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Someone to Wed PDF, ePub eBook A very practical marriage makes Alexander Westcott question his heart in the latest Regency romance from the New York Times bestselling author of Someone to Hold. When Alexander Westcott becomes the new Earl of Riverdale, he inherits a title he never wanted and a failing country estate he can’t afford. But he fully intends to do everything in his power to undo years of negl A very practical marriage makes Alexander Westcott question his heart in the latest Regency romance from the New York Times bestselling author of Someone to Hold. When Alexander Westcott becomes the new Earl of Riverdale, he inherits a title he never wanted and a failing country estate he can’t afford. But he fully intends to do everything in his power to undo years of neglect and give the people who depend on him a better life. . . . A recluse for more than twenty years, Wren Heyden wants one thing out of life: marriage. With her vast fortune, she sets her sights on buying a husband. But when she makes the desperate—and oh-so-dashing—earl a startlingly unexpected proposal, Alex will only agree to a proper courtship, hoping for at least friendship and respect to develop between them. He is totally unprepared for the desire that overwhelms him when Wren finally lifts the veils that hide the secrets of her past. . . .

30 review for Someone to Wed

  1. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Someone to Wed by Mary Balogh is a 2017 Berkley publication. A tender, but redemptive love story, that gave me so many feels! While this series has been quality reading up to this point, as is most anything Mary Bologh pens, I was still suffering a bit of a book hangover from the ‘Survivor’ series, which was absolutely amazing. Up to this point the first two books in the Wescott series have failed to really grab me in the same way. However, this third installment was the perfect remedy for my pre Someone to Wed by Mary Balogh is a 2017 Berkley publication. A tender, but redemptive love story, that gave me so many feels! While this series has been quality reading up to this point, as is most anything Mary Bologh pens, I was still suffering a bit of a book hangover from the ‘Survivor’ series, which was absolutely amazing. Up to this point the first two books in the Wescott series have failed to really grab me in the same way. However, this third installment was the perfect remedy for my previous lethargic response to the Wescott saga. Alexander has been a wonderful character in this series and I am so happy he got his own story. With an inherited title, came a country estate in dire need of repair. With limited funds, his only choice is to marry for money. It was therefore quite fortuitous when he is summoned to the home of Wren Heyden, a wealthy businesswoman who is looking for a husband. Her marriage proposal, which would simply be an a marriage of convenience,but one Wren hopes will quell her soul deep loneliness, and provide her with children, is very tempting to Alexander, and he can’t dismiss it out of hand. The couple agrees to see how well they might get along before making any decisions, but this task is more difficult than it should be, due to Wren’s extreme social anxiety and awkwardness around other people. Can the couple find a way around their differences or will Wren's insecurities prevent her from making a commitment? Wren’s years in seclusion has made her appear aloof, or cold, when nothing could be further from the truth. She has endured so much, most of it needlessly, but with Alexander’s openness and willingness to draw her out, to encourage her to step out into the open more often, Wren flourishes. Alexander may need to marry for money, something his family is very sad about, but every day he spends with Wren, the deeper he falls in love with her. He admires her unconventionality, her lack of pretentiousness, her intelligence, and incredible courage and inner strength, and so did I!! She is a most remarkable character, one that is both vulnerable and inspirational. This story touched my heart! I loved this couple and their journey together!! The characters are front and center, there is no childish, immature angst, but the emotions and feelings of these richly drawn characters pulled at my heart, and, moved me deeply, evoking sincere empathy and compassion, which is Mary Bologh’s signature touch. This is, quite simply, a beautiful love story, the kind we ALL need a lot more of! 4.5 stars

  2. 4 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    $1.99 Kindle sale, June 11, 2019. One for the Regency romance fans. Someone to Wed is a lovely Regency romance that I downed whole in one evening. It's by one of the better-known authors in the field, Mary Balogh. The unique plot point here is that the heroine, Wren, has a large purple birthmark on one side of her face that she considers disfiguring, and she's been a hermit for many years, always wearing a veil in public. Notwithstanding that, she's also an intelligent, accomplished businesswoman $1.99 Kindle sale, June 11, 2019. One for the Regency romance fans. Someone to Wed is a lovely Regency romance that I downed whole in one evening. It's by one of the better-known authors in the field, Mary Balogh. The unique plot point here is that the heroine, Wren, has a large purple birthmark on one side of her face that she considers disfiguring, and she's been a hermit for many years, always wearing a veil in public. Notwithstanding that, she's also an intelligent, accomplished businesswoman who's taken over her uncle's glassworks business. Now her aunt and uncle (her beloved adoptive parents, who took her in after a distressing childhood that Wren refuses to discuss with anyone) have passed away. Wren is lonely, almost 30, and very rich, and so she comes up with the idea of essentially bribing some nice, respectful man to marry her, treat her well and give her babies and sex (not, however, in that order :D), and put up with her isolated ways. Enter Alex, who's unexpectedly inherited a title and needs lots more money to whip the accompanying estate into shape. He's young and handsome, and he's not sure why he should even consider Wren's offer to him. There are lots of other rich heiresses around, and with his title and looks he shouldn't have any trouble finding a wife. She's clearly a very damaged soul, which is far more distressing to Alex than the mark on her face. But Alex is also a kind and thoughtful man. Perhaps something might be worked out? They decide to get to know each other slowly, with lots of bumps in the road along the way. It's a heartwarming story, if a little facile, especially in the last half. Alex is a paragon, and a man who feels bound by his duties to the people working on his estate. He very much wants to make life better for them, and is willing to set aside his own desires in order to achieve that. Wren is a more memorable character, trying to muster the courage to do things - meet new people, go out in public, kiss a man - that she's never done before. Lots of references and characters from the prior books in this Westcott series. It was a little distracting for me since I haven't read those books, but if you've read them you should be pleased to catch up with those characters. I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley for review. Thank you!

  3. 5 out of 5

    WhiskeyintheJar/Kyraryker

    I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. Wren has hidden herself away from the world but without her aunt and uncle, she has grown lonely. Deciding that her inheritance should be good for something, she decides to buy herself a husband. Alexander was happy in his life but now finding himself an earl of an impoverished estate, his life has been turned upside down. What starts off as a business propositi I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. Wren has hidden herself away from the world but without her aunt and uncle, she has grown lonely. Deciding that her inheritance should be good for something, she decides to buy herself a husband. Alexander was happy in his life but now finding himself an earl of an impoverished estate, his life has been turned upside down. What starts off as a business proposition could end up being a fairy tale. "I am twenty-nine years old, very nearly thirty, and I would like…someone to wed." Third in the Wescott series we come to Alexander's story. The previous two books set the storyline of the previous Earl of Riverdale dying and exposing that his second marriage was bigamist. His three children are declared bastards while a daughter from the first marriage is found in an orphanage and suddenly legitimate. I did not read the previous two books and appreciated how Balogh smoothly and organically explained how Alexander became the Earl. Balogh relayed important information and characters but didn't info dump and in fact integrated all those previous characters into this story, creating a believable and familial world. You could feasibly start the series here. Her instinct was to hide behind veils within veils, and she had done it for so long that she did not know how to cast those veils aside. The star of this story and where most of the heavy emotional lifting comes from is our heroine Wren. She was born with a large birthmark covering half of her face and a mother who puts vanity above all else. When she is ten, her aunt takes her from her home and eventually she and her husband adopt Wren. Unfortunately, those important formative years with her cruel mother keep Wren from having any self-worth. Wren always wears a veil to cover her face unless around her aunt and uncle. When they die she becomes incredibly lonely and decides to buy a husband. Her new neighbor, the Earl of Riverdale, is third on her list for potential husbands but he may be just too good looking. You'll feel awful for Wren as she uses an ice queen persona to keep her pain and self shielded. Balogh masterfully created a perfect hero for Wren in Alexander. He perfectly complements the situation by being wary of the heroine's pain but also acknowledges it; there are no quick simple solutions in this story. This wasn't even a slow burn but a slow thawing; you'll need to wait until around the half-way mark before our couple starts to really get moving. I appreciated this building and forming of their relationship but I also thought the second half dragged on a bit. This is definitely not a "modern" historical, characters and mannerisms stay true to the time period, emotions and actions are a bit more constrained. While the larger cast of characters helped create a full world, it also stole away from my lead's romance more than I would have liked, the story had a tendency to slowly meander. Alexander's sister and mother and how they engaged and tried to understand Wren brought such a wonderful warmth to the story; I love when women characters kindly engage with each other. Alexander and Wren were such intelligent characters but I did think Wren’s internal declaration of love felt a bit quick as I don't think the "special" connection with Alexander had been quite made yet, he was the first and only man to show her attention in her life. A little slow and meandering towards the end but Wren will have you emotional and incredibly happy that she found the handsome Alexander.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Caz

    I've given this an A- at AAR, so that's 4.5 stars rounded up. Someone to Wed is the third book in Mary Balogh’s series following the fortunes of the Westcott family as its members struggle to put their lives back together after the revelation of a long-buried family secret impacts all of them in many different ways.  The author once again proves herself to be incredibly skilled at examining the detail and minutiae of relationships – both romantic and familial – and in her ability to make her char I've given this an A- at AAR, so that's 4.5 stars rounded up. Someone to Wed is the third book in Mary Balogh’s series following the fortunes of the Westcott family as its members struggle to put their lives back together after the revelation of a long-buried family secret impacts all of them in many different ways.  The author once again proves herself to be incredibly skilled at examining the detail and minutiae of relationships – both romantic and familial – and in her ability to make her characters’ dilemmas and insecurities feel understandable and realistic.  These aren’t ‘flashy’ books; the focus is very much on the characters and how they adjust to the fact that the lives they had imagined for themselves are suddenly taken away – and how they come to understand that perhaps the very thing they have regarded as a disaster might just have changed their lives for the better. When, after his death, it was discovered that Humphrey Westcott, the Earl of Riverdale had married his countess while he was already married to someone else, the consequences were far reaching.  His ‘wife’ retired from society to reside with her brother and took to using her maiden name again, and their three children – two daughters and a son – were declared illegitimate, meaning that the supposed heir, Harry, a happy-go-lucky young man in his early twenties, could no longer inherit the earldom.  That honour now falls to Alexander Westcott, the late earl’s nephew, although it’s an honour Alexander could have done without. When we first met Alex in Someone to Love, he had spent the better part of the last five years working on making good his family finances and setting his Kent estate, Riddings Park, to rights.  A young man who takes his responsibilities very seriously, Alex was at long last looking forward to settling into the life of a country gentleman and had expressed his intention of looking about him for a wife, hoping to find a woman with whom he could happily share his life.  But his dreams of love and a quiet life of obscurity were shattered when he became the Earl of Riverdale. He has inherited the entailed properties that come with the title without being left even the smallest amount of the money necessary to run them, meaning that Alex is now faced with the prospect of marrying for money rather than for love as he’d hoped. When he receives an invitation to tea from his reclusive neighbour, Miss Wren Heyden, Alex is surprised on arrival to discover that he is the only guest, and even more surprised when Miss Heyden suggests that they are both in a position to offer the other something they want. She is a shrewd, intelligent and very wealthy businesswoman who successfully runs the glassworks she inherited from her uncle, but owing to the birthmark that covers half her face, she considers herself disfigured and has lived the life of a hermit. But she doesn’t want to spend the rest of her life alone; she wants marriage and a family (and she’s not too coy about her desire to experience sexual passion) and decides to – in effect – buy herself a husband. Alex is stunned (and not a little put out) by the offer, but he can’t deny that marrying Miss Heyden would solve his financial problems and enable him to put right everything that needs putting right at Brambledean Court. Yet even so, he knows she isn’t his only option. In spite of his lack of fortune, he’s very eligible – he’s young, titled and attractive – and there are enough wealthy cits looking to land a title for their daughters that he wouldn’t have any trouble finding a bride among them. And while Wren’s birthmark doesn’t really worry him, he senses she’s broken somehow, that her “defensive, slightly mocking manner” and her “surface coldness” and self-imposed isolation are the result of emotional issues that go far beyond her face – and he isn’t sure he wants to deal with them. After a few meetings, Wren and Alex agree that they will not suit and part ways. Alex returns to London and his family, and gets down to the serious business of bride-hunting while Wren goes to Staffordshire to visit her glassworks. Yet as Wren immerses herself in work and Alex sets about courting a suitable young lady, both find their thoughts straying to the other, and when, to Alex’s astonishment, Wren appears unexpectedly in London, he realises he’s happy to see her and had missed her. It’s a new beginning for them both. Alex has come to terms with the fact that Wren is clearly hiding the truth about her childhood, but feels fairly sure that, given time, she will confide in him, while Wren comes to understand that, should she actually become the Countess of Riverdale, her life as a recluse must end. She realises the foolishness of her hopes to marry and continue to live in obscurity and, with the help and support of Alex and his family, all of whom treat her with warmth and respect, begins to come out of her shell and to live her life – which is by no means easy for her. All her life she has hidden her face and her secrets, and it takes a huge amount of courage and determination to set aside years of conditioning and to deal with her fears of being seen in public as well as to believe that people can see past the mark on her face. Throughout it all, Alex encourages and supports her with a growing sense of pride, even pulling her back occasionally when he senses she’s pushing herself too hard. Both central characters are extremely likeable and easy to relate to. There’s a danger that Alex – intuitive, responsible, gorgeous and charming – could come across as too good to be true, but there’s an honesty and depth to him that counteracts that, making him seem more human. For instance, while his admission that he is put off by Wren’s emotional baggage might make him seem somewhat selfish, I applauded him for both his insight and his truthfulness. And he gets extra Brownie Points for the way he owns up to being offended that a woman would propose a match based on monetary consideration, while it would have been perfectly acceptable had the boot been on the other foot and actually takes the time to think things through. Wren is perhaps more difficult to warm to, but that’s intentional; she is self-assured and independent when it comes to business, but her insecurities and lack of social interaction make her seem aloof and prickly, although as soon as the reader begins to understand the reasons for her awkwardness, it’s easy to sympathise with her and to cheer her on as she decides to take back her life with both hands. As I said at the beginning, this is not a ‘flashy’ book, meaning there are no convoluted plot-twists or melodramatic developments. Someone to Wed is a leisurely-paced, beautifully developed, character driven romance of the sort at which Mary Balogh excels, and I have no qualms about giving it a wholehearted recommendation.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mei

    What would you do if you had a big mark on your face? When I was young even having a pimple was a huge tragedy! Sometimes I watch a TV show where plastic surgeons remove scars from peoples' faces and here I felt sad that such an option was not available to Wren. I don't even know if modern medicine could help her... I admired Wren at the end of the book very much! I don't know if I would have such courage! And I loved Alexander (and his family too!) even more for appreciating Wren for herself with What would you do if you had a big mark on your face? When I was young even having a pimple was a huge tragedy! Sometimes I watch a TV show where plastic surgeons remove scars from peoples' faces and here I felt sad that such an option was not available to Wren. I don't even know if modern medicine could help her... I admired Wren at the end of the book very much! I don't know if I would have such courage! And I loved Alexander (and his family too!) even more for appreciating Wren for herself without judging her from only her appearance! The love part of the story here is slow growing and very tender. At the beginning neither Wren nor Alexander are even attracted to each other! Here there's no lusting at first sight! Wren was righteously cold and business-like, but at the same time determined. She wants her own family and children. She think that with her blemish no man will want her, but she's rich and probably it would be possible to find a honorable man who will wed her for a part of her inheritance. To her it's the only way... Alexander is in dire straits. He knows that he must marry a heiress - he doesn't want to, but that's the only way. But when summoned and proposed by Wren, he's aghast! It is just not done! Man proposes, not a woman! And she also dare to make it a business!!! But he's also intrigued. So they agree to become acquainted before deciding anothing about marriage. And so it starts... It is really a sweet love story. I could see Alexander's opinion changing, his feelings getting engaged, his tenderness and admiration growing. Also you can see Wren being dragged out of her shell, acquiring her confidence and overcoming years of hiding her face. Just beautiful.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lyuda

    Mary Balogh is my comfort read. She waves her magic and creates emotionally satisfying world of complex relationships between strong, likable and honorable characters without relying too much on evil villains or annoying misunderstandings. Her stories tend to have more characters’ introspection as opposed to melt downs or limitless arguments. The story, third in the series, is no exception and I would say it’s my favorite in the series. I loved both protagonists. I don’t know if it's possible to Mary Balogh is my comfort read. She waves her magic and creates emotionally satisfying world of complex relationships between strong, likable and honorable characters without relying too much on evil villains or annoying misunderstandings. Her stories tend to have more characters’ introspection as opposed to melt downs or limitless arguments. The story, third in the series, is no exception and I would say it’s my favorite in the series. I loved both protagonists. I don’t know if it's possible to create a better romantic hero than Alex. He’s kind, patient, honorable dream-man. He is a perfect man for the emotionally scared heroine. It’s she who made a difference for me in the story. My heart went out to her right at the beginning even when she appeared stiff, defensive, cold, and at times, even hostile. She had good reasons for it. Her courage to face and overcome the demons and to venture outside of her lonely cocoon was truly admirable. The two protagonists were made for each other. I smiled and sighed with contentment at the end. This story is exactly what I needed.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Proffitt

    This is third in a series and I highly recommend that you read them in order. The extended family is broad and a lot of them show up in all the stories and that can be confusing if you’re coming into that newly here. All the books are outstanding, so at least starting at the beginning shouldn’t be a burden. This one became my favorite, no question. And it has been a whole week since I finished, so I’m afraid this review won’t be as good as it could have been. Which sucks, but it was still too raw This is third in a series and I highly recommend that you read them in order. The extended family is broad and a lot of them show up in all the stories and that can be confusing if you’re coming into that newly here. All the books are outstanding, so at least starting at the beginning shouldn’t be a burden. This one became my favorite, no question. And it has been a whole week since I finished, so I’m afraid this review won’t be as good as it could have been. Which sucks, but it was still too raw for me to write until now because I had all the feels. I already knew that I liked Alex from the first two books. Not only that, but he has all my sympathy for having toiled for years to bring his ancestral home into order after his father’s neglect only to inherit a far greater mess from his great uncle—that set him even farther back from being able to offer a stable home to a deserving female and settle into domestic life. A competent, quietly powerful man who wants to create a loving home is just all kinds of attractive and Alex has already been shown to be good and kind and admirable. I only hoped that the woman he ended up with would be worth it. And I had doubts about Wren. She’s all kinds of damaged. And while it originated with a birthmark that covers half her face, early abuse extends that damage far deeper emotionally than a simple sense of disfigurement. But I came to really enjoy her, too. It helped that she has had the benefit of an extremely kind adoptive family and that they let her get involved in the family business so she has a core of strength that she knows she can rely on. She’s competent and smart and completely unwilling to simply let herself be background to any man or to consider herself helpless. I was skeptical, at first, about her desire for a husband because it’s completely self-driven and a bit nonsensical (in that she doesn’t need one). Fortunately, Balogh is good enough to make that an integral part of her character, as well, so that you can see her underlying need for loving contact and her awareness of its absence in her current situation. The family continues to be a very strong presence in this story, possibly more so than in the others. By now, we’re pretty familiar with the pattern of rallying around need and exerting the family influence on behalf of others that so defines them, so seeing them rally around Wren was no surprise. I really like that in this series. I might have been skeptical about such a thorough commitment to each other in an extended family except that I’ve been the beneficiary of exactly that dynamic in marrying into Melissa’s family. They are essentially just like this—to the extent that I’m far more comfortable in my mental disorder with them than I am with my own family. And again, Balogh is good enough that they still feel like individuals with their own perspectives and problems even as they unite behind the needs most prominent at any given moment. So anyway, this was an outstanding experience and Balogh just seems to be getting better all the time and fully warrants all five stars. A note about Steamy: There are a couple explicit sex scenes. They’re all post-marriage, because that’s definitely the man Alex is. And they are a beautiful illustration of the act of physical and emotional intimacy in bringing two people together into a new whole. And I particularly liked how “well” the first time went, not least because it wasn’t all smooth sailing, or even much better than “good enough”. Or maybe I mean “a good place to start”. Anyway, way more realistic than most romances reach for and I really liked that.

  8. 4 out of 5

    ♥Rachel♥

    Oh, this book! I just loved it so much! Since Wren has lost her aunt and uncle, Wren has been lonely. She wants a marriage and hopes for all that comes with it: respect, trust, affection, and children. As a wealthy woman she sets out to buy a husband, since she doesn’t think she could acquire one any other way. She’s heard of Alexander Westcott’s predicament, inheriting the title of Earl of Riverdale with the massive estate of Brambledean, long neglected, and in need of a mountain of money to re Oh, this book! I just loved it so much! Since Wren has lost her aunt and uncle, Wren has been lonely. She wants a marriage and hopes for all that comes with it: respect, trust, affection, and children. As a wealthy woman she sets out to buy a husband, since she doesn’t think she could acquire one any other way. She’s heard of Alexander Westcott’s predicament, inheriting the title of Earl of Riverdale with the massive estate of Brambledean, long neglected, and in need of a mountain of money to repair and restore. So, Wren makes Alexander and offer of marriage. Alexander Westcott always thought when he married it would be for love, but that was before he unexpectedly inherited the title of Earl with Brambledean, its people and properties dependent on its prosperity. He doesn’t have the money to restore it the way it should and if he doesn’t take a bride for money it will be years of struggling to get the estate back on course. Wren Heyden’s offer is practical, and he feels like he could respect and eventually have affection for her, but Alexander’s afraid by the deep pain he thinks lies under her surface. Could she get past that to truly let him in? If not, would he be content such an emotionally remote marriage? Wren had so many barriers at first, I wasn’t sure a romance between her and Alex could be possible. They start off as so practical without the promise of love, it was a little depressing, but oh, things change and progress, and I fell in absolute love with their emotional journey!! Once their course was settled the romance was slow steps, but always going forward. No ridiculous, dramatic setbacks. Wren didn’t have any family to speak of, so I was very moved that Alexander’s family stepped up and gave Wren the support and friendship she needed. It was impossible to feel lonely with his cousins, aunts and uncles by her side, but I most appreciated Alexander’s mother and sister welcoming her into the family so warmly. Mary Balogh’s writing stirred up so many emotions, had me tearing up here and there with all the feels! She brought Wren and Alexander to life, to the point they felt real that I was genuinely touched by all the trials they overcame to find their HEA! Someone to Wed is tied as favorite in the series with Someone to Hold, the previous book, and now I can’t wait for the next one! A copy was kindly provided by Berkley in exchange for an honest review. This review is also posted at The Readers Den.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sabina

    As always, another delightful read from the Wescott series! I loved how Wren gradually shed her reclusiveness and how Balogh described her thought processes as she did so. The slow burn romance is so sweet! A wonderful read, and my favorite in the series so far.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Penny Reid

    Oh man, this one started out SO GOOD!! I had that expectant feeling in my chest at the build up, and then their (view spoiler)[ argument had me glued to the page, and then he sees her in the park, and then. . . they're both very calm and reasonable and make nothing but good decisions, thinking the best of each other and doing absolutely everything right. (hide spoiler)] Along the way, what could have been passionate and exciting became . . . tepid? With two MC's so entirely free of making poor d Oh man, this one started out SO GOOD!! I had that expectant feeling in my chest at the build up, and then their (view spoiler)[ argument had me glued to the page, and then he sees her in the park, and then. . . they're both very calm and reasonable and make nothing but good decisions, thinking the best of each other and doing absolutely everything right. (hide spoiler)] Along the way, what could have been passionate and exciting became . . . tepid? With two MC's so entirely free of making poor decisions, I think the problem (for me) was that the climax focused on the heroine's personal struggles rather than the couple. I wanted that big *PASSIONATE* moment, but the love came quietly and skipped passion, going straight to affection. I still enjoyed the story, characters, and writing (obviously, Mary Balogh is a freaking goddess mastermind).

  11. 4 out of 5

    Geri Reads

    There's plenty to like in Someone to Wed, Mary Balogh's third installment in her Westcott series. It's a fantastic MOC story, something that Mary Balogh does really well. Great, well-developed characters. Wren is such a strong, layered character. She knows what she wants and while she presents this cold and aloof behavior on the outside, her heart is passionate. But years of self-imposed seclusion and loneliness did a number of her, which made her all the more endearing and likable in my opinion There's plenty to like in Someone to Wed, Mary Balogh's third installment in her Westcott series. It's a fantastic MOC story, something that Mary Balogh does really well. Great, well-developed characters. Wren is such a strong, layered character. She knows what she wants and while she presents this cold and aloof behavior on the outside, her heart is passionate. But years of self-imposed seclusion and loneliness did a number of her, which made her all the more endearing and likable in my opinion. I really liked Alexander, too. I liked that at very beginning, there's no feelings or even an attraction between them. Their relationship grew from chapter to chapter and I was swept away with the slow burn romance between these two characters. If you're a fan of both slow-burn romances and the marriage-of-convenience trope, I highly recommend this book. ARC provided by Berkley

  12. 5 out of 5

    Caz

    I won't rehash my review of the book, which is HERE. The audio version - narrated by the incomparable Rosalyn Landor - is every bit as enjoyable as the print version - possibly even moreso given the extra emotional nuance conveyed by Ms. Landor, who is just brilliant at getting into the heads of the characters she narrates. Highly recommended.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Hollis

    I'm sorta starting to regret my determination to catch up on this series in preparation for my ARC of book four because I have a sneaking suspicion I might have liked it better had I not experienced all these up and down reads for my first foray in Balogh's writing. "Do you value yourself so little that you believe only your money gives you any worth at all?" "Yes." Strangely, in some ways, SOMEONE TO WED was my favourite of the Westcott series so far because the arrangement between this couple was I'm sorta starting to regret my determination to catch up on this series in preparation for my ARC of book four because I have a sneaking suspicion I might have liked it better had I not experienced all these up and down reads for my first foray in Balogh's writing. "Do you value yourself so little that you believe only your money gives you any worth at all?" "Yes." Strangely, in some ways, SOMEONE TO WED was my favourite of the Westcott series so far because the arrangement between this couple was the most.. believable. It was more mercenary and practical than passionate and all-consuming, and because of how little of the romance I end up feeling via this author's writing, that actually suited best. It was not just her face that she had hidden from the world. It was the whole of herself. Alexander is the heir who has inherited the Westcott title in the aftermath of the events of book one. He's now titled, with entailed properties, yet possesses none of the fortune to support them. So he's very aware he must marry for money. Conversely, Wren is a glassworks heiress with plenty of money, and yet believes herself to have no appeal because of a large birthmark that covers half of her face. "I thought you were all gentlemanly perfection. How delightful it is to discover that you are human." Their first interactions are not smooth, totally awkward, and show none of the connection one might expect for the book's couple. There is no hate, it's not one of those tropes, there's just.. weirdness. Incompatibility. Over the course of the book, Alex pushes Wren to open herself up to possibilities, to venture out unveiled, to experience life. To choose courage despite her fears and despite how self-conscious she is. And as a result Alex sees the woman behind the curtain who has been hidden away for so many years and who infact has more value than just a hefty bank account. He wanted to be able to choose a bride with his head. The heart was too unpredictable and too capable of feeling pain and doubt and a host of other things. Once again the part of this book that is an easy win for me is the concept, including the struggles the characters face. But I feel all that interest is lost beneath other things. Endless description. Tediously long monologues. Repetition repetition repetition. Rehashing of all the previous books. And while the intimacy for this romance was the least jarring of the three, there's still.. something lacking. I'm really doubting my own compatibility with this author. For all that I love how she handles the subjects within her books, the emotional complexity, I just can't find the love for the experience on a whole. Had this been my first read by the author, I think I would've been rounding up near a four. Maybe. But after three of these, despite this being my favourite, I'm just weary of it. The annoying members of this family are still mostly annoying. The oblivious ones are still oblivious. And they are all just too involved, too meddlesome, too.. I don't know. Something. I'm glad I have a month's reprieve until my review for book four is due. I'll need every second of it. 2.75 "no rounding up this time" stars

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ira

    This is going to be a quick review!:) I love Mary Balogh’s books and this one too, every time I read it, I feels like been watching those BBC period drama!:) it feel authentic 😍. Also, her heroine mostly a real woman, not 18 years old simpering miss! This one is no difference, the heroine is a 29 years old successful business woman. Usually with other authors, the heroine in this age will giving up man and feel permanently stay on the shelf. But this one? She used her money and tried to buy a husba This is going to be a quick review!:) I love Mary Balogh’s books and this one too, every time I read it, I feels like been watching those BBC period drama!:) it feel authentic 😍. Also, her heroine mostly a real woman, not 18 years old simpering miss! This one is no difference, the heroine is a 29 years old successful business woman. Usually with other authors, the heroine in this age will giving up man and feel permanently stay on the shelf. But this one? She used her money and tried to buy a husband! 😂😂😂 Well, you know find a tittle guy who desperately need money😜. So, that’s how our H and h met. Unfortunately thought behind those bravado, the heroine had a tragic childhood which made her a recluse and stay away from everyone. While it made me frustrated reading it I can understand until I’ve got to read the villain’s POV! Goodness me, she is too cartoonish to be afraid of! If Wren is only 19yo, I can understand her more but a successful 29yo woman? Nah.. And the scene with those two young men, good grief, give me a break!! But those situations is not ruin the story, it just me I think, sigh. Beside is only one chapter toward the end, so there you go, I like it but I like Anna and Avery’s story in Someone to Love more:)

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tina

    I put this book on my TBR because Mary Balogh is an autobuy for me, not because I was necessarily excited for Alexanders' story. Frankly, Alexander wasn't all that exciting in the two previous books. But Balogh transforms Alexander into a truly great hero in this one, he rather blossoms honestly. This story seems rather an allusion to beauty and the beast with the gender roles reversed. In fact, like she did in the first book of the series where she throws romance novel convention out the window a I put this book on my TBR because Mary Balogh is an autobuy for me, not because I was necessarily excited for Alexanders' story. Frankly, Alexander wasn't all that exciting in the two previous books. But Balogh transforms Alexander into a truly great hero in this one, he rather blossoms honestly. This story seems rather an allusion to beauty and the beast with the gender roles reversed. In fact, like she did in the first book of the series where she throws romance novel convention out the window and makes her her hero in that book code rather effeminate (I always picture Netherby as looking kinda like a Caucasian version of Prince with his lace and eyeliner) she codes Wren, the heroine here, somewhat masculine-ly. Alexander is always described as otherworldly handsome and proper and his estates needs rescuing by money. Whereas Wren is "tall as man" and "athletic" and she is a business mogul who runs a glass factory and brings in dolla-dolla bills to help him fix all his estates. Also she is the one who proposes to him. And while she is not technically a beast -- she has a big birth mark on one side of her face which has made her a recluse and she hides in her big estate all alone -- her life is in somewhat of a suspension until Alexander breaks the spell. But the story isn't just abut her surface scars, the bigger issues surrounding them are much deeper. The fun of the story is watching their somewhat unconventional courtship play out and then watching as Alexander and his family dive under that surface and help her heal. There seems to be a theme that runs throughout all three books so far and that is one of parental/parentage secrets and lies and the resultant scars those secrets have left that the adult children must work out. And speaking of Alexander's family -- this is the third book in the series so if you've read the other two you know that the Westcott family is ginormous. And they all make an appearance. I rather like the chaotic lot of them and to see how they are all faring after the monumental scandalous revelations from the first book. Thank goodness Balogh includes a family tree in the beginning. Really good book. My second favorite of the series. this review is based on an ARC received from the publisher

  16. 5 out of 5

    Heather *Awkward Queen and Unicorn Twin*

    This was a sweet romance. I've read three of Balogh's books before, and I'm still not sure if I'm a fan. What drew me to this one was the fact that the heroine has a purple birthmark on her face. This isn't mentioned in the synopsis, and I probably wouldn't have picked the book up if I hadn't learned of this from reading Tadiana's review. I really enjoyed Wren as a character. Her growth and insecurities were well-described and realistic. A lot of the story was dull for me however, and that's prob This was a sweet romance. I've read three of Balogh's books before, and I'm still not sure if I'm a fan. What drew me to this one was the fact that the heroine has a purple birthmark on her face. This isn't mentioned in the synopsis, and I probably wouldn't have picked the book up if I hadn't learned of this from reading Tadiana's review. I really enjoyed Wren as a character. Her growth and insecurities were well-described and realistic. A lot of the story was dull for me however, and that's probably my own fault for not reading the previous two books in the series and acquainting myself with all the characters. The Westcott family played a huge part in this book, and there were SO many of them it was difficult to keep track. A lot of the story was them conversing, and I wish there had been slightly more drama. I did get chills at one point from Balogh's writing, which also happened when I read Slightly Dangerous. It was a pleasantly surprising moment, and because of it I may read more of her works in the future. 3 stars

  17. 4 out of 5

    Juliana Philippa

    She was well aware that she was different. She was not warm or open in manner and never could be. She seemed incapable of showing her feelings. She was not ... Oh, she was not a thousand and one things other people were without any effort. What was she, then? She did not want to define herself for the rest of her life with negatives. What an enjoyable read! I just recently finished Book 2 in the series, Someone to Hold (my review), which was absolutely lovely, but it's not a required read ( She was well aware that she was different. She was not warm or open in manner and never could be. She seemed incapable of showing her feelings. She was not ... Oh, she was not a thousand and one things other people were without any effort. What was she, then? She did not want to define herself for the rest of her life with negatives. What an enjoyable read! I just recently finished Book 2 in the series, Someone to Hold (my review), which was absolutely lovely, but it's not a required read (also: I have yet to read Book 1). Balogh keeps giving us these terrific heroines that completely break my heart (though in the very best of ways)!! Summary. Miss Rowena (Wren) Heyden (29) is searching for a husband. She has just finished a year of mourning the loss of her beloved aunt and uncle, and finds herself now an heiress, with work that she loves to do, but nothing and no one (really) else in her life. She longs for love, belonging, and family, and as she is now an heiress and very well-off, she figures she can essentially buy herself these things by proposing to a man who is in need of money, since she is convinced that no man would ever willingly marry her. Wren has never been out in society and has been a virtual recluse since she was 10 years old and went to live with her aunt and uncle—all because of a large birthmark that severely mars her face. She is extremely, extremely self-conscious about it, to the point where she has never even spoken with the neighbors whom she's lived near for the past 19 years. The only place she would go, besides for church, was to her uncle's place of business, but there (and everywhere else she went out) she always wore a veil so that no one would see her face. It was not just her face that she had hidden from the world. It was the whole of herself. Her instinct was to hide behind veils within veils, and she had done it for so long that she did not know how to case those veils aside. She's now 29 years old, alone in the world, and longs for a family, children, and ... marital relations (love that she's so open about her curiosity and desire for this!). Alexander Westcott, the Earl of Riverdale (30), is 3rd on her list of suitors, and while the first two were unfortunate duds, she knows that Alex is in need of an heiress after unexpectedly becoming an earl and inheriting properties, without any of the necessary income to maintain them (or bring them back from the already-shabby state they're in). As soon as she meets him though, she realizes she should have left him off, for he is far too good-looking, but she nonetheless goes forward with "the interview" and lays out the situation, figuring you have to risk a lot to gain a lot. Alex does indeed need a rich wife, but he hates the fact that he has to marry a woman for her money. He's a dedicated family man, extremely responsible, who has spent the last 7 or so years bringing his family home and the surrounding area back from the brink, after his father wasted so much money, and now he finds himself back at square one, with new properties and new emergencies to handle. He's determined to fulfill his responsibility though and do what he has to in order to take care of the people that are dependent on the Riverdale title. Their first meeting is awkward at best, with Wren being blunt to the point of rudeness, and Alex's pride and self-respect being sorely tested. The stark differences between them are also evident from the first—and by this, I mean things that go far beyond the surface and their perfect/imperfect looks. Alex is, generally speaking, warm, friendly, and engaging ... while Wren is none of these things. Besides for her maid (and her now dead aunt and uncle), she has no one in her life who is really close to her and has absolutely no practice at letting people in. Being social and interacting with people is physically and emotionally tiring for her, and her anxiety about it is compounded by the fact that she feels her deficiency in this area most keenly. Alex is in desperate need of money, but can he marry someone who would prefer to be anything else but a countess, and who would go from living a very singular life, to being part of the huge Westcott family and all the many close relations that come with it? What repelled him was, paradoxically, the very thing that had brought him back here. Her pain. It was carefully guarded. It was veiled more heavily than her face was, in fact. It was encased in a coolly poised manner. But it screamed at him from the very depths of her, and he was both horrified and fascinated. My Review. What follows is a truly lovely tale of two people who seem like they couldn't be more different, but who in truth fit together so very, very well. So many times, the romances we read feature tortured/pained/etc. heroes, who are healed and supported by the heroines, and it was a nice change to have this traditional setup reversed. I love Alex's family members, whom we met briefly in Book 2. We get to know Alex's mother and sister very well in this story and they're a wonderful addition to the story. Wren is incredibly strong and admirable, but also so, so fragile; the beginning of her life was torturous, and it is no wonder, with all that she has been through, that she is the way she is. There is a great vitality and capacity for love in her, though, and Alex is able to see the promise of this and finds himself continuing their interactions and pursuing her, despite his initial instincts. There were two things I really, really appreciated about her character and think Balogh pulled off really well: she's a very sharp and competent businesswoman and has a really strong sense of self, which is all the more fascinating given the also deep well of insecurity that she has; she very openly and honestly has sexual desires and wants to act on them and experience that part of life. Alex is super, super sweet and I loved how Wren is able to bring out a more relaxed and joyful side to Alex. He's a very positive and "happy" character generally speaking, but he is also quite burdened because he takes his responsibilities so seriously and always feels like he needs to be making everything right for everyone; Wren is able to give him some relief and push him to relax and let himself off the hook sometimes. Wren is really the main star of this book, but I don't want to give the impression that Alex is cast in shadows, because he's not; he's a quieter character in the arc of the story, but absolutely essential to Wren and her development—he provides the strength, acceptance/understanding, and romantic love that she needs. Quote. He was gazing at her rather than at the view, at her right profile, proud, inscrutable, beautiful. But appealing? Attractive? Lady of mystery. Jessica had chosen the very best words to describe her, he thought. She was unknown and perhaps unknowable. It had bothered him back at Brambledean, and it made him uneasy now. But ... he had glimpsed something tantalizingly fleeting behind the veil. Something ... no, he could not find the word. But something that invited him to keep looking. This review is of an ARC provided by NetGalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Some changes and/or edits may be made to the final published version.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Marlene

    Originally published at Reading Reality I’m a little early with this review, but this was the book that was calling my name. So I decided to listen to that little voice and just read it now anyway. And I’m so very glad I did. Someone to Wed is the third book in Balogh’s historical romance Westcott series, and just like the first two books, Someone to Love and Someone to Hold, it is an absolute treat from beginning to end. The stories are all tied together, loosely enough that you don’t HAVE to read Originally published at Reading Reality I’m a little early with this review, but this was the book that was calling my name. So I decided to listen to that little voice and just read it now anyway. And I’m so very glad I did. Someone to Wed is the third book in Balogh’s historical romance Westcott series, and just like the first two books, Someone to Love and Someone to Hold, it is an absolute treat from beginning to end. The stories are all tied together, loosely enough that you don’t HAVE to read them in order, but I think it adds a bit more depth if you do. In the beginning, Humphrey Westcott, Earl of Riverdale, was an ass. Just how big an ass was only revealed after his death, when it was discovered that his countess wasn’t really his countess, his heir wasn’t really his heir, and that his only legitimate child had been raised in an orphanage with no knowledge of her heritage whatsoever. He left a big, huge, stinking mess. But he didn’t have to deal with any of it, because he was dead. This is probably a good thing, as most of the participants in the drama he left behind, and many readers, would cheerfully wring his neck if it wasn’t already six feet under. Each story in this series deals with the human fallout from the late Humphrey’s assholishness. This time around it’s his cousin Alexander Westcott's turn. Alex, as now the next legitimate male heir, has become the very unwilling Earl of Riverdale. While one might think that anyone would love to inherit a title, this is definitely not true in Alex’s case. Because Alex has inherited the title and the quite frankly failing entailed estates, but none of the money that should go with them. Alex has inherited a title and a money pit. Money that he does not have. Just plain Alexander Westcott had just managed to restore his own inherited patrimony to profitability after decades of neglect on his late father’s part and years of hard work on his own. Becoming the Earl of Riverdale means that he has the same work to do all over again, with the same resources he had before spread over much, much larger (and more seriously neglected) lands. Plain Alexander Westcott could have afforded to marry for love. The new Earl of Riverdale must marry money. And that’s where Wren Heyden comes in. Wren has inherited a fortune and a very successful glassworks from her late and much beloved uncle. Nearing 30, her year of mourning for her uncle’s (and aunt’s) deaths over with, she wants to marry. But Wren believes that her fortune is all she has to recommend her. Why? Because Wren has a large port-wine stain, in other words a big purple birthmark, covering much of the left side of her face. Long ago, someone convinced her that she was so ugly that no one could ever possibly love her – or even manage to look at her without running screaming from the room. Years of her aunt's and uncle’s unstinting love and unwavering support never managed to convince her otherwise. Wren attempts to buy Alex’s hand in marriage. He needs a rich wife, and she needs a man who will give her children. She begins by believing that she can maintain her life as a hermit, while giving Alex the money he needs to restore Riverdale. While Alex feels that marrying for love is a now a dream out of his reach, he is still offended by the crassness at the base of Wren’s proposal. He does not want to be bought. But he recognizes the injustices of his feelings – after all, he was planning to present himself in the marriage mart with the hope of contracting just such an alliance. Even more, Alex wonders if they will suit. He may not be able to marry for love, but mutual respect and eventual affection are surely not out of reach. But can there be anything else between two people after such an inauspicious beginning? Can there be anything at all? Escape Rating A: I swallowed this book in a day. Someone to Wed is marvelous because it throws so many of the standard historical romance tropes over within its first pages. Of course, the thing that makes Someone to Wed so different is that Wren is the mover and shaker of the story. In the beginning, she acts, and Alex is the one who reacts – not always terribly well. What makes it work is the way that he thinks about his reactions, and reminds himself just how unfair so many of them are. What makes the romance work is the way that both Wren and Alex bend over the course of the story. As unexpected as her proposal is, and as much as all of Alex’s instincts urge him to reject it and her, he does his best to be fair. She is both right and reasonable in her actions – he’s just not used to seeing a woman exhibit that much cold-blooded logic. That Alex discovers that he actually enjoys talking with a woman who is his intellectual equal and is not afraid to show it – or who is completely incapable of hiding it – comes as a revelation. Another thing that made this story work for this reader is the way that Wren’s birthmark was handled. It, and her mother’s reaction to it, scarred her, seemingly for life, much more than the birthmark itself does. She feels ugly and unlovable because that’s how she was made to feel as a child – not because either of those things are true. Her journey towards acceptance of herself is marvelously hard won. Alex’ reaction to her birthmark reminds me of a quote from science fiction writer Robert Heinlein’s Notebooks of Lazarus Long, “A man does not insist on physical beauty in a woman who builds up his morale. After a while he realizes that she is beautiful–he just hadn’t noticed it at first.” While there is definitely some sexism in there, the point is still valid. Think of it as a more pleasant version of the old saw about beauty being skin deep, but ugly going clean through to the bone. Beauty is as beauty does. And beauty shines from within. Wren is beautiful. And it takes Alex much less time to realize that fact than it does Wren herself. But when she finally does, it’s even more beautiful than their romance.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Debby "Piene Raven"

    I can't say enough how I love Ms. Balogh's novels. This one hit home for me as I had a friend from school who had a birthmark that too covered her left side of her face. She was picked on a lot however I never let her appearance deter us from becoming close friends. I truly love the fact that the H/h were both older mature individuals who knew what they wanted and needed in their lives to make them somewhat a whole person. Although there seemed to be not alot of romance and intimacy between the t I can't say enough how I love Ms. Balogh's novels. This one hit home for me as I had a friend from school who had a birthmark that too covered her left side of her face. She was picked on a lot however I never let her appearance deter us from becoming close friends. I truly love the fact that the H/h were both older mature individuals who knew what they wanted and needed in their lives to make them somewhat a whole person. Although there seemed to be not alot of romance and intimacy between the two there was definitely mutual respect for one another. I also loved the strong woman that Wren made herself into and how she made her own destiny. This was was a very lovable story that had me tears-eyed for the heroine and also wanting to pummel the mother and her entourage. What kind of mother would treat her child in such a fashion when she does not possess the level of beauty ascribed by her standards...to put her in an asylum...totally ridiculous. A wonderful read and I am going to have to listen as I know Ms . Landor probably has done a fantastic job of narrating. 5-Stars

  20. 4 out of 5

    Janga

    Admittedly, the pace of the book is slow. Alex and Wren’s story is about as far from insta-lust as a romance can be. They meet and part and meet again and gradually come to understand their feelings for each other. They don’t so much fall in love as they grow in love. This is one of the things I valued most in this book, having read a surfeit of books based on a romance variation of Caesar’s description of victory: I saw, I lusted, I came. A book in a Balogh series invites readers into a world Admittedly, the pace of the book is slow. Alex and Wren’s story is about as far from insta-lust as a romance can be. They meet and part and meet again and gradually come to understand their feelings for each other. They don’t so much fall in love as they grow in love. This is one of the things I valued most in this book, having read a surfeit of books based on a romance variation of Caesar’s description of victory: I saw, I lusted, I came. A book in a Balogh series invites readers into a world in which all the characters in the series—and occasionally characters from another series—reside. Most of the Westcotts and their connections make an appearance in this book, and, of course, new characters are introduced. I find such rich contexts appealing. I even loved that Camille and Joel and their family (Someone to Hold), living happily in Bath, earn a mention and Wren anticipates meeting them. And I thought Colin, Wren’s rediscovered brother, was delightful. I hope to see more of him. Other readers may feel that the large family distracts from the central love story, just as some readers may long for a more rapid pace. I see these qualities as strengths. Balogh is quite simply one of the most gifted authors in the romance genre. She has been giving her readers memorable, engaging, character-driven stories for more than three decades, and the Westcott series confirms that she continues her record of excellence. I enthusiastically recommend Someone to Wed. I am already counting the days (six months to go) to the release of the next Westcott story: Someone to Care, the story of Viola Kingsley, the countess who was not a countess and who is now a forty-year-old grandmother. Now that’s a rare heroine! See full review at The Romance Dish: http://www.theromancedish.com/2017/11...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dorine

    Rated 4.5 - SOMEONE TO WED by Mary Balogh exemplifies her skills in characterization. I adored our heroine, Wren, from the very beginning, even though she was determined and overbearing. It was easy to see through her haughty behavior as a barrier she used as much as her veil. Miss Wren Heyden inherits Withington House and her uncle’s glass factory, after the couple she claimed as her parents die within a week of each other. Considering herself a businesswoman first, she intends to buy herself a Rated 4.5 - SOMEONE TO WED by Mary Balogh exemplifies her skills in characterization. I adored our heroine, Wren, from the very beginning, even though she was determined and overbearing. It was easy to see through her haughty behavior as a barrier she used as much as her veil. Miss Wren Heyden inherits Withington House and her uncle’s glass factory, after the couple she claimed as her parents die within a week of each other. Considering herself a businesswoman first, she intends to buy herself a husband. Not able to attract one due to her facial disfigurement, she sets her sights on the Earl of Riverdale. He’s broke and needs the money. It seems like a perfect match – the rich heiress and the poor earl with a property to revamp. Apparently, Wren doesn’t know Alexander Wescott as well as she thinks. Their initial meeting in reservedly hilarious. Alexander has not met anyone as direct as Wren. She, on the other hand, cannot understand his need for communication, socializing, and a courtship. He pushes, and she pushes back. Finally, Wren gives in to Alexander’s demands in hope that he’ll marry her. Alexander puts up with Wren’s curt responses because he desperately needs her money to renew his broken-down estate. He cares about the people who live there and feels responsible for their welfare. I like that he sensed that there was something more to Wren than she let on. Initially, her money is his reason for pursuing their relationship, but it doesn’t take long for Wren to impress him as someone to love. Wren has been a recluse most of her life. Her hideous birthmark forces her to wear a veil in public, giving her a mysterious air. She prefers to stay at home, but she will go to her glass factory as needed. Her aunt and uncle allowed her to withdraw from society when they became her adoptive parents. Alexander won’t stand for her reclusive behavior. He insists that any wife of his will learn her social duties. I found Wren very entertaining. Her high-handed way of speaking was often very funny. She acted as if she had no feelings, but that was to cover up her very passionate core that truly cared what others thought about her appearance. Alexander was a good hero, but Wren was such an outstanding heroine that Alexander faded into the background for me. One of the best parts of this book is visualizing the other characters we’ve come to love from this series through Wren’s eyes. There are some good chuckles, as well as heartfelt emotion. Wren’s situation choked me up on page 137. My own emotion was sudden and unexpected. Author Mary Balogh has a true gift of making me love her characters. I get so wrapped up in their lives without even realizing it. The Westcott family are all so precious. I love their hearts. I highly recommend the WESTCOTT series so far. I think you’ll enjoy it best if you read all three books in order. Start with Anna and Avery in SOMEONE TO LOVE, then read Camille and Joel’s journey in SOMEONE TO HOLD. SOMEONE TO WED is the type of historical romance I love to read. It’s emotional and funny with characters I can’t wait to catch up with in future books. The Regency period is not my favorite style of historical. It takes a very talented author to draw me into this era without reservations. Mary Balogh has a unique talent that is mesmerizing. I can’t wait for SOMEONE TO CARE, releasing in May 2018! Review by Dorine, courtesy of Romance Junkies. Print ARC provided by the publisher.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jan

    2.5 to 3 stars. There were aspects of the book that I liked, but overall, it was just okay for me. Somehow I never really warmed to Alexander and Wren, and their romance fell a little flat for me. Alexander has recently and unexpectedly inherited a title and a run-down estate. A neighbour near his new estate, Wren is a bit of a recluse due to her awful childhood, and the fact that she has a large purple birthmark on her face, about which she is understandably quite self-conscious. But Wren has an 2.5 to 3 stars. There were aspects of the book that I liked, but overall, it was just okay for me. Somehow I never really warmed to Alexander and Wren, and their romance fell a little flat for me. Alexander has recently and unexpectedly inherited a title and a run-down estate. A neighbour near his new estate, Wren is a bit of a recluse due to her awful childhood, and the fact that she has a large purple birthmark on her face, about which she is understandably quite self-conscious. But Wren has another life as a competent businesswoman in the glass manufacturing industry. She is also quite wealthy. Wren is lonely, and has decided she wants a husband and children. But due to her circumstances, it's not likely to happen for her. So, quite coolly, almost cold-bloodedly, she sets out to 'buy' herself a husband by seeking out and interviewing a short-list of eligible gentlemen and offering herself and her riches in return for their name and companionship. And Alexander is on the list. I didn't love this storyline, but I accept that these kinds of marriage bargains were probably made more than we think. Very practical. So that wasn't really my problem with the book. And I did quite like the MCs. Alexander is a decent and kind man, although not that high on the hotness scale IMO. Wren, in spite of the challenges in her life, is a strong and determined woman, and with the support of Alexander and his family, she starts to come out of her shell and participate in society. And to face the horror of her past, to deal with it and put it behind her. It was nice to see the development of her character. But overall, 'nice' wasn't really enough for me. I just somehow didn't really connect with the characters, or fully believe in them. It all felt a bit flat, and at times I found myself starting to skim. So for me, this book was a bit lukewarm in the end. Not sure whether or not I'll read any more in the series. The next one has two older protagonists (late 30s) which I quite like, so maybe I'll give it a try when it comes out.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Laura (Kyahgirl)

    That was really lovely. I thoroughly enjoyed the process of luring/cajoling/enticing Wren out of her cocoon. The Westcotts and Radleys are maybe a bit too sweet and awesome as a family but I am happy to go with it for the warm fuzzies.

  24. 5 out of 5

    steph

    I loved it.I absolutely loved it. There is something about this book (i.e. Wren) that grabbed me and wouldn't let me go. I just adored Wren and the way she held herself aloof from the world but the reasoning behind her walls and spending 400 pages watching her start to let others in? "Do we have the courage?" Her character just did so many things to my heart, I can't even put them into words. Going into this I knew I already really liked Alex (had from the first book) but seeing the world through I loved it.I absolutely loved it. There is something about this book (i.e. Wren) that grabbed me and wouldn't let me go. I just adored Wren and the way she held herself aloof from the world but the reasoning behind her walls and spending 400 pages watching her start to let others in? "Do we have the courage?" Her character just did so many things to my heart, I can't even put them into words. Going into this I knew I already really liked Alex (had from the first book) but seeing the world through his eyes and watching him interact with Wren made me love him even more. I just really loved all the scenes with him and Wren. I didn't even get annoyed with all the various relatives popping in (seriously, this series could easily be 10 books) because they helped Wren come out of her (self imposed) fortress and explained the kind of man Alex is. I am so excited Viola's story is next (yes!). I've been hoping since the first book she would get to be the heroine of her own story and I am so glad Balogh is writing her next.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Guilty Pleasures Book Reviews

    Someone to Wed by Mary Balogh is a Regency romance at its finest and one not to be missed. It is Beauty and the Beast but in reverse and shows the heroine that beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Wren Heyden is a wealthy businesswoman and is convinced that she is going to have to use her wealth to buy herself a husband. She wants a marriage and figures if men can do this why can’t she? Lucky for her she has a new neighbor who needs the means to repair his country estate and could use a bit of Someone to Wed by Mary Balogh is a Regency romance at its finest and one not to be missed. It is Beauty and the Beast but in reverse and shows the heroine that beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Wren Heyden is a wealthy businesswoman and is convinced that she is going to have to use her wealth to buy herself a husband. She wants a marriage and figures if men can do this why can’t she? Lucky for her she has a new neighbor who needs the means to repair his country estate and could use a bit of cash. Alexander Westcott doesn’t know what to think at first of her marriage proposal and is taken back by her boldness. He sees getting involved with Wren would be a whole heap of trouble considering she hides herself behind a veil and that her tight composure holds tight a world of pain and trouble. He doesn’t know what to think but is definitely intrigued by her. Mary Balogh nicely creates characters that are flawed and complicated and show genuine feelings in the situations they find themselves in. The heroine Wren has defined herself by her facial mark and lives a reclusive life. She wonders if she has the courage to push herself out of her comfort zone. It took baby steps but she stretched herself with each new person she met and each new experience she does. Her fears, her strengths and struggles are expressed throughout the story making my heart ache for her for the life she has lived and the one she wants. The journey wasn’t easy but Wren learned something new about herself when she challenged herself to take a chance. Alexander Westcott recently inherited the title of Earl of Riverdale and felt he had no choice in marriage when he knew he needed a woman with wealth to help him rebuild his estate. He could have ignored his responsibility but that is not who he is. He is an honorable man and intelligent to understand the bigger picture. He is a gentleman and protects the women in his family. He dreams of marriage with affection and respect so Wren’s offer doesn’t guarantee he’ll have those if he pursues this with her. When things fall apart with Wren and he returns to London for the Season, he sees what his choices are and isn’t satisfied. Wren isn’t your typical woman and has a trunk load of issues, but it would be a way to a means, and will keep things interesting. His love for Wren came softly over the course of their relationship when he learns more about this woman and how much she expands her world to include him and his big family. Someone to Wed is the third book in the Westcott series but can read as a stand-alone without feeling lost when coming in midstream. There is a slew of characters and the author does explain the where Alexander fits in the mix and how he came into his inheritance. No worries on trying to learn them all because you can always go back and read the previous stories. Wren grew up feeling unwanted and unloved but it her aunt and uncle to show her that life is what you make of it if you are willing to go for it. She didn’t believe them but Alex keep telling her that she is only hurting herself by not trying. Reading a story by Mary Balogh is always a pleasure because she does it so well and delivers a well-crafted historical romance. One of my go-to authors of historical romances is Mary Balough. Her Westcott series is fun and interesting and you never know what kind of twist she is going to put into her stories. And, Someone to Wed was no different. Wren and Alexander were one odd couple. She was a recluse due to her appearance and Alexander is a reluctant Earl. She is looking for someone to wed to fulfill her dream and he’s looking for someone to wed to help with the finances at his estate. But, to be invited and interviewed for the position? No, that was not what he was expecting when he was invited to Wren’s home. Both of them were intrigued with the other. Wren was pushed past her comfort zone and Alexander was amazed that she was as entertaining as she was. Wren fell in love with the handsome and sweet Alexander. He was hoping to just help her out of her self-imposed solitary confinement and maybe get a good friend out of the deal. But, when he sees the one woman he can’t get off of his mind helping a little child, he has no choice but to face the feelings he is starting to have for the intriguing Wren. Mary Balough had me smiling throughout this story. The way Alex treated Wren and finally made her feel comfortable enough to take off the veil was brilliantly written. I love the way she brought Wren out of her shell and had her accepted by society. I loved how Wren stood up to the people who wanted nothing to do with her. I loved how the one person she missed in her life came through and supported her through a very rough time. I guess I just loved everything about this beautifully written romance.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Μαρία Γεωργοπούλου

    Loved it!!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Gilgamesha

    It is that time of the month and I am currently digging into a cartoon of Ben and Jerry and because of my insatiable sweet tooth I am inclined to use deserts as analogies to express my reaction to this book specifically the main characters. Please forgive my fanciful thoughts but to me damaged people, myself included, are like dark chocolate. To most, especially those with staid vanilla preferring palates, dark chocolate is too strong, the flavor too overwhelming, the initial taste too bitter, a It is that time of the month and I am currently digging into a cartoon of Ben and Jerry and because of my insatiable sweet tooth I am inclined to use deserts as analogies to express my reaction to this book specifically the main characters. Please forgive my fanciful thoughts but to me damaged people, myself included, are like dark chocolate. To most, especially those with staid vanilla preferring palates, dark chocolate is too strong, the flavor too overwhelming, the initial taste too bitter, and the rest of the experience just too sharp to be swallowed easily. But there exists some people brave enough to endure the experience for the benefits of it which is commendable. However, there are a few with a refined palate who truly understand and are willing to experience the pleasure of a bite of dark chocolate with the full awareness that the initial bitter taste is totally worth the unique experience that follows it. Alex was one such a person, though himself was not aware. He kept going back for more sampling of that rich and flavorful taste offered by Wren. Honestly having any kind of relationship with someone who was emotionally damaged at such a young age is a great undertaking that requires maturity, courage, patience, sacrifice and understanding. It is also not possible to fix this individual and one must be able to accept that at the very beginning. To me Alex's reaction to Wren's pain was completely reasonable because he knew what it meant and how deep it ran. I connected with Wren in a very real way...too real for my comfort in fact. But ultimately damaged people are damaged because they felt too deeply at some point in their life and that capacity does not go away....it just waits...dormant...in the hope that it finds someone worthy to be reawakened by. Anyways only a really well written book awakens such a fanciful thoughts in me so go and read and I hope you enjoy as much as I did because Ms. Balogh once again has proven herself the master of character development and story telling. In my humble opinion a true 5 star romance!

  28. 5 out of 5

    herdys

    Sometimes I don't understand how I can hate one of her books but then completely LOVE another! Mary Balogh you baffle me, but please continue to write books like these! This book felt so much like The Arrangement from her Survivor's club series. It wasn't too dramatic or angsty and didn't have a grand plot. It's about two people who meet and get to know each other in special circumstances, then get married and fall in love in the best way! It may not work for other people but slow burn is the be Sometimes I don't understand how I can hate one of her books but then completely LOVE another! Mary Balogh you baffle me, but please continue to write books like these! This book felt so much like The Arrangement from her Survivor's club series. It wasn't too dramatic or angsty and didn't have a grand plot. It's about two people who meet and get to know each other in special circumstances, then get married and fall in love in the best way! It may not work for other people but slow burn is the best way to have characters fall in love! Wren was such an amazing heroine. She started as a recluse, standoffish but so damn lonely. She had lost her only family, the one that counted and just needed love and companionship. Her road to happiness was amazing and rewarding to read. It really brought tears to eyes more than once! Alexander was a sweetheart from beginning to end, but he wasn't perfect. His character wasn't as developed as Wren, but it was obvious this was HER book and he was there to love and support her, and to be happy too of course. Alexander's family was amazing too and I can't wait for all the siblings to get a book, especially Viola who has suffered so much and deserves her happiness again! Words fail me to describe why I loved this book so much. Maybe like with The Arrangement I connected with the heroine. I'm not invisible like Sophie, wasn't mistreated by my family and ended up a recluse like Wren, but there is something there that spoke to my heart. Be that may loneliness or the yearning to be cherished, it touched me deeply. I'm sure everyone has felt like that before! So, even if you're are like me and Mary Balogh's books are a hit or miss, I completely recommend this one. You may not love it as much, but I really hope it will speak to you as it did to me and give you lost of FEELS!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Susana

    3.5 Stars An engaging story lovely written. I've come to love most of the author's books because of the care that it's placed on everything. The setting, the characters, the atmosphere, they're all perfectly done. Also the fact that they mostly have a story besides _eventually _ disrobing... helps. This story has all the things that I like: _No insta love; _No insta attraction; _No pointless drama; Instead there's friendship and companionship from the part of a big crazy family. From my experience, I 3.5 Stars An engaging story lovely written. I've come to love most of the author's books because of the care that it's placed on everything. The setting, the characters, the atmosphere, they're all perfectly done. Also the fact that they mostly have a story besides _eventually _ disrobing... helps. This story has all the things that I like: _No insta love; _No insta attraction; _No pointless drama; Instead there's friendship and companionship from the part of a big crazy family. From my experience, I found that a little far fetched, lol, everyone getting along brilliantly; but it was nice to read...okay, a little less sweetness would have been preferred, :D but that's just me being emotionally stunted. I loved the way the romance developed... calmly (most of the time). Alexander never once behaved like a neanderthal towards Wren, and that was vastly appreciated. I am done with brutes and alpha jerks. For me the only thing that kept this from being a perfect read was the last pages. I think that cutting a few pages and taking it easy on the sweetness might have helped. But I really liked it and I do see myself re-reading it! ;) p.s. Now of to go read the first volumes, lol

  30. 4 out of 5

    Manda Collins

    I scored an ARC of Balogh's Someone to Wed and really enjoyed it. Alex was the hero I was waiting for from the first book and he didn't disappoint. Wren was an unusual heroine but I think Balogh did a very good job--as she always does--of getting inside the mind of someone who has been profoundly hurt emotionally. The supporting cast was lively and I was touched by how welcoming they were to Wren. Looking forward to more stories of this family.

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