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Lady Chatterley's Lover: By D. H. Lawrence : Illustrated & Unabridged (Free Bonus Audiobook) PDF, ePub eBook

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Lady Chatterley's Lover: By D. H. Lawrence : Illustrated & Unabridged (Free Bonus Audiobook) PDF, ePub eBook Lady Chatterley's Lover by D. H. Lawrence How is this book unique? Illustrations Included Free Audiobook Lady Chatterley's Lover is a novel by D. H. Lawrence, first published in 1928. The first edition was printed privately in Florence, Italy, with assistance from Pino Orioli; an unexpurgated edition could not be published openly in the United Kingdom until 1960. (A pr Lady Chatterley's Lover by D. H. Lawrence How is this book unique? Illustrations Included Free Audiobook Lady Chatterley's Lover is a novel by D. H. Lawrence, first published in 1928. The first edition was printed privately in Florence, Italy, with assistance from Pino Orioli; an unexpurgated edition could not be published openly in the United Kingdom until 1960. (A private edition was issued by Inky Stephensen's Mandrake Press in 1929.) The book soon became notorious for its story of the physical (and emotional) relationship between a working class man and an upper class woman, its explicit descriptions of sex, and its use of then-unprintable words. The story is said to have originated from events in Lawrence's own unhappy domestic life, and he took inspiration for the settings of the book from Eastwood, Nottinghamshire, where he grew up. According to some critics, the fling of Lady Ottoline Morrell with "Tiger", a young stonemason who came to carve plinths for her garden statues, also influenced the story. Lawrence at one time considered calling the novel Tenderness and made significant alterations to the text and story in the process of its composition. It has been published in three versions.

30 review for Lady Chatterley's Lover: By D. H. Lawrence : Illustrated & Unabridged (Free Bonus Audiobook)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    WARNING: This review contains a discussion of the c-word, and I plan to use it. Please don't read this if you do not want to see the word spelled out. Thanks. This is less a review than an homage to my crazy mother (now I have you really intrigued, don't I?) It was 1983, and I was in my first Catholic school. I'd spent my first six years of school in a public school, but my "behavioral issues" coupled with my lack of growth made me a target for bullies, so my parents were advised to move me to ano WARNING: This review contains a discussion of the c-word, and I plan to use it. Please don't read this if you do not want to see the word spelled out. Thanks. This is less a review than an homage to my crazy mother (now I have you really intrigued, don't I?) It was 1983, and I was in my first Catholic school. I'd spent my first six years of school in a public school, but my "behavioral issues" coupled with my lack of growth made me a target for bullies, so my parents were advised to move me to another school where no one knew me. So off I went to the home room of a fallen nun, who'd given up her habit for a family. She wasn't much of a teacher. She was an old school Catholic educator who practiced punitive teaching, which included kicks to the shins, yanking of ears, pulling of hair, and screaming from close range. I kept my head down and tried to blend in with my new surroundings, but my Mother made that difficult from the get go. I was a voracious reader, and she passed on the disease to me. From grade two on she had been recommending great books to me. I was reading everything before most everyone else, but my Mom's recommendation of Lady Chatterly's Lover in my first month of Catholic school was probably her most outrageous and unforgettable recommendation. She bought me a copy at the book store in the mall, and that's where I met one of my favourite words of all time -- cunt. Back in 1983, cunt was not a word in your average child's vocabulary. Sure we'd heard it, and maybe even seen it, but it was not something that was regularly used by kids, and its usage was pretty vague to every 13 year old I knew. But there it was in Lady Chatterly's Lover. It was all over the place. So as I read the story and absorbed the way Lawrence used cunt, his usage became my usage. Lawrence used cunt beautifully; it was not a term of denigration; it was not used to belittle; it was not an insult nor something to be ashamed of; cunt was lyrical, romantic, caring, intimate. And I came to believe that cunt was meant to be used in all these ways. That the poetic use of cunt was the accepted use of cunt, the correct use of cunt, and suddenly cunt was part of my vocabulary. I was thirteen. Now I didn't just start running around using cunt at every opportunity. I did what I always did with new words that I came to know and love. I added them to my vocabulary and used them when I thought it was appropriate. And when I whispered it to Tammy, the girl I had a crush on, a few weeks later, thinking that it was the sort of romantic, poetic language that made women fall in love with their men (I can't remember what I said with it, but I know it was something very much like what Mellors would have said to Constance), she turned around with a deep blush, a raised eyebrow and a "That's disgusting" that rang through the class (I can still see the red of autumn leaves that colored her perfectly alabaster skin under a shock of curly black hair, aaaah...Tammy. Apparently she had a better sense of cunt's societal taboos than I did). Mrs. C--- was on her feet and standing parallel to the two of us in a second, demanding to know what was going on. To her credit, Tammy tried to save me -- sort of. She said "Nothing." Then Mrs. C--- turned on me; I was completely mortified (I'd obviously blown it with the first girl I loved in junior high school), and while I was in this shrinking state, Mrs. C--- demanded to know what was happening and what I had said. I tried to avoid repeating what I had said. I admitted I shouldn't have been talking. I admitted that I should have been working. I tried to divert her attention. But she was a scary lady, and I couldn't help myself. I repeated what I had said -- as quietly as I could -- but as soon as Mrs. C--- heard "cunt" I was finished. That was the moment I knew "cunt" was the catalyst for the whole debacle. Now...I'd known before that the word was taboo, but I didn't think it would generate the response it did. I really thought that Tammy would be flattered. And I certainly didn't expect that I would be dragged to the office by an angry ex-nun. Silly me. I got the strap. It was the first time (although there would be another). Three lashes to the palm of the hand. I didn't use "cunt" in public or private for a long time after that, but my punishment couldn't diminish my love for the word. Lawrence made such and impression on my young mind that neither humiliation nor physical pain could overcome my appreciation of cunt's poetic qualities. To me the word is and always will be a beautiful and, yes, gentle thing. Every time that event was recounted at the dinner table over the years, whether it was amongst family, or with my girlfriends or my future wife, my Mom always got this sly little grin on her face and indulged in a mischievous giggle before refusing to take the blame for me getting the strap. After all, "Who was the one who was stupid enough to use the word, Brad? Not me." I love her response as much as I love the word. And in case you were wondering, my Mom never stopped recommending books to me. She was an absolute kook. I miss her. I can't wait to pass on Lady Chatterly's Lover to my kids...but I think it's going to have to be in grade three if it's going to have the same effect it had on me...hmmm...I wonder how that will go over.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Madeline

    I honestly think that if this book hadn't been banned for obscene content, no one would have ever read it. Yes, there are lots of sex scenes (omg scandalous) but all the stuff in between is, for the most part, ungodly boring. The book gets points for having some very intellectual discussions of class and the differences between men and women, and Lawrence's characters talk about sex with more honesty than any other book I've ever read, but that's about all it has going for it. I was about fifty I honestly think that if this book hadn't been banned for obscene content, no one would have ever read it. Yes, there are lots of sex scenes (omg scandalous) but all the stuff in between is, for the most part, ungodly boring. The book gets points for having some very intellectual discussions of class and the differences between men and women, and Lawrence's characters talk about sex with more honesty than any other book I've ever read, but that's about all it has going for it. I was about fifty pages into the book when I realized that I really didn't like either of the title characters (Lady Chatterley and her Lovah), and it didn't get much better from there. Mellors started to grow on me towards the end, when he discovered sarcasm, but Lady Chatterley (aka Connie) was one of the most boring protagonists ever. She was almost completely personality-deficient, and Lawrence worked hard at the beginning to convince us that she was intelligent, a task at which he fails miserably. Example? At one point in the book, when Connie and Mellors have just finished having hot sex and are in bed together, he starts a rant about the class system. Connie's response? She observes that Mellors' chest hair and pubic hair are different colors. Fascinating. Basically, the book can be summed up like this: Blah blah SEX blah blah class blah SEX SEX blah blah class England's economy SEX SEX SEX SCANDAL arguement arguement SCANDAL Vacation time! blah blah blah SEX arguement SCANDAL blah blah the end.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Paul Bryant

    "Afternoon, m'lady - do ye fancy a quick one over yon five barred gate?" "Oh you earthy gamekeepers, well I don't know... oh alright... but only if you mention my private parts in a rough yet tender manner and clasp them enthusiastically betwixt your craggy extremities." Lord Chatterley, from a mullioned window: "Grr, if I wasn't just a symbol of the impotent yet deadening power of the English aristocracy I'd whip that bounder to within an inch of an orgasm." 40 years later : Barrister in full periw "Afternoon, m'lady - do ye fancy a quick one over yon five barred gate?" "Oh you earthy gamekeepers, well I don't know... oh alright... but only if you mention my private parts in a rough yet tender manner and clasp them enthusiastically betwixt your craggy extremities." Lord Chatterley, from a mullioned window: "Grr, if I wasn't just a symbol of the impotent yet deadening power of the English aristocracy I'd whip that bounder to within an inch of an orgasm." 40 years later : Barrister in full periwig : "Is this a book you would want your wife or your servant to read?" Jury : "Well, it's not one of his best, that's for sure, but it isn't bad, crudely propagandistic but it does trenchantly place its finger on a particular moment in the shift of class consciousness in Britain." Judge : "Cut the crap, guilty or not guilty?" Jury : "Guilty pleasure!"

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    Oh man, I wanted to like this soooo bad! So many people complained about it, but I misconstrued their complaints for prudishness or lord knows what. (NOTE TO SELF: Stop judging people's judgements until you can judge for yourself!) But the fact is, two-thirds of the way in I was done with this. I absolutely trudged through to the end. Why? It's not because this is basically porn. I luuuuvs me the sex! Apparently this caused quite a scandal and I can see why. The language is sexually explicit, unn Oh man, I wanted to like this soooo bad! So many people complained about it, but I misconstrued their complaints for prudishness or lord knows what. (NOTE TO SELF: Stop judging people's judgements until you can judge for yourself!) But the fact is, two-thirds of the way in I was done with this. I absolutely trudged through to the end. Why? It's not because this is basically porn. I luuuuvs me the sex! Apparently this caused quite a scandal and I can see why. The language is sexually explicit, unnecessarily so...or well, maybe not. I suppose it needed to be said at the time or at least some time. However, a person can only take so many fucks before they no longer give one. And I wasn't turned off by the lengthy asides Lawrence takes while grinding his ax against the industrialization of England's Midlands. Like Melville's treatise on whales in the midst of his adventure novel, Lawrence had an agenda in writing Lady Chatterley's Lover and he often takes the reader out of the main story in order to linger upon his pet project. That can be distracting, but in this case it's not enough to make me hate the thing, not on the whole. No, my main issue is with the writing, which is a big problem since there's so much of it in books. Lawrence is quite a capable writer, but he does get adverb-lazy now and then, and often repeats words for emphasis. That last point can be effective, say when trying to instill a sense of forward motion when describing something that's going faster and faster. Occasionally the technique works for him. Usually it does not work for me. Some call it a poetic style. I call it bullshit...what do I mean? Well, allow me to Lawrence-ify it: The technique is bullshit in the most bullshitty sense, by which I mean, it is bullshit. As you see, it looks like I've explained myself, yet I've said nothing. Done with flair, it can sound lyrical, even powerful. To me, it sounds like so much hot air. And what does hot air sound like? It sounds like

  5. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    Ah, D.H. Lawrence, why are you so awesome? I think Lawrence is one of those writers you either love or hate, and this is possibly even more true of Lady Chatterley's Lover, his last novel. The author's confidence speaks on every page: firstly, Lawrence has no qualms about interjecting his opinion in the narration throughout. Secondly, the book is from the perspective of a woman, a challenge for any male author, and thirdly (and possibly most famously), the book makes liberal use of "fuck" and "cu Ah, D.H. Lawrence, why are you so awesome? I think Lawrence is one of those writers you either love or hate, and this is possibly even more true of Lady Chatterley's Lover, his last novel. The author's confidence speaks on every page: firstly, Lawrence has no qualms about interjecting his opinion in the narration throughout. Secondly, the book is from the perspective of a woman, a challenge for any male author, and thirdly (and possibly most famously), the book makes liberal use of "fuck" and "cunt." It's not just that the book is about sexual awakening, it's really about how frank the book's two central characters are about their sexual experiences. Lawrence succeeds more often than not in creating a believable female pscyhe in the figure of Lady Constance Chatterly, and though, as some have pointed out, some moments ring less true than others (as when she refers insistently to her womb), overall she's quite believable. Mellors, the game-keeper she has an affair with, is also quite believable, whether or not you agree with some of his more sexist attitudes towards women. As for the sex bits, I laughed several times at the sheer effort Lawrence goes through to try to describe what a female orgasm might feel like. Really, a bravura performance! As a woman, I can say that to my mind he gets it pretty right. Even where the language is stilted or embarassing, I could see what Lawrence was trying at: a totally frank, unashamed look at sex. His book is a big cry against all those who would rather not talk about it, and maybe that's triumph enough. But the book is engaging, frequently funny, and finally, as a last novel, a beautiful piece of hopefulness from a notoriously cynical author.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    3.5 Stars Well.........I can certainly see why LADY CHATTERLEY'S LOVER was banned soon after publication back in 1928. So okay, you already know or anticipate that this particular classic is going to contain vulgarity and erotic situations, but for the life of me, I never thought it would be a combination of tedium and humor.The story is rather unremarkable in itself, and pretty much given away in the book summary, so no spoiler here......Aristocratic (and highly superior in his own mind) upperc 3.5 Stars Well.........I can certainly see why LADY CHATTERLEY'S LOVER was banned soon after publication back in 1928. So okay, you already know or anticipate that this particular classic is going to contain vulgarity and erotic situations, but for the life of me, I never thought it would be a combination of tedium and humor.The story is rather unremarkable in itself, and pretty much given away in the book summary, so no spoiler here......Aristocratic (and highly superior in his own mind) upperclass man marries well-to-do spoiled and free-spirited daddies girl. He goes off to war, comes back injured and impotent. Fickle, bored and depressed young wife finds comfort elsewhere.........What will stick in my mind is not the plot or actual sexual encounters, but the many priceless conversations from 'the boys' point of view on morality, distinctions between social classes and ridiculous beliefs about intimate relationships. (Lady Chatterley's opinion of the uninspiring male physique is pretty memorable too)Check out this quote: "I can't see I do a woman any more harm by sleeping with her than by dancing with her.....or even talking to her about the weather."......and that's just one example, but worst of all......the one exclamation that really stands out......is lover #1's exasperating ranting and raving about Lady C's prolonged mode of sexual exertions that inconvenienced him. Oh. My. God!Anyway, my first D. H. Lawrence novel was indeed entertaining, but slow going and repetitive with not much of a storyline. Glad I finally read it though and love my Penguin Classics book cover!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jo (A follower of wizards)

    *This review contains explicit content* D.H Lawrence, what have you done to me? This book was so much more than I thought it was going to be. This was an experience that I wanted to devour quickly, but that would mean not being able to soak up and bathe in Lawrence's every word, so I realised I needed to take my time. I found this book in a used bookstore, and even when I picked it up, my Dad raised an eyebrow at me. I said "Oh come on Dad, I'm thirty-three" I thought it was just going to be a bo *This review contains explicit content* D.H Lawrence, what have you done to me? This book was so much more than I thought it was going to be. This was an experience that I wanted to devour quickly, but that would mean not being able to soak up and bathe in Lawrence's every word, so I realised I needed to take my time. I found this book in a used bookstore, and even when I picked it up, my Dad raised an eyebrow at me. I said "Oh come on Dad, I'm thirty-three" I thought it was just going to be a book with countless sex scenes and not much else. I was wrong, as although the sex was heavy, it intertwined perfectly with the plot. "My soul softly flaps in the little Pentecost flame with you, like the peace of fucking. We fucked a flame into being" I just love that quote: "We fucked a flame into being" It's just so raw and honest, and that is what I love and appreciate about Lawrence's writing style. He is confident in his style, and hell it shows. He is writing completely from a woman's perspective too, which is a challenge for any male author, and I have great respect for that. The two main characters, Lady Chatterley and Mellors, are very frank about their sexual experiences, and I think this is what makes the book so desirable. The words "Fuck" and "cunt" are used countless times, but these words fit in beautifully with the scenes. They are both for the most part, very believable, apart from when Lady Chatterley remarks about her womb rather a lot, and possibly some of the sexist remarks that come from Mellors. The sexual scenes were beautifully written, long and drawn out, and to me, they were even a little sad. I did laugh a little at Lawrence's grand effort to describe the female orgasm. It really was excellently done, though. I think what I love most about this book, is the way sex is openly talked of, without absolutely any shame. This is how sex ought to be discussed. It's natural, beautiful and we all have needs and desires, and this book shows us just that in the most erotic and incredible way possible.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Lady Chatterley's Lover, David Herbert Richards (D.H.) Lawrence Lady Chatterley's Lover is a novel by D. H. Lawrence, first published privately in 1928 in Italy, and in 1929 in France and Australia. An unexpurgated edition was not published openly in the United Kingdom until 1960. The story concerns a young married woman, the former Constance Reid (Lady Chatterley), whose upper class husband, Sir Clifford Chatterley, described as a handsome, well-built man, has been paralysed from the waist down d Lady Chatterley's Lover, David Herbert Richards (D.H.) Lawrence Lady Chatterley's Lover is a novel by D. H. Lawrence, first published privately in 1928 in Italy, and in 1929 in France and Australia. An unexpurgated edition was not published openly in the United Kingdom until 1960. The story concerns a young married woman, the former Constance Reid (Lady Chatterley), whose upper class husband, Sir Clifford Chatterley, described as a handsome, well-built man, has been paralysed from the waist down due to a Great War injury. In addition to Clifford's physical limitations, his emotional neglect of Constance forces distance between the couple. Her emotional frustration leads her into an affair with the gamekeeper, Oliver Mellors. The class difference between the couple highlights a major motif of the novel which is the unfair dominance of intellectuals over the working class. The novel is about Constance's realization that she cannot live with the mind alone; she must also be alive physically. ... عنوانها: فاسق خانم چترلی؛ فاسق لیدی چترلی؛ عاشق خانم چترلی؛ عاشق بانو چترلی؛ نویسنده: دیوید هربرت دی.اچ. لارنس؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش: سی و یکم ماه ژانویه سال 1972 میلادی عاشق لیدی چترلی رمانی از: دی. اچ. لارنس است که چاپ نخستین اش به سال 1928 میلادی برمی‌گردد. نسخهٔ نخست رمان به طور مخفیانه و زیرزمینی با کمک جوزپه اوریولی در فلورانس ایتالیا به چاپ رسید. هم‌چنین در سال 1929 میلادی نسخه‌ ای مخفیانه از این رمان توسط نشر ماندارکِ اینکی استفنسن در دسترس علاقمندان قرار گرفت. انتشار نسخهٔ کامل و بدون سانسور این رمان تا سال 1960 میلادی در ایالات متحدهٔ آمریکا و بریتانیا ممنوع بود. عاشق لیدی چترلی که یک اثر کلاسیک است، خیلی زود به دلیل محتوای داستان که بیان روابط جسمی میان مردی از طبقه کارگر و زنی از طبقات بالا و مرفه است، توصیف صریح و بی‌پردهٔ صحنه‌ های جنسی و استفاده از واژگان قبیح و مبتذل به شهرتی جنجال‌ برانگیز رسید. گفته می‌شود داستان برگرفته از رخ‌دادهای زندگی شخصی لارنس است و مضامین کتاب از نگاه ایشان به زادگاهش، ایستوود ناتینگهام‌ شایرر الهام گرفته‌ است. برخی از منتقدان بر این باورند که الهام‌بخش لارنس در خلق قهرمان رمان لیدی چترلی، لیدی اوتولاین مرل بوده‌ است. عاشق لیدی چترلی که در سه نسخهٔ متفاوت چاپ شده‌ است، آخرین و مشهورترین رمان لارنس است. داستان: عاشق لیدی چترلی روایت زندگی زنی جوان و متأهل به نام کنستانس (لیدی چترلی) است که همسر اشراف‌زاده‌ اش: کلیفورد چترلی، در اثر جنگ قطع نخاع می‌شود. ناتوانی جنسی و سردی احساس کلیفورد نسبت به کنستانس (کانی) دیوار فاصله میان این زوج را بالا می‌برد. کانی که امیال جنسی اش را سرکوب شده می‌بیند، دلباختهٔ شکاربان شوهرش: الیور ملورز، که مردی از طبقات پایین است، می‌شود. در انتهای رمان کنستانس همسرش را ترک می‌کند، تا روابط عاشقانهٔ جدیدی را با ملورز از سر گیرد. تفاوت سطح اجتماعی میان کنستانس و ملورز که بن‌مایهٔ اصلی رمان است، در واقع نمود سلطهٔ نابرابر طبقهٔ نخبه و بالادست بر طبقهٔ کارگر در جامعه را نشان میدهد. ا. شربیانی

  9. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    I bought this book in high school because it was cheap and I thought that because I was going to be a big, bad Enlglish major in college, I should probably expand my literary repertoire. I also thought it might be a little racy, given the title, which piqued my interest. Fast forward seven and a half years and I am now a big, bad graduate of American Studies (Chaucer killed me on the spot, and I changed majors immediately), and I had yet to read this book. I picked it up off my shelf about 2 wee I bought this book in high school because it was cheap and I thought that because I was going to be a big, bad Enlglish major in college, I should probably expand my literary repertoire. I also thought it might be a little racy, given the title, which piqued my interest. Fast forward seven and a half years and I am now a big, bad graduate of American Studies (Chaucer killed me on the spot, and I changed majors immediately), and I had yet to read this book. I picked it up off my shelf about 2 weeks ago, and had trouble putting it down until I was finished. I love this book for its philsophical interrogation of the class system, which even 80 years later is still quite relevant, and because it questions what true love really is. Is it physical? Is it mental? Can you have one without the other? It's not perfectly written, and some parts are a little too stream of consciousness for my liking, but overall, it really moved me in a weird way. And, yes, it's quite racy, even by today's standards. No wonder it was banned until 1960!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Steven Godin

    Though this maybe looked at as the book that bought sex writing to the masses, 'Lady Chatterley’s Lover' delivers more than just the oohs and aahs of an elicit love affair, it can also be seen as a parable of post-war England, and the steady rise in modernism. It even features a dog called Flossie. Why is this significant to me? Because I once had a childhood dog with the same name, bless her soul. Slammed and banned for being pornograpic back in the day, this caused a storm. Now it's just a smal Though this maybe looked at as the book that bought sex writing to the masses, 'Lady Chatterley’s Lover' delivers more than just the oohs and aahs of an elicit love affair, it can also be seen as a parable of post-war England, and the steady rise in modernism. It even features a dog called Flossie. Why is this significant to me? Because I once had a childhood dog with the same name, bless her soul. Slammed and banned for being pornograpic back in the day, this caused a storm. Now it's just a small ripple in a teacup. As compared to the work of today it's sexual nature barely raises the eyebrows. It does contain many a rude word that I can image would have left folk back then with rosy red blushed cheeks. But today, I am sure even a nun wouldn't be overly shocked by it's naughty bits. Lady Chatterley (Constance, Connie) is the bored wife of Sir Clifford, a war cripple who returns to his family estate, amid the decay and unemployment of the industrial towns in middle England. He takes to books as a way to withdraw, and applies himself feverishly to an attempt to retrieve his coal mines by the application of different methods. He is clearly an unhappy man, who suffers inner turmoil that he can't take to pleasuring his wife. She in turn is unfulfilled, and one fine day bumps into the gamekeeper, Oliver Mellors, and feelings start to bubble up inside towards this man, whom she knows little about. Surrounded by woodland, where it's easy to wander off undetected, Connie slowly is drawn sexually to Mellors, who has his way with her, opening her to an awakening that Sir Clifford simply could not provide. Mellors, a child of the collieries and whom also served in the forces, slips into disillusion away from his wife and leads a solitary existence with just his dog for company. Sir Clifford, who since he is unable to give Connie a child himself, accepts the fact an illegitimate child is an option. But the last person on his mind would have been Mellors, he has no inkling of his wife's affair, but is open to the idea of another man having sex with her. Does he truly love her? or is this just a ploy so he can proudly gain his heir. Does Mellors love her? or just after the sex. For Connie, difficult decisions would arise. And with her sister, takes a break to Venice to ponder on her future. Lawrence’s treatment of his subject's is done with a manner of intelligence, and compared to the likes of an E. M. Forster, does a good job of presenting his characters as flawed and believable. The story is raw with power, yes, but also brings to the table the age old problem of melodrama. It's not huge, but for me, did affect the overall feel for the story. Each in their own way on a more positive note, the three main characters do carry a certain heroic dignity, a symbolical importance that's difficult to ignore. Lawrence utilizes the self-affirmation and triumph of life in the teeth of all the destructive powers that be, industrialism, physical depletion, dissipation, careerism and cynicism—of modern England, and in general, he has given a noble account of it. There is more like two stories in one going on here, the mixture of romance and sexually explicit details and the double background of the collieries and the English forests, possesses both solid reality and poetic grandeur. This is so much more than a novel with fruity bits, it is a work which explores how the naturalness of love and sexual attraction is distorted and perverted by society. It has me pondering a lot on the non-sexual aspects of the story. There's a lot of insight here, and plenty of social commentary, so reading this purely because of the smutty reputation it gained then prepare be disappointed. Beautifully written for the most part, although Mellors is a hard nut to crack with his use of dialogue at times, and some aspects of the story seemed waffley and unnecessary, but just glad to have now finally read it, to see what all the fuss was about.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    Okay, DH, so I was sort of with you at the beginning. I was amused by or interested in watching you create a tale that seemed to be a love child of the Lost Gen and existentialist authors that instead turned out a rebelliously nostalgic Romantic, a perverted Wordsworth in a Bacchanalian temple. I rolled my eyes at, yet went along with, the endless repetition, of "everything is nothing," by your twit of a main character, Connie, or at poor Sir Clifford who builds endless castles of theories in th Okay, DH, so I was sort of with you at the beginning. I was amused by or interested in watching you create a tale that seemed to be a love child of the Lost Gen and existentialist authors that instead turned out a rebelliously nostalgic Romantic, a perverted Wordsworth in a Bacchanalian temple. I rolled my eyes at, yet went along with, the endless repetition, of "everything is nothing," by your twit of a main character, Connie, or at poor Sir Clifford who builds endless castles of theories in the air to escape every basic feeling in his life, or even at first the brooding, fighting "hero," in Oliver Mellors. I excused it as Lost Gen disillusionment, a depiction of people afraid to feel after the masses' passion overflowed in the horror that was WWI. I was even sort of rooting for you against the cold, cold people who can't let go enough to feel something. The one thing I did like was the way you could conjure up ecstatic joy in earthiness. I'm on board with that. But unfortunately, after the love scene/pagan naming ceremony of which we shall not speak, and the comments about how women with "too much will" are lesbians and/or invalid women somehow, you made the ecstatic love you celebrated absolutely ridiculous by the end. I can't even bring myself to discuss that last scene in the book, but if you've read it you know what our payoff was. Really? Really? The obscenity trials are the best thing that ever happened to this book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Dem

    Book Club Read for November for Sit in Book Club. I finished this book only because it was a bookclub read and in order to discuss a book at meetings I really feel I need the full story. I thought this book was crap and I will try to explain my reasons why. The Novel was banned and I do think that if it hadn't been banned this book would have had no impact what so ever and very few people would have bothered to pick it up to read. The book was written back in the 1920s and I really do think that D Book Club Read for November for Sit in Book Club. I finished this book only because it was a bookclub read and in order to discuss a book at meetings I really feel I need the full story. I thought this book was crap and I will try to explain my reasons why. The Novel was banned and I do think that if it hadn't been banned this book would have had no impact what so ever and very few people would have bothered to pick it up to read. The book was written back in the 1920s and I really do think that D H Lawerence set out to shock his readers and I can imagine for a book of its time he succeeded in doing so. The Novel really doesn't have any of the qualities of what I have come to expect a classic to have, The language is coarse, the characters boring and dull and the plot is poor. I never got a sense of time or place that a classic normally delivers. It was extremely repetitive. I don't think the book has stood the test of time for the right reasons and I cant see much of a discussion in this Novel. This is only my opinion and time will tell how the group rates the book. A boring and dull read and didn't compare with any of the other classics I have read previously.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Χαρά Ζ.

    _Lady Chatterley's Lover_ There are no words to describe how much i love this book. I mean, i really, really, really do love this book, even if it became vulgar and indelicate at some point, even when i thought it was too much. I couldn't put it down, i had to keep reading, i had to keep reading D. H. Lawrence's words and sentences and paragraphs. I had the need to keep reading. This man did something amazing in the begining of this book. Nobody has ever understood a female's temperament and ment _Lady Chatterley's Lover_ There are no words to describe how much i love this book. I mean, i really, really, really do love this book, even if it became vulgar and indelicate at some point, even when i thought it was too much. I couldn't put it down, i had to keep reading, i had to keep reading D. H. Lawrence's words and sentences and paragraphs. I had the need to keep reading. This man did something amazing in the begining of this book. Nobody has ever understood a female's temperament and mentality like he did. "Yes, this is exactly how a woman feels". And he was dead for so many years and i wish i lived in his era or he lived in mine but then i thought he was the way he was bcz he lived at that era. And i am the way i am cz i live in this era. And this couldn't have worked otherwise. It's amazing how a person is dead for about a century but leaves pieces of himself behind and here i am, picking them up. "I can feel what you feel." And this happens with Greek authors a lot but not with authors from different countries. He is the exception. This is a masterpiece, a great book, an amazing, truly emotional, truly raw, truly authentic love story. The characters feel and i feel with them. And it will make you angry and sad and happy. This book gave me so much love and so much to love. God.. I adore it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Oh D.H., you eccentric one. You’ve outdone yourself. (Here’s to my fourth Lawrence read, and counting…) This is not your read if you cringe when faced with numerous sexual scenes that depict various sex positions, language that doesn’t shy away from using the four letter words that start with c and f, and insane sexual stream of thought. I suppose if one could wrap up Lawrence’s reasoning about his work, this would be a good summary phrase: Sex is really only touch, the closest of all touch. And it Oh D.H., you eccentric one. You’ve outdone yourself. (Here’s to my fourth Lawrence read, and counting…) This is not your read if you cringe when faced with numerous sexual scenes that depict various sex positions, language that doesn’t shy away from using the four letter words that start with c and f, and insane sexual stream of thought. I suppose if one could wrap up Lawrence’s reasoning about his work, this would be a good summary phrase: Sex is really only touch, the closest of all touch. And it’s touch we’re afraid of. We’re only half conscious, and half alive. We’ve got to come alive and aware. Especially the English have got to get into touch with one another, a bit delicate and a bit tender. It’s our crying need. In other words, get over yourself. I’ll admit I’ve been drawn to Lawrence’s novels because of his disdain of alienation from the body and senses, and his remorse of his society’s attempt at ignoring female sexual consciousness. I’ve appreciated his depiction of the brutal lines between sexual love and class conflict and his rebuttal of what is forbidden. (And oh yes, I forgot to add how amusing the ridiculousness of his sublime language can be). In some way, I thought this book would be a continuation of the acute discussions in Women in Love, for example. In fact, the opening paragraph is alluring: Ours is essentially a tragic age, so we refuse to take it tragically. The cataclysm has happened, we are among the ruins, we start to build up new little habits, to have new little hopes. It is rather hard work: there is now no smooth road into the future: but we go round, or scramble over the obstacles. We’ve got to live, no matter how many skies have fallen. One thing is certain when reading this novel, the first half, with its honest, provocative ideas, refined story setup and character portraits, is much different than the second half, with its overblown and somewhat repetitive sexual scenes, blunt, abrupt language, misunderstanding of the female orgasmic context, and lack of plot development. At times, the novel seems to lack cohesiveness. Lady Chatterley, or Connie, initially resembles Ursula in Women in Love, but she slowly morphs into something stereotypical and unappealing. She is raised by parents who want her to have the individual and intellectual liberties their society shuns for women. She marries an arrogant fool who at first seems to afford her the freedom to be his partner in thought, but after the war, he is paralyzed from the waist down. She soon finds herself the Lady of Wragby Hall, but one who is bereft of sexual liberation. So once Connie is faced with sex of a different form than what she’s known, it’s as if the intellectual parts of her slowly melt away. Yet this seems antithetical to a Lawrencian scheme. So the more sexual a woman gets, the less intelligent she appears? Or perhaps intelligent women are prudes? It’s not clear what to make of this meander. The layered motives, however, are clear: here is a broken woman faced with choices forced upon her by society and at some point she finds some form of self-assurance in sexual nonconformity: Shame, which is fear: the deep organic shame, the old, old physical fear which crouches in the bodily roots of us, and can only be chased away by the sensual fire, at last it was roused up and routed by the phallic hunt of the man, and she came to the very heart of the jungle of herself. She felt, now, she had come to the real bedrock of her nature, and was essentially shameless. She was her sensual self, naked and unashamed. Lawrence wrote this novel after his last visit to England, where he was furious at the treatment of miners, and as usual, vexed about the entitlement of the upper class; hence it’s missing some of the subtleties usually found in some of his depictive scenes. He imagined economic stability could only be achieved with some class upheaval and it’s clear that Mellors, the lover, is Lawrence’s symbol of freedom from the institutional bondage he detested. The novel may lack the scintillating story structure of The Rainbow, the evocative thematic of Women in Love, and the provocative plot of Sons and Lovers, but it is unique in its portrayal of transformation. In some sense, this book marked the end for Lawrence, literally and figuratively. After its publication, his paintings and some of his work were confiscated by British police because he dared encourage adultery and most importantly, adultery that crossed class lines. A year later, he died of tuberculosis. One can appreciate the art of a writer whose works have been ostracized and banned (as was Rainbow) and this is why I return to his words each year. One thing’s for sure: his novels won’t be banned from my shelves.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Duane

    Very explicit for it's time. One of Lawrence's 3 love novels, as I call them; Sons and Lovers, Women in Love, and Lady Chatterley's Lover.

  16. 4 out of 5

    J

    “I've not taken ten minutes on Lady Chatterley's Lover, outside of looking at its opening pages. It is most damnable! It is written by a man with a diseased mind and a soul so black that he would obscure even the darkness of hell!" Utah’s Reed Smoot was speaking to the 1930 Senate. To demonstrate just how filthy they were, he’d threatened to read from Lawrence’s Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Honore de Balzac's Droll Tales, the poetry of Robert Burns, the Kama Sutra… The place was packed. Unfortunately “I've not taken ten minutes on Lady Chatterley's Lover, outside of looking at its opening pages. It is most damnable! It is written by a man with a diseased mind and a soul so black that he would obscure even the darkness of hell!" Utah’s Reed Smoot was speaking to the 1930 Senate. To demonstrate just how filthy they were, he’d threatened to read from Lawrence’s Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Honore de Balzac's Droll Tales, the poetry of Robert Burns, the Kama Sutra… The place was packed. Unfortunately, he was bluffing. “I'd rather have a child of mine use opium than read these books.” Opium? Really? So I sat myself down to read. And it was dull. I tried to make myself concentrate on the ideas, consider the times, you know, act my age. But it was so… so… wordy. That seems a strange complaint to make of a book, but seriously – where was the sex? As it turns out, this book isn’t about sex. Well, it is and it isn’t. To me it spoke of wholeness. Lawrence originally titled it Tenderness and that’s what Lady Chatterley’s lover, Mellors, struggles with. Against war, against the endless pursuit of money, against the hardness of life, he strives to protect the tenderness within. He wants to be whole. But hiding from the world – from living – doesn’t satisfy. Constance Chatterley values the mental over the physical in relationships until that’s all she has. And then it’s not enough. As her own father remarks to her husband, it doesn’t suit her to be a demi-vierge. “She’s not the pilchard sort of little slip of a girl, she’s a bonny Scotch trout.” Being a soft, ruddy, country-looking girl, inclined to freckles, with big blue eyes, and curling, brown hair, and a soft voice and rather strong, female loins she was considered a little old-fashioned and “womanly”. She was not a “little pilchard sort of fish,” like a boy. She was too feminine to be quite smart. Constance and Mellors are throw-backs, more fully female and male than their acquaintances. They don’t fit in modern society. Being more trout than pilchard in appearance myself, I think this is lovely. But Lawrence is getting at something else here. (Why? Where is the SEX??) We’re back to that old theme of metrosexuals ruining the world. Or Man versus Machine. Or agrarian values beset by… Ah, but here it is! “I love that I can go into thee,” Mellors tells her (This is it! The sex!) but he means more than that. (Of course he does. Good God. Does the man ever stop thinking? It’s annoying and I kind of like it and that annoys me all the more.) What he means is that he can lose himself in her. He can stop thinking about what it all means and worrying where it’s taking them. There’s just female reveling in male and man exulting in woman. In sex, by giving themselves up wholly to one another they become whole. Finally! The sex! Okay, I can see why Senator Smoot might not want this lying out where his kids could find it. There are words. Not just that wordy nonsense in the beginning that so perfectly proved to me Lawrence’s point that the mind is not enough. Other words. Shocking words that Lawrence batters you with until they seem ordinary and natural. Yes, there’s sex. Not the forthright, anatomically descriptive eroti… okay, well maybe there… and here, on page 224… and, um… yeah. It's pretty blatant. There’s also the gibberish about Lady Jane and John Thomas and at least one paragraph of conversation with John Thomas. But. For the most part I thought it fairly moving. The expressions may be outdated, but the emotions are not. Constance is trapped in a world where she doesn’t belong, a world where she can not truly live. Afraid of losing that essential part of him, which is not the testosterone driven manliness we imagine, but a more tender one, Mellors has refused to live. Time went on. Whatever happened, nothing happened, because she was so beautifully out of contact. She and Clifford lived in their ideas and his books. She entertained… there were always people in the house. Time went on as the clock does, half-past eight instead of half-past seven. And then it began again. Life. And this is what will save us from the coldness of the world: life. Blood coursing in our veins, tenderness and feeling for others, “warm-hearted fucking”. There, Mr Smoot. I've said it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa

    Lawrence has in recent times fallen out of fashion in the literary world, which is a shame because despite his reputation (often well-deserved) as a misogynist, the themes he explores in this novel go well beyond its sexual reputation. This is a novel about living versus existing. The conversations between the upper class friends proves witty, but ultimately dry, lifeless, as is shown by Tommy Dukes' reasoning as to why he is asexual. Moreso, the novel is about class restrictions, about a dying Lawrence has in recent times fallen out of fashion in the literary world, which is a shame because despite his reputation (often well-deserved) as a misogynist, the themes he explores in this novel go well beyond its sexual reputation. This is a novel about living versus existing. The conversations between the upper class friends proves witty, but ultimately dry, lifeless, as is shown by Tommy Dukes' reasoning as to why he is asexual. Moreso, the novel is about class restrictions, about a dying breed of aristocratic dinosaurs; it's about the call of money and the lifelessness that becoming a slave to the wage creates. Lawrence broke not only sexual boundaries (after all, to give the man his due, he did offer Connie sexual fulfillment, while managing to not make her a wanton whore), but also those of class, and he did so in a provocative, entertaining, and lush read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kirk

    I see a lot of my GR friends are currently reading this, so I'll be interested to see what they think of it. I understand the importance of this one--free speech, yo---but honestly, I wasn't blown away. I prefer Ginny Woolf, in fact. Part of it is that Lawrence is too damn Freudian for me. And all the stuff about women needing civilization fucked out of them by virile treetrimmers seems a little misogynistic. I know the historical context out of which Lawrence is writing, what with industrializa I see a lot of my GR friends are currently reading this, so I'll be interested to see what they think of it. I understand the importance of this one--free speech, yo---but honestly, I wasn't blown away. I prefer Ginny Woolf, in fact. Part of it is that Lawrence is too damn Freudian for me. And all the stuff about women needing civilization fucked out of them by virile treetrimmers seems a little misogynistic. I know the historical context out of which Lawrence is writing, what with industrialization and war sapping the natural semen-spewing strength of all us who can grow hair on chests (trust me, I value all three of mine; they're insured by Lloyd's of London). Still, that only dates LLCoolLady more for me. Finally there's the sex. Shocking in its day, but 80 years later, it has all the poetry of your average Penthouse Forum entry. Seriously, dudes, don't name your peen. Especially don't name it John Thomas. It makes your reader think of The Waltons (i.e. John Boy, portrayed by Richard Thomas). And if you feel the need to write about anal, try not to justify it saying you're ridding your lady of "shame, which is fear: the deep organic shame, the old, old physical fear which crouches in the bodily roots of us, and can only be chased away by the sensual fire, at last it was roused up and routed by the phallic hunt of the man.” In my (admittedly limited) experience, chicks don't go for that ole "phallic hunt" line. In the end (no pun intended), I think this book is most interesting to read alongside the history of 1920s’ and 30s' sexology. To wit, a line from Theodoor van de Velde's Ideal Marriage, one of the most popular (and controversial) sex manuals of the era: “What both man and woman, driven by obscure primitive urges, wish to feel in the sexual act ... is the essential force of maleness, which expresses itself in a sort of violent and absolute possession of the woman. And so both of them can and do exult in a certain degree of male aggression and dominance—whether actual or apparent—which proclaims this essential force.” Like I said, a tough sell these days. Still, looking forward to seeing other folks' reviews. Get on the stick, RA (not literally, of course).

  19. 4 out of 5

    Apatt

    Idle: Is, uh,...Is your wife a goer, eh? Know whatahmean, know whatahmean, nudge nudge, know whatahmean, say no more? Jones: I, uh, I beg your pardon? Idle: Your, uh, your wife, does she go, eh, does she go, eh? Jones: Well, she sometimes 'goes', yes. Idle: I bet she does, I bet she does, say no more, say no more, know whatahmean, nudge nudge? - Monty Python’s “Nudge Nudge” sketch Why did I just quote that? I don’t know, it seems oddly appropriate somehow (but probably isn’t!) From its reputation, I w Idle: Is, uh,...Is your wife a goer, eh? Know whatahmean, know whatahmean, nudge nudge, know whatahmean, say no more? Jones: I, uh, I beg your pardon? Idle: Your, uh, your wife, does she go, eh, does she go, eh? Jones: Well, she sometimes 'goes', yes. Idle: I bet she does, I bet she does, say no more, say no more, know whatahmean, nudge nudge? - Monty Python’s “Nudge Nudge” sketch Why did I just quote that? I don’t know, it seems oddly appropriate somehow (but probably isn’t!) From its reputation, I was half expecting Lady Chatterley's Lover to be wall-to-wall sex. As it happened this is not the case, floors and beds are sometimes included in the configuration—nudge nudge! Well, OK, not really, if you are looking for “porn-fic” from this novel you had better look elsewhere*. I would not know where to direct you, though. As always, Google is your friend! D. H. Lawrence was a serious novelist, I am not even sure he had a sense of humour**. The last thing he would do is write a salacious novel to titillate the masses. My only other experience of his fiction is the beautiful and moving Sons and Lovers, a moving portrayal of a mother and son relationship, with myriad relatable themes. Lady Chatterley's Lover is equally serious, packed to the gills with Lawrence’s ideological messages. The basic plot is very straight forward, Constance is married to invalid aristocrat Clifford Chatterley, who was injured and became paralyzed during the Great War. Unfortunately, the paralysis seems to have spread to his humanity also. This is very depressing for Lady Constance Chatterley who finds her married life entirely devoid of warmth or happiness. She has a brief fling with a German boy whose wurst turns out to be unsatisfactory and also dies unexpectedly, then she has an affair with Michaelis, an Irish playwright, and an aristocrat wannabe. This ends when Connie finds that she can not love him. Eventually, she meets the real love of her life, gamekeeper Oliver Mellors who is rather plebian but has a heart of gold. So begins their affairs and several scenes of these two famously having it off. Of course, one day the cat gets out of the bag… Unlike Sons and Lovers, Lady Chatterley's Lover does not resonate much with me. I cannot relate to any of the characters. Connie—when fully clothed— spends most of the time fretting, feeling sorry for herself. Sir Clifford is entirely unsympathetic and unfeeling, and Oliver Mellors, like Connie, is always moping when he is in a vertical position. The sex is portrayed as something rather silly and awkward. As for the aforementioned ideological messages, Lawrence has plenty to say about the class system, intellectuality vs. passion and the battle of the sexes, but I cannot relate to the characters and their plight so I don’t have a feel for the nuances. For me, Lady Chatterley's Lover is readable but a little bit of a chore to get through. I don’t care for the characters and the plot is just not interesting enough, it seems the nuances are more important than the plot. There are a lot of rambling narration and dialogue which is only made more bearable by the audio format (easier to zone out or just doze off until something interesting happen). I can’t exactly recommend the book but if you are particularly curious about it, it is not too hard to get through. Of course, you may like it a lot more than I do, it just is not up my street, not even in the same time zone. ______________________________ * I was expecting to write “More like Lady Shaggerty, nudge nudge!” Alas, no. ** I think Sons and Lovers may have some funny bits but I don’t really remember! Notes: • Free Audiobook read by Jan McLaughlin. Quite nicely read on the whole, some strange pauses during the first couple of chapters but she seems to settle down after a while. Anyway, I am very grateful for her effort. The whole audiobook in one ZIP file can be downloaded here. • I am not really into Lady Chatterley's Lover but I am interested to read more from D.H. Lawrence, he does write very nice prose. Next time I’ll check out the synopsis first. Quotes: “It would be wonderful to be intelligent: then one would be alive in all the parts mentioned and unmentionable. The penis rouses his head and says: How do you do?--to any really intelligent person. Renoir said he painted his pictures with his penis...he did too, lovely pictures!” 'All the darned women are like that,' he said. 'Either they don't go off at all, as if they were dead in there...or else they wait till a chap's really done, and then they start in to bring themselves off, and a chap's got to hang on. I never had a woman yet who went off just at the same moment as I did.' “A woman wants you to like her and talk to her, and at the same time love her and desire her; and it seems to me the two things are mutually exclusive.”

  20. 4 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    “There's a bad time coming, boys, there's a bad time coming! If things go on as they are, there's nothing lies in the future but death and destruction, for these industrial masses.” I first read Lady Chatterley’s Lover when I was 14, in 1967. I felt I had to hide it well from my mother, so kept it between my mattresses. It was the first book I read with explicit sexual passages, and the first time I had read words no one in my house or neighborhood yet used, words used proudly and unashamedly to “There's a bad time coming, boys, there's a bad time coming! If things go on as they are, there's nothing lies in the future but death and destruction, for these industrial masses.” I first read Lady Chatterley’s Lover when I was 14, in 1967. I felt I had to hide it well from my mother, so kept it between my mattresses. It was the first book I read with explicit sexual passages, and the first time I had read words no one in my house or neighborhood yet used, words used proudly and unashamedly to describe what were for Lawrence holy acts and body parts. But the first third of it is not focused sex; much of it describes conversations among characters about politics, art, class, and sure, sex. First published privately in 1928, it was banned in many countries. In 1960 there was an obscenity trial with this book at the center, and the publisher, Penguin, won their case, after which it sold 3 million copies in the first year. Sexual intercourse began In nineteen sixty-three (which was rather late for me) - Between the end of the "Chatterley" ban And the Beatles’ first LP—Philip Larkin Lady Chatterley was born Connie Reid, raised as an upper-middle class bohemian, familiar early on with free love/affairs and a generally liberal approach to politics and social ideas. In 1917 (with WWI still on), she marries Clifford Chatterley, an aristocrat who goes to war one month after they are married, and is paralyzed from the waist down, impotent. He becomes a successful writer, he becomes a coal baron, and drifts apart from Connie, who hates her husband’s writing, and the coal industry, especially what owners do to workers. She has a short, unsatisfying affair with Michaelis, a playwright, but finds her ideal physical and spiritual man in Oliver Mellors, the gamekeeper on Chatterley's estate, also newly returned from serving in the army. Mellors was well-educated, but he came back from the war to separate from an unsatisfactory relationship with his wife Bertha, and live alone—without women, but also outside of society and its empty materialism, He chooses to live as a working class man, and to speak in the manner of his Darby upbringing and to be honest about his preference for the body and nature over the life of the mind and society. He and Connie choose each other, and begin an affair that is still well known in literary fiction for good reason. Sexual healing! And in a hut, not a mansion! Better?! Obviously! Roughly 100 years later we are aware of some of his ideas as not quite up to contemporary feminist standards, but Connie chooses him because he is tender-hearted as lover and generally as a man. The original title of the book was Tenderness, and this is the central theme of the novel for relationships and society, the feeling of complete yielding and sensitivity to each other that can happen in a tender-hearted relationship. So what does the roughly cynical and somewhat callous Mellors believe, finally? “I believe in that little flame between us.” This “flame” was created by mutually satisfying sex and nurtured through “tenderness.” Mellors is initially skeptical that a woman with as much money as Connie could ultimately give it all up for him, but in time they both see that their passionate relationship can set them apart from society and feed each other’s needs. Sexual is seen as pure creativity, as a kind of sacrament. Some other themes that are familiar in Lawrence here: Body is better than mind; nature is better than machines; materialism, money, and the greed of the upper classes are destroying the planet. How to regenerate? Good democratic relationships, integrity, wholeness. Anarchism, socialism, communism as alternatives to capitalism. Class issues are addressed throughout. Lawrence sides with the working class, for sure. “Their whole life depends on spending money, and now they’ve got none to spend. That’s our civilization and our education: bring up the masses to depend entirely on spending money, and then the money gives out.” “If you could only tell them that living and spending isn't the same thing! But it's no good. If only they were educated to live instead of earn and spend, they could manage very happily. . .” Obscenity? Two, to my mind even better Lawrence books, The Rainbow and Women in Love also were seen as pornographic, so at one point Mellors says in this book: “Obscenity only comes in when the mind despises and fears the body, and the body hates and resists the mind.” After being accused of writing pornography in those earlier books, Lawrence defiantly makes his most explicit book. Lady Chatterley’s Lover was inspired by Frieda von Richthofen, who left her husband to marry D.H. Lawrence. But it’s less romance than a commentary on contemporary society: “There, in the world of the mechanical greedy, greedy mechanism and mechanized greed, sparkling with lights and gushing hot metal and roaring with traffic, there lay the vast evil thing, ready to destroy whatever did not conform. Soon it would destroy the wood, and the bluebells would spring no more. All vulnerable things must perish under the rolling and running of iron.” I think The Rainbow and Women in Love are better books, but I still think this is a great book. Make love, not war, was the sixties cry, and this book was an anthem to that cry. Love one another? Lawrence saw it would save us all from the results of war and the alienation of civilization. Huh! Maybe he had something, there.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Clausen

    Before I can say anything about the novel, I have to talk about the novel's first paragraph. I love novel openings sometimes more than I love novels themselves. This novel has one of the best first paragraphs ever, to be ranked with "A Tale of Two Cities". "Ours is essentially a tragic age, so we refuse to take it tragically. The cataclysm has happened, we are among the ruins, we start to build up new little habitats, to have new little hopes. It is rather hard work: there is now no smooth road Before I can say anything about the novel, I have to talk about the novel's first paragraph. I love novel openings sometimes more than I love novels themselves. This novel has one of the best first paragraphs ever, to be ranked with "A Tale of Two Cities". "Ours is essentially a tragic age, so we refuse to take it tragically. The cataclysm has happened, we are among the ruins, we start to build up new little habitats, to have new little hopes. It is rather hard work: there is now no smooth road into the future: but we go round, or scramble over the obstacles. We've got to live, no matter how many skies have fallen." It almost seems like this is a first paragraph for another novel entirely -- certainly not a novel about bored housewives and sexual affairs. The first paragraph, of course, is a reference to the end of WWI, but it could speak to any of a number of times...the end of the French Revolution, the end of the Second World War, or even our own times. It is certainly not a paragraph about ennui. But in the wake of that first paragraph, I do need to think about the novel as a complete novel...and in this way, I feel like the first paragraph is an obstacle, because this is a novel about ennui, sexual desire, married life...and at times, also about class antagonisms and the relentlessness of progress. This latter themes -- class antagonism and the relentlessness of modernity -- clearly put the book in its late 1920s milieu. Presumably, the book was finished before the start of the great depression. But you can see the anxieties about the onset of the industrial world. You can see the intellectual class's mixed feelings toward Bolshevism. These themes come out in rich -- and often moralizing -- language. "This is history. One England blots out another. The mines had made the halls wealthy. Now they were blotting them out as they had already blotted out the cottages. The industrial England blots out the agricultural England. One meaning blots out another. The new England blots out the old England. And the continuity is not organic, but mechanical." How would we write this passage today? "This is (e)history (as seen from an updated Wikipedia post, which may or may not have been written by a hack). One world (digital) blots out another (analog). Now the anonymous "they" were posting their messages over truth. Now data wrangling was used to make truth anolog, disposable. The digital was blotting out the world. Fake, truth, digital, analog...in the great tide of (e)history, everyone's worlds were becoming private, mobile, cellular, applications to consume, worlds were becoming endlessly self-referential. There was no continuity, only the endless stream of streaming data that refused to flow in any kind of logic the (analog) world had known." Is that how D.H. Lawrence would have written about our times. LOL :) #D.H. Lawrence Delete his Facebook Account ;) And, even in the shadow of the book's great first paragraph, I feel like the book is a great one. It is, however, excessively ponderous in its word choice...it is full of internal monologue, narration (telling not showing), romantic language...it is a modern book written in Victorian language. ...for me, this is fine. Because modern writing, which frowns on the excessive and unnecessary often leaves me unfulfilled (not unlike Lady Chatterley). A book about dirty, sordid sex, shouldn't be too modern...it should smack of the Victorian. A final word about D.H. Lawrence -- I wonder how women feel about this book. If he does succeed at writing the character of Lady Chatterley, if women think he pulls this off as good as or better than female writers, then he has really done something marvelous as a writer -- something I'm not sure I'd be able to pull off myself.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rowena

    D.H. Lawrence is a writer I'm growing more fond of. He really does have a way with words. Connie Chatterley, in my opinion, was a rather insipid character. She marries Clifford Chatterley, who gets injured in the war and comes back paralyzed. Consequently, she begins an affair with the gameskeeper, Oliver Mellors and discovers who she is as a woman.Lawrence definitely pushed the boundaries for 1920s standards. I did sympathize with Connie's feelings of restlessness, aggravated by the fact that he D.H. Lawrence is a writer I'm growing more fond of. He really does have a way with words. Connie Chatterley, in my opinion, was a rather insipid character. She marries Clifford Chatterley, who gets injured in the war and comes back paralyzed. Consequently, she begins an affair with the gameskeeper, Oliver Mellors and discovers who she is as a woman.Lawrence definitely pushed the boundaries for 1920s standards. I did sympathize with Connie's feelings of restlessness, aggravated by the fact that her invalid husband was so insensitive and selfish. "Connie was aware, however, of a growing restlessness. Out of her disconnexion, a growing restlessness was taking possession of her like madness." "...deep inside herself, a sense of injustice, of being degraded, began to bloom in Connie," However, overall I felt Connie was rather vapid and boring. I also like Lawrence for his descriptions of nature, especially when he anthropomorphizes it: " And they were there, the short-stemmed flowers, rustling and fluttering and shivering, so bright and alive, but with nowhere to hide their faces, as they turned them away from the wind." Bravo, Lawrence!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    I really tried to read this classic, but when Lady Chatterly's lover appeared and fit the description of Groundskeeper Willie from the Simpsons, I just couldn't do it. I mean, D.H. Lawerence has written in Willie's accent phonetically, and Lady Chatterly was having an affair with a cartoon! I just couldn't read anymore from that moment on...

  24. 4 out of 5

    Pink

    I loved this. Absolutely adored the writing, the war references, character development and even the sex. I probably put off reading this for years as I thought it was the sort of book to be embarrassed reading. The literary equivalent of 50 shades of Grey. I'm not about to try that, but I will definitely be reading more D. H. Lawrence. 5 stars and I don't hand those out lightly.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Gabrielle

    Some books have a very deceptive reputation, and “Lady Chatterley’s Lover” is an excellent example. There was an obscenity trial about it, so it must be page after page of explicit sex (between the aristocrats and the help, no less!), right? Well, no, not really. There is sex, and it’s frankly described (and discussed at great lengths), and some naughty words are used – but it’s not that simple, nor is it gratuitous. Sir Clifford Chatterley was injured in the Great War, and one of the sad consequ Some books have a very deceptive reputation, and “Lady Chatterley’s Lover” is an excellent example. There was an obscenity trial about it, so it must be page after page of explicit sex (between the aristocrats and the help, no less!), right? Well, no, not really. There is sex, and it’s frankly described (and discussed at great lengths), and some naughty words are used – but it’s not that simple, nor is it gratuitous. Sir Clifford Chatterley was injured in the Great War, and one of the sad consequences of his injury is that he is now paralyzed from the waist down, and therefore, impotent. His wife Constance obviously feels neglected, but not just sexually: Clifford is a distant man who would rather lose himself in books and in plans to improve the productivity of his family’s mines than spend time bonding with his young wife. She gets to know the estate’s gamekeeper, Oliver Mellors, who, for someone of his occupation, is surprisingly well-read and philosophical, and eventually begins an affair with him. Sure, he’s a bit rough around the edges, but he also has a warmth and tenderness that Clifford certainly never had, even before he was confined to a wheelchair. Predictably, the affair is revealed and scandal ensues, in an awful mess of classism and hypocrisy. I only have very dim memories of my first time reading this novel, so when I picked it up again, I knew the story, and yet it felt like a brand new read, very fresh and strangely unexpected. One of my biggest surprises on this re-read was that I found myself (somewhat reluctantly) feeling bad for Clifford! I found him to be the most nuanced character in the book: he’s very proud, yet shy, and he has a very hard time adapting to life as disabled. When he tells Connie that she can have an affair, and that he’ll be happy to acknowledge an illegitimate child as his, if it means his family has an heir, I’m sure he meant it as a generous offer, and a show of concern for her fulfillment. But the poor bastard only drives the wedge between them further by telling her this, making her feel like a brooding mare - and like he simply couldn’t give a shit. Silly Cliff, this is not how you show a woman you care for her! His assumption that she will choose a man he would approve of is also ridiculous, but it made a certain amount of sense given how humiliated he must have felt to not be able to perform the deed himself: he expects her to choose someone who would be a lot like him, which is probably why he is horrified that she ends up sleeping with Mellors, who is his polar opposite. I did hate his insufferable class snobbery, and his admitting point-blank that he doesn’t think servants are people. His profound unhappiness is obviously no excuse for some of his behavior, but it did make me feel more sympathetic towards him than I expected to feel. To me, he was a wounded (not to mention emasculated) animal, struggling with the burden of a duty meant for a healthy, strapping lad he could never be again. Connie is not much more likable than her husband. She doesn't have a very developed personality (unless you count being spoiled as a personality), she can be spectacularly vapid, and her worldliness is inherited and accidental until her infamous affair and sexual awakening. But what is truly fascinating about Lady C is how well Lawrence manages to get into the head of a woman so realistically, from the very first page. The way she feels trapped, disconnected and out of place is captured perfectly, as is the frustration she tries to cope with. But mostly, I completely understood her dissatisfaction with relationships that kept intellectual stimulation and physical stimulation separate. I don’t know about other people, but for me, these things could never be mutually exclusive (it was always a disaster when they were), and it is not something that is often discussed in literature, even now. As silly as she could be, I can respect that he stuck to her guns regardless of what happens and what people think. Mellors’ gruffness and post-war disillusionment is as much an injury as Clifford’s paralysis: both men return from the War wounded in their own way, but Mellors’ damage makes him seek the solitary life of gamekeeper. He has more depth and substance than the other men Connie has known, and stimulates her both intellectually and physically. He is a lot more lucid and honest than the other characters, but there’s something ambiguous about him: he can slip in and out of the local “dialect” and accent, as if he was putting it on like a mask to satisfy some people’s idea of what he should be. I completely understood his cynicism and his urge to live away from the society he simply didn't fit in. That being said, Mellors has plenty of prejudices of his own, which did not make him particularly endearing to me. I’m not bothered by his use of the c-word, but I’m bothered by his use of the n-word! That racism (and homophobia) was more broadly accepted than classism in 1920s England is probably what depresses me most about this novel. One of the things that might have made this novel very shocking at the time it was published, is that Connie eventually loses that shame about sex, which is so deeply ingrained in the Anglo-Saxon mind that we still suffer the consequences of aeons of repression today. Could it be that it is not so much the sex that was a problem, but the fact that a woman could simply enjoy it without blushing? In some parts of the world, this is still a goddam problem! This book will always have a special place in my heart for that shamelessness. Yes, the sex scenes are drawn out and somewhat graphic (for the time), but not unlike real life sex, they are also sometimes awkward, and I actually appreciate that realism. I was impressed with Lawrence’s understanding of female sexuality: he even has one female character who talks openly about not wanting children and looking forward to the future, where they will be brewed in bottles and women won’t have to worry about getting pregnant anymore! And the way he describes the difference between purely physical fulfillment and the complete satisfaction of true intimacy was spot on – and I admit that some passages about her less than stellar pre-Mellors fling made me shake my head in sympathy. Been there, done that! Lawrence also clearly had a lot on his mind about the class warfare and industrialization of England, and when he gets verbose about that, I admit that it can get a little tedious. I actually completely agree with the point he wants to make, about how being increasingly disconnected from nature is making us worse as human beings in so many ways; but his argument for fixing the way the world is changing often ends up feeling just a bit retrograde. The fear of automation might still be a relevant subject, but his ideas about “real men” and “real women” have not aged well… But those little rants are not enough to overshadow the wonderful prose, and the beautiful use of symbolism: the dirty and bleak little Midland mining town as the stage for an infertile and frustrating marriage, the little cottage, lost in the woods and surrounded by freshly sprung flowers as a background for the transformative affair… Definitely not nearly as smutty as it is made out to be, this book is much more about the true nature of intimacy, Lawrence’s belief that it is a place where both body and mind could meet openly and naturally – and that societal and class restrictions have spoiled something beautiful and important. He expresses those ideas in a beautiful prose, that deserves to be read slowly and carefully. If you want to read something smutty, by all means, grab a collection of Anaïs Nin short stories and enjoy yourself. But if you want to read something insightful about how sex can anchor feelings between people and bridge many gaps society has imposed on us, then this is the book for you. Just try not to laugh too hard at Mellors’ name for his junk and at the unreasonable amount of times the word “womb” is used... A flawed but important novel. 4 and a half stars.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Paul Sánchez Keighley

    This book is: a warning of the dangers living in an industrialised society poses to the human soul, a study of the disintegration of post-war British aristocracy, and a manifesto for the recovery of the long-lost art of just chilling the fuck out and shamelessly enjoying sex (or, as Lawrence rather off-puttingly puts it, ‘the sex-thing’). More specifically, it’s about how sex has been perverted (no pun intended) and adulterated (still no pun intended) by dogma, decorum and, this being an early 20 This book is: a warning of the dangers living in an industrialised society poses to the human soul, a study of the disintegration of post-war British aristocracy, and a manifesto for the recovery of the long-lost art of just chilling the fuck out and shamelessly enjoying sex (or, as Lawrence rather off-puttingly puts it, ‘the sex-thing’). More specifically, it’s about how sex has been perverted (no pun intended) and adulterated (still no pun intended) by dogma, decorum and, this being an early 20th-century British novel, class, to the point where no parties derive any enjoyment from it. Men see it as a means to an end, and women’s sexual needs take a back-row seat to the more transcendent task being carried out by the man. Lawrence uses this celebration of primaeval ur-sex to attack, on the one hand, the prudish, old-fashioned British propriety governing class relations, and on the other hand the post-war industrialised world, which Oliver Mellors, the jaded titular lover, sees as seeping the manhood out of men, reducing them to mere 'labour-insects' without spunk. As scandalous as Lawrence’s ideas might have been in the roaring twenties, a lot of it will sound old-fashioned and, alas, heteropatriarchal to modern readers. Just as it’s genuinely exciting to see him proclaim sex should be enjoyed without shame and our bodies admired in all their raw accidental beauty, it’s also disappointing to realise the ideal sex he triumphantly touts is one in which the woman is hopelessly submissive to the man. To say nothing of the occasional racist, homophobic and anti-Semitic comments that slither their way into the prose. Lawrence is a lyrical, flowery writer, and I can see how his style is not for everyone. He has moments of brilliance - especially when describing nature, Lady Chatterley's introspections or even the industrial smokescape surrounding the estate. But then he also has a slightly irksome tendency to repeat himself. And I don’t just mean repeat the same idea in different words, but literally repeat the exact same sentence two or three times in a single paragraph. But overall, it’s a fascinating psychological novel. Lawrence doesn’t write sex scenes just to provoke; far from it, his long-winded portrayals of sex are so unabashedly honest, he takes the reader on a roller coaster ride of emotions, making you feel aroused, profoundly awkward, slightly ashamed and madly in love with life all within the course of a page. The complexity and nuance with which he approaches sex is an extension of his meticulous treatment of his character’s personalities. All characters are at a time sympathetic and irritating. There are no good guys or bad guys, just a bunch of victims of society and circumstance. The slow deterioration of Connie and Clifford’s marriage, brought about by his sexual impotence, is wonderfully done; both characters have arcs so long and fine one barely appreciates their curvature. I see a lot of fellow goodreaders saying this isn’t one of Lawrence’s best novels. If this is the case, I guess I’ll have no choice but to read more of his stuff.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ivana Books Are Magic

    More sensual than lyrical, more original than accomplished, this is an unusual novel! I've read it quite a long time ago (at least four or five years ago), but I remember it fondly. It is not exactly a significant achievement of literature, but it feels so fresh, I can't help liking it. Sure, it's messy, disorganized and even probably a bit dated but there is something original in it. It is not the best writing out there but there is substantial ambition and drive behind it that can't be missed. More sensual than lyrical, more original than accomplished, this is an unusual novel! I've read it quite a long time ago (at least four or five years ago), but I remember it fondly. It is not exactly a significant achievement of literature, but it feels so fresh, I can't help liking it. Sure, it's messy, disorganized and even probably a bit dated but there is something original in it. It is not the best writing out there but there is substantial ambition and drive behind it that can't be missed. There is passion in this novel and it is one of its merits. I heard it described as one of those novels you skip pages to get to the juicy parts..for me personally those pages about sex weren't particulary interesting (or juicy), so I there was no need to skip anything to get to them. I Not that I wasn't tempted to skip a page or two from time time to time- the novel wasn't one of those that makes you cluch to every page- but I didn't skip anything and I'm glad I didn't because novel as whole works quite well, if not perfectly. I don't think most people would read it only for juicy pages nowadays. Really, for todays' standards, there is nothing shocking in this one but I can see how for its time this novel must have been shocking....and it must have seem like something else! From my personal perspective, Lady Chatterley's Lover was a very good read, the plot itself was interesting enough to read, enough for me to ignore some of the books faults. The humour of this book is quite nice too, not pretendious at all, quite refreshing in fact. There are some flaws in the writing. I had a feeling that this is one of those novels that would have benefited from a good editor. In addition, somehow I had a feeling it could have been shorter, all things considering. Perhaps the fact it was banned, made us all read more into it than there is. Or not. I'm just not sure how much genuine profoudness there is this work...but isn't book that makes us think (even if we're doubting it with our thoughts) already proven itself capable of great depth? What did I like most about this novel? Well, I really liked the character of Constance. There was something very lively about her. The class gap was something that was well handled. Indeed, in some cultures belonging to different classes is like belonging to different worlds. As for characterization of characters, I'm not sure what exactly to make of it. I think that Lawrence was getting at something universal (perhaps even wise) in his exploration of characters. I'm not sure he has come full circle, though. The characters seemed a bit unfinished but maybe that was the point. Maybe we're supposed to guess what they were really feeling. I just can't tell for sure. I didn't have a feeling he has done the best job potraying his characters, but I certainly had a feeling he invested some effort into it. Another thing that impressed me were the touches of philosophy. It was lovely to read most of those philosophical passages. All in all, this is a fascinating novel. I rather liked it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Viv JM

    My preconception of this book was that it was just a story about a posh lady who wanted a bit of rumpy pumpy with the gamekeeper. I had never particularly felt inclined to read it, even though I have read other books by D H Lawrence and loved them, but this fitted a task for a couple of reading challenges I'm participating in, so I thought I'd give it a shot. It *is* a book about a posh lady having sexy times with the gamekeeper but it is so much more than that. Set after the First World War, th My preconception of this book was that it was just a story about a posh lady who wanted a bit of rumpy pumpy with the gamekeeper. I had never particularly felt inclined to read it, even though I have read other books by D H Lawrence and loved them, but this fitted a task for a couple of reading challenges I'm participating in, so I thought I'd give it a shot. It *is* a book about a posh lady having sexy times with the gamekeeper but it is so much more than that. Set after the First World War, there is a lot of dealing with the changes in the class system and advent of upward mobility. The gamekeeper himself had been in the Army and worked his way up to a high ranking. People born into the upper classes resented these kinds of upstarts and this is explored quite a bit in Lady Chatterley's Lover. There is also a fair bit of philosophising on the nature of love and the disconnect between the intellect and the more animal/sensual side of human nature. If I was reading this as erotica, I think I would be sorely disappointed. But if threading forget-me-nots through your pubic hair is your thing, you might feel differently :-)

  29. 4 out of 5

    Laurel

    This book was a bizarre experience for me. It reads much like a traditional, classic English novel, except with loads of descriptive sex and vulgar words mixed in for shock value. Instead of being shocked, though, I just found it all a bit tiresome and rather silly. Maybe it was the fact that Lawrence sometimes used words like "thee" and "thy" and "dost" mixed in with modern day vulgarities that added to the overall unintentional humor of it for me, or perhaps it was that the vulgarities were si This book was a bizarre experience for me. It reads much like a traditional, classic English novel, except with loads of descriptive sex and vulgar words mixed in for shock value. Instead of being shocked, though, I just found it all a bit tiresome and rather silly. Maybe it was the fact that Lawrence sometimes used words like "thee" and "thy" and "dost" mixed in with modern day vulgarities that added to the overall unintentional humor of it for me, or perhaps it was that the vulgarities were simply used so darned often. In any event, I found myself laughing out loud often. I also found myself cringing. C and F words aside, did anyone tell Lawrence the word "bowels" is not particularly appealing? Anyway, I can see why some people felt at the time this was quite simply a trashy romance disguised as literature. It kind of is. Well-written and intelligent, for the most part, but still a bit trashy nonetheless. The story is essentially this: Lady Chatterley's young husband is paralyzed from an injury at war, and is rendered impotent. This leaves the question: can Lady Chatterley be happy in her new marriage without sexual intimacy, or is she excused for seeking physical satisfaction elsewhere with another man? This may have made for a somewhat interesting story (whether you sympathized with her or not) had Lady Chatterley and her husband had a loving friendship or an otherwise soulful or intellectual connection of some kind. But, they didn't. They seemed to have little in common at all. And as such, the book became (for me) merely a story about a woman generally unhappy in her marriage who chooses to have an affair. The fact that her husband is paralyzed becomes almost irrelevant, as it appeared their marriage would have lacked love and passion (physical or emotional) regardless. While I understand Lawrence was trying to argue that both mind and body must be equally satisfied, particularly in a society Lawrence felt was growing more industrialized and thus emotionally and physically stilted (as was Lady Chatterley's husband), I don't think he did so in the most effective or impressive of ways. I think I had been hoping to read a book about the complexities of what truly defines intimacy, and how a sudden illness or disability can alter a relationship. But that was definitely not this book. That being said, there are somewhat interesting (and yet also at times rather dull) discussions on the state of the social classes and industrialization in post-WWI England, as well as some rather open (if not extremely overly stereotypical) dialogues about the differences in which men and women viewed sex at the time. Vulgar words excluded, the prose is quite lovely in places, and there's no doubt Lawrence can write. But in the end, it felt much to me like nothing more than a book trying way too hard to be provocative. I just could not take it seriously.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sarah (Presto agitato)

    There were some interesting discussions of class issues in early 20th century England, but Connie was pretty ditzy and Mellors was almost a non-entity for most of the book. What I couldn't get past, though, was the (*ahem*) flower arranging and the repeated mentions of bowels yearning for other bowels. I guess intestines are the unsung heroes of erogenous zones, but there were really too many anthropomorphized body parts overall. A book more memorable for the obscenity trial surrounding it than There were some interesting discussions of class issues in early 20th century England, but Connie was pretty ditzy and Mellors was almost a non-entity for most of the book. What I couldn't get past, though, was the (*ahem*) flower arranging and the repeated mentions of bowels yearning for other bowels. I guess intestines are the unsung heroes of erogenous zones, but there were really too many anthropomorphized body parts overall. A book more memorable for the obscenity trial surrounding it than for the content itself.

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