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The Iliad of Homer PDF, ePub eBook

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The Iliad of Homer

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The Iliad of Homer PDF, ePub eBook When John Keats first read Chapman's translation of the epics of "deep-brow'd Homer," he was so overwhelmed, so overcome with the joy of discovery, that he compared his experience to finding "a new planet." When you join Professor Elizabeth Vandiver for these lectures on the Iliad, you come to understand what enthralled Keats and has gripped so many readers of Homer. Indeed When John Keats first read Chapman's translation of the epics of "deep-brow'd Homer," he was so overwhelmed, so overcome with the joy of discovery, that he compared his experience to finding "a new planet." When you join Professor Elizabeth Vandiver for these lectures on the Iliad, you come to understand what enthralled Keats and has gripped so many readers of Homer. Indeed, it is probably true to say that only the Bible rivals Homer for sheer depth and scope of cultural and literary influence. Professor Vandiver makes it vividly clear why, after almost 3,000 years, the Iliad remains not only among the greatest adventure stories ever told, but also one of the most compelling meditations on the human condition ever written. 12 Lectures: 1. Introduction to Homeric Epic 2. The Homeric Question 3. Glory, Honor, and the Wrath of Achilles 4. Within the Walls of Troy 5. The Embassy to Achilles 6. The Paradox of Glory 7. The Role of the Gods 8. The Longest Day 9. The Death of Patroklos 10. Achilles Returns to Battle 11. Achilles and Hektor 12. Enemies' Tears—Achilles and Priam.

30 review for The Iliad of Homer

  1. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Chaikin

    Vandiver gets four stars because she does very well within the (limited) context of these Great Courses. Overall it's very light stuff, but she makes it interesting, captures a lot and adds in several interesting details. She has lectures on the Odyssey, the Aeneid and on Greek Mythology and I may just try them all.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    Good little course in the Iliad. Vandiver's passion is quite clear and she makes connections to later literature as well. There is a good background selection as well.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I've been trying to read The Iliad for months and could not stay focused long enough to get through a few pages. So many characters, and the endless battles. Disclaimer: I still haven't read it. However, I have now listened to this lecture series by Elizabeth Vandiver. It is a great introduction and overview of the story. What I thought was most interesting was the explanation of honor, family life, gods and class systems in 800 B.C. vs. today. All of the same elements are present today, but the I've been trying to read The Iliad for months and could not stay focused long enough to get through a few pages. So many characters, and the endless battles. Disclaimer: I still haven't read it. However, I have now listened to this lecture series by Elizabeth Vandiver. It is a great introduction and overview of the story. What I thought was most interesting was the explanation of honor, family life, gods and class systems in 800 B.C. vs. today. All of the same elements are present today, but they do not have the same meaning. If you read this book and transpose your own experiences onto the characters, you could be vastly misinterpreting the story. But one thing I can say with some confidence: Achilles was a real jerk. Another favorite part - when Ms. Vandiver talks about the continued relevance of this 2,500+ year old story, she recites Achilles in the Trenches by Patrick Shaw-Stewart from WWI...very touching.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Darla

    Spectacular lectures regarding Homeric texts within their cultural context as well as the significance of specific linguistics which give the readings more depth. I would definitely recommend these to anyone who has read (or wishes to read) The Iliad, as these lectures have the potential to truly broaden the reader's understanding of ancient Greek civilization and cultural mores of the time, along with figures of speech and double-entendres of the Greek language and how they are used within the Spectacular lectures regarding Homeric texts within their cultural context as well as the significance of specific linguistics which give the readings more depth. I would definitely recommend these to anyone who has read (or wishes to read) The Iliad, as these lectures have the potential to truly broaden the reader's understanding of ancient Greek civilization and cultural mores of the time, along with figures of speech and double-entendres of the Greek language and how they are used within the readings to create mental imagery and extended meaning, all of which deepen comprehension of the piece, itself.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Terry Southard

    A 12 lesson (6 hour) discussion of The Iliad. Elizabeth Vandiver is a jewel of a teacher. I would love to sit in her class. So, next best thing? Teaching company CDs. Thoroughly enjoyed. Now on to the Odyssey.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Innastholiel

    This course has taught me more about the Homerian epics (and Ancient Greece in general) than 4 years of studying Ancient Greek did, tbh. I mean, to be fair, we only covered the Iliad and the Odyssey for like half of one school year, but still. Vandiver is such an excellent lecturer that I’ve actually already picked up two more of her courses, the one on the Odyssey, and the one on Greek Tragedies. I’m going to listen to the one on the Odyssey next because from what she says in this course, these This course has taught me more about the Homerian epics (and Ancient Greece in general) than 4 years of studying Ancient Greek did, tbh. I mean, to be fair, we only covered the Iliad and the Odyssey for like half of one school year, but still. Vandiver is such an excellent lecturer that I’ve actually already picked up two more of her courses, the one on the Odyssey, and the one on Greek Tragedies. I’m going to listen to the one on the Odyssey next because from what she says in this course, these two were meant to be listened to together.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Clif Hostetler

    Listening to these lectures is a good way to get ready for a discussion about The Iliad. The group, Great Books Kansas City, is planning to discuss The Iliad later this month, and I'm trying to get myself into the ancient Greek state of mind. Visit this link for info on the group. http://www.goodreads.com/group/show/9... Also, our blog link: http://greatbookskc.blogspot.com/ These lectures are the equivalent of reading the commentary that comes with some written versions of the Iliad. Professor Va Listening to these lectures is a good way to get ready for a discussion about The Iliad. The group, Great Books Kansas City, is planning to discuss The Iliad later this month, and I'm trying to get myself into the ancient Greek state of mind. Visit this link for info on the group. http://www.goodreads.com/group/show/9... Also, our blog link: http://greatbookskc.blogspot.com/ These lectures are the equivalent of reading the commentary that comes with some written versions of the Iliad. Professor Vandiver provides an insightful analysis of selected episodes in the Iliad. Her lectures make the Iliad much more understandable. She explains the cultural assumptions that lie behind Homer's lines. She repeatedly visits the Iliad's overriding theme of what it means to be human and what the Iliad has to say about the human condition. She probes the relationship of this great epic to the tradition of orally transmitted poetry. The Iliad is one book that is very appropriately listened to in the audio format because originally it was presented orally to a listening audience. That was in the days before iPods. But interestingly, it is the iPod that makes the epic readily available in its original medium, the human voice. These recorded lectures provide access to one of the best lecturers, and payment of college tuition is not required. What a bargain!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Sebesta

    This was a great introduction to the subject of the Iliad. Vandiver is passionate, and there are moments where she gets really, really excited about some Greek word or nuance in the epic. But she also never gets lost in the weeds–she brings out her excitement about small (and large) points to drive home the major themes of the Iliad: death and mortality, glory and honor, the human condition, the admixture of good and evil in every person's character. She also does a great job of bringing out imp This was a great introduction to the subject of the Iliad. Vandiver is passionate, and there are moments where she gets really, really excited about some Greek word or nuance in the epic. But she also never gets lost in the weeds–she brings out her excitement about small (and large) points to drive home the major themes of the Iliad: death and mortality, glory and honor, the human condition, the admixture of good and evil in every person's character. She also does a great job of bringing out important contextual notes. (At least I think she does. I'm no ancient historian!) Details about glory and honor, about the Greek conception of the afterlife and immortality, the importance of gifts and glory, what Greek gods and aren't, violence and war: these were really valuable to me. I'll confess: I haven't read the text of the Iliad. I plan to read Robert Fitzgerald's translation now. And you know what? I'm excited. Vandiver did a great job in getting me excited, because I know there's much she couldn't cover. (She did, after all, summarize the themes AND the plot in six hours.) Onward!

  9. 4 out of 5

    K.M. Fernandes

    To read the Iliad without this course would be to miss the heart and soul of the story. Vandiver is an excellent professor - thorough and insightful - and her grasp on classical mythology and Ancient Greek culture is undeniable. She uncovers and explores so many details that most readers would otherwise miss.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Keating

    This series on tape taught me some things, but was not really what I had expected. She's pretty knowledgeable btu has an annoying voice which acn be tough when driving.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    Outstanding. I've reread the Iliad and read a half dozen books about the poem and the Trojan War within the last couple of years, and still I learned something from every lecture. Highly recommended.

  12. 5 out of 5

    David

    Although I did not find a lot in these lectures to be particularly compelling, any discussion of The Iliad is worth attention. But there was one observation that struck me—Homer’s contrast of mortal humans with the deathless gods. From Zeus’ point of view, the fact that humans must die, and know they must die, is an emblem of our wretchedness, our dismalness, our unhappiness. But what Zeus does not see is that our mortality is what gives us the potential for nobility, courage, self-sacrifice, an Although I did not find a lot in these lectures to be particularly compelling, any discussion of The Iliad is worth attention. But there was one observation that struck me—Homer’s contrast of mortal humans with the deathless gods. From Zeus’ point of view, the fact that humans must die, and know they must die, is an emblem of our wretchedness, our dismalness, our unhappiness. But what Zeus does not see is that our mortality is what gives us the potential for nobility, courage, self-sacrifice, and other such virtues that we prize. The gods cannot directly experience these virtues, they can only observe them from afar. Our misfortune is our fortune.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Not a bad overview. She loves her stuff, like looooooooves the Iliad. It was informative. One thing that bothered me, and I fear it permeates the thinking of people who dedicate their lives to esoteric topics, is that she sees soooooooooooooo much meaning in certain parts of the story. It bothers me because I think she could argue for the profundity of the most mundane detail. She mentions that some scholars think the ending is abrupt and unfinished, but she finds a way to think of it as perfect Not a bad overview. She loves her stuff, like looooooooves the Iliad. It was informative. One thing that bothered me, and I fear it permeates the thinking of people who dedicate their lives to esoteric topics, is that she sees soooooooooooooo much meaning in certain parts of the story. It bothers me because I think she could argue for the profundity of the most mundane detail. She mentions that some scholars think the ending is abrupt and unfinished, but she finds a way to think of it as perfect. In cognitive biases terms, it's called 'fitting'. Buuuut, maybe she's right.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Martin

    Absolutely essential to my understanding of my translation of the Illiad by Samuel Butler. Would recommend this short series of lectures to anyone reading the Illiad, and everyone should read the Illiad because even contemporary literature like A Game of Thrones is heavily influenced by its representation of Homeric Greek culture.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Suz Thackston

    The Iliad is long and bloody and sometimes obscure and hard to unpack. While you're not going to get an Orphic or Neo-Platonic view of it, Vandiver's straightforward scholarly thoughtful insightful interpretation is a great solid base to have under your feet before you venture into more esoteric realms. Love my Vandiver.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    Wow, even after the brief introduction I got via The Song of Achilles I had no idea this work was such a treatise on grief. This was amazing. Of course, I still can’t say that I’ve read it, but having been exposed to these fascinating “Cliff notes” I am intrigued for more.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    Excellent within the limitations of the Great Courses lecture series. Would have preferred less plot summary, and more context and analysis. Professor Vandiver knows her stuff, and I would bet that her lectures IRL are more challenging and insightful.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Gary

    Dr. Vandiver's lectures make me feel as though I had never understood The Iliad before now. Superb examinations of the characters of Hector and Achilles highlight the series.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    These lectures are both fascinating and informative and really deepens one's knowledge of 'The Iliad'.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tom Baikin-O'hayon

    A great series for insigts and a better understanding of this great Epic

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tammy

    Loved this! Was really ignorant about the Iliad and this was so informative!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lilyleia78

    One of my favorite Great Courses lecturers.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Glenn Bowlan

    Elizabeth Vandiver is an engaging lecturer; but, in general, the material in the Illiad is not as engaging as The Odyssey.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    The professor clarified some points that do not translate well from Greek to English, whether linguistically or culturally. She is, however, very repetitive, which is a pet peeve of mine.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Giò

    I love Elizabeth Vandiver

  26. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    I read this book, The Iliad of Homer at the same time that I read the Iliad BY Homer and it made for the perfect companion as I moved through Homer's book. The Iliad recounts four days in the ninth year of the Trojan War (c. Early 12th century BC). It's broken down into 23 "Books" and that is where The Iliad of Homer, by Elizabeth Vandiver, comes in handy. Why? Because when it comes to breaking down the classics, Dr. Vandiver is dialed in. She is Prof. of Classics and Latin at Whitman College in I read this book, The Iliad of Homer at the same time that I read the Iliad BY Homer and it made for the perfect companion as I moved through Homer's book. The Iliad recounts four days in the ninth year of the Trojan War (c. Early 12th century BC). It's broken down into 23 "Books" and that is where The Iliad of Homer, by Elizabeth Vandiver, comes in handy. Why? Because when it comes to breaking down the classics, Dr. Vandiver is dialed in. She is Prof. of Classics and Latin at Whitman College in Washington state and has received numerous awards for outstanding scholarly achievements in the Classics field to include the highest award conferred upon American classicists – The American Philological Society's, Excellence in Teaching award for 1998. That said, she breaks her course into 23 lectures outlining exactly what Homer is writing about and what you should be "getting" out of each of the Iliad's books. And trust me, you'll get a lot more out of reading the Iliad if you have someone telling you what's going on between the lines – and there's a lot going on between those lines! Iliad the book, didn't start out as a book. For its first 400 years or so, the Iliad was "performed" by traveling storytellers called Bards. These entertainers toured from town to town, each spinning a slightly different rendering of the Iliad and Odyssey, and surely a myriad of other tales, myths, and news. As the telling of the Iliad takes about 13 hours in the Odyssey, another 11, Bards must have stayed in each polis for a couple-of-weeks providing that early Iron Age equivalent of HBO and Cinemax.

  27. 5 out of 5

    David Huff

    Somehow, I managed to get through all my school years without ever reading The Iliad (or, for that matter, The Odyssey). I did, however, have a memorable 7th grade English teacher who, on dreary days when she was disinclined to lecture, would dispatch one of us to the library to "fetch her some Poe", which she would then read to us for the rest of class. I can only imagine what her presentation of Homer might have been like. Anyway, the Iliad has been on my reading bucket list ever since. So whil Somehow, I managed to get through all my school years without ever reading The Iliad (or, for that matter, The Odyssey). I did, however, have a memorable 7th grade English teacher who, on dreary days when she was disinclined to lecture, would dispatch one of us to the library to "fetch her some Poe", which she would then read to us for the rest of class. I can only imagine what her presentation of Homer might have been like. Anyway, the Iliad has been on my reading bucket list ever since. So while I'm on the road some this summer -- and since the Iliad was originally a recited, rather than a written, work -- I'm planning to listen to it on Audible. For some advance prep, I chose this Great Courses overview of the Iliad. While it was a short course, Elizabeth Vandiver's expertise, knowledge, and deep familiarity with the story and characters were very helpful. Her insights and examples of how the original Greek language portrayed the epic were particularly good. The course was clear, well-organized, and just enough to whet one's appetite for the full Iliad. So joining me on the road this Summer, along with my family, will be Achilles, Agamemnon, Hector, Menelaus and many more!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nickie

    This six hour cd collection, produced by The Teaching Company has been very helpful towards my understanding of this great Homeric epic. I feel that I can now read The Iliad and hold appreciation for this time in history. I always thought Achilles was a 'good guy' but he isn't. He is human and his weaknesses and pride were sad to learn about. At lest he morns with the father of Hector and returns his son's body to the people of Troy. That Helen. Boy, did she and Paris cause trouble. Well isn't tha This six hour cd collection, produced by The Teaching Company has been very helpful towards my understanding of this great Homeric epic. I feel that I can now read The Iliad and hold appreciation for this time in history. I always thought Achilles was a 'good guy' but he isn't. He is human and his weaknesses and pride were sad to learn about. At lest he morns with the father of Hector and returns his son's body to the people of Troy. That Helen. Boy, did she and Paris cause trouble. Well isn't that what immorality does to families, nations, and the whole human race? I will continue to invest in The Teaching Company.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    Dr Vandiver delivers a well prepared, concise survey and summary of this epic story/poem that is as alive today as it was nearly 3000 years ago. Troy, and it's story, seems to have a special attraction to western culture, and maybe it is because of this classic that it does. I won't give a synopsis...there are far too many as it is...but will advise the potential purchaser of these lectures that you won't be disappointed (it has it all, seduction, sex, slaughter and sorrow). I've just finished L Dr Vandiver delivers a well prepared, concise survey and summary of this epic story/poem that is as alive today as it was nearly 3000 years ago. Troy, and it's story, seems to have a special attraction to western culture, and maybe it is because of this classic that it does. I won't give a synopsis...there are far too many as it is...but will advise the potential purchaser of these lectures that you won't be disappointed (it has it all, seduction, sex, slaughter and sorrow). I've just finished Liz's Iliad lectures (for the second time), and will be re-listening to the Odyssey shortly. These are bargain lectures, very often on sale...and they are some of the best."

  30. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

    I had never read The Iliad before, so after listening to the Fitzgerald translation, I wanted to get more meaning and context from my reading. Professor Vandiver of Northwestern University gave some excellent lectures and enhanced my understanding of this classic of Western Literature. She was very organized and presented the material in an easy-to-grasp way. Her enthusiasm for the book and ancient Greek literature was evident in her voice. I would love to take one of her classes! I am now readi I had never read The Iliad before, so after listening to the Fitzgerald translation, I wanted to get more meaning and context from my reading. Professor Vandiver of Northwestern University gave some excellent lectures and enhanced my understanding of this classic of Western Literature. She was very organized and presented the material in an easy-to-grasp way. Her enthusiasm for the book and ancient Greek literature was evident in her voice. I would love to take one of her classes! I am now reading The Odyssey and intend to purchase her series of lectures on it too.

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