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Tout plutôt qu'être moi

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Tout plutôt qu'être moi PDF, ePub eBook Comme beaucoup d'adolescents, Craig est bien décidé à réussir sa vie. Il intègre l'une des plus prestigieuses prépas de New York, de celles qui font de vous un homme et assurent votre avenir. Seulement, au bout d'un an, il ne mange plus, ne dort plus, n'arrive plus à se lever, pense sans arrêt à ses devoirs, ses exams et à la jolie copine de son meilleur ami. Pour faire fr Comme beaucoup d'adolescents, Craig est bien décidé à réussir sa vie. Il intègre l'une des plus prestigieuses prépas de New York, de celles qui font de vous un homme et assurent votre avenir. Seulement, au bout d'un an, il ne mange plus, ne dort plus, n'arrive plus à se lever, pense sans arrêt à ses devoirs, ses exams et à la jolie copine de son meilleur ami. Pour faire front à tout ça, il ne trouve d'autre solution que de fumer de l'herbe en glandant pendant des heures. Craig est pris dans une spirale d'anxiété, d'inquiétudes, de peurs qui l'acculent et le paralysent. Comment en est-il arrivé là ? Comment est on poussé au point où la pression se fait tellement forte et nous, si faibles que la seule solution qui s'offre à nous, c'est d'en finir ? Dans ce roman tendre et émouvant, inspiré d'un séjour qu'il a effectué en hôpital psychiatrique, Ned Vizzini aborde ses propres démons, son long combat contre cette maladie qui l'accable depuis des années. D'un sujet aussi délicat et tabou que la dépression adolescente, Vizzini crée un livre tout à la fois drôle et empreint d'espoir.

30 review for Tout plutôt qu'être moi

  1. 5 out of 5

    Raeleen Lemay

    It's Kind of A Great Book

  2. 5 out of 5

    Richard Derus

    In respectful acknowledgment of Vizzini's suicide on 19 December 2013, I have cleared my rating of his book and removed my review. There is no more tragic occurrence in a family's life than the suicide of one of its members. My most heartfelt sympathy to Vizzini's wife and young son.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Megs ♥

    I came across this movie the other day on TV and watched it. I didn't think the movie was great or anything, but I thought the idea of the story was interesting. So I decided to give the book a try. I loved this book. It is about teens and it discusses suicide, sex, drugs and more, but it is a great book with an important message. Sometimes you have to get all the way to the bottom of the barrel before you can get back to the top. Craig is like a lot of teens nowadays. Overly stressed out. He is I came across this movie the other day on TV and watched it. I didn't think the movie was great or anything, but I thought the idea of the story was interesting. So I decided to give the book a try. I loved this book. It is about teens and it discusses suicide, sex, drugs and more, but it is a great book with an important message. Sometimes you have to get all the way to the bottom of the barrel before you can get back to the top. Craig is like a lot of teens nowadays. Overly stressed out. He is very smart and has a seemingly bright future ahead of him until he decides that being a teenager is simply too much to handle and he contemplated just how easy it would be to commit suicide. Luckily, instead, he calls a suicide hotline, but then he shocks his family when he checks himself into a mental hospital. Only problem is that the teen ward is closed down so he is forced to live with the adult patients and meets an interesting group of people. This was a very touching story and one that everyone who has ever had depression can probably relate to even if just a small amount. It's an inspiring story, because it shows that there are ways to get help. The self discovery that Craig goes through is amazing. He learns that no matter how bad you think your life is, there is always someone worse off. Of course we all know that, but we may forget it sometimes, especially when we are at our low points and throwing ourselves pity parties thinking things couldn't be worse. The characters were all well written, and I really feel the fact that the author had been in a mental hospital before showed through the vivid descriptions of the place and types of people you may see there. I'm not sure why, but I feel like the fact that he is a now successful person and openly admits that he had a stay in a mental hospital makes this book stand out to me in comparison to most other YA books that deal with mental illness. It's one thing to write about these things even having well researched the subject, but it's entirely different writing about them after experiencing them firsthand. Also, I thought the writing in general was good. I love when an author can write about such a sad subject, but make humor shine throughout. This book is about suicide, but it's not depressing. I laughed a few times as well. The only parts I didn't enjoy were the romantic ones. It seemed totally contrived. The chances of two teens put into an adult ward and falling in love are just so bad. The best part about this story was Craig's upbringing. This wasn't the typical suicide story where they kid had it rough, and in the end couldn't take it. He had a great family with supportive parents and a beautiful little sister. He was quite privileged, and I'm glad that author was able to show that mental illness does not discriminate. Even the most together person in the world can suddenly become depressed and the stigma attached to mental illness is something that infuriates me. Even though this book was made into a movie it doesn't seem too popular so maybe I'm in the minority. Maybe it just isn't well marketed. I have no idea, but I would recommend this book for sure.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Emma Giordano

    I'm so happy I finally read this book! It's been recommend to me for YEARS and I have no idea why I've been putting it off for so long. I loved the way this book captured depression and suicidal idealization. I really resonated with Craig's story. He really spoke to me and his journey of growth was very inspirational in my opinion. I also feel it had a more positive view of inpatient treatment/crisis intervention. A lot of YA books that approach this topic go the route of showing it as an unplea I'm so happy I finally read this book! It's been recommend to me for YEARS and I have no idea why I've been putting it off for so long. I loved the way this book captured depression and suicidal idealization. I really resonated with Craig's story. He really spoke to me and his journey of growth was very inspirational in my opinion. I also feel it had a more positive view of inpatient treatment/crisis intervention. A lot of YA books that approach this topic go the route of showing it as an unpleasant, unhelpful, "get-me-out-of-here-as-soon-as-possible" place. (And while that is true for my personal experiences), I think it is extremely important we have a positive view of these situations as well so not to discourage individuals from entering a hospital that may very well save their life. Overall, I truly loved this book. Definitely one of my new favorite mental illness novels! (Let's be real, I say that every time I read a new mental illness novel bUT I MEAN IT THIS TIME.) It's Kind of a Funny Story really stands out to me as a well-developed, beautifully constructed novel with an immense amount of depth and growth within it's pages. I would highly highly recommend!

  5. 4 out of 5

    jessica

    my immediate reaction after reading this: its kind of a funny boring story. oh boy. i cant help but feel a bit let down by this. throw in some guilt to the emotional mix and you have me not wanting to write this review. first things first - i understand that this book was written the month after vizzini spent some time in a psychiatric hospital and was based on his own experiences there (hence my guilt for rating this so poorly). i do think that was an asset to the story, as it really portrayed my immediate reaction after reading this: its kind of a funny boring story. oh boy. i cant help but feel a bit let down by this. throw in some guilt to the emotional mix and you have me not wanting to write this review. first things first - i understand that this book was written the month after vizzini spent some time in a psychiatric hospital and was based on his own experiences there (hence my guilt for rating this so poorly). i do think that was an asset to the story, as it really portrayed depression and anxiety authentically. however, as much as i hate criticising personal experiences, that was probably the only good thing about this book. everything else was just kind of meh. the main character is often described as having a ‘flat affect’, and thats exactly how i would describe this story - its just completely devoid of any sort of emotion. a boy admits himself into a facility, he meets some (heavily exaggerated) people, he gets released five days later. thats really all that happens. the writing and emotive qualities are just so simplistic and flat that it renders any sort of insightful moments ineffective. so whilst i thought some aspects of this book were decent, im not sure i would recommend it to anyone. i feel like there are many more impactful and effective stories about mental illness/health out there that would be better. ↠ 2.5 stars

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlyn

    I refuse to believe that writing a book from the perspective of a fifteen year old boy is any excuse for the level of transphobia, sexism, homophobia, and classism that defines this book. I kept trying to excuse the narrator--he's fifteen, he's sheltered, he's a stupid kid who wants to have sex with every female-bodied person he encounters (minus the poor ones, duh)--but that's not fair to fifteen year old boys. I was tolerating the book until Craig, our hero, refers to a human being as "he/she/ I refuse to believe that writing a book from the perspective of a fifteen year old boy is any excuse for the level of transphobia, sexism, homophobia, and classism that defines this book. I kept trying to excuse the narrator--he's fifteen, he's sheltered, he's a stupid kid who wants to have sex with every female-bodied person he encounters (minus the poor ones, duh)--but that's not fair to fifteen year old boys. I was tolerating the book until Craig, our hero, refers to a human being as "he/she/it" and that was probably the high point of his encounter with a trans-woman. (When she got human pronouns at all, it was always, always "he.") She was hypersexualized, devious, lying, manipulative, and disconcertingly hot. But it's OK because Craig is our HERO. He knows he's flawed (as he continuously reminds the reader, he has to be to end up in a psychiatric treatment facility--but, of course, his depression is his only real flaw and the cause of all of the ways in which he treats other people terribly) but he becomes the Savior of Six North, helping the other patients with his penis and his privilege. (I say this at the risk of sounding like an angry feminist. But, well, I'm a feminist and this book made me angry.) From the sexual assault survivor he teaches to love again (though his continued advances are clearly unwanted and unneeded), to the poor man he saves with the shirt off his own back, all of the other patients in Six North LOVE Craig and are sure to tell his parents what a great kid he is. The ones that don't love him are just too messed up to see what a great guy he is. Somehow, amid all the Craig-worship, we get a few moments to laugh at the silly conflict in the middle east and their silly religions. That's fun! Vizzini manages to pack in everything that could possibly mortify and still save room for tedious writing and contrived plot devices. I would say it was a waste of time, but a little bit of self-righteous indignation can be nice from time to time. Unfortunately, this was more than a little bit of self-righteous indignation.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    Young Adult books seem to have a few formulas: divorce, unrequited love, death of a parent, self-transformation, and as of late... vampires. Oh... and angst. Usually always angst. Sometimes these can be written quite loverly. As with the few that have been jostled around GR lately,Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, The Book Thief ,I Am the Messenger ... These authors will come along and break, twist, switch it up...make.you.think. And manage to rise above the whole stigma of what it means to b Young Adult books seem to have a few formulas: divorce, unrequited love, death of a parent, self-transformation, and as of late... vampires. Oh... and angst. Usually always angst. Sometimes these can be written quite loverly. As with the few that have been jostled around GR lately,Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, The Book Thief ,I Am the Messenger ... These authors will come along and break, twist, switch it up...make.you.think. And manage to rise above the whole stigma of what it means to be reading YA. I think I found another one. Ned Vizzini.... I knew nothing of you prior to finding you on the GMBA (Green Mountain Book Award) list. And, well... that introduced me to Zusak, Foer, Vowell... So, I jumped in all willy nilly. You didn't disappoint. In fact, you're one of those child prodigies---publishing your first book at 19. He began writing articles for The New York Times Press while still in school and continues to do so, getting an essay published in The New York Times Magazine….yeah, I hate you. It’s Kind of a Funny Story centers on Craig Gilner, 15. Basic overachiever, two parent household, precocious little sister, privileged. Not someone that I usually bond with. But, the writing is so dead on… so unpretentious and raw. I loved it. Usually I’d be all ‘cry me a river, buddy’ but to watch this 15 yr old lose it. (Yes, I don’t put it quite so eloquently…deal)—You really get sucked in. You get to think. How much pressure is there on kids to succeed? Did it start with my generation? I don’t remember the be all end all of my parents having to complete college. I come from a very blue collar situation, my father didn’t even finish junior high… Yet, it was ingrained in me to get into college and that if I didn’t, I’d be a nobody. A loser. Forget about making anything of yourself. Now it seems that even THAT is not enough. It has to be the right college, with the right grades (93s are average, my friend), you have to have the RIGHT extracurriculars… etc, etc. Who wouldn’t break down? Craig’s disconnect reminds me of Oskar in Extremely Loud…he has his own terms… his own language. ‘Tentacles’ are the ‘evil tasks that invade life and then jut out into new tasks that lead to new ones that take him away from his original goal -‘Cycling’ is when his brain won’t shut down, it repeats each tentacle… which leads to the ultimate failure. A ‘fake shift’ is when you think that these issues are being resolved, but it’s only a front… a temporary reprieve. ‘Anchors’ are the items that hold him down… keep him safe. He finally decides that he’s going to take the big leap off the Brooklyn Bridge…that this is the ultimate anchor, but instead finds himself self admitting into a psychiatric ward in a local hospital. Here is where Craig shines, finds his voice. And it’s not overtly formulaic. You see yourself in this fucked up kid…you see how he can relate to amphetamine heads and transvestites and how he can reach back and truly find his anchor…which happens to be making ‘brain maps’--- drawing the streets, highways, bridges, traffic circles, chaos, order, symmetry, beauty that’s in all of us, wrapped around firing neurons and SSRIs and warped brain cells. It’s truly beautiful. It’s funny, typical teenage boy shit and a joy to read. Sounds strange, but---not. Because this is life and it can suck and it can hurt and it can overwhelm and make you feel minuscule and that’s okay. Because every now and then ‘okay’ can be your anchor and maybe there will be less days when it will suck. When we realize, like said in this book ‘life can’t be cured, but it can be managed.’ We hope.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    It took me a while to finish, but I liked it. Full review to come!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lain

    Take a good helping of "The Perks of Being a Wallflower," add a heaping spoonful of "Girl, Interrupted," and stir in a dollop or two of "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close," and you'll have a good idea what you're going to get with "Funny Story." A week after the author, Ned Vizzini, was discharged from his own stay in the psychiatric ward of a New York hospital, he began the tale of depressed teen Craig Gilner. On the point of suicide, Craig checks himself into the hospital, hoping to come to Take a good helping of "The Perks of Being a Wallflower," add a heaping spoonful of "Girl, Interrupted," and stir in a dollop or two of "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close," and you'll have a good idea what you're going to get with "Funny Story." A week after the author, Ned Vizzini, was discharged from his own stay in the psychiatric ward of a New York hospital, he began the tale of depressed teen Craig Gilner. On the point of suicide, Craig checks himself into the hospital, hoping to come to find hope beyond his depression. Inside he gains perspective on his illness, his current lifestyle, and his own talents and strengths. Smoothly written with a strong voice, "Funny Story" is full of vivid, real characters. What rings less true is Craig's almost-miraculous recovery and ability to gain a new lease on life after only five days. However, the fairly unbelievably happy ending was welcome after the flood of depressing books that seem to be hitting the charts.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Candace

    Craig Gilner is an ambitious teen wanting to get into the best school, go to the best college, and get the best job. When he gets accepted into the Manhattan's Executive Pre-Professional High School, Craig believes he is headed on the right track. Soon, however, the pressure becomes too much. The class work, extracurricular activities, friends, girls, email, and pot smoking become more than he can bear. One night Craig decides to take his own life. Before he does he reach out to the Suicide Hotl Craig Gilner is an ambitious teen wanting to get into the best school, go to the best college, and get the best job. When he gets accepted into the Manhattan's Executive Pre-Professional High School, Craig believes he is headed on the right track. Soon, however, the pressure becomes too much. The class work, extracurricular activities, friends, girls, email, and pot smoking become more than he can bear. One night Craig decides to take his own life. Before he does he reach out to the Suicide Hotline. Craig goes to the hospital and admits himself into a mental hospital. From there he meets the residents and gets on the road to better understanding his illness. I found this novel to be right on the mark. I too have spent time in a mental hospital on suicide watch. I felt Ned Vizzini handled the issues of anxiety, depression and suicide with humor (You'll understand the humor when you read the novel.) and tacked, even the cycling of thoughts is handled well. It helps us to appreciate the story more knowing that the author spent time in a mental hospital. Unfortunately, Ned Vizzini committed suicide in December 2013. I recommend this book to better understand the issues of anxiety, depression and suicide.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lotte

    I read this in less than 24 hours. All I can say is, that it's still such an important read and one of all-time favorite books. I recommend it to everyone.

  12. 4 out of 5

    rachel

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. ETA: Ned Vizzini's death makes me feel sick to my stomach with sadness. Rest in peace, so sorry he lost his fight. The plot of this book -- teenage boy admitted to mental hospital for five days to treat anxiety/depression -- is super close to my heart and I wanted to love it, but the execution reminds me way too much of John Green. Those of you who love John Green: this is a recommendation! But personally, there are few types of characters that annoy me more than the dorky boy whose main ambition ETA: Ned Vizzini's death makes me feel sick to my stomach with sadness. Rest in peace, so sorry he lost his fight. The plot of this book -- teenage boy admitted to mental hospital for five days to treat anxiety/depression -- is super close to my heart and I wanted to love it, but the execution reminds me way too much of John Green. Those of you who love John Green: this is a recommendation! But personally, there are few types of characters that annoy me more than the dorky boy whose main ambition* is to touch the inside of a girl's vagina (and who eventually does, because he's a dork but not SUCH a dork that the hot girl won't let him fool around with her anyway). There are other things in life, boys! *: OK, Craig has other ambitions. This may be a bit of an exaggeration. Still. Vagina touching gets a lot of mention. Actually, it's not the teenage quest for sex that bugs me so much as the fact that in this book, like in Looking for Alaska, the first person boy protag is lusting after and objectifying a girl that specifically does not want to be objectified and is, in fact, made miserable when she is. Gross. At least (and I never thought I'd say this) in John Green's version, there's some acknowledgment and shame felt about this. It's unfortunate that that aspect of the book sucks, because it all comes to a very good ending. Vizzini's been in a psych ward, so he knows what the Shift from unwellness to wellness feels like upon becoming stabilized enough to leave -- it's wanting to [verbs! wherein any verb = a metaphor for "live"] rather than wanting to nothing. Yes. This is exactly the difference between depression/anxiety and NOT depression/anxiety. I don't know if that's a difference you can understand so acutely if you haven't experienced it, to be happy even to want to pee or to go grocery shopping or to commute to work or whatever. Also: I love Jimmy the schizophrenic. He is the best. Even though two stars is a little stingy for this one, one of those full stars is for him. He deserves it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sandra

    While I could relate to this book on some levels... there was something about it that didn't quite gel with me. Was it the character? Not at all. I actually kind of like Craig. Was it the plot? Nope. I actually books that deal with psychological issues. Was it relatable? It was. It dealt with depression quite a bit. Even had suicidal thoughts at some point. So this was not it either. But I had a big problem with how the story was told. It dragged out on a lot on the first part of the book. It was on While I could relate to this book on some levels... there was something about it that didn't quite gel with me. Was it the character? Not at all. I actually kind of like Craig. Was it the plot? Nope. I actually books that deal with psychological issues. Was it relatable? It was. It dealt with depression quite a bit. Even had suicidal thoughts at some point. So this was not it either. But I had a big problem with how the story was told. It dragged out on a lot on the first part of the book. It was only at about 45% when something really started happening. In short it was a bit boring. I'd have to say the movie was better paced than this.

  14. 4 out of 5

    April (Aprilius Maximus)

    DNF at page 155 for personal reasons. I found this book extremely triggering for my anxiety and depression and could not continue. It's fantastically written though and I still recommend it if it sounds interesting to you! Trigger warning: suicide and suicidal thoughts, self-harm, depression, anxiety.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Warda

    #BookTubeAthon Day 7, Book 7. Challenge: Read and watch a book-to-film adaptation. I think if you liked We Are the Ants, then you’ll like this book. A story about a boy who deals with depression and anxiety and learning to manage it in the most beautiful way.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alexa

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Despite its overly confident title, I failed to find the humor in It's Kind of a Funny Story. However, there were many things about this book that were, in fact, an absolute joke. I tend to be overly generous with regards to book reviews, so I let Funny Story take three stars. If I could, I would grant it two and a half stars, but that's not an option on Goodreads. And I will admit, there were a few things about the novel that I liked. I suppose I'll start with the good things, else I'll be too wo Despite its overly confident title, I failed to find the humor in It's Kind of a Funny Story. However, there were many things about this book that were, in fact, an absolute joke. I tend to be overly generous with regards to book reviews, so I let Funny Story take three stars. If I could, I would grant it two and a half stars, but that's not an option on Goodreads. And I will admit, there were a few things about the novel that I liked. I suppose I'll start with the good things, else I'll be too worked-up and frothingly-mad by the end of the criticism to actually say anything positive. The first half of the book was earnest, genuine, and not exactly powerful but definitely memorable--Craig is basically a good guy, and the reader can sympathize (or empathize, depending) with the kid. His friends seem like cardboard cutouts of teenagers (oh, wait, it's not time for negative criticism yet, is it?), but Craig remains fresh and realistic. Craig's descriptions and experiences of chronic depression are pretty accurate, initially. Those good things are heavy outweighed by the bad, however. Firstly, what makes me so mad about the book is its resolution. Craig hooks up with not one but TWO girls during his stay in psychiatric care. That seems a little ridiculous--the hospital sounded more like a four-star hotel than a center of mental health: I mean, a smoking lounge, poker games every other night? Just saying. I expected more formalities, structure, and healing--and became a sort of deus ex machina. Ohoho, teenage boy gets some action, he can't even remember> what it was like to suffer from anxiety! Craig just "gets better" almost overnight, which comes as a slap in the face to me. Let me tell you, it really does not happen like that. It also bothered me that Craig's problems seemed to obviously stem from school-related stress, yet this was almost ignored in his treatment. Not that that wasn't a valid cause for his distress; it was just misleading, if the reader did not know any better. Regardless of whether the cause was external or internal, though, I doubt that a teenage fling or two would have "fixed" everything. Overall, I was disappointed. There was so much potential--here was a tale of genuine teenage problems that didn't turn the victim into a punch line. Vizzini just had to ruin it by leaving readers with the moral that "true luv" and a positive attitude can nullify genuine illness. And to that I say, Vizzini, go perform a physical impossibility.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Idarah

    “Everybody has problems. Some people just hide their crap better than others.” Craig Gilner is a fifteen-year-old Brooklynite who’s spent the past year waiting for “The Shift” to take place. Up until a year ago he wasn’t an insomniac, could hold down more than four bites of food, didn’t break out in cold sweats, could finish his sentences, and didn’t have cycling thoughts about committing suicide. Through a series of events, Craig finds himself in the adult wing of the local psychiatric hospital w “Everybody has problems. Some people just hide their crap better than others.” Craig Gilner is a fifteen-year-old Brooklynite who’s spent the past year waiting for “The Shift” to take place. Up until a year ago he wasn’t an insomniac, could hold down more than four bites of food, didn’t break out in cold sweats, could finish his sentences, and didn’t have cycling thoughts about committing suicide. Through a series of events, Craig finds himself in the adult wing of the local psychiatric hospital where he meets a slew of different patients. Although each has a different version of events leading up to their admittance, they’re each attempting to cope with life. A semi-autobiographical coming-of-age novel, the postscript mentioned the following: “Ned Vizzini spent five days in adult psychiatric in Methodist Hospital, Park Slope, Brooklyn, 11/29/04-12/3/04. Ned wrote this 12/10/04-1/6/05.” Something that sticks in my mind is that Vizzini was only a couple of years older than me. Ironically, he lost his battle with depression and committed suicide in December of 2013, nine years after he was hospitalized. It’s a really sobering thought. It’s also why the last paragraph of the book seems so sad. He obviously really wanted to live, and saw himself thriving on into the future. It doesn't elude me that this book had similarities to Sylvia Plath's The Bell Jar, also semi-autobiographical, and much like Vizzini's life, hers ended much too early.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Drew

    4 1/2 stars. For such a moving and detailed look at an important subject, I can't believe how little I've heard about this book. I was hooked from the first sentence: “It’s so hard to talk when you want to kill yourself.” It's Kind of a Funny Story is a brutally honest contemporary following a teen who has a mental illness - yep, it's another one of those. But out of the thousands already published, this one stood out because it was so well written. My hat goes off to Mr. Vizzini. He gave an hones 4 1/2 stars. For such a moving and detailed look at an important subject, I can't believe how little I've heard about this book. I was hooked from the first sentence: “It’s so hard to talk when you want to kill yourself.” It's Kind of a Funny Story is a brutally honest contemporary following a teen who has a mental illness - yep, it's another one of those. But out of the thousands already published, this one stood out because it was so well written. My hat goes off to Mr. Vizzini. He gave an honest and informative description of exactly what mental illness - in this case, depression - does to a person. He showed the inner workings of fifteen year old Craig's mind, how depression slowly crept up on him and pressure built from places he'd never expected, such as school and his friends. Craig is afraid of what he calls the "Tentacles" overwhelming him. If he gets low grades, he thinks this will set him up to get into a bad college and get a bad job and thus fail at life. He's constantly anxious and over thinking things. After one particularly bad night, Craig gets admitted into a psychiatric hospital. The story follows Craig before he became depressed - what he calls "the time when he was happy" - and after, showing his days in the hospital and the friends he makes there who are just as screwed up as he is. This was a very emotional story. I can be pretty cold hearted when it comes to these kinds of books, but I found myself tearing up when Craig's mom found out that her son was planning to kill himself. The loving support provided by Craig's family was amazing; I loved the characters and their realistic relationships, the fantastic dialogue that made me crack up, and above all how the people in the hospital were painted as real, no matter what kind of illness they had. Some people think having a mental illness is "cool," a way to stand out, and that saddens me so much. Craig's friend Aaron was this way, but the author showed how horrible depression really is. I think this could be a very important book for someone who has never experienced depression. To be able to step into Craig's shoes was eye opening. “Sometimes I just think depression’s one way of coping with the world. Like, some people get drunk, some people do drugs, some people get depressed. Because there’s so much stuff out there that you have to do something to deal with it.”

  19. 5 out of 5

    Bern

    It's Kind of a Funny Story isn't my usual kind of book, to be honest. Its synopsis makes it clear from the get-go that it's a book about a character going through some tough times, which isn't usually my thing because I'm of the opinion that we go through enough tough times ourselves without watching or reading about other people having it too, but I have myself gone through depression and I thought, "Well, here's your chance to read about tough times you actually identify with." And weirdly enou It's Kind of a Funny Story isn't my usual kind of book, to be honest. Its synopsis makes it clear from the get-go that it's a book about a character going through some tough times, which isn't usually my thing because I'm of the opinion that we go through enough tough times ourselves without watching or reading about other people having it too, but I have myself gone through depression and I thought, "Well, here's your chance to read about tough times you actually identify with." And weirdly enough, especially for someone who runs out of the room with his index fingers stuck in his ears, screaming "LALALA, CAN'T HEAR YOU!", whenever the tragedies of the world are being discussed, I really did connect with Craig and his ordeal with depression. Mostly because despite the theme It's Kind of a Funny Story tackles, it never lets things get on the melodramatic end of the storytelling spectrum, but also because it is one of the most lovely and lighthearted books I have read to this day. Depression is a weird little thing, because you can never really know when or why it started; you can't get tested and be diagnosed with it; you can't have an unsafe encounter with a really bad situation and boom, it's over, you have depression, no way to back out now. Depression is a weird thing that slithers in if you let it, but that's exactly the catch: it's all inside you, inside your head. Not because it's not true, or because you're making it up, but because that's exactly where it lies. I mean, at least this is what I think, I'm not a psychiatrist, a shrink, or anything like that, but from my personal experience, that's how it works. And there was just an immensely helpful sense of relief or, I don't know, vindication, maybe, to read about Craig's time in a mental ward and realize that it wasn't just me who felt that, somebody understood. I mean, of course I know people who have gone through it as well, but for the most part, the way Craig dealt with his issues (or non-issues) was so similar to mine that I was staggered to realize that just as in the end he understood that problems are only as big as we make them to be, so did I. I loved the time I spent inside his head, learning about his passion for map-making, for watching other people play videogames, then for studying hard. I understood him in his self-applied pressure to never waste a second and subsequently wasting all of them, to desperately cling to the things you have and at the same time distance yourself from them. I didn't spend days or weeks reading It's Kind of a Funny Story, just mere 48 hours, but in those hours I laughed, and cried, and felt the chills all over. I read about people with all sorts of problems, from self-mutilation to drug abuse, and despite them not being real and the irrelevancy of my endless sympathy (and empathy) for them, I loved every single one of them. In the end, a book is just a book, but a book can nudge you in the right direction, and sometimes that's all you need. I don't know if I'll ever pick up It's Kind of a Funny Story again, or if I'll ever read another book like it, but I'm glad that, for these brief 48 hours, I felt like I had someone who understood me, and who made me understand that depression isn't this huge black hole you sometimes find yourself being sucked into; depression is just what happens when you forget to live. So live.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

    A book that deals with teen depression and mental illness. It’s a tough topic to tackle, but the author managed to blend some light humour in with the dark issues dealt within this book. I guess knowing that the author committed suicide himself made this book feel a little more morose. I only wish he took his own advice and listened to his own last words written in this book. 3 sad stars.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa

    I’m just going to put this out there, in case you have the preconceived notion - like I did - that this book is supposed to be a hilarious, slap-knee comedy about being a depressed teenager on the brink of suicide: this book really isn’t that funny, and I seriously wish it hadn’t been so desperate to be. To an extent, this book is enjoyable, even credible. Within the first 100 pages of this book, the MC-underdog Greg Heffley Craig Gilner won my heart with his realistic voice, and the portrayal o I’m just going to put this out there, in case you have the preconceived notion - like I did - that this book is supposed to be a hilarious, slap-knee comedy about being a depressed teenager on the brink of suicide: this book really isn’t that funny, and I seriously wish it hadn’t been so desperate to be. To an extent, this book is enjoyable, even credible. Within the first 100 pages of this book, the MC-underdog Greg Heffley Craig Gilner won my heart with his realistic voice, and the portrayal of his suffering, which evoked much empathy. I honestly felt pretty confident that I was bound to adding IKOAFS to my favourites list. In fact, for a while, I thought that literature had a new Holden Caufield to marvel over. Craig’s therapist: “What happened when you woke up?" Craig: "I was having a dream. I don’t know what it was, but when I woke up, I had this awful realization that I was awake. It hit me like a brick in the groin." CT: "Like a brick in the groin, I see." C: "I didn't want to wake up. I was having a much better time asleep. And that's really sad. It was almost like a reverse nightmare, like when you wake up from a nightmare you're so relieved. I woke up into a nightmare." CT: "And what is that nightmare, Craig?" C: "Life." CT: "Life is a nightmare." C: "Yes.” You see what I mean? What sucks is that once Craig booked himself into the hospital for rehab, most of his authentic qualities flew right out the window. What began as a mostly-serious/moderately-playful book changed too quickly to revolve around a boy who forgot all about his very life-altering problems because people made him eat every meal, empathized with him, and because a pretty girl paid attention. The book felt forcefully light; instead of focusing on the depression that is taking over Craig’s life, the final 75% of the book centers on the relationships Craig has and makes, and seems to leave the biggest, heaviest, most important part of the story behind to give way to not-so-funny one-liners and bad, bad jokes. I appreciate that Vizzini recognizes that depression is often a hard subject to take, and that entertainment is a great tool to lighten the mood, but I was extremely put-off by the flippant way he treated such a serious topic, and also how he alienated his MC ‘s voice, making everything within the first quarter of the book seem like some big scam. It should also be said that the last 50 pages of the book are basically one huge lecture given by preachy doctors and even Craig himself, and that the resolution (view spoiler)[or lack thereof (hide spoiler)] leaves much to be desired. Aside from the too-tidy way Craig’s story was handled, Vizinni’s writing isn’t very tight - not only did slang take over nearly every conversation, but basic sentences seemed off-beat and awkwardly phrased. What also provided some eyebrow-raising was the depiction of Craig’s love interests. Neither Nia nor Noelle’s relationships with Craig were developed, nor were they based on anything else than lust, and it was really hard to enjoy any scenes featuring either girl. Every single relationship Craig made in this book seemed shallow as a puddle, though fortunately there was no DPS going on. I don’t think I’ll be reading any more Ned Vizzini, despite how much promise the beginning of this book held. Something about his writing style has really, really grated on me, to the point where I could hardly help myself from giving up on this book. Maybe it's me being over-critical, or the fact that I know first-hand about depression and that I don't, in any way, think there's anything funny about it, but there's something about this book that has very seriously rubbed me the wrong way, whatever its source may be. Still, IKOAFS is a pretty popular reading choice amongst teens – so much so that it’s even been adapted into a movie – so I wouldn’t say not to give it a chance, since you might feel differently than I do. 2/5 stars

  22. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

    This reader has the knack of choosing depressive stories, as does this reader have a knack for being affected by depressing stories. I was very interested in this one though as the author lost his life to the disease, and I can see through his character Craig the author had so much going on in his mind, but what a clever guy he must have been. There was a method to the madness in Craig's racy mind of mind maps, teenage angst and the depression that he was afflicted with. What a talented author w This reader has the knack of choosing depressive stories, as does this reader have a knack for being affected by depressing stories. I was very interested in this one though as the author lost his life to the disease, and I can see through his character Craig the author had so much going on in his mind, but what a clever guy he must have been. There was a method to the madness in Craig's racy mind of mind maps, teenage angst and the depression that he was afflicted with. What a talented author who writes Craig's story. An extremely bright teenager who realises the signs of his over-thinking mind and checks himself into hospital for having thoughts of suicide. There are little funny bits here, and as I read this some time ago I am reaching for my thoughts, but the conversation Craig has with a telephone support person. He actually couldn't reach the suicide hotline, and begins to wonder can he do anything right. The nuances and self-deprecating thoughts of a very clever yet depressed teen seem to be so spot on. Meeting a special friend in the hospital was a turning point for Craig, here is a favourite part for me, in the form of a handwritten note from a girl to a boy. "I'M TAKING A BREAK FROM YOU. CAN'T GET TOO ATTACHED. THE NEXT MEETING WILL BE TUESDAY, SAME TIME AND PLACE. DON'T BE WORRIED THAT IT'S SUCH A LONG WAIT. I THINK YOU'RE LOVELY."

  23. 4 out of 5

    Becca

    I really cannot describe how much this books means to me. I read it for the first time when I was only twelve years old on a trip to Wisconsin and it helped me come to terms with a situation in my life I really couldn't understand. I had read it many times between that and the last time I read it, sometime last year, when I felt almost exactly like the main character in this book did. I really cannot say in any words how much this book helped me in my life. I hope Ned Vizzini knew how much his bo I really cannot describe how much this books means to me. I read it for the first time when I was only twelve years old on a trip to Wisconsin and it helped me come to terms with a situation in my life I really couldn't understand. I had read it many times between that and the last time I read it, sometime last year, when I felt almost exactly like the main character in this book did. I really cannot say in any words how much this book helped me in my life. I hope Ned Vizzini knew how much his book helped people. I really do.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    It's Kind of a Funny Story was better than I was expecting. Having read a lot of these YA mental health books, I've started to notice this really annoying reoccurring theme of pretentiousness, so it was nice to find one that's a bit more down-to-earth with a main character who just seems like an average guy who anybody can identify with. Not only is it more relatable, but I think it's important for teen readers who have a mental illness themselves to be able to find a character who shares their It's Kind of a Funny Story was better than I was expecting. Having read a lot of these YA mental health books, I've started to notice this really annoying reoccurring theme of pretentiousness, so it was nice to find one that's a bit more down-to-earth with a main character who just seems like an average guy who anybody can identify with. Not only is it more relatable, but I think it's important for teen readers who have a mental illness themselves to be able to find a character who shares their problems but who can also identify with the same types of concerns, lifestyle and dreams. Craig Gilner is a New Yorker with a huge dream - to get into one of the best high schools and get a good job along the way. As usual with these types of prestigious schools though, the pressure and competition is very intense, and admitting failure or asking for help can be a humiliating experience. It isn't look before Craig tries the unthinkable and is sent to a mental hospital. Here he finds a trio of friends with their own mental health issues, but more importantly than that, they help Craig face his fears and start to understand where his anxiety is coming from. This book is very well-written and also not nearly as dark or nightmarish as some books on mental health can be. Instead it's also a good coming-of-age tale about overcoming your problems at your own pace, getting an education but keeping a balance between work and life at the same time, and making new friends. My only real problem with it was that often it's very predictable and takes the same route as many other books do. If you've already read Girl, Interrupted, Cut or Go Ask Alice, you'll see what I mean.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Romie

    By the time I finished this book, I was in tears. Because this end is full of hope, and this hope wasn't enough for the author, and it breaks my heart to know some people won't ever recover from depression. But let's talk about this book a bit, shall we ? The writing is raw, if you've been through or are suffering from depression, you'll understand what I'm talking about. What Craig is going through, it hits home for many people, it hits home for me, and I think you have to be in a specific mood By the time I finished this book, I was in tears. Because this end is full of hope, and this hope wasn't enough for the author, and it breaks my heart to know some people won't ever recover from depression. But let's talk about this book a bit, shall we ? The writing is raw, if you've been through or are suffering from depression, you'll understand what I'm talking about. What Craig is going through, it hits home for many people, it hits home for me, and I think you have to be in a specific mood to read this. At least the first half. Don't start this book if you're low, it won't make you feel better. I personally read this book when I was both feeling not really well and hopeful for the future. Craig is a very strong character, even if he doesn't feel brave at all, because calling the Suicide Hotline, if you don't know, is fucking BRAVE. It's brave to choose to live when all you want to do is to die. I was so proud of him, so extremely proud. I really appreciated his character development, I loved the people he met and helped, the choices he made while staying at Six North, the way he now considers his life... I'm just proud of him. It's an amazing story, it deserves to be read by everybody - especially the families of those suffering from mental illnesses - it's really important. If you feel like it, if your mental state is at the right place, do yourself a favor, and read this book. 4.5 Around the Year in 52 books 2016. 34. A book about mental illness.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Grace (BURTSBOOKS)

    I love this book with all my heart. I read it on a trip to Cuba with my family and I spent the whole day reading. I didn't talk to anyone. I was in Cuba on the beach and all I wanted to do was read this piece of art.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Wardrip

    Reviewed by Me for TeensReadToo.com Ned Vizzini has a distinct advantage over other authors who write about teen depression, attempted suicide, and the ins and outs of psychiatry--as a teen he was clinically depressed and even spent time in a psychiatric hospital. That experience has allowed Mr. Vizzini to bring to life the kinds of situations that were once largely absent in teen fiction; that of the fact that not all teens are happy, spontaneous, happy-go-lucky youths. For Craig Gilner, gaining Reviewed by Me for TeensReadToo.com Ned Vizzini has a distinct advantage over other authors who write about teen depression, attempted suicide, and the ins and outs of psychiatry--as a teen he was clinically depressed and even spent time in a psychiatric hospital. That experience has allowed Mr. Vizzini to bring to life the kinds of situations that were once largely absent in teen fiction; that of the fact that not all teens are happy, spontaneous, happy-go-lucky youths. For Craig Gilner, gaining acceptance into the elite Executive Pre-Professional High School in Manhattan is not the end of his problems, but only the beginning. All the studying, the cramming, the all-nighters he pulled to get high marks in his old high school and ace his entrance exam now seem mediocre, at best, at his new school. Craig realizes quite early on that he's not brilliant, he's not at the top of his class--he is, in fact, average. For a guy who worked as hard as Craig did, with such obsessive determination, this is a blow not just to his ego, but to his very soul. Craig soon finds himself unable to eat, unable to sleep, unable to find joy in just about everything. As he realizes he's clinically depressed, he tells his shrink--excuse me, psychiatrist--that his only joy in life comes from peeing. Yes, peeing. You go in, you get it done, you accomplish what you set out to do, and you're finished. It's pretty sad that going to the bathroom seems to be the highlight of his day (he even manages to stretch each trip out to about five minutes), but it's also the truth. Dr. Minerva, for $120/hour, is attempting to help Craig figure out exactly why he's depressed and how to overcome it. But Craig no longer thrives on a life of complexity; for him, life is a nightmare. And as his depression leads to thoughts of suicide, he's not even surprised to find that there's an 800 number he can call. And after taking the plunge and calling 1-800-SUICIDE Craig hikes over to the local emergency room at the hospital, where he meets Dr. Mahmoud (who is not a terrorist). From there, Craig is checked into a psychiatric hospital, and he meets a motley crew of patients who, amazingly enough, become better friends to him than the ones he had before he went in ever were. For Craig, being in the hospital might just save not only his life, but his sanity and his will to keep on keeping on. IT'S KIND OF A FUNNY STORY is a great read. Filled with issues that plague a large number of teens today, the author has managed to take sensitive topics and deal with them in a humorous way that never seems disrespectful. A very enjoyable, thought-provoking read.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Lumos

    A solid 4.5/5 stars. After reintroducing reading for pleasure into my life in 2017, I came to discover that I enjoy contemporary novels with thought-provoking dialogues, complex social issues, comedic elements, and witty characters, so this book sounded perfect and it was. When I was 18-years-old, I was going through what could be considered an early quarter-life crisis – I was uncertain, insecure and ill-prepared for the competitive and rigorous academic environment at my college. At that time, A solid 4.5/5 stars. After reintroducing reading for pleasure into my life in 2017, I came to discover that I enjoy contemporary novels with thought-provoking dialogues, complex social issues, comedic elements, and witty characters, so this book sounded perfect and it was. When I was 18-years-old, I was going through what could be considered an early quarter-life crisis – I was uncertain, insecure and ill-prepared for the competitive and rigorous academic environment at my college. At that time, I was fortunate enough to stumble upon the trailer for It’s Kind of a Funny Story on Youtube. I thought it was one of the most awesome things I have ever seen, and devoured the movie in one-sitting not once, but twice and then a third time a few days later. I am not going to say the movie was perfect but Roxane Gay, an author I admire, once said (and I am paraphrasing here) when we cherish a story, it becomes challenging to look at it with a critical lens. That film helped me feel a little less lonely during a tough time, but of course, the book is always better than the movie, right? Yup. Weird things happen when a book is converted into a movie, just like when foreign languages are translated into English subtitles - the intention is good but inaccurate. Reading It's Kind of a Funny Story answered a lot of questions and plot holes that the film adaption (understandably) left unanswered. There is only so much you can fit into an hour and a half of footage. It's Kind of a Funny Story is an insightful and funny story about Craig, a 15-year-old boy who struggles with depression and suicidal ideations. Craig has a pretty good life and he cannot pinpoint why he is depressed. He goes to a good school, he sort of has a close group of friends, and he’s a hardworking kid who appears to have a lot going for him, but he isn’t happy. Craig spends copious and unhealthy amounts of time conspiring his death. It even gets to the point where he creates a plan to end his life, but a call to a national suicide hotline prompts him to admit himself to a psychiatric hospital. I found out that the gifted,Ned Vizzini, passed away only after placing an order for this book. I did a quick Google search as I always do before reading a new book and the news of his death sent a chill down my spine. It was hard for me to believe that Ned Vizzini was actually gone. He blessed the world with his writing, speaking engagements, humor, and advocacy. I know this story will resonate with those coping with mental illness and encourage them to seek out help for their mental health concerns. My sincerest condolences to the friends and family members of Ned Vizzini. As a 20-year-old, all I can say is that I wish I read this book while I was in middle-school because as a teenager who coped with a mental illness, I would have found Craig’s situation to not only be relatable, but insightful. A lot of teenagers and young adults experience worries related to uncertainty – what college am I going to go to? What type of job will I have? When am I going to get married? How many kids am I going to have? When something in our detailed plans goes amiss, the negative thought spiral kicks into gear and the probability of experiencing burn out is high, which is exactly what happens to Craig. A reoccurring theme in this book is dealing with insecurities and change. Prior to becoming clinically depressed, Craig was a hardworking kid with plenty of ambition, but going to a top-tier high school envelops him with doubts about his abilities. Everybody around him seems to be moving forward while he’s stuck in a time wrap moving backward. He feels guilty for not being able to balance out a life, extracurriculars, and academics and views the students that can as being the gifted few or just plain more hardworking than him, but Craig doesn’t understand the gravity of his illness just yet - how the chemical imbalance that is causing his mood to dip is also impacting his motivation and as he says, his ability to function like a normal human being. I don’t think I’ve ever been able to relate to a character so much before. Craig also experiences a constant battle of being unable to understand his illness. His family is far from perfect, his father often makes inappropriate comments around him, but at the end of the day, they’ve got his back. Even after going to see a physician and therapist, it’s difficult for Craig to see his depression as an illness and when he’s reassured by his mental health team that it is normal for patients to feel this way, instead of feeling reassured, he ends up feeling worse. When you're going through illness, sometimes we want to pretend we're in a unique narrative of our own story instead of a collective. And figuring out we're not special can be a huge blow, which was the case for Craig. However, the strength of this book is the secondary characters. Craig is great, but the relationships he has with the fellow psychiatric hospital patients is superb. I loved reading about their daily interactions - the jokes they made, the types of food they are, the adventures they went on, and just their struggles. They were like the light at the end of Craig's tunnel vision, which can happen when you're young. In my opinion, the other patients helped Craig realize that he has a lot of time ahead of him; he's a talented kid; he shouldn't lose hope, and they reminded him he was privileged enough to have a good family and house to go back to once he checked out of the hospital. Roxane Gay said in her book, Bad Feminist, in the developed world, every single person has something over another. And as Craig has proven in this book, pain is subjective, and outward success does not equate to inner happiness, but sometimes we just forget to remind ourselves of our blessings and I think being able to see the psychiatric ward helped Craig be reminded of that. I would HIGHLY recommend this books times infinity if you're in middle-school or high-school and are coping with mental illness. I also think this would be a great read for those who are supporting a loved one with mental illness, who want to understand more about the illness, and even for those that work in the mental health sector.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    A Synoptic Version of a Review Written but then Deleted. Accidentally This is a book about a kid who thinks about killing himself but doesn't. It is edgy; I mean that there is sex and f-bombs in the book. The characters do drugs too. Kids will like that, some parents will get their closed little minds into a fucking tangle over it. I wrote a whole review and then accidentally refreshed the page and lost it. Oh well. I'm not even going to try to re-write what I had written. Your lose. You missed a A Synoptic Version of a Review Written but then Deleted. Accidentally This is a book about a kid who thinks about killing himself but doesn't. It is edgy; I mean that there is sex and f-bombs in the book. The characters do drugs too. Kids will like that, some parents will get their closed little minds into a fucking tangle over it. I wrote a whole review and then accidentally refreshed the page and lost it. Oh well. I'm not even going to try to re-write what I had written. Your lose. You missed a book report. You also missed me talking about myself in ninth grade and how I related to this passage: "How long have you had feelings like that, Craig?" "Since last year, mostly." "What about before then?" "Well... I've had them for years. Just less intense. I thought they were, you know, just part of growing up." "Suicidal feelings." I nodded. Dr. Barney stared at me, his lips puckered. What was he so serious about? Who hasn't thought about killing themselves, as a kid? How can you grow up in this world and not think about it? It's an option taken by a lot of successful people: Ernest Hemingway, Socrates, Jesus. Even before high school, I thought it would be a cool thing to do if I ever got really famous." I also talked a bit about the kids in Bergenfield, New Jersey who in 1987 killed themselves. This was one town over from where I lived at the time. I didn't add a link to the song "New Jersey Exit" by Alice Donut because I couldn't find a version of it online. It is a wonderful song though about an event that deeply affected my childhood. You should listen to it. And other Alice Donut songs because they are really good. The lyrics to the song I was going to link to are as follows: Yeah, Due to acne. Due to heavy metal. Due to Fred and Barney, Wilma and Pebbles. New Jersey Exit Suzy's got the flu. Well, maybe this will clear up her sinuses She's got nothing better to do. You're kids are having a gas (in the garage)(3X) Hah, Hah, Hah, Hah, Hah! Daddy comes home To the kiddie circus. Charlie, get out of that car. Sorry, Daddy got rigor mortis. You're kids are having a gas (in the garage)(3X) Hah, Hah, Hah, Hah, Hah! (What's the use, anyway?) If something's pretty much dead, you might as well shoot it. What will this do to car insurance? How 'bout the family unit? Seven at a time Death extravaganza Little Joe and Hoss Never did this on Bonanza You're kids are having a gas (in the garage)(3X) Hah, Hah, Hah, Hah, Hah! You're kids are having a gas (in the garage)(2X) You're kids are getting gassed That is where I was at when I erased the fucking thing.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ephemera

    A lot of people have summarised this already, so I won't bother. I started off really liking the book because Craig is a character that I found easy to relate to, as I have depression and some similar thoughts to his. At some point, however, it fell kind of flat, especially when Noelle was introduced. At that point it became all about sex and how much he wanted it, and sex was treated like the key to overcome his depression...all wrong. At that point, the characterisation seemed to flop a bit, t A lot of people have summarised this already, so I won't bother. I started off really liking the book because Craig is a character that I found easy to relate to, as I have depression and some similar thoughts to his. At some point, however, it fell kind of flat, especially when Noelle was introduced. At that point it became all about sex and how much he wanted it, and sex was treated like the key to overcome his depression...all wrong. At that point, the characterisation seemed to flop a bit, the writing became dull and it was a pain to finish the book. I was bothered how, at the end, he's pretty much all better. That's not how it works, especially since some of the threads of Craig's thoughts (ie. realising that he liked being in a structured community where food was handed to him) were dumped by the wayside and not dealt with because he was too busy thinking about genitals. I would be able to excuse that kind of ending for the sake of the plot if it weren't for that, because it felt really inconsistent, it felt like an easy fix. In the end, it gives the impression that mental illness for teens can be just dealt with, it's an ephemeral event easily solved by being more relaxed with your life when, in reality, it's a lot more complex. In the end, I am glad that this book makes depression a more easily approachable subject for teens, I am just disgruntled with the execution and the way the theme is treated.

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