Hot Best Seller

Chasing Water: Elegy of an Olympian PDF, ePub eBook

4.6 out of 5
30 review

Chasing Water: Elegy of an Olympian

Availability: Ready to download

File Name: Chasing Water: Elegy of an Olympian .pdf

How it works:

1. Register a free 1 month Trial Account.

2. Download as many books as you like (Personal use)

3. Cancel the membership at any time if not satisfied.


Chasing Water: Elegy of an Olympian PDF, ePub eBook "Here Ervin and swim trainer and journalist Markides combine talents to create a biography that is part first-hand narrative by Ervin, with Markides filling in the details and providing context. The formula works, pulling readers into Ervin's experience of the thrill of victory and search for meaning....Featuring more depth, breadth, truth, and the effects of reckless choi "Here Ervin and swim trainer and journalist Markides combine talents to create a biography that is part first-hand narrative by Ervin, with Markides filling in the details and providing context. The formula works, pulling readers into Ervin's experience of the thrill of victory and search for meaning....Featuring more depth, breadth, truth, and the effects of reckless choices than found in traditional athlete biographies, this gripping account is just in time for the gear up to the Rio 2016 Olympics. Readers will understand the psyche and life of elite athletes as never before, then cheer Ervin on in his attempt to make another Olympic team." --Library Journal "A celebrated Olympian recounts how he rose to the top of his sport, crashed, and found redemption....This book, which tells his story through a narrative that interweaves the former gold medalist's memories with commentary by his friend and colleague Markides, reveals the extreme highs and lows that characterized Ervin's remarkable life and career....The author never flinches at revealing his less-than-perfect past, and the humility he demonstrates at coming to terms with his own egotism and personal shortcomings makes the book frequently compelling. A provocative and refreshingly honest redemption memoir." --Kirkus Reviews "Markides smartly combines his own journalistic account with a parallel narrative in which Ervin...explains his life and style. Some talents simply defy explanation, however, and Ervin may be in that category....The story of his comeback at 31 (ancient for a swimmer) is rendered more amazing by the contrast with what went before." --Booklist "You won’t find many athletes like Ervin, nor will you find many sports autobiographies like his recently published Chasing Water: Elegy of an Olympian. . . . It’s fascinating." --Charlotte Observer Every four years in the Olympic cycle the surge of national interest in swimming grows, and with it a desire to be captivated by its stars. This book tells the dramatic, surprising, and sometimes provocative path that Anthony Ervin has taken to become one of those captivating Olympic heroes. Not your typical sports memoir, Chasing Water also contains arresting black-and-white drawings and a graphic story extra, as well as an inventive and mercurial narrative style that morphs chapter by chapter to reflect Ervin's restless, multifaceted life. Ervin won a gold medal at the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games at the age of nineteen. He is an athlete branded with a slew of titles including being the first US Olympic swimmer of African American descent, along with Jewish heritage, who also grew up with Tourette's syndrome. He shocked the sporting world by retiring soon after claiming two world titles following the 2000 Olympics. Auctioning off his gold medal for charity, he set off on a part spiritual quest, part self-destructive bender that involved Zen temples, fast motorcycles, tattoo parlors, and rock 'n' roll bands. Then Ervin resurfaced in 2012 to not only make the US Olympic team twelve years after his first appearance, but to continue his career by swimming faster than ever before. At the Rio Olympics in August 2016, Ervin "wrote" the most fitting afterword to his astonishing story, winning two gold medals, becoming the oldest swimmer (from any nation) to win a gold medal in an individual race, and--in finishing first in the 50-meter freestyle--once again earning the title of fastest human in water.

30 review for Chasing Water: Elegy of an Olympian

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alison Donnelly

    Preface: I'm not a huge sports fan. I'm a huge people fan. I first came across Ervin in a Rolling Stone article many years ago and I was struck by his unusual and unconventional life story. This biography will sate those who read it because they are interested in swimming, those who read it because they are looking for the antidote to Ryan Lochte's Olympic level idiocy, or just anyone curious about a very interesting person. Ervin is thoughtful, thankful, and seems constantly in awe of the unive Preface: I'm not a huge sports fan. I'm a huge people fan. I first came across Ervin in a Rolling Stone article many years ago and I was struck by his unusual and unconventional life story. This biography will sate those who read it because they are interested in swimming, those who read it because they are looking for the antidote to Ryan Lochte's Olympic level idiocy, or just anyone curious about a very interesting person. Ervin is thoughtful, thankful, and seems constantly in awe of the universe. I like him. Definitely not your typical sporting memoir, more of a biographical bildungsroman for sure, but one you'll be glad you picked up.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ralph Porrazzo

    Vivid, honest and raw. That exactly what you receive from this wonderful work of art. Carefully crafted to give the reader a candid look at Anthony Ervin's life. I may be biased because of my swimming background, but an outsider will truly never understand the mental hell you endure. This book enlightens us and finally says what is needed to be said about finding one's self. Outstanding. My only wish would be for Anthony and Constantine to go back in time and wait one more year to publish this. Vivid, honest and raw. That exactly what you receive from this wonderful work of art. Carefully crafted to give the reader a candid look at Anthony Ervin's life. I may be biased because of my swimming background, but an outsider will truly never understand the mental hell you endure. This book enlightens us and finally says what is needed to be said about finding one's self. Outstanding. My only wish would be for Anthony and Constantine to go back in time and wait one more year to publish this. But heck, I'm waiting for the next book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Keill

    As both a swimmer and someone who battles various mental issues, this book was a great read for me. It got me thinking about how society sees and manages mental health (as a 'problem') and also the links between exercise, discipline and mental health. And also swimming and mental health. There are a lot of us who plough up and down the lanes and are fighting off some formidable demons. Without my time in the pool, I think mine would occasionally get the better of me. Swimming, for me, is better As both a swimmer and someone who battles various mental issues, this book was a great read for me. It got me thinking about how society sees and manages mental health (as a 'problem') and also the links between exercise, discipline and mental health. And also swimming and mental health. There are a lot of us who plough up and down the lanes and are fighting off some formidable demons. Without my time in the pool, I think mine would occasionally get the better of me. Swimming, for me, is better than any medication, and yet only a few of the doctors I've seen - admittedly the top bods - encouraged me to keep doing it. Sadly, it seems easier for them to dish out Prozac. Really pleased Ervin got his gold. He deserves it. Not least for all his hard work, but for being so candid, and just for keeping on going.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    An absolutely engaging an in depth look at the Mr. Ervin's life. It's ups and downs, it's a warts and all look and the public Olympian and the private man. An exceptional book about an exceptional man!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tinjin Chang

    Awesome book by an incredible Olympic champion, coach, artist, human being, and friend. I've degusted over 1,200 library checkouts since the last Olympic Trials and this one easily ranks among the top 10. Highly recommended.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Eileen Granfors

    Anthony Ervin's CHASING WATER stands out among sports bios because of its raw honesty and clear voice. The crash-and-burn of a beloved athlete is a familiar story in our sports-obsessed world. But it is Anthony's (Tony's) voice in this memoir that creates the friction and the heartache. A gifted natural in the water, Anthony portrays himself as an uncomfortable creature on land. He showed such early promise in swimming that other aspects of his life devolved. His family supported his quest for in Anthony Ervin's CHASING WATER stands out among sports bios because of its raw honesty and clear voice. The crash-and-burn of a beloved athlete is a familiar story in our sports-obsessed world. But it is Anthony's (Tony's) voice in this memoir that creates the friction and the heartache. A gifted natural in the water, Anthony portrays himself as an uncomfortable creature on land. He showed such early promise in swimming that other aspects of his life devolved. His family supported his quest for individuality, but not at the sacrifice of discipline. Anthony proved a hard act to balance as his adventures outside of home grew wilder, darker, more dangerous. The man who won Olympic gold in Australia (50 meter freestyle) is not the man who competed at Cal Berkeley. The man who finally earned his degree in English lit is someone whom his roommates did not know ever swam a race. The press delighted in his story of a comeback at the old age of 31 for the London Olympics. Anthony makes it clear that just reaching the age of 30 was a miracle in itself. The journey from golden boy to homeless couch surfer, from depressed and insular and dangerously addicted to risk, is a story of growth. The growth of the soul and his intellect save Ervin from his darkest thoughts. His "swimmer's body" with superior muscle memory and drive saved him from accidental death. Ervin does not flinch away from the rough, rude truth of drugs, alcohol, sex, and speed that consumed his life for years. This is not a whiny tale of someone mourning a lack of public applause. This is the truthful story of a young man's fall from grace in the spotlight and of how he found his way back to living life with a purpose other than one confined in a blue rectangle marked off by lanes.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Emily S.

    There's a lot to say about this book, but it seems wrong to say it. Anthony Ervin, no matter how you feel about his personal life, is a sports legend (though the book was published prematurely in regard to his Rio victory). Chasing Water detailed some things I think would have been better left un-detailed (notice I don't say unmentioned), i.e. certain acts in burlesque shows or things related to drugs. This is definitely an adult book; I think even aspiring (young) swimmers should wait to read. There's a lot to say about this book, but it seems wrong to say it. Anthony Ervin, no matter how you feel about his personal life, is a sports legend (though the book was published prematurely in regard to his Rio victory). Chasing Water detailed some things I think would have been better left un-detailed (notice I don't say unmentioned), i.e. certain acts in burlesque shows or things related to drugs. This is definitely an adult book; I think even aspiring (young) swimmers should wait to read. I was disturbed by some things (promiscuity, etc.), but pleasantly surprised by others (chiefly literary references). This is a two-voice narrative, Ervin's voice being the quieter of the two. This style serves to make the book feel like somewhat of a study versus a story, but in that sense it was...enlightening. I like to talk about the "human experience," and well, this was certainly that!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Todd Walter

    Interesting read. After years of working with youth, many of the frustrations I had with them were present in Anthony Ervin. He took many years of self-destructive behavior to learn that only he could define who he was to be or wanted to be. To finally recognize that those people who matter most did not care about the "winner" but the man who competed. Even with the frustration over Anthony's long journey to get to an obvious endpoint, the interesting path he took, the people he met and befriend Interesting read. After years of working with youth, many of the frustrations I had with them were present in Anthony Ervin. He took many years of self-destructive behavior to learn that only he could define who he was to be or wanted to be. To finally recognize that those people who matter most did not care about the "winner" but the man who competed. Even with the frustration over Anthony's long journey to get to an obvious endpoint, the interesting path he took, the people he met and befriended along the way, and the realization and rediscovery of his love of the water more than override any of my personal issues with his behavior. I will be sharing the sections related to swimming with my eleven year old daughter. Much of the last third of the book is inappropriate for her age but Anthony's approach to swimming and competition are very innovative and worth her time.

  9. 5 out of 5

    woody bedell

    Excellent regardless of whether you like swimming or not A wonderful read. While about the story of an Olympic swimmer it provides an in-depth profile of the struggle and final break through of boy of mixed race and with autistic profile. Anthony is not only a superb athlete but highly intelligent and thought provoking. Recommend highly.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jack Haywood

    This book was really good to understand Anthony Ervin's childhood to how he became an Olympian. It was put into two perspectives, his perspective, and when he told his story to Markides, a journalist. I would like to recommend this to young adults, like myself.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    So much swimming in here I could understand, and many highlight worthy revelations. I also think my son is very similar to Ervin in many ways, as a biracial 20-year-old, trying to find his way.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Engaging, detailed stories from swimmer Anthony Ervin's life, starting with the discovery of his talent in childhood through young adult trials to his trips to the Olympic games. The narrative alternates between Markides' straightforward journalistic style and Ervin's journal-like recollections; there are frequent references to philosophy, literature, and music as a means to flesh out the experiences of the thoughtful, insightful if sometimes impulsive & reckless Olympian. Ervin's self-refle Engaging, detailed stories from swimmer Anthony Ervin's life, starting with the discovery of his talent in childhood through young adult trials to his trips to the Olympic games. The narrative alternates between Markides' straightforward journalistic style and Ervin's journal-like recollections; there are frequent references to philosophy, literature, and music as a means to flesh out the experiences of the thoughtful, insightful if sometimes impulsive & reckless Olympian. Ervin's self-reflections + revelations throughout make his story a richly satisfying relief to read; the brash comic appendix illustrated by friend & fellow swimmer/artist Frank Zio is an inspired addition.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Morgan

    I think I appreciated this memoir of US Olympic swimmer Anthony Ervin because I am a former competitive swimmer and understand the swimming lingo and the dedication it takes to excel in this sport, but non-swimmers will also be informed and amused by Ervin's tales. Ervin talks about what a hooligan he was growing up and how swimming kept him out of more trouble he could have been into. His love/hate relationship with the sport resonates with me, as I'm sure it would with other athletes who had t I think I appreciated this memoir of US Olympic swimmer Anthony Ervin because I am a former competitive swimmer and understand the swimming lingo and the dedication it takes to excel in this sport, but non-swimmers will also be informed and amused by Ervin's tales. Ervin talks about what a hooligan he was growing up and how swimming kept him out of more trouble he could have been into. His love/hate relationship with the sport resonates with me, as I'm sure it would with other athletes who had to train hours upon hours a day to try to get ahead in a sport you once loved but come to resent at times. When an opportunity presented itself to Ervin for a free ride to college if only he would continue swimming competitively, he took it with the intent to continue swimming for one year, then move on with his life. That one year led to an Olympic gold medal and some hard partying. While Ervin didn't finish college in the traditional means, he did eventually realize what college and swimming meant to him and made his way back to them both after many years of partying, drugs, and transient living. Ervin and his co-writer are both interesting writers with a sense of humor and this book makes for a quick read in which I found myself rooting for Ervin and his don't-call-it-a-comeback, looking forward to more success for this truly interesting human being. I was happy to have won a copy of this book from LibraryThing.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mandar Gokhale

    I always read about how intensively Michael Phelps used to train – getting up at 6am every morning, rigorously doing laps for the whole day, ad infinitum. To me, this book seems to show what would have ended up happening to a more free, creative version of him who would have chafed at the rigid, almost inhuman discipline needed for Olympic swimming. To be clear, the book is not about Phelps. It is about Anthony Ervin, an American swimmer who won the gold medal in 50m freestyle at the 2000 Sydney I always read about how intensively Michael Phelps used to train – getting up at 6am every morning, rigorously doing laps for the whole day, ad infinitum. To me, this book seems to show what would have ended up happening to a more free, creative version of him who would have chafed at the rigid, almost inhuman discipline needed for Olympic swimming. To be clear, the book is not about Phelps. It is about Anthony Ervin, an American swimmer who won the gold medal in 50m freestyle at the 2000 Sydney Olympics, and sort of faded out immediately thereafter. Not an unusual story – except that he came back, an incredible twelve years later to compete at the 2012 London Olympics, and continued the comeback to win two gold medals in the 2016 Olympics. The book treats the swimming and time-spent-outside-swimming parts of his life with equal importance. Anthony Ervin (and Constantine Markides, serving as a narrator in between) lay out all the phases of his life journey from childhood, to initial Olympic triumph, to all the time spent down in the dumps, to his eventual comeback. This is done in a dispassionate tone that I really enjoyed. Note that the book was written before Ervin's two gold medals at the 2016 Olympics, so it doesn't contain an account of those (even though the cover mentions them; must have been printed afterwards).

  15. 5 out of 5

    Katy

    So happy I picked up this book! It was a very uniquely told sports biography that alternated between a first-person descriptions of events in Anthony Ervin's life (written by Anthony himself) and third-person descriptions (written by Constantine Markides) that bring everything into focus and provide necessary details to understand Anthony's portions. There are some photos scattered throughout the book, and there's even a comic at the end! I loved how art was perfectly married with the technicali So happy I picked up this book! It was a very uniquely told sports biography that alternated between a first-person descriptions of events in Anthony Ervin's life (written by Anthony himself) and third-person descriptions (written by Constantine Markides) that bring everything into focus and provide necessary details to understand Anthony's portions. There are some photos scattered throughout the book, and there's even a comic at the end! I loved how art was perfectly married with the technicalities of the sport. I don't necessarily expect a sports biography to have language this enjoyable and beautiful, which made me really enjoy the novel. I feel like the novel makes you care about Anthony as a person; I am so happy he's in a better place in his life now. As a former swimmer, it was cool to get a peek into the life of an Olympian, and the training and the friendships that form between the competitors. I also had the pleasure of meeting Anthony and Constantine when they came to Ann Arbor for a book signing. The camaraderie between these two friends filled the room as they read one of the funnier passages from the book. They were also very personable and engaging during the book signing, and I'm very lucky to have had a chance to meet them!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    I received this as an Advanced Reader's Copy. I am a swimmer, and reading about other people's experiences with swimming motivates me and inspires me. But reading about an Olympian, I was hesitant. I had expectations of ego and stereotypical lessons learned. What I experienced was completely different. It was pure gold. This is the story of Olympian swimmer Anthony Ervin, told in rotating point of view between Anthony himself and Anthony's friend, the narrator. Anthony's life is about so much more I received this as an Advanced Reader's Copy. I am a swimmer, and reading about other people's experiences with swimming motivates me and inspires me. But reading about an Olympian, I was hesitant. I had expectations of ego and stereotypical lessons learned. What I experienced was completely different. It was pure gold. This is the story of Olympian swimmer Anthony Ervin, told in rotating point of view between Anthony himself and Anthony's friend, the narrator. Anthony's life is about so much more than swimming, which is a big reason why this book is so interesting and different than expected. Another reason that I liked it so much, and that other readers will like it even if they aren't acquainted with the sport, is that Ervin and Markides are readers, writers, and thinkers themselves, so the thoughts and ideas they explore run much deeper than the typical athlete experience. Ervin is a pretty fascinating individual, while being completely and unashamedly human, which he's not afraid to reveal through this book. Really glad I received this book. It's one of the better ARC's that I've received.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Angie

    Co-written by Anthony Ervin, an Olympian, and Constantine Markides, a journalist with a swimming background, Chasing Water is about what you'd expect from a sports memoir: a remarkable talent is discovered in childhood, the individual is thrust into greatness before he is really ready, falls off the wagon for a (long) while, and later rediscovers a love for what defined him when he was younger. Weaving between Ervin's own thoughts and Markides' outside—yet still personal—perspective, this book g Co-written by Anthony Ervin, an Olympian, and Constantine Markides, a journalist with a swimming background, Chasing Water is about what you'd expect from a sports memoir: a remarkable talent is discovered in childhood, the individual is thrust into greatness before he is really ready, falls off the wagon for a (long) while, and later rediscovers a love for what defined him when he was younger. Weaving between Ervin's own thoughts and Markides' outside—yet still personal—perspective, this book gives readers unique insights into Tourette's Syndrome, the day-to-day experiences and expectations of a high-level athlete, plus some forays into drug abuse and depression and anxiety. It's the story of what makes a man, and the army of people who contribute to the making. Seeing as this is a memoir about an Olympian, I would have liked more time on the sports side of things and much less on Ervin's "rebel" period, but all in all, it's an enjoyable book. And who doesn't love a good Olympics story?

  18. 5 out of 5

    Asya

    An insightful, poetically written account of swimming, Ervin is able to describe, like no one else I've read to date on the topic, what swimming feels like, from the inside out. There may be some formal and stylistic problems with the book overall (Ervin's and Markides' sections don't always gel and the stylistic games can get a bit distracting) but it mostly doesn't take away from the clarity and insight of Ervin's vision or the intensity of his journey. Reminded me of Oliver Sacks' On the Move An insightful, poetically written account of swimming, Ervin is able to describe, like no one else I've read to date on the topic, what swimming feels like, from the inside out. There may be some formal and stylistic problems with the book overall (Ervin's and Markides' sections don't always gel and the stylistic games can get a bit distracting) but it mostly doesn't take away from the clarity and insight of Ervin's vision or the intensity of his journey. Reminded me of Oliver Sacks' On the Move, right down to the motorcycle and speed (as in velocity, mostly) addiction. Ultimately, the memoir was about the way we always find our way back to ourselves, our essence, whatever pain and conceit may take us away from ourselves.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

    "Every discipline requires intensive training when practiced at the world-class level, but competitive swimming places unique and inordinate disciplinary demands upon its victims. Swimming may be the only sport combining insane puke-in-the-gutter-between-sets workouts with an anal obsession with numbers. A standard swim workout is like having to do the SAT math section while bleeding and being pursued by a hungry shark." Reviews echo redemption. Rather, this book is about self-discovery. Markide "Every discipline requires intensive training when practiced at the world-class level, but competitive swimming places unique and inordinate disciplinary demands upon its victims. Swimming may be the only sport combining insane puke-in-the-gutter-between-sets workouts with an anal obsession with numbers. A standard swim workout is like having to do the SAT math section while bleeding and being pursued by a hungry shark." Reviews echo redemption. Rather, this book is about self-discovery. Markides wry wit highlights the brutality of the sport (and life). As a swimmer, this book was special to me because it chronicles how Ervin learned to explore his identity as a person, not just an athlete. The typeface changes to signify Markides v. Ervin text made me nuts for the first 100 pages.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alene Scoblete

    Anthony Ervin is an idiot. He threw away his talent and all the time and energy he invested in swimming competitively in order to do hard drugs, get tattoos and play video games. The drugs he took in large quantities and dangerous combinations could have killed him or permanently harmed him; the risks he took speeding on motorcycles or in cars could have hurt him or others. This guy is not a champion – he’s a moron. I read this book to see what makes a champion and Anthony Ervin has nothing to t Anthony Ervin is an idiot. He threw away his talent and all the time and energy he invested in swimming competitively in order to do hard drugs, get tattoos and play video games. The drugs he took in large quantities and dangerous combinations could have killed him or permanently harmed him; the risks he took speeding on motorcycles or in cars could have hurt him or others. This guy is not a champion – he’s a moron. I read this book to see what makes a champion and Anthony Ervin has nothing to teach me. The writing is poor. Take a look at pages 155 – 156 to see the worst writing in history.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    This was great! I thought Ervin's story was interesting just based on the TV version we get during the Olympics but this is so much better! (I especially loved the nod to Robert Jordan...) First, I loved the style they used, seamlessly transitioning from Ervin's voice to narrator and back. Second, (and this is so cliche but..) the zen-like approach they take to telling the story and diving into the struggles he's had in life and his progression through life are really inspiring to read. Not only This was great! I thought Ervin's story was interesting just based on the TV version we get during the Olympics but this is so much better! (I especially loved the nod to Robert Jordan...) First, I loved the style they used, seamlessly transitioning from Ervin's voice to narrator and back. Second, (and this is so cliche but..) the zen-like approach they take to telling the story and diving into the struggles he's had in life and his progression through life are really inspiring to read. Not only do I recommend this book but I'm sending a copy to the friend who got me into (watching) swimming.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Heather Fineisen

    Anthony's book is a strong entry in sports memoir/biography and I especially liked the combination of the two. The end gets a bit bogged down with the Olympic partying of the biographer but that's what happens so although it reads at times like their memoir, at times it is their memoir because they were together. I would have liked to see more about the actual training but this is more of the swimmer' s personal story. Creative and at times raw with candid writing about drugs, sex and depression Anthony's book is a strong entry in sports memoir/biography and I especially liked the combination of the two. The end gets a bit bogged down with the Olympic partying of the biographer but that's what happens so although it reads at times like their memoir, at times it is their memoir because they were together. I would have liked to see more about the actual training but this is more of the swimmer' s personal story. Creative and at times raw with candid writing about drugs, sex and depression. A must read for anyone interested in Olympic swimmers. Provided by LibraryThing

  23. 4 out of 5

    Janice

    I received this book as a Goodreads Giveaway. Tony Ervin certainly has lived an "interesting" life in his 30+ years. I learned a lot about the pressures placed on elite athletes, particularly swimmers, from the time they first start competing. What he has achieved despite all of the turmoil in his life is remarkable. However, the narrative was so disjointed that I had a hard time understanding how events transpired in any chronological sense.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    A very interesting, complex book that goes way beyond the typical sports memoir in exploring themes of identity, societal expectations and the culture of Olympic celebrity. Given how much of the book is devoted to Ervin's struggle with being labeled an African American swimmer, I was surprised that Cullen Jones is only mentioned in passing. I would have appreciated hearing the authors' thoughts in comparing his experience to Ervin's.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cathy M.

    Very interesting read which details the highs and lows of Ervin's life, both in and out of the pool. To bookend gold medals 16 years apart, with so much going on in his life in between, is pretty amazing.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Brenten Gilbert

    RATING: 4.0 Many sections of extremely good writing. Some level of superfluous narrative. Overall, an engaging and intriguing look into Anthony Ervin's life - struggles and successes alike. Definitely not a book to read along with youngsters, though.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    The unique and clever combination of biography and autobiography bluntly relays the tempestuous and tumultuous life and career of this star swimmer. When all is said and done, Anthony's is a moving and inspiring story.

  28. 4 out of 5

    pianogal

    I always love to watch swimming during the Olympics, but for some reason, I don't really remember Anthony Ervin. Not really shocked about his life, but I am glad he pulled himself out of it to race again. Even if he didn't win.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

    I loved the inside look at the life and sacrifices athletes and Olympians make for their craft and I enjoyed watching Erwin carve his path through the water and the sport. A great story and an athlete to watch in Rio.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I won this book through Goodreads. I really loved this book. Truly inspiring and a great man.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.