily assess The Wheel of Osheim to be a great and fitting closure to Mark Lawrence's second trilogy set in the post-apocalyptic Broken Empire.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mogsy (MMOGC)

    5 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2016/06/03/... There’s so much to say about The Red Queen’s War series, even more so now that I’ve finished this third and final installment and realized to my joy and horror that yes, my time with the remarkable Prince Jalan and his crew has indeed come to an end. Taken as a whole, this trilogy may be Mark Lawrence’s finest work ever, and this stunning conclusion that is The Wheel of Osheim has left me with my mind completely blown. Afte 5 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2016/06/03/... There’s so much to say about The Red Queen’s War series, even more so now that I’ve finished this third and final installment and realized to my joy and horror that yes, my time with the remarkable Prince Jalan and his crew has indeed come to an end. Taken as a whole, this trilogy may be Mark Lawrence’s finest work ever, and this stunning conclusion that is The Wheel of Osheim has left me with my mind completely blown. After we were left with that cruel cliffhanger at the end of The Liar’s Key, I just couldn’t wait to see what would happen next. And indeed, The Wheel of Osheim is a book that will ultimately reveal all—though admittedly in its own time and in its own way. It’s a story that guards its secrets jealously, opening with a bizarre sequence that sets the beginning of this novel in stark contrast to the terrors experienced by the characters on the journey to get where they are. In fact, if there was ever an award given for “Most Hilarious Escape from Hell”, I have a feeling Jalan will remain the undisputed champion for years to come. His goals to ditch Loki’s key and return to his old life of drinking, gambling, and womanizing don’t go as planned either, as he returns home to Vermillion to find everything changed. The end of the world is said to be coming, caused by a large construct in the north called the Wheel of Osheim. All of reality will unravel as the Wheel turns faster, unless someone is willing to go into the heart of it to shut it down. In the middle of this looming threat, an old enemy also makes its move, taking advantage of the confusion to make a bold strike at Jalan in the capital of Red March. Our poor, luckless protagonist has never wanted to be a hero, but unfortunately even a coward has to step up sometime. Yep, this one’s all on Jalan, and don’t you doubt it for a second. Though his friends Snorri, Kara, and Hennan are also along for this crazy ride, most of this book is driven by our main character, who has all but shed his former persona by replacing the insouciance with actual initiative and responsibility. The impending destruction of the world isn’t the only reason why he can’t go back to his old life; it’s because he’s also not the old Jalan. That said, this change is not something that occurs overnight. We’ve actually been seeing this shift in Jalan’s personality since the last book, and only now are we seeing the results of that transformation. Thankfully though, Jalan still retains a lot of what made him the “Prince of Fools” we fell in love with when this series first started. While his experiences in the past year have hardened his soft edges and impressed upon him a sense of honor, he’s still far from the picture of gallantry—and I’m perfectly fine with that. With Jalan coming into his own though, it did mean seeing a bit less of the supporting characters. Not even Snorri presents himself in the flesh until later in the book, but we do get to witness snippets of his and Jal’s time in Hell together, woven into the early parts of the story. Compared to the books that came before, The Wheel of Osheim has a more distinct “ethereal” vibe, due in part to the structure of the narrative as well as the strange, otherworldly nature of the main conflict. I also found the story to be darker, a lot twistier. The tensions between the Red Queen and the Blue Lady have been building up for a while now, and their war finally comes to a head in this book. More puzzle pieces also fall into place as Jalan encounters Jorg once more, further linking the events of The Red Queen’s War to those of The Broken Empire. How surreal it was to watch these two very different young men get drunk together and give each other life advice. And finally, we get a lot more background into the mysterious Builders. The revelations here confirm that Lawrence is still the undefeated master at turning this genre on its head; with six novels by him under my belt, you’d think I would be used to the surprises by now, but somehow he still manages to amaze me every single time. Still, when it comes down to what makes this novel truly special—and why I loved this entire trilogy, really—my reasons are actually quite straightforward. Very simply, this book made me laugh. There’s horror and darkness in this series, but also genuine humor. Few books in this genre can claim to be funny in the traditional sense, but then, most books in this genre don’t have a protagonist like Prince Jalan. He was a coward, a cheat, and a liar (and still a bit of all those things, I admit) but it didn’t matter; because of the fantastic way he was written, I loved him from the start. Jalan is, I’m convinced, an honest-to-goodness once in a lifetime character, the likes of which we’ll never see again. Now that the trilogy is over, I’m going to miss him very much. What else is there left to say, really? The Wheel of Osheim is a masterpiece. You need to read The Red Queen’s War trilogy. The end. Full stop.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Solseit

    This was such an amazing book, the best end for the series I could have (not) imagined. It really is the best book yet in the series, the most complicated yet satisfactory. Great work by Mark Lawrence, totally recommended to those who love fantasy and a great, impressive really, character development.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alissa

    Mark Lawrence surpasses himself. I think this was potentially a very difficult book to deliver because, on top of being the last installment of a trilogy and consequently with a story to resolve, it had to dovetail convincingly with the Broken Empire’s events. Moreover, the story itself was also intricate with its many long games and conflicting interests at play, with its intriguing characters pitted against obscure and mundane forces…needless to say, after the delectable Prince of Fools and the Mark Lawrence surpasses himself. I think this was potentially a very difficult book to deliver because, on top of being the last installment of a trilogy and consequently with a story to resolve, it had to dovetail convincingly with the Broken Empire’s events. Moreover, the story itself was also intricate with its many long games and conflicting interests at play, with its intriguing characters pitted against obscure and mundane forces…needless to say, after the delectable Prince of Fools and the outstanding The Liar's Key my expectations were high indeed. Lawrence pulled it off and he did it with style, confirming himself an excellent storyteller with a remarkable knack for endings, who does a great job of handling solid plots and fleshed-out characters while providing lots of introspection, witty humour and stories both thrilling and chilling. There are funny moments, but the tones of this book are especially serious and grim, well-suited to the inner growth of its narrator and the mood of the plot which ratchets up in complexity. Jalan has become decidedly more somber (not more sober, mind, and I couldn’t help but laugh at his latest…quip) and though his development is very appropriate and realistic I welcomed it with mixed feelings. The whole cast of secondary characters is similarly tended and I was personally very involved with Snorri’s storyline. The narrative also builds heavily on its prior worldbuilding, layers and events, and plays off the audience's awareness, bringing the story to a brilliant climax which is both conclusive and coherent with the interlocking threads of Emperor of Thorns. The book is masterfully executed – there are remarkable dialogues and gripping descriptions, flowing prose and great action. The story unfolds with a speculative quality on occasion and there are purposeful shifts in the timeline; it wasn’t an easy going, with the elaborate reveals and all, but the experience is totally rewarding. Immersive, I guess, is the word. While the Broken Empire trilogy is a great but controversial read, I would wholeheartedly recommend Jalan and Snorri’s tale to everyone with a taste for dark fantasy, intriguing world-building, politics, character development, great entertainment and a soft spot for witty bantering. This said, a returning reader is also able to appreciate the little in-jokes, the connections between the trilogies, and the deft hand of the author who keeps them all in balance. I’m eagerly looking forward to his next creation, Red Sister. ‘A story will lead a man through dark places. Stories have direction. A good story commands a man’s thoughts along a path, allowing no opportunity to stray, no space for anything but the tale as it unfolds before you.’

  9. 4 out of 5

    Twerking To Beethoven

    "The Red Queen's War" trilogy, just like "The Broken Empire", starts off as a fantasy saga but then everything goes tits up and shapeshifts into sci-fi and dystopia. Which is fascinating, engrossing, riveting, you name it. Given I suck at reviewing stuff, I'll tell you what Lawrence's books remind me of. 1. A Canticle for Leibowitz - For obvious reasons. 2. Mothership - This is a less known little sci-fi gem by an australian author who passed away a few years ago, leaving this series (unfortunatel "The Red Queen's War" trilogy, just like "The Broken Empire", starts off as a fantasy saga but then everything goes tits up and shapeshifts into sci-fi and dystopia. Which is fascinating, engrossing, riveting, you name it. Given I suck at reviewing stuff, I'll tell you what Lawrence's books remind me of. 1. A Canticle for Leibowitz - For obvious reasons. 2. Mothership - This is a less known little sci-fi gem by an australian author who passed away a few years ago, leaving this series (unfortunately) unfinished. Drat, I wish someone took Brosnan's notes and finished the job. Now, whereas Walter M. Miller Jr.'s book is a very grim tale of a far future earth, Brosnan's novel is kind of a light-hearted sci-fi/fantasy adventure with plenty of (at times, crass) humour, sort of a Robert Asprin with lots of swearing. Mark Lawrence's "The Red Queen's War" sits somewhere in the middle. There are quite a few grim moments but there's room enough for a few chuckles as well. I’m a liar and a cheat and a coward, but I will never, ever, rarely let a friend down. Bottomline...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Conor

    3.5 Stars The pacing of this book was consistently tight which, combined with some interesting mysteries and constant action made it an easy read. Jalan was always bouncing from one adventure to the next, with plenty of action scenes and some light horror overtones that I thought really worked well. The plot was, by the standards of epic fantasy series, fairly straightforward and focused which was a nice change of pace, however there were still enough twists, turns and mysteries to make keep it i 3.5 Stars The pacing of this book was consistently tight which, combined with some interesting mysteries and constant action made it an easy read. Jalan was always bouncing from one adventure to the next, with plenty of action scenes and some light horror overtones that I thought really worked well. The plot was, by the standards of epic fantasy series, fairly straightforward and focused which was a nice change of pace, however there were still enough twists, turns and mysteries to make keep it interesting. On the downside I never really cared about Jalan( I went into some detail about my problems with him in my review for the second book). I think the key to my enjoying Jalan is pacing. I read the first 2 books back-to-back and went from liking Jalan as a unique hero with lots of potential, to growing frustrated with him to officially being done with his bullshit by the midpoint of book 2. At the start of this one my frustrations seemed to have worn off and I was able to enjoy his humorous quips without particularly liking him as a character. However as the book went on my investment in him didn't grow. I often found him amusing and I appreciated some of the subtle character development Lawrence game him but if he were suddenly and terribly murdered (GRRM style) I wouldn't really have been bothered, which is a major problem in a series as dependent on it's protagonist as this one. I also found Snorri to be a pretty dull Magnus Stu (the term I just invented for a Viking Mary Sue) who was pretty much a paragon of virtue throughout: brave, loyal, tough, smart, cultured etc. I thought there was a very good opportunity missed in this series to have There were some cool secondary characters in this but unfortunately they were under-used. Garyus, Jalan's crippled but formidable Uncle, was sympathetic and intriguing in all of his appearances and reminded me of Miles in the Vorkosigan Saga. It would have been cool to see his relationship with his sisters explored more as well as his struggles with his health and his desire to do his duty to protect his people and family. The Red Queen was a less sympathetic character but she was also extremely interesting as a ruthless, ambitious anti-heroine. We finally learned the entirely of her plan in this one but I still would have liked to see more of her up-close, it would have been especially interesting to see more of her war with the Lady Blue and her thoughts on it. The plot was fast-paced with plenty of intriguing mysteries and exciting action scenes and some light horror elements that added a sense of unease to the story that was really effective. The setting was solid but imo Abercrombie's Shattered Sea series (alliteration for days) does it quite a bit better, especially in how it was able to bring stuff from the modern world (such as the guns in the third book) into play. tbh I'm not really sure why Lawrence even made this a post-apocalyptic version of our world given that he used practically nothing from it (except for some really, really far-fetched scientific experiements). The ending itself was pretty comprehensive and provided closure to the main storylines while leaving the door open for future stories. (view spoiler)[ My one complaint was that it lacked real impact. The world was saved and continued as it had been before, the Red Queen continued to rule Red March and Jalan went back to being a selfish dick. The only real impact I felt from the ending was Garyus' sacrifice. I was also once again disappointed that Jalan's character regressed from the signs of growth we had seen throughout the book. He decided not to destroy the world (which is good) but then started an affair with his best-friends wife which is a massive dick move and the kind of selfish cuntishness that I would have expected from him at the start of the series. (hide spoiler)] Overall this was a pretty enjoyable series with lots of action, mystery and interesting plots that I wasn't able to fully get into due to the main character. I actually haven't read Lawrence's earlier series yet although I've heard that the main character in that one was very controversial. I'll give that series a go if and when I get the chance based on the positive things I've heard about Lawrence's stuff from my friends and the good things he showed in this series but if I'm not liking it I'll probably just cut and run.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

    Fun, action packed read. Definitely, the best book in the series! Although the series hasn't been one of my favorites, it certainly is well worth the read. The final installment was definitely the icing on the cake. Right from the start, the plot captured my attention and drew me in. Prince Jalan remains a character that I really didn't relate to. However, that was far less of an issue in this installment than the others as he seems to have grown some and become more of a "hero" than he really w Fun, action packed read. Definitely, the best book in the series! Although the series hasn't been one of my favorites, it certainly is well worth the read. The final installment was definitely the icing on the cake. Right from the start, the plot captured my attention and drew me in. Prince Jalan remains a character that I really didn't relate to. However, that was far less of an issue in this installment than the others as he seems to have grown some and become more of a "hero" than he really wants to be.  Also, Snorri plays a much larger role in this installment and I have to admit he's my favorite character.As with all the Mark Lawrence books I've read the writing is fantastic. The descriptions are detailed and beautifully presented without distracting from the plot. The characters are real and detailed.  Most are easy to relate to.  If I'm honest, even Prince Jalan is relatable. I guess I just don't want to! I think after three books I've learned to love to hate him.I'd have given it five stars if the ending hadn't turned out to be a bit too predictable. It was fun and exciting but just too much of what I'd expected. When you read a book like this by an author of this caliber you expect a surprise of some kind. Something. Anything. But no such luck.Still worth the read though!

  12. 4 out of 5

    samantha (books-are-my-life20)

    A very good book, great writing with the same humor that was found in the first two books of the trilogy. Now I will be not so patiently waiting for whatever Mark has in store for us next, The RED SISTER trilogy? sign me up!!!!!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jesper

    Without a doubt the best book in the trilogy and one of the best books i've read in 2016. Fast flowing entertainment with the right amount of blood, gore and death...

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tracey the Lizard Queen

    Review originally posted at: http://thequeenofblades.blogspot.co.u... 02/06/2016: I'm pretty sure my husband has bought this for me, and a signed one at that, but because he is a evil bastard as well as a generous one he won't allow me to open it until my birthday. Only 22 days to go... 05/06/2016: (to my husband) "You need to hide this away! It's taunting me. You'll come home one day and I'll have finished it already!" "No." Followed by an evil laugh. 07/06/2016: Husband decides its not nice to t Review originally posted at: http://thequeenofblades.blogspot.co.u... 02/06/2016: I'm pretty sure my husband has bought this for me, and a signed one at that, but because he is a evil bastard as well as a generous one he won't allow me to open it until my birthday. Only 22 days to go... 05/06/2016: (to my husband) "You need to hide this away! It's taunting me. You'll come home one day and I'll have finished it already!" "No." Followed by an evil laugh. 07/06/2016: Husband decides its not nice to tease, package mysteriously disappears from the couch. 24/06/2016: Got it, didn't start it. Not today, I'm very busy. Really. 26/06/2016: Tomorrow. 28/06/2016: Still hadn't started it. I'm still busy. What? No I'm not avoiding the last book because I don't want the adventure to end! Ridiculous. 02/07/2016: Right I need to get this done, I can't avoid it forever. Time to be a grownup. The series has ended! I can't stop it from happening, its already happened. 08/07/2016: Ok I did it. I finished another series that I love. And now I need to be alone. 21/07/2016: Ok review time. Always review the books you read. It really helps the author. Ever since I picked up Prince of Thorns about 4 years ago, I knew that Mark Lawrence would be one of my favourite authors. It just clicked with me, Jorg was the most fascinating character I'd ever come across. I wanted to study him, I wanted increasingly difficult obstacles placed in his path just to see how he would react. How he would get out of this scrap or escape that fate. Now when I first read Prince of Fools back in 2014, I was worried I'd just not click with Jalan at all. I wanted more Jorg. I did not get him. What I got was something so totally different that there was no way the two could even be placed on the same scale. And yet somehow Jalan was just as fascinating. When challenged, Jorg would have no choice but to push back. Harder. Much Harder. He didn't flinch, he didn't hesitate (except once), he didn't take 'no' for an answer. Jalan's first instinct is self-preservation, always. Run, hide, beg, bribe, steal, whatever it costs. A cushy life in the Red Queen's Palace is worth it. As with PoT events (people) conspire to make use of Jalan. There's a silent war occurring and Grandmother needs soldiers. When we last left Jalan and Snorri they had just crossed over into Hell, so we pick up not long after that. Jalan finds himself in the Sahar Desert, once again on coming a little too close for comfort to the future Emperor. One of my favourite things about this series is there are echoes of the events of Prince of Thorns and King of Thorns everywhere. Little repercussions here and there. Jalan always arrives just a tad too late to witness the events themselves, but he's usually right in the middle of the fallout. And of course if he can exploit the situation to his benefit then it would go a little way to making up for inconveniencing him so much in the first place. It's only fair. I could go into detail explaining the plot and going on and on about the brilliant prose and the hilarious dialogue, blah, blah, but I won't. Go and read this series, and if you want the whole experience go and read The Broken Empire series too. It's as simple as that.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lee

    Without a doubt, my favorite of the trilogy. This was a wonderfully paced book, where I felt the main character writing actually improved and my friend Jaelan went from a slightly annoying coward, to a slightly annoying coward who I really really enjoyed reading about. I started to look forward to his comments and tried to second guess how he would respond. I have to hand it to Mark Lawrence, he played this character well, when I first started reading, I was worried that Jarl was going to be a c Without a doubt, my favorite of the trilogy. This was a wonderfully paced book, where I felt the main character writing actually improved and my friend Jaelan went from a slightly annoying coward, to a slightly annoying coward who I really really enjoyed reading about. I started to look forward to his comments and tried to second guess how he would respond. I have to hand it to Mark Lawrence, he played this character well, when I first started reading, I was worried that Jarl was going to be a character I hated as much as Kip from Lightbringer, or Thomas Covenant or the entire cast of WoT, but no, as much as a coward as Jaelan is, he actually pulls of enough of the heroics (albeit, somewhat by fluke) to make him very believable and eventually like-able. By the end of this book, I did not want the story to end. I wanted my Snoori and Jarl adventures, maybe less sailing to a town, getting drunk, shagging the local dukes/headman/nobles daughter and fleeing in the night and more journeys to Wheel of Osheims. A thoroughly enjoyable read. If you liked Prince of Thorns, then it bet a few bucks you'll enjoy this. Set in the same time, Jorg and Jarl actually share a jar or two. If you found Jorg's romping around the country a little to dark and grim, then you might like Red Queen, it is no where near as dark. It still has it's moments, but no where near the level of Jorg's lot. Go for it, a bloody good, fun read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mitriel

    I was given the chance to torture Mark Lawrence with my lengthy observations on the first draft of his second longest book to date at the end of 2014, which I thought was a fine and solid work with a satisfying conclusion to the series. It somewhat took me by surprise to find that it was a lot darker and more serious, but in some ways more epic, too, than The Liar’s Key. I personally thought that in The Liar’s Key there was a sense of awesome adventure, laugh-out-loud banter, captivating magic & I was given the chance to torture Mark Lawrence with my lengthy observations on the first draft of his second longest book to date at the end of 2014, which I thought was a fine and solid work with a satisfying conclusion to the series. It somewhat took me by surprise to find that it was a lot darker and more serious, but in some ways more epic, too, than The Liar’s Key. I personally thought that in The Liar’s Key there was a sense of awesome adventure, laugh-out-loud banter, captivating magic & plot, while in the final instalment, in the twilight of the final days before the world coming to an end the plot grew more serious, the shadows longer, the stakes higher. In a way it was almost like eating the steak after the dessert. Nonetheless. It was satisfying, exciting, gripping, moving, touching, with still the humour lurking around the grim edges and written, like the rest of it, in his beautiful and elegant trademark prose, that is almost a given by now. I will never ever have a favourite Mark Lawrence book, I equally love them all and for different reasons, but if I had to say something I would say The Liar’s Key brought me more enjoyment, while The Wheel of Osheim more satisfaction.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mayim de Vries

    The concluding instalment to Red Queen's War series is one of the worst, and least satisfactory endings to a series I have ever read. Flat, hurried after the bloated, dead (pun intended) weight of the side stories, frayed with lose ends, and truly disappointing not only in terms of The Wheel of Osheim, but also with regard to the two earlier books. Mark Lawrence, a fine writer that he is, is less of an artist and more of a craftsman. He has mastered few tricks and applies them without mercy acro The concluding instalment to Red Queen's War series is one of the worst, and least satisfactory endings to a series I have ever read. Flat, hurried after the bloated, dead (pun intended) weight of the side stories, frayed with lose ends, and truly disappointing not only in terms of The Wheel of Osheim, but also with regard to the two earlier books. Mark Lawrence, a fine writer that he is, is less of an artist and more of a craftsman. He has mastered few tricks and applies them without mercy across his books. It is OK, I don’t hold a grudge. After all, not every book needs to be a masterpiece. Sometimes books can be like pieces of furniture and when you’ve made one comfy chair, there is nothing wrong in replicating it again and again. The two basic elements of Mr Lawrence’s books are: an antihero and a narrative swinging between the now and the past. Both motifs were employed with great artistry in The Broken Empire series that talked about a veritable psychopath on his way to rule the world. The Red Queen Wars, as oppose to the misleading title, have very little interest in the Red Queen. Instead they focus on a coward (cheater and liar) on his way to prevent the end of the world. But where the Broken Empire had it all wrought with elegance and harmony (the premise, the plot, the character and his development, females in more than ornamental capacity, the suspense, the convergence between the past and the present climaxing in the finale), Red Queen's War dissolve into a cacophony of discordant tones. The premise stays the same, but while it has been fresh and enticing in the Broken Empire, it has the the feeling of a recycled toilet paper in this series. It speaks volumes that the crossovers and Jorg appearances were the most interesting scenes in the first part of the book. At the same time, Jorg’s and Jalan’s stories more coincide than are convincingly intertwined. While Jorg propels Jalan’s reckoning with his gambling and indebted past, Jalan is not even a footnote in Jorg’s fight against the Dead King. This is surprising when one considers how much of the book is just a medieval zombie apocalypse, while the fight against the Lady Blue is kept to the margins. (view spoiler)[ When you consider the big picture, the whole siege does not make sense and is not justified or explained, especially if you know the finale to the Dead King’s rise that took place in the Emperor of Thorns. Similarly, Jalan’s meeting with the Dead King in Hell is meaningless, why then bother to write it? (hide spoiler)] It feels like Mr Lawrence didn’t really have an idea what to do with Jalan. I had bad feelings about it already after the Liar’s Key, but I put it down to the second book syndrome. In the end, there is no character development but character solidification that reminded me of the Shattered Sea trilogy. If Jalan changed then only becoming more of what he’d been before bordering on caricature, the rare breakthroughs (firstly in the forms of berserk rages and then the moment when he pays his debts) do not have a lasting impact on him. His visit to Hell amounts to suffering a protracted dinner at your lest favourite aunt’s. For me the ending of his story, and particularly this last scene of the book, was an insult to the sparkling potential we could glimpse in the Prince of Fools. No interesting female leads. Save from the Red Queen, but let’s be honest she does not play a huge role. Volva is ornamental, Jalan’s love interest instrumental, the rest insignificant. There is no equivalent to Aunt Katherine. In terms of plot design, I thought the series goes awry, somewhat sideways, already in the previous instalment. The present with intermittent flashbacks didn’t make sense in the Wheel of Osheim and served little purpose. More importantly, when both pathways converged, they did so not even without a bang, but lacking as much a s whimper. There was no new impetus for the story, all suddenly didn’t make sense as a whole; no, there were still two stories back to back or arm in arm, if you like. In other words, while chronological order would spoil the Broken Empire tales, the Wheel of Osheim could have been told chronologically without ever harming the story. I should probably say that my two-star rating still means that this book is much better than your average 3-star novel. But I expect more from Mark Lawrence than the Wheel of Osheim delivered. If disappointment ever becomes impersonated, it will be named Jalan. Other books in the series: Prince of Fools The Liar’s Key

  18. 4 out of 5

    Milda Page Runner

    Wow! What an awesome conclusion to this fantastic trilogy. And that ending tying the story back to the beginning, all the threads coming together - the balance between horror and humour, adventure and the feels, philosophy and bloody fights – I’m speechless. Loved it, absolutely loved it. Unputdownable beginning to the end. Whilst The Broken Empire has a darkness to it that bites, Red Queen’s War balances darkness with humour, adventure and friendship making it an easy trilogy to recommend to ev Wow! What an awesome conclusion to this fantastic trilogy. And that ending tying the story back to the beginning, all the threads coming together - the balance between horror and humour, adventure and the feels, philosophy and bloody fights – I’m speechless. Loved it, absolutely loved it. Unputdownable beginning to the end. Whilst The Broken Empire has a darkness to it that bites, Red Queen’s War balances darkness with humour, adventure and friendship making it an easy trilogy to recommend to every fantasy lover. It’s much more hopeful and positive read and I promise you’ll have quite a few laughs along the way and some nail biting moments too. I highly recommend Prince of Fools to everyone: come in for the laughs and you might stay for the story and the feels. And in the end neither the lies nor the truth matter. Just what we feel. ===== Being on a galloping camel bears several resemblances to energetic sex with an enormously strong and very ugly woman. Right now it was pretty much all I wanted, but the desert is about the marathon not the sprint. “Which direction shall we try?” Snorri asked. I sighed and pointed up the hill without looking at it. “It’s pretty obvious. Where else would it be? A fortress full of corpses, laced with the remnants of some horrendous magic or Builder weapon . . . it’s got to be there, doesn’t it?” None of them bothered to deny it. “The light of the sun is new-born, hot from the fires of heaven, and speaks cruel truths as the young are wont to—but starlight, starlight is ancient and reaches across an emptiness unimagined. We are all of us young beneath the stars.” “Very pretty,” I said. “And not much help.” “Come!” Snorri snatched up my sword and, limping, ran into the fray. “Come? You just took my bloody sword. What am I supposed to use? Bad language?” Behind me my dragon collapsed, falling onto its side and scraping at the shiny scales over its stomach as if it had eaten something that disagreed with it. Actually I suspect dragons tend to eat everyone that disagrees with them… Pride lets a man be skewered on the point of other people’s expectations. How often had I walked into the proverbial, and sometimes literal, fire with Snorri watching on, my justifiable instinct to run in the opposite direction crushed under the weight of his confidence in me?

  19. 4 out of 5

    James Schmidt

    Today I will be reviewing The Wheel of Osheim by Mark Lawrence A copy of this book was provided to me in exchange for an honest review. My opinions are my own. I always find it difficult to review books that I love as much as all of Mark Lawrence’s books. I guess it is the fact that I want to make sure I can express how much the books meant to me and how much I want everyone to know that. Can I do them justice with my little review? Probably not, but I will try. I have given all of Mark’s books 5/ Today I will be reviewing The Wheel of Osheim by Mark Lawrence A copy of this book was provided to me in exchange for an honest review. My opinions are my own. I always find it difficult to review books that I love as much as all of Mark Lawrence’s books. I guess it is the fact that I want to make sure I can express how much the books meant to me and how much I want everyone to know that. Can I do them justice with my little review? Probably not, but I will try. I have given all of Mark’s books 5/5 stars and to be honest each book has been better than the last. I need a new rating system for his books! I honestly do not know how he has done it but every book continues to get better. Whenever I think I am going to be slightly let down in a new book (how can they get better) I am again blown away. Now the last book The Liar’s Key was a special book to me. I had a emotional bond with it. It was a tough time in my life and it helped me get though. To be honest things got worse, I stopped reading and blogging for a while. I have been trying to get back into both reading and blogging recently. I started several books and just could not get into them, I know they are good books and I will read them but everything seemed to lack something. I got the email that I was approved on Netgalley for The Wheel of Osheim and I was so excited, full on happy dance excited. This had to be what I needed to get back into things. Right? Boy was I right. It felt so right in the world again. I had a Mark Lawrence book to read, and it was amazing! His best book yet. This book truly brought me back and I am very thankful for that. This book like all of Mark’s others is well written with his mastery of prose. It’s hard to describe for me but when I am reading his work it never feels tedious, everything flows so beautifully and I am immersed in the story. The man just has a way with words! Master worldbuilding is still the key with this book. It is very easy to feel right at home in the world created here. A vast and rich world but never overwhelming, you never get lost in the vastness. It is deep and colorful, full of imagination, with a gritty undertone. Now what makes this book and series so special to me are the characters. His characters are wonderfully complex and easily identifiable. To be specific the dynamic duo of Jal and Snorri. The relationship between these two is truly a thing of beauty. It has been many things though out the series but has always been what held everything together. I started out the series a Snorri fan and ended a Jalen fan. To be honest I really love them both. In conclusion what can I say but this is an amazing piece of literary genius! This book has built upon the extraordinary solid foundation of the first two books and takes this series to a new level of greatness. I will put these books proudly on display, on the self next to Tolkien and Martin. Well, I am not one for big long reviews full of synopsis and spoilers. So I guess what I wrote will have to due. It is enough for me, I hope it is for you too. Now I will be not so patiently waiting for whatever Mark has in store for us next, The RED SISTER trilogy? Hmmm, sign me up! Very excited! 5/5 STARS! The Red Queen’s War series also 5/5 Stars! My blog review is here: https://mightythorjrs.wordpress.com/2...

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    This was a satisfying end to the Red Queen's War series. Mark Lawrence has an engaging writing style and the story had a great mix of humour and action. It helps that the characters in this series are a memorable and likeable batch and that the world is an inventive and interesting one. Prince Jalan has things no easier in this final book of the series. Our reluctant hero needs to escape from Hell/Hel and then get to the task of stopping the Wheel of Osheim. Lucky for him he has a few friends li This was a satisfying end to the Red Queen's War series. Mark Lawrence has an engaging writing style and the story had a great mix of humour and action. It helps that the characters in this series are a memorable and likeable batch and that the world is an inventive and interesting one. Prince Jalan has things no easier in this final book of the series. Our reluctant hero needs to escape from Hell/Hel and then get to the task of stopping the Wheel of Osheim. Lucky for him he has a few friends like Snorri to help him! It was a fun tale for the most part, but I did think it suffered from the odd lull spell that slowed things down a bit. I liked the banter between the characters a lot and loved the bits that had to do with the way magic works and the way the old Builder technology still functioned in this crazy post-apocalyptic world. The bits that bored me a bit were the battles with the endless dead. All in all I found this to be a good ending to a good series. Rating: 4 stars. Audio Note: Tim Gerard Reynolds gave an excellent performance.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bob Milne

    Like any great story, The Wheel of Osheim is a book of lies . . . a story of lies . . . a very mythology of lies. Names, people, places, memories, histories - all damned lies. I'm treading on the edge of spoiler territory here (I can see the gaping chasm to my left) but, as we come to discover late in the tale, the entire story of Jalan Kendeth actually hinges on a single lie that's too painful to even contemplate here. In wrapping up his third and final chapter of The Red Queen's War, Mark Lawre Like any great story, The Wheel of Osheim is a book of lies . . . a story of lies . . . a very mythology of lies. Names, people, places, memories, histories - all damned lies. I'm treading on the edge of spoiler territory here (I can see the gaping chasm to my left) but, as we come to discover late in the tale, the entire story of Jalan Kendeth actually hinges on a single lie that's too painful to even contemplate here. In wrapping up his third and final chapter of The Red Queen's War, Mark Lawrence has truly outdone himself. I would actually go so far as to say that this is his best book, hands down, and that is no lie. While he's used a number of different framing devices in spinning his tales of Jorg and Jalan, Lawrence's approach here is perfectly suited to the shaping of lies. The book opens with Jalan's comic escape from the bowels of Hell, seemingly robbing us of a resolution to the cliffhanger that ended The Liar's Key. It's several chapters later before we get the first fragment of Jalan's journey through (and escape from) Hell. As for Snorri's own journey, his is a tale that must wait until the closing chapters of the tale, a story to be shared as a distraction from the living lies that surround the Wheel of Osheim itself. There's a lot of overlap here with The Broken Empire, with some of Jorg's darkest acts there having a major bearing here - not just on Jalan's journey, but on the world around him. Even more so than in the first two books, we really get to see Jorg's influence on the world from a different perspective, one that's shaped by the lies of those who would interpret his methods and motives for themselves. What we know to be entirely human acts of Builder brutality are reimagined here as divine acts of the gods, who are themselves an entirely different sort of lie . . . but I won't say any more on the score. A big part of what sets this book (and this series) apart for me is the character arc of Jalan. Here is a character who has grown, evolved, matured, and emerged from his own lies as the story has progressed. We still get the drunken, cowardly fool of the first two books, a young man who repeatedly resorts to liquor-fueled lies to hide from the cruelties of the world. He's just as amusing as he was before, but much less exasperating. At the same time, we also get the hero of Aral Pass, a soldier and a leader who overcomes the lies Jalan used to shield himself from responsibility. He's still largely a reluctant hero, but also a motivated one. Once again, Builder technology plays a significant role in the story, but it's the lies told about it and the mythologies created to explain its magics that really drive things. Lawrence throws a lot of gadgets and set pieces at the reader, veering closer to the edges of science fiction than ever before, but it's the slow unveiling of the truth that makes this so exciting. It is story that's as clever as it is exciting, with the climax surrounding the Wheel of Osheim entirely worth the three books that it's taken to realize. There are so many little details in the last hundred or so pages, it's worth rereading to see how carefully Lawrence constructed the lies of Loki and his key. While I won't say much about them (at risk of spoiling things), the Red Queen, the Silent Sister, and Lady Blue finally get their moments to shine here. They've been built up so much over the course of the books that I really wondered what Lawrence could possibly do with them, but it all pays off. As for Snorri, he doesn't get a lot of page time here, but the role he plays in Jalan's quest, and the way his own is finally resolved, will satisfy even the most jaded of readers. Lawrence isn't an author who indulges in needless sentimentality, but there is significant emotional impact to Snorri's last, lonely steps through Hell that will resonate with even the most jaded of readers. The Wheel of Osheim is an epic book in every sense of the word. In terms of scope, imagination, and significance it actually feels bigger than the trilogy that came before it. It's a book that captures the spectacle that Lawrence does so well, but also the human aspect. Even as we face off against some of the biggest, darkest monsters we've seen yet, those lies are slowly unraveled, allowing us to see the true face of danger . . . and the man destined to end it. Originally reviewed at Beauty in Ruins Disclaimer: I received a complimentary ARC of this title from the publisher in exchange for review consideration. This does not in any way affect the honesty or sincerity of my review.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mili

    Same world and timeline as Broken Empire yet so different in atmosphere! Loved the series! Finally Jalan grew on me more and was less annoying haha. I disliked his solo journey in book 2 but loved his growth in the final book. Next to that (view spoiler)[ the group getting back together (hide spoiler)] , a beautiful and amusing chemistry that I loved reading about. I liked how the plot continued from the last cliffhanger. Kinda didnt expect it that way, which is always a nice surprise. The flashba Same world and timeline as Broken Empire yet so different in atmosphere! Loved the series! Finally Jalan grew on me more and was less annoying haha. I disliked his solo journey in book 2 but loved his growth in the final book. Next to that (view spoiler)[ the group getting back together (hide spoiler)] , a beautiful and amusing chemistry that I loved reading about. I liked how the plot continued from the last cliffhanger. Kinda didnt expect it that way, which is always a nice surprise. The flashbacks worked really well. And I was overjoyed for (view spoiler)[the group to find eachother back again (hide spoiler)] ...yeah yeah had to mention it twice..it really made me go yayy! Read it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    I rediscovered my love for Jalan in this final instalment, his humour and internal monologue raised above the constant complaining and back to that wry person I found so appealing in the first book. The plot and action was tighter, with some cracking fight scenes that brought real surprises, my favourite involving a certain religious stone artefact belonging to Jalan's father. There are proper laugh out loud moments here, but overall the book is much darker; not just because it deals with the en I rediscovered my love for Jalan in this final instalment, his humour and internal monologue raised above the constant complaining and back to that wry person I found so appealing in the first book. The plot and action was tighter, with some cracking fight scenes that brought real surprises, my favourite involving a certain religious stone artefact belonging to Jalan's father. There are proper laugh out loud moments here, but overall the book is much darker; not just because it deals with the end of things, but because the ways Lawrence deals with the themes of duty, family, and personal morality hit right to the heart of human nature, the good and bad of it. Right to the end our heroes are challenged, lies and half truths still hold power. It was cleverly done and I enjoyed how it was brought together.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Maryam

    I repeatedly say that I really like how Mark Lawrence sets his characters and tells the story. This book is no exception. I enjoyed it very much. Jalan is complete opposite of Jorge (Prince of Thorns series) and since both series location is Broken Empire we see their path collided sometimes.Prince of Thorns was all about Jorge but this series is about Jalan and at the same time Builders secrets too. Jalan is not the only hero of this tale, we have Snorri, Kara and even Hennan and Red Queen herse I repeatedly say that I really like how Mark Lawrence sets his characters and tells the story. This book is no exception. I enjoyed it very much. Jalan is complete opposite of Jorge (Prince of Thorns series) and since both series location is Broken Empire we see their path collided sometimes.Prince of Thorns was all about Jorge but this series is about Jalan and at the same time Builders secrets too. Jalan is not the only hero of this tale, we have Snorri, Kara and even Hennan and Red Queen herself.To me Jalan's story was a side story to Jorge's to reveal more and more about Broken Empire. I liked it very much; however my favorite book of Mark Lawrence remains King of Thorns.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Patremagne

    Extremely satisfying ending to a great series. I will read every single thing Mark Lawrence writes.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jordi Gil

    5/5 stars Books such as this one should bear a warning sign on their cover: "This book may cause time to lapse abnormally quick when reading it" Or something like that... This is my second trilogy from Mr. Lawrence and I am more and more convinced he keeps improving on each iteration, because this trilogy went for me from an interesting story and pasable main character to a thrilling and charming status. I admit it that Jorg Ancrath was without a doubt first in the list, but Jalan has managed to cli 5/5 stars Books such as this one should bear a warning sign on their cover: "This book may cause time to lapse abnormally quick when reading it" Or something like that... This is my second trilogy from Mr. Lawrence and I am more and more convinced he keeps improving on each iteration, because this trilogy went for me from an interesting story and pasable main character to a thrilling and charming status. I admit it that Jorg Ancrath was without a doubt first in the list, but Jalan has managed to climb perhaps a step higher than the aforementioned fellow. Well.. I can love both of them, can't I. After all it's all in my head, isn't it? (until somebody in Switzerland turns the wheel and lets our imagination take over reality). I won't be going into details about the story, suffice to say that I was concerned how Mr. Lawrence was going to tie in the ending with the previous trilogy, and he did it nicely. I really liked how Jalan transition from a coward and a selfish person to somebody who even questioned his motivations for sacrificing himself for others. He's grown as a person, more so than the other non POV of the story. Something like that goes for the narrator. I decided to acquire the European copy in audible for this book, where it is read by Sean Ohlendorf. Perhaps my lack of experience with him as a narrator, coupled with my initial reticence with the main character resulted in a mixed experience during the initial stages of our relationship. Journey's end now I have no complains about him as a narrator, nor as for the book :). Very much looking forward to the next trilogy from Mr. Lawrence. I am a firm believer in his work.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Enzo

    As a reader there are times when the ending of a book also ends your relationship with an awesome character and you feel saddened. This is how I feel losing Prince Jalan. If you go back and read my reviews or why not anyone else review of "The Broken Empire" series you'll see how many loved Mark Lawrence series. But I tell you something "The Red Queen's War" series is better. The two main characters Prince Jalan and Snorri are incredible and the way they complete each other just works. "The Whee As a reader there are times when the ending of a book also ends your relationship with an awesome character and you feel saddened. This is how I feel losing Prince Jalan. If you go back and read my reviews or why not anyone else review of "The Broken Empire" series you'll see how many loved Mark Lawrence series. But I tell you something "The Red Queen's War" series is better. The two main characters Prince Jalan and Snorri are incredible and the way they complete each other just works. "The Wheel of Osheim" is a wonderful book that caps the series and let me tell you. Its non-stop action and fun. The pacing on this book is near perfect, you never get to feel lagging or to be taken away by the action. It carries you across Jalan's adventures in the Sahara with flashbacks to Hell. To the Battle for Vermillion and Jalan's bravery. To his ultimate surprise and happiness at seeing Snorri. His story of his passage thru Hell. Its not easy being a coward in this world. Not when you carry Loki's key. Jalan tries and I mean he really tries to give away the key and return to his life of drinking, gambling and women. Against all predictions he survives and keeps getting push down but never giving up. For his part Snorri is a column of perfection. This Norse does not know the meaning of failure and it just fits him. When the time comes to deal with the Wheel it will surprise you. I loved this book

  28. 5 out of 5

    Aoife

    The Wheel of Osheim is the last book telling the tale of Prince Jalan and Snorri as they attempt to wade through Hel, come out the other side and turn the Wheel of Osheim to banish all magic from the world. I really enjoyed this and actually flew through it. There was so much great character development in this book. I really felt like Jalan grew into the man he was always foretold to be in this book, and even without the presence of Snorri for the majority of the tale, he was able to stand up, t The Wheel of Osheim is the last book telling the tale of Prince Jalan and Snorri as they attempt to wade through Hel, come out the other side and turn the Wheel of Osheim to banish all magic from the world. I really enjoyed this and actually flew through it. There was so much great character development in this book. I really felt like Jalan grew into the man he was always foretold to be in this book, and even without the presence of Snorri for the majority of the tale, he was able to stand up, take control and I'm pretty sure this was the only book he didn't pee his pants when faced with danger. The battle in Vermillion was excellent and I really felt like my heart was racing through the whole thing (which was a rather long time). I also though their trip in Hel was brilliant, with Snorri's being oddly emotional. And oh my goodness, when Tutt appeared I felt like crying. I loved him so much. I really enjoyed this trilogy and was happy to have been able to follow Snorri and Jalan's adventures together. I just hope Jalan maintains some of the sense he learned on his journeys. (which probably will never happen). And can I fangirl for a minute about the drinking between Jorg and Jal because YESSSSS. I've been waiting for them to have a conversation for the whole trilogy and it was amazing. The way they talked about being a prince and a king, their similarities in their childhood. Everything! It was amazing! I was just dancing through all of that and loved how Jal thought afterwards that he should have rolled a sleeping Jorg off the the roof. Also the scene of Jal taking Jorg's advice on how to deal with Maerus and channelling Jorg Ancrath was EVERYTHING! I just imagined him walking back to the palace soaked in blood and it's terrible but I cheered. It's like he evolved in that moment to the warrior he needed to be and really showed he was the Red Queen's grandson. YASS. ALL HAIL THE RED PRINCE.

  29. 4 out of 5

    senboo

    Boy, it's been quite the journey. Jorg first an then Jalan were the best companions during my frequent travels from home to Florence and vice versa, when immersing yourself in a battle against things made of other dead things is way more pleasant than the shrieking of uneducated children, roaming around without a supervision. It's been a peculiar journey too. I hadn't imagined that the wild boy I met while he destroyed, raped and pillaged could become so dear to my heart, another child made of i Boy, it's been quite the journey. Jorg first an then Jalan were the best companions during my frequent travels from home to Florence and vice versa, when immersing yourself in a battle against things made of other dead things is way more pleasant than the shrieking of uneducated children, roaming around without a supervision. It's been a peculiar journey too. I hadn't imagined that the wild boy I met while he destroyed, raped and pillaged could become so dear to my heart, another child made of ink that I feel like I have adopted, like a crazy catlady that already has a house full of little furry friends. Anyway. I've been charmed by the perfect balance between humor and angst (and there was a lot of both, often at the same time), by ideas so crazy that written just a little bit differently would have been catastrophically bad (starting from having Jorg as main character, I mean, I love my boy but it could have been disastrous) and by a kind of sensibility I haven't found so often in fantasy literature. Jalan and Jorg, and every other character, even the most secondary one (I mean, we all bow in front of the Red Queen and Miana, but I'd like to dedicate this parenthesis to Count Isen, little cask of madness) will stay with me forever in the special hall in my heart I save for good fantasy novels.

  30. 4 out of 5

    *Absorbed in Countless Worlds*

    What a wonderful and satisfying conclusion to the trilogy that is. I really enjoyed it all the way through. And Jalan appeared to me to be one of the most believable characters in the genre, concerning the ways he grows throughout his quest, without loosing his characteristics. And isnt that one of a humans most true traits - having to go through changes, while having to stay oneself, from child to grave? I believe so, watching myself and others around me. So yes, this was a marvellous trip, in What a wonderful and satisfying conclusion to the trilogy that is. I really enjoyed it all the way through. And Jalan appeared to me to be one of the most believable characters in the genre, concerning the ways he grows throughout his quest, without loosing his characteristics. And isn´t that one of a human´s most true traits - having to go through changes, while having to stay oneself, from child to grave? I believe so, watching myself and others around me. So yes, this was a marvellous trip, in so many aspects. Thank you very much, Mark Lawrence, for taking me on such a vivid voyage!

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