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Duty Free Art: Art in the Age of Planetary Civil War PDF, ePub eBook

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Duty Free Art: Art in the Age of Planetary Civil War

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Duty Free Art: Art in the Age of Planetary Civil War PDF, ePub eBook What is the function of art in the era of digital globalization? In Duty Free Art, filmmaker and writer Hito Steyerl wonders how we can appreciate, or even make art in the present age. What can we do when arms manufacturers sponsor museums and some of the world's most valuable artworks are used as a fictional currency in a global futures market that has nothing to do with What is the function of art in the era of digital globalization? In Duty Free Art, filmmaker and writer Hito Steyerl wonders how we can appreciate, or even make art in the present age. What can we do when arms manufacturers sponsor museums and some of the world's most valuable artworks are used as a fictional currency in a global futures market that has nothing to do with the works themselves? Can we distinguish between creativity and the digital white noise that bombards our everyday lives? Exploring artifacts as diverse as video games, Wikileaks files, the proliferation of spam, and political actions, she exposes the paradoxes within globalization, political economies, visual culture, and the status of art production.

30 review for Duty Free Art: Art in the Age of Planetary Civil War

  1. 5 out of 5

    Scotty

    this was the first book I finished this year. the title might make it look like an art book on first glance but notice the phrase 'planetary civil war' in the title. it's about the globalized world crumbling apart and devolving into a million little extra-territorial tax havens (see: switzerland, the caymans, the panama papers, etc). this is more a commentary on neoliberalism than on the art itself. but it does take time to criticize artists and critics who could be doing good as opposed to norm this was the first book I finished this year. the title might make it look like an art book on first glance but notice the phrase 'planetary civil war' in the title. it's about the globalized world crumbling apart and devolving into a million little extra-territorial tax havens (see: switzerland, the caymans, the panama papers, etc). this is more a commentary on neoliberalism than on the art itself. but it does take time to criticize artists and critics who could be doing good as opposed to normalizing bad. less picassos, more pistolettos. the bookended first and last chapters are meh to be sure. too many adjectives for too few ideas. i'm sure they resonate live, with a crowd reacting to the speech, but on paper not so much. the book's best pieces are in the middle. they hit like a sledgehammer to the brain. overall very enjoyable. i haven't encountered an author this smart and engaging in a long time. sure, it gets a bit International Art English'y at times, but what do you expect? this was a very fucking book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sophie Fields

    Less about art than I anticipated and a lot more focused on the contemporary Art in relation to politics and globalization. Steyerl’s work makes a lot more sense after reading her well-supported theories. A lot of interesting topics about the future of new media art, at times it was a little dense or too abstract to me, but my favorite essay was called International Disco Latin!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Russell

    slightly list-y run on sentences that clobber you with a pessimistic lens of our world. But! A lot of ideas worth pondering. I struggle with art writing that is mostly about exposing the ills of the world instead of exploring the grace of art despite our humanity.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Cassie

    I thoroughly enjoyed the chapter outlining the history of both spam & SPAM, and now will forever hold in my memory and wonderment that as a delicacy in Hawaii, traditional dishes from around the world have been creatively reimagined to incorporate spam, most beautifully producing the delightful reincarnation of macaroni cheese as Spamaroni & Cheese. What else will I retain from the book? A re-remembering of what was already half known about the neoliberal, privatised, automated, unsancti I thoroughly enjoyed the chapter outlining the history of both spam & SPAM, and now will forever hold in my memory and wonderment that as a delicacy in Hawaii, traditional dishes from around the world have been creatively reimagined to incorporate spam, most beautifully producing the delightful reincarnation of macaroni cheese as Spamaroni & Cheese. What else will I retain from the book? A re-remembering of what was already half known about the neoliberal, privatised, automated, unsanctioned, warmongering world at hand; there was no huge enlightenment, no wider scope, I felt, no conciseness towards an ultimate answer (of what question?) but a general theme of reminding the reader of the interconnectedness of these things within our lives, and, occasionally mentioned, though not as much as I’d wish it to be, the art world; the insidious effects these policies, ideas or non ideas, and notions have as they play out upon a global sphere filled with drone warfare, art as currency and duty free warehouses of unseen and unaccounted for art. But. We are free to reimagine a parallel universe running alongside the pessimistic scope of the world that Hito constantly alludes to, and, amongst her more enlightening essays, we find can find the ways and means to begin to do so.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Callum Cound

    In 'Duty Free Art', Steyerl's iconic and accessible writing style shines through in this collection of recent essays/ lectures. Working through the concepts that centuries of unregulated art market capitalism have given us, she makes important points around how we can organise, collectivise and resist against what seems to be all pervasive challenges in the art-world. I super recommend the chapter on 'International Disco Latin' (a version of which can be found here: https://www.e-flux.com/journa In 'Duty Free Art', Steyerl's iconic and accessible writing style shines through in this collection of recent essays/ lectures. Working through the concepts that centuries of unregulated art market capitalism have given us, she makes important points around how we can organise, collectivise and resist against what seems to be all pervasive challenges in the art-world. I super recommend the chapter on 'International Disco Latin' (a version of which can be found here: https://www.e-flux.com/journal/45/601...) which attempts to demarcate English as an/the International Art Language, arguing in favour of the language of exploited art workers in forming a bulwark against the fascism of language and the monolithic power structures that keep art in the hands of the few. Hito Steyerl is ever prescient in her analysis of contemporary conditions of art / production, and this book further illustrates what an important figure she is in the art landscape of today.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Casey Robertson

    Duty Free Art confronts the reader with countless questions. Steyerl hypothesizes every possible effect of a world that is connected in multiple dimensions across a million platforms, each concern feeling more pressing than the last. As exciting as her writing is, there is hardly ever a decisive conclusion being made, and this can be very frustrating as a reader. But maybe this is where we are in our current moment.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Helen Varley

    this collection of recent articles and essays confirms hito steyerl as one of the most exciting and inspiring thinkers of our time. her style is playful, provocative and poetic, and highly readable. she deals with myriad complex topics in ways that are engaging and often surprising. for example, a chapter exploring the implications of 3D technologies leaps unexpectedly into the 1990s war in Bosnia-Herzogovina and, curiously, kisses. drawing connections between such disparate events and ideas, st this collection of recent articles and essays confirms hito steyerl as one of the most exciting and inspiring thinkers of our time. her style is playful, provocative and poetic, and highly readable. she deals with myriad complex topics in ways that are engaging and often surprising. for example, a chapter exploring the implications of 3D technologies leaps unexpectedly into the 1990s war in Bosnia-Herzogovina and, curiously, kisses. drawing connections between such disparate events and ideas, steyerl reminds us of the extent of inter-connectedness and thoughtfully interrogates the massive social changes that currently taking place. from email scams to tax dodging, language to facism - steyerl starts with reality and dances us rapidly into critical thought and imagination. she is unafraid to state difficult truths or to open cans of worms. the world needs more writing and thinking like this.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    Some parts of this blew my mind while some didn’t, but the analysis is always compete and compelling. You don’t find yourself to this book by accident so if you’re here, you’re meant to be. Pick it up.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Riar

    Great follow-up after The Wretched of the Screen. Certainly one of the best out there who is really capable of dissecting media, politic, art and technology with witty comments and anachronistic montage-style writing.

  10. 4 out of 5

    David Rice

    A dense, compelling, and often frightening look at the contemporary connections between art, war, fraud, unreality, and the Internet. It reads like a series of sci-fi stories that one suspects are all too true. Occasionally too clever for its own good, but very often arresting and profound.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kitzel

    Super interesting but definitely not an easy read. A work of art in itself, this thought palace that is all over the place.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Vuk Trifkovic

    Great set of essays in the intersection of art, technology, and politics. Informed and inspired. Great pairing with "New Dark Age" by Bridle.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kristine

    📳💳💡🤳🖼💻🕹 📝🎀 i love her!!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

  15. 5 out of 5

    Zeynep

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

  17. 5 out of 5

    svenharambasic

  18. 5 out of 5

    Barry

  19. 5 out of 5

    The_kensta

  20. 5 out of 5

    Werner Camps

  21. 5 out of 5

    Guillermo Fernandez

  22. 4 out of 5

    Cristina Valdez

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mark Wheaton

  24. 4 out of 5

    Melanie Strouse

  25. 4 out of 5

    Gianni

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jazzy

  27. 4 out of 5

    John

  28. 5 out of 5

    Carlo

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sean Peeters

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rafael Lubner

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