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The Essential Jung: Selected Writings

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The Essential Jung: Selected Writings PDF, ePub eBook This volume presents the essentials of Jung's thought in his own words. To familiarize readers with the ideas for which Jung is best known, the British psychiatrist and writer Anthony Storr has selected extracts from Jung's writings that pinpoint his many original contributions and relate the development of his thought to his biography. Dr. Storr has prefaced each extract This volume presents the essentials of Jung's thought in his own words. To familiarize readers with the ideas for which Jung is best known, the British psychiatrist and writer Anthony Storr has selected extracts from Jung's writings that pinpoint his many original contributions and relate the development of his thought to his biography. Dr. Storr has prefaced each extract with explanatory notes. These notes link the extracts, and with Dr. Storr's introduction, they show the progress and coherence of Jung's ideas, including such concepts as the collective unconscious, the archetypes, introversion and extroversion, individuation, and Jung's view of integration as the goal of the development of the personality.

30 review for The Essential Jung: Selected Writings

  1. 4 out of 5

    Owen Spencer

    Carl Jung's writings in this book (and in Man and His Symbols) have greatly increased and improved my understanding of psychology. This is the kind of stuff that attracted me to the field of psychology in the first place. I can't believe that I completed all coursework for a Ph.D. in clinical psychology without reading Jung! Better late than never. The best was saved for last, I guess. This is deep, advanced psychology that may go over the heads of many readers (including those in the field). It Carl Jung's writings in this book (and in Man and His Symbols) have greatly increased and improved my understanding of psychology. This is the kind of stuff that attracted me to the field of psychology in the first place. I can't believe that I completed all coursework for a Ph.D. in clinical psychology without reading Jung! Better late than never. The best was saved for last, I guess. This is deep, advanced psychology that may go over the heads of many readers (including those in the field). It is far from inaccessible, however, as long as you are willing to spend the time and energy necessary to carefully study and ponder what Jung has written. After reading this book I am convinced that Jung is not only the greatest psychologist of all time, but may be the greatest mind of the 20th century. My entire perspective has changed for the better as a result of reading Jung. I highly recommend this book to anyone who wants to receive greater enlightenment regarding personality, the soul, art, history, religion, philosophy, etc. READ JUNG NOW! {Note: I don't agree with all of Jung's perspectives, especially those found in his writings about the Biblical Job. Nevertheless, overall, Jung's insights and perspectives are extremely valuable}.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    This was assigned reading for my Jungian Psychology class. We split the large book into three sections, one for each class session. I've enjoyed this reading the most since it's actually Jung's writing, and not writing about Jung (though those materials are valuable as well). I like this collection because it includes material from throughout Jung's career and is carefully selected and highlighted by Anthony Storr. It's really a walk-through of all of Jung's concepts (archetypes, Self, shadow, e This was assigned reading for my Jungian Psychology class. We split the large book into three sections, one for each class session. I've enjoyed this reading the most since it's actually Jung's writing, and not writing about Jung (though those materials are valuable as well). I like this collection because it includes material from throughout Jung's career and is carefully selected and highlighted by Anthony Storr. It's really a walk-through of all of Jung's concepts (archetypes, Self, shadow, etc) as well as an over-view of his early-late works. Storr's commentary makes the material even more accessible and places Jung's writing in context. I do enjoy Jung's writing style as well. I do find his work very accessible. Since I've been reading this 400 page book for the last two months though, I find I've already "forgotten" the start of the book. Glad to have all my highlights and notes to flip through!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas

    This is a successful attempt at distilling a huge intellectual output into one volume.Inevitably it is challenging in places, especially the section on Alchemy,and the vocabulary used can sometimes have you reaching for the big dictionary but the insights come along frequently enough to keep you motivated.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Ricker

    I must say I’m becoming a fan of good old Carl. I’m glad I read Freud first, as it’s giving me a good background helping me to understand Jung.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    Finally. 2 months later, I finish this. I am giving it three stars because it is truly a great selection of Jung's work - and that means, inevitably, that I will come across a decent amount of material that I do not vibe with. During certain parts I was soaring, and during others, it felt as though I was working my way through Tolkien's Dead Marshes. But it's done.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Devin Arriaga

    From the first few pages, I knew this work would likely be my favourite for a long time. I had this book sitting in dust for a long time because of its title; "The Essential Jung: Selected Writings." For some strange reason, I just saw the word Jung and believed it to be something about Eastern meditation methods, but then I saw it later and thought how dumb that was; Jung was a psychoanalyst! This non-fiction brings pieces and excerpts from the essential ideas of Jung together into a single book From the first few pages, I knew this work would likely be my favourite for a long time. I had this book sitting in dust for a long time because of its title; "The Essential Jung: Selected Writings." For some strange reason, I just saw the word Jung and believed it to be something about Eastern meditation methods, but then I saw it later and thought how dumb that was; Jung was a psychoanalyst! This non-fiction brings pieces and excerpts from the essential ideas of Jung together into a single book, and they're brought together so smoothly in order to get a good grasp on the concepts of psychoanalysis. Being knew to this topic, yet knowing of the complexity of other psychoanalytic writers (Lacan being one), I was quite stunned by how perfectly combined Jung's writings were, which made me indulge. It can be considered an introductory work to psychoanalysis, as it covers in discrete sections many aspects of it; word association, complexes, the soul & psyche, Jung's anima & animus, repression (which is prime), as well as other known topics in psychology that Jung breaks down. Not only are Jung's topics covered, but it is also described his history in working in the field of analytic psychology. His association with Freud is detailed, as well as the reasons that he and Jung began to separate. In Freud's view, the unconscious factors of the sexual libido (sex drive) were the main causes of repression and regression. In his idea of sexual libido was also the Oedipus complex and the Electra complex (sexual desire for one's parents). His view was that when sexual impulses were forbidden from being expressed (repression), one would regress to an almost infantile state concerning that area of mind. In the book, Jung states that Freud overemphasizes the role of sex in psychoanalysis, and he does so by explaining so after. Jung's encounters with patients and examples are documented to prove his points, while the reader is able to understand exactly what Jung is saying because of the simplicity of his style. Leaving this book, psychoanalysis is of great interest to me. For such a subject, I was intrigued. I most certainly think that the next reader will be too.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Josée

    I have learned so much, it definitely helped that I was already interested in all the topics he covered in this collection of his works, and while a whole lot of new ground was covered, a lot of the information was confirmation from other sources as well. The last part of the book really drove it home for me, that while I *know* and now understand more clearly that the way to a healthier, more progressive, more unified society is through the healing of the individual, I should only put my efforts I have learned so much, it definitely helped that I was already interested in all the topics he covered in this collection of his works, and while a whole lot of new ground was covered, a lot of the information was confirmation from other sources as well. The last part of the book really drove it home for me, that while I *know* and now understand more clearly that the way to a healthier, more progressive, more unified society is through the healing of the individual, I should only put my efforts into keeping to heal and expand myself, and only divulge this information through silent example, or if asked directly; all of us concerned with where the world is heading can relax, because people are either going to discover that self-reflection and healing is fundamental themselves, or they will keep being whisked around by the rest. People have been realizing individualism (in=non + divi=divide + dualism), the numbers have been growing, but it could still take a loooongass time. Anyway, I definitely recommend this to anybody that is slightly interested in psychology, or in bettering themselves or the world. This collection covers so many topics from dreams, to mandalas, to the subconscious religious archetypes, to alchemy, to politics... all in relation to the healing of the self. It was definitely not an easy read, but one of the most worthwhile things I have ever read...

  8. 4 out of 5

    kate

    I have since read several books written by Jung and this is an excellent introduction. Was pleased to discover that jung has been resonating through my life for a decade, without proper credit. His ideas are very interesting - like me, he applies psychology at an individual level and at a societal level. and freud has never worked for me, I am not sure how anyone takes him seriously. This book excerpts and breaks down many key ideas and provides footnotes and details to flesh out, clarify and ex I have since read several books written by Jung and this is an excellent introduction. Was pleased to discover that jung has been resonating through my life for a decade, without proper credit. His ideas are very interesting - like me, he applies psychology at an individual level and at a societal level. and freud has never worked for me, I am not sure how anyone takes him seriously. This book excerpts and breaks down many key ideas and provides footnotes and details to flesh out, clarify and expand upon jung's points. Jung was a very interesting man and his process for himself would be looked at with scorn and concern right now - at the same time, the world we live in reflects very accurately his concerns about the human psyche and the collective societal consciousness - and the challenges he viewed as pressing concerns, which man has yet to meet.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Holly LeCraw

    Still plugging away...editing and commentary by Storr is excellent.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

    Easily the best book I've read all year, and I have read some great books.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I'm a psychology major and I like Carl Jung, but what is he talking about? I need a translator!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Hicks

    I was introduced to Jung by watching many random Jordan Peterson podcasts and YouTube lectures and I’m glad I finally took the time to read some of his actual material. This is very deep reading and goes through a wide range of topics. At one long talking about schizophrenia and dream interpretations ... the next about alchemy, communism, art and biblical commentary. It’s all kind of a whirlwind in my head, but I enjoyed the ride and feel that my knowledge on psychology has been greatly enhanced. I was introduced to Jung by watching many random Jordan Peterson podcasts and YouTube lectures and I’m glad I finally took the time to read some of his actual material. This is very deep reading and goes through a wide range of topics. At one long talking about schizophrenia and dream interpretations ... the next about alchemy, communism, art and biblical commentary. It’s all kind of a whirlwind in my head, but I enjoyed the ride and feel that my knowledge on psychology has been greatly enhanced. Some of the highlights of this book (which is really more of an anthology of his lifeworks, rather than one singular text) for me was his section on dream interpretations. I’ve had a lot of bizarre dreams over the years and have puzzled over what they could mean ... is it all just nonsense, or does it have some deeper meaning hidden within? Jung discusses about one of his patients who had a dream where his father was drunk and making a buffoon of himself. This perplexed him because his father was an ideal one: loving, caring and never prone to alcohol or making a spectacle of himself. I’ve had a similar dream (though much darker) where I was a walking ghost through out my house and I overheard my father confessing to my mother about how he killed me. He was even laughing about it. This didn’t make any sense to me because I’ve never had a problem with my dad. I idolized him in fact and visa-versa. Jung’s explanation for the dream was that there were two parts to a person: the conscious mind and the unconscious one. The conscious mind is your ego, your sense of self, while the unconscious are thoughts and feelings that are difficult or impossible to access. They are a hidden part of you yet deeply connected, and this unconscious reveals itself through the medium of dreams. The unconscious, he explains, will often have opposing viewpoints of the conscious, but paradoxically, it can also compliment the conscious mind. In the dream about the father acting uncharacteristic, indeed intensely negatively as opposed to his normal self, was a way of the unconscious mind saying that you idolize your father too much and this is the psyche’s way of bringing him down a notch by means of contrast. This explanation comforted me in its parallels to my own situation and clarified why it is the real people in my dreams always act so unlike themselves in real life. Some of Jung’s other big ideas are archetypes: the motifs one finds everywhere in world literature. Stuff like the Hero’s Journey, the jealous brother, the hermit in the woods, etc., Jung argues that there instincts, or proclivities, to certain images and ideas are inherited and passed down from generation. Secondly, the idea of synchronicity: the interconnectedness of nearly everything in existence. This is the idea that the material world: aka, the stuff you can feel, taste, hear, and so forth, and the psyche: the intimate ideas in your head, personality, shapes, concepts, etc., are not so entirely independent of one another as most people think, but are actually related to each other. There is some striking evidence of this in modern physics where people have discovered that certain subatomic particles will actually behave differently depending on whether or not one is observing them. Pretty fascinating stuff. I also liked Jung’s stress on the importance of individuality versus the collective. People will often talk of things like “the needs of society”in a way that personifies it, as if it something you can actually go out and touch and see for yourself. But society is an abstract concept, and in its true sense a group of individuals. It would be kind of like stressing the important of a forest while at the same time degrading the individual trees themselves as being insignificant. The forest doesn’t exist ... the trees do. This book has made me stop to ponder the difficulty of understanding what is truly deep down YOUR opinion or just the opinion/viewpoint you’ve inherited or absorbed through your environment. The sad truth is that a very small tiny amount of people are individuals ... the majority is the mob. “Our personality develops in the course of our life that are hard or impossible to discern, and it is only our deeds that reveal who we are. We are like the sun, which nourishes the life of the earth and brings forth every kind of strange, wonderful, and evil thing; we are like the mothers who bear in their wombs untold happiness and suffering. At first we do not know what deeds or misdeeds, what destiny, what good and evil we have in us, and only the autumn can show what the spring has engendered, only in the evening will it be seen what the morning began.” -Carl Jung

  13. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Leichenger

    Jung's conception of archetypes seems to get close to something true of social/symbolic language, but I cannot help but disagree with his notion of the "collective unconscious," "inherited memory images," and the anima/animus (eros and logos) duality. This is not the first place he lost me, but one of the most significant moments, when he claims that the baby boy's affection for the mother is not the result of a dependent sexual drive (say in the need for breast milk), but rather due to the boy' Jung's conception of archetypes seems to get close to something true of social/symbolic language, but I cannot help but disagree with his notion of the "collective unconscious," "inherited memory images," and the anima/animus (eros and logos) duality. This is not the first place he lost me, but one of the most significant moments, when he claims that the baby boy's affection for the mother is not the result of a dependent sexual drive (say in the need for breast milk), but rather due to the boy's projection of his collective archetype of the anima (essentially feminine, according to Jung) upon his mother, who becomes the "first carrier of the projection making factor for the son." Jung's commitment to subjectivity (perhaps in opposition to Freud's objective interpretation) leads him to isolate and essentialize desire as emanating purely from individuated loci, specifically gendered, and cast upon external objects which only meet the subject's gaze through a veil. If anything, I thought Jung almost perfectly described the way I viewed the world and external objects when I was a teenager (or when I relapsed into esoteric judeo-christian mysticism in my early twenties), inculcated with strict gendered and patriarchal norms, without any rational basis of judging social and personal consciousness.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Brianna Perry

    Well-organized anthology. Second attempt at reading Jung. (First attempt: weird obsession with alchemy leads my middle schooler self to a collection of Jung’s writings on alchemy) I believe Jung was on the precipice of anti-psychiatry after he split from Freud. The reduction of an individual’s psyche to childhood is a popular generalization, from therapy sessions to artwork. Western culture has an odd fixation on the primacy of childhood, but Jung’s middle-aged patients led him to alter their tr Well-organized anthology. Second attempt at reading Jung. (First attempt: weird obsession with alchemy leads my middle schooler self to a collection of Jung’s writings on alchemy) I believe Jung was on the precipice of anti-psychiatry after he split from Freud. The reduction of an individual’s psyche to childhood is a popular generalization, from therapy sessions to artwork. Western culture has an odd fixation on the primacy of childhood, but Jung’s middle-aged patients led him to alter their treatment. An immersion in childhood memory was ineffective. When Jung super slams this fallacy, he also enters a neurosis. The ethos of psychiatry takes the authority of a psychiatrist for granted; doc and patient can’t both be cracked. But a project of self is effective when it benefits the individual and their loved ones. It’s collective psychic debt, baby.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

    I have read many books about Jung and his ideas, but never a selection of Jung's writings. Reading his thoughts about personality types, religion, the unconscious, etc. in his own words was powerful. I was surprised by his humor, the biting wit, the way he could bring complex issues to light in the most succinct way. Anthony Storr's introductions to passages gave pertinent background to set the stage for better understanding. As I was reading, I was struck by Jung's passion, his insight, and his I have read many books about Jung and his ideas, but never a selection of Jung's writings. Reading his thoughts about personality types, religion, the unconscious, etc. in his own words was powerful. I was surprised by his humor, the biting wit, the way he could bring complex issues to light in the most succinct way. Anthony Storr's introductions to passages gave pertinent background to set the stage for better understanding. As I was reading, I was struck by Jung's passion, his insight, and his genius.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Di Bryan

    Great as an introduction to Jung’s work as it briefly covers the main points and adds some details about his life.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Joana

    Very interesting, but too dense.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michael D

    A brilliant compendium with highly insightful commentary by Storr, this is indeed, essential.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Moss 慈映夢図

    Jung, when delving into his findings, often does so in contrast to those of his former mentor Freud. Fortunately for us, this results in Jung doing a far better job of succinctly detailing Freud's work as well as his own, and doing so more efficiently than Freud ever managed himself - His writing is sometimes borderline impenetrable. Unlike Freud, Jung could take something as vast and nebulous as psychology and make it somewhat more digestible to the average reader, and the result is a clearer a Jung, when delving into his findings, often does so in contrast to those of his former mentor Freud. Fortunately for us, this results in Jung doing a far better job of succinctly detailing Freud's work as well as his own, and doing so more efficiently than Freud ever managed himself - His writing is sometimes borderline impenetrable. Unlike Freud, Jung could take something as vast and nebulous as psychology and make it somewhat more digestible to the average reader, and the result is a clearer and more concise understanding of both their works. Required reading. 5 stars.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Philip

    I find myself in agreement with Jung many times, especially as a critic of society and concerning the psychic "shadow" he has a believer in me. And yet, at other times I just can't fathom what on earth he is talking about, especially concerning this whole abracadabra business with alchemy; but that's probably mainly due to my own deficit in the field. I am also skeptical about the "animus" and "anima" branch of his theory. My main objection, however, to his work is that he seems to disallow for t I find myself in agreement with Jung many times, especially as a critic of society and concerning the psychic "shadow" he has a believer in me. And yet, at other times I just can't fathom what on earth he is talking about, especially concerning this whole abracadabra business with alchemy; but that's probably mainly due to my own deficit in the field. I am also skeptical about the "animus" and "anima" branch of his theory. My main objection, however, to his work is that he seems to disallow for the existence of literal demonic possession. One may argue up and down the block that demons do not exist, that they are but an archaic remnant of a long gone unenlightened religious era and therefore have no place in our so-called scientifically "enlightened" modern age, but as a former demoniac I can guarantee you that they are still very much alive-and-kicking real. In fact, until September 2009 I had six of them in me, all different types too. Up until this day, I am still being harassed by them on a nightly basis; this is called demonic oppression, a milder form of harassment compared to hardcore demonic possession. And, as unphysical beings cannot be registered by physical machines, I cannot prove demons exist of course. Nevertheless, I personally know for a fact that if a psychoanalyst does not allow for the incorporation of parasitic demonic spirits infecting the human psyche (operating from the unconscious), then their model of, and approach toward, the human psyche is inaccurate and incomplete. Another point of criticism is that Jung makes a great many claims of truth, and yet is not too generously forthcoming in actually explaining what he states. To me, what makes a person a great teacher is when they actually explain what they stand for, for without it it's merely declaration -- to be memorized by rote much rather than being viable to thorough understanding.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bharath

    If you like Jung's theories on Collective Unconscious, Synchronicity and personality types you will like this book. He makes a genuine and good attempt at aligning religious and scientific thought. This book is a collection of the most significant writings of Carl Jung with some introductory notes by Anthory Storr. This has turned out to be very satisfying read where all of Jung’s popular theories are discussed in detail in his own words. There are descriptions of personality types – basic ones in If you like Jung's theories on Collective Unconscious, Synchronicity and personality types you will like this book. He makes a genuine and good attempt at aligning religious and scientific thought. This book is a collection of the most significant writings of Carl Jung with some introductory notes by Anthory Storr. This has turned out to be very satisfying read where all of Jung’s popular theories are discussed in detail in his own words. There are descriptions of personality types – basic ones including intraverts and extraverts. There are further interesting descriptions on the properties of the soul/psyche. In the case of men, the soul has many properties one would consider feminine (since that is what is suppressed), while it is the reverse in women. Men inwardly feel while women inwardly reason – this he offers as a reason why men are driven to total hopelessness at times than women. There are long and fascinating passages on the origin of evil. Another very good discussion item is on looking outward and inward - while there are many who look outward to seek God, there are others who see looking inward as a higher priority. A number of conceptual similarities and differences between Western and Eastern civilization is also discussed. Expectedly, a good amount of space is devoted to his theories of the “Collective unconscious” and “Synchronicity” with examples from his life. While Freud’s diagnosis of personality (and also possibly Adler) is more simplistic, Jung’s approach takes a wide range of factors into play including personality, upbringing, surroundings, beliefs, etc. Overall through much of his writing Jung seeks to establish a most needed link between religion and science. If Jung’s theories appeal to you, you will find this book to be a good read.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tony Lovell

    good introduction to Jung for those unfamiliar with his work....explanatory notes were helpful!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Scriptor Ignotus

    An excellent introduction to Jungian psychology, very tightly and skillfully edited to allow the reader to read a single line of Jung's thought over several different sources. It touches on the whole spectrum of Jung's work; his doctoral thesis, his divergence with Freud, his confrontation with the unconscious, the anima and animus, the psychological types and functions, his study of alchemy, and excerpts from Answer to Job and The Undiscovered Self. Those who are looking to get into Jungian psy An excellent introduction to Jungian psychology, very tightly and skillfully edited to allow the reader to read a single line of Jung's thought over several different sources. It touches on the whole spectrum of Jung's work; his doctoral thesis, his divergence with Freud, his confrontation with the unconscious, the anima and animus, the psychological types and functions, his study of alchemy, and excerpts from Answer to Job and The Undiscovered Self. Those who are looking to get into Jungian psychology, but aren't sure where to start due to the sheer volume of his work, will find this volume invaluable.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Seifert

    Jung continues to revive my understanding of self/psyche and in relationship with others to include the many figures/images/archetypes that make up the sub and collective consciousness, some of which I wish to better understand and see consciously to include shaking off the shards and embracing the avatars that support a transcendence and "transmutes our personal destiny into the destiny of [humankind], and evokes in us all those beneficent forces that ever and anon have enabled humanity to find Jung continues to revive my understanding of self/psyche and in relationship with others to include the many figures/images/archetypes that make up the sub and collective consciousness, some of which I wish to better understand and see consciously to include shaking off the shards and embracing the avatars that support a transcendence and "transmutes our personal destiny into the destiny of [humankind], and evokes in us all those beneficent forces that ever and anon have enabled humanity to find refuge from every peril and to outlive the longest night." (from "On the Relationship of Analytical Psychology to Poetry")

  25. 4 out of 5

    Scott Kinkade

    This is the definitive book for anyone looking to study at the feet of Carl Jung. While it's mostly reprints of his various works, the book begins each section by explaining what Jung was trying to say, and gives context for his different theories. From dreams to personalities to UFOs and even the Bible, he's full of fascinating ideas. If you have any interest in philosophy, you owe it to yourself to read this.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tim Weakley

    This might have been a more worthwhile book for a student of psychology. The first half of the book was interesting. I enjoyed the exploration of Jung's work with individuation, the collective unconcious, archetypes etc. The second half of the book concerned his ideas about alchemy which held no appeal for me at all and left me glazed over. The same can be said for the massive amounts of prose on religion.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Corey

    Ok, so this took me over a year to get through and, frankly, some of it was over my head. But I was in Jungian therapy for a decade and credit it with helping me become a better writer. Hence, parts of his writings resonated very deeply with me.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    Jung does not make for an easy read. This is the best introduction/overview on the market. Anthony Storr does well to give a rounded collection of writings and excepts, so you have a good taste of Jung.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Fern

    What an incredible book of Jung's writings that summarises his theories. A man with great insight into the human psyche: his philosophies have opened up my eyes into my conscious and unconscious being. He has left the fate of humanity into our own hands...

  30. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Interesting and spiritual (although it's been a couple of years since I read it so i can't remember my exact thoughts) some of it went over my head though and I don't think I like Jung as much as I thought I would- I kind of thought his theories would be the answer to everything- sadly they're not!

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