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Running Home PDF, ePub eBook In the tradition of Wild and H Is for Hawk, an Outside magazine writer tells her story—of fathers and daughters, grief and renewal, adventure and obsession, and the power of running to change your life. I’m running to forget, and to remember. For more than a decade, Katie Arnold chased adventure around the world, reporting on extreme athletes who performed outlandish feats—w In the tradition of Wild and H Is for Hawk, an Outside magazine writer tells her story—of fathers and daughters, grief and renewal, adventure and obsession, and the power of running to change your life. I’m running to forget, and to remember. For more than a decade, Katie Arnold chased adventure around the world, reporting on extreme athletes who performed outlandish feats—walking high lines a thousand feet off the ground without a harness, or running one hundred miles through the night. She wrote her stories by living them, until eventually life on the thin edge of risk began to seem normal. After she married, Katie and her husband vowed to raise their daughters to be adventurous, too, in the mountains and canyons of New Mexico. But when her father died of cancer, she was forced to confront her own mortality. His death was cataclysmic, unleashing a perfect storm of grief and anxiety. She and her father, an enigmatic photographer for National Geographic, had always been kindred spirits. He introduced her to the outdoors and took her camping and on bicycle trips and down rivers, and taught her to find solace and courage in the natural world. And it was he who encouraged her to run her first race when she was seven years old. Now nearly paralyzed by fear and terrified she was dying, too, she turned to the thing that had always made her feel most alive: running. Over the course of three tumultuous years, she ran alone through the wilderness, logging longer and longer distances, first a 50-kilometer ultramarathon, then 50 miles, then 100 kilometers. She ran to heal her grief, to outpace her worry that she wouldn’t live to raise her own daughters. She ran to find strength in her weakness. She ran to remember and to forget. She ran to live. Ultrarunning tests the limits of human endurance over seemingly inhuman distances, and as she clocked miles across mesas and mountains, Katie learned to tolerate pain and discomfort, and face her fears of uncertainty, vulnerability, and even death itself. As she ran, she found herself peeling back the layers of her relationship with her father, discovering that much of what she thought she knew about him, and her own past, was wrong. Running Home is a memoir about the stories we tell ourselves to make sense of our world—the stories that hold us back, and the ones that set us free. Mesmerizing, transcendent, and deeply exhilarating, it is a book for anyone who has been knocked over by life, or feels the pull of something bigger and wilder within themselves. Advance praise for Running Home “A contemplative, soul-searching account of the death of [Katie Arnold’s] beloved father and how she used long-distance running as a way to heal from the grief.”— Kirkus Reviews “A beautiful work of searching remembrance and searing honesty . . . will soon join such classics as Born to Run and Ultramarathon Man as quintessential reading of the genre.”—Hampton Sides, author of On Desperate Ground and Ghost Soldiers

30 review for Running Home

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alanna

    I’m recommending this book to everyone. The best read in awhile. You don’t have to be a runner to get into this book. I mean, yes, she writes about her amazing ultra marathon runs, but that’s not what the heart of the book is about. It’s about love, loss, motherhood, and life. I want to share so many amazing quotes but they would be spoilers. JUST GO NOW AND READ THIS BOOK.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Joyce Gohr

    There were several thing I liked about this memoir, and a few that caused me to pause. While I am not a runner, I do have a desire to write. I had a great start on a book then stopped abruptly. Katie’s book has me reenergized....”Let it rip on the page, puke your guts out on paper, then sit.” And, “...I will have conditioned my mind to sit in a chair and write for hours, so when I’m 95 I won’t be talking wistfully about the novel I once wanted to write. I’ll have written it.” Thank you Katie!! I There were several thing I liked about this memoir, and a few that caused me to pause. While I am not a runner, I do have a desire to write. I had a great start on a book then stopped abruptly. Katie’s book has me reenergized....”Let it rip on the page, puke your guts out on paper, then sit.” And, “...I will have conditioned my mind to sit in a chair and write for hours, so when I’m 95 I won’t be talking wistfully about the novel I once wanted to write. I’ll have written it.” Thank you Katie!! I have experienced grief, anxiety, depression, motherhood, etc. my faith in God helped, and continues to help me tremendously. I sensed that Katie was looking for a source of help and comfort , but instead found other beliefs/outlets that, in my opinion, left her searching. It really is a good read. I would recommend.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Shelley

    One of the best books I’ve ever read. I felt like this author was speaking straight to my soul. Her words on mothering and anxiety spoke to my heart and had me constantly saying, “yes! This is so me.” So different from other books, I ended this book feeling inspired and fulfilled, whereas so many books make me crave wanting more. I cried my way through this entire book - not a bad cry, but a good, cathartic cry. This book inspired me to want to be a better daughter, a better wife, a better mothe One of the best books I’ve ever read. I felt like this author was speaking straight to my soul. Her words on mothering and anxiety spoke to my heart and had me constantly saying, “yes! This is so me.” So different from other books, I ended this book feeling inspired and fulfilled, whereas so many books make me crave wanting more. I cried my way through this entire book - not a bad cry, but a good, cathartic cry. This book inspired me to want to be a better daughter, a better wife, a better mother, and a better athlete. This will be a book I’ll reflect on often and highlight the pages and read again and again to remind myself to just keep going. Bravo, Ms. Arnold. You are a badass.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Donna Hines

    Who knew you could just run away from your problems, get a runner's high, take on massive amounts of mileage, and all would be well with the world? Well, I usually do keep track of not only the length of my runs but also my weight, height, food intake, and other items needed for a good run. However, with Katie she simply laced up and took it all on and as long as she made progress than it was worthwhile cause. I've never ran extremely long distance. In fact I've always been a mid level runner a few Who knew you could just run away from your problems, get a runner's high, take on massive amounts of mileage, and all would be well with the world? Well, I usually do keep track of not only the length of my runs but also my weight, height, food intake, and other items needed for a good run. However, with Katie she simply laced up and took it all on and as long as she made progress than it was worthwhile cause. I've never ran extremely long distance. In fact I've always been a mid level runner a few miles never over 25, 50, 100. So hats off to her but for me this was not quite what I had hoped and fell somewhat short. While her family, her father's cancer scares, and the issue with her own achievements were meaningful to her the reader wasn't really pulled in with the writing. However, you may feel differently as variety is the spice of life. I hope you enjoy. Thank you to Katie, the publisher, NetGalley, and Amazon Kindle for this ARC in exchange for this honest review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Anneke

    Book Review: Running Home: A Memoir Author: Katie Arnold Publisher: Random House Publication Date: March 12, 2019 Review Date: March 24, 2019 I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Some of the writing is quite beautiful, but I realized at 33% of the way through that I was just bored to tears. I love memoir, for example, The World According to Fannie Davis: My Mother's Life in the Detroit N by Bridgett M. Davis , now THAT was a fantastic memoir. Maybe it's Book Review: Running Home: A Memoir Author: Katie Arnold Publisher: Random House Publication Date: March 12, 2019 Review Date: March 24, 2019 I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Some of the writing is quite beautiful, but I realized at 33% of the way through that I was just bored to tears. I love memoir, for example, The World According to Fannie Davis: My Mother's Life in the Detroit N by Bridgett M. Davis , now THAT was a fantastic memoir. Maybe it's just me. But everyone's parents die at some point, and yes, it is devastating. And yes, there are ultramarathoners, and that's an interesting thing to read about. But I just found the book boring. The only thing that interested me is that she lived in Washington DC in the early 70's, when I was in DC at Georgetown. I love that place and loved reading the little Washington tidbits. Otherwise, I've got too many other books to read. Onwards. Thank you to Random House for an early look at this book. This review will be posted on NetGalley, Goodreads and Amazon.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tory

    DNFed at 39%. I couldn't really figure out what the focus was meant to be. I wanted more running and less father dying/motherhood/mortality.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    I expected this book to be a memoir about ultra running and yes, there is a lot of running in Katie Arnold’s Running Home—but this is really a book about life; running is just Arnold’s way of processing and coming to terms with, as she puts it, “the jolting, destablizing shocks” of her own life. Running may give Arnold’s book its energy and organizing theme, but her clear, beautifully candid reflections on death, doubt, fear and grief give it a beating heart. The memoir is loosely organized in t I expected this book to be a memoir about ultra running and yes, there is a lot of running in Katie Arnold’s Running Home—but this is really a book about life; running is just Arnold’s way of processing and coming to terms with, as she puts it, “the jolting, destablizing shocks” of her own life. Running may give Arnold’s book its energy and organizing theme, but her clear, beautifully candid reflections on death, doubt, fear and grief give it a beating heart. The memoir is loosely organized in two parts. The first chronicles Arnold’s childhood and life before she made the leap to ultrarunning: her earliest memories of the breakdown of her parents’ marriage and her years of shuttling between their homes in New Jersey and rural Virginia with her older sister; her conflicted but loving relationship with her father, the spirit of adventure she inherited from him, and then his sudden cancer diagnosis and death; and the crippling bouts of postpartum anxiety and grief that followed. “There is never any end to the fears,” she writes. “The trick is to move toward them, not away. Running is as good a way as any to try.” Armed with this resolve, Arnold shifts the second part of Running Home to her pursuit of ultrarunning—her physical and mental training for the grueling 50k, 50 mile, 100k amd 100 mile distances and the toll this takes on her body, her marriage and her family. This part of the book—and particularly Arnold’s riveting accounts of her first 50k race and her Grand Canyon Rim to Rim to Rim run—was fascinating to me (whose idea of a long run is five miles) and gave me insight into what it takes to push your mind and body to their absolute limits. It’s worth noting here as well that, as you might expect from a former editor and writer at Outside magazine, there is beautiful nature writing throughout Running Home, but particularly so in this part of the book, when Arnold describes the scenery on her long mountain training runs. Running Home is a book that will be relatable and appealing to so many people—runners, of course, but also children of divorce; those who have fought their own battles with anxiety; mothers trying to balance work and family life with their own passions; and those who have experienced the death of a loved one. (I lost my own beloved father to cancer the same year as Katie, and her descriptions of her grief were among the most viscerally relatable I’ve ever read.) The publisher’s blurb likened Running Home to Helen Macdonald’s H is for Hawk but, while I understand that comparison, it reminded me more of Hope Jahren’s memoir Lab Girl. I loved them all, though, so I’m happy to let it go at that. Many thanks to Random House and NetGalley for providing me with an ARC of this book in exchange for my honest review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lee Husemann

    I thoroughly enjoyed this inspiring memoir which was so much more than a memoir. Katie Arnold was 2 when her parents divorced. Her mother remarried and they moved to New Jersey where Katie and her older sister Meg had to juggle back and forth with visitation with their father in Virginia. After college, Katie got a job at Outsider magazine in Santa Fe, NM, married her husband there and had two daughters. After the birth of her second daughter, her father died of cancer and Katie sunk into deep d I thoroughly enjoyed this inspiring memoir which was so much more than a memoir. Katie Arnold was 2 when her parents divorced. Her mother remarried and they moved to New Jersey where Katie and her older sister Meg had to juggle back and forth with visitation with their father in Virginia. After college, Katie got a job at Outsider magazine in Santa Fe, NM, married her husband there and had two daughters. After the birth of her second daughter, her father died of cancer and Katie sunk into deep depression and anxiety. Katie used ultra running to deal with his death and grief, and ran an ultramarathon. This book is so inspirational in how it deals with loss and anxiety caused by the death of a loved one. Thank you to NetGalley and Random House for the ARC of this wonderful book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    I received Running Home as a PRC from NetGalley in exchange for my unbiased review. Writer and ultramarathoner Katie Arnold's memoir is a tribute to her father, who sparked her interest in running. Although her parents separated when Arnold was a child, her father had a prominent role in her life. After he died, she developed severe, debilitating anxiety. She returned to running as a way to manage her symptoms. For the first part of Running Home, there is very little about running and I started t I received Running Home as a PRC from NetGalley in exchange for my unbiased review. Writer and ultramarathoner Katie Arnold's memoir is a tribute to her father, who sparked her interest in running. Although her parents separated when Arnold was a child, her father had a prominent role in her life. After he died, she developed severe, debilitating anxiety. She returned to running as a way to manage her symptoms. For the first part of Running Home, there is very little about running and I started to wonder if this was a running book at all! But as the book progresses, there is plenty of running. There is also a great deal of introspection. The book is beautifully written. Arnold has a true gift for writing and storytelling. This is a beautiful read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Christie Bane

    This is without a doubt the best running book I’ve ever read. I stayed up way too late last night and tonight inhaling it. I wish it was ten times longer so I could enjoy it for longer. Katie Arnold both completely understands and can articulate beautifully all the feelings that both cause people to embrace long-distance running and are stirred up by the running. Running can be beautiful and it can be agonizing, the best thing and the worst thing you can do. But most of all running is freeing. A This is without a doubt the best running book I’ve ever read. I stayed up way too late last night and tonight inhaling it. I wish it was ten times longer so I could enjoy it for longer. Katie Arnold both completely understands and can articulate beautifully all the feelings that both cause people to embrace long-distance running and are stirred up by the running. Running can be beautiful and it can be agonizing, the best thing and the worst thing you can do. But most of all running is freeing. About half of this book is about her ultra-running journey and the other half is about dealing with the impending, then actual, loss of her father. She processes her complicated feelings about her father through her running, and comes out a wiser, more complete person on the other side. Because of running. I don’t know who I would be or where I would be in life without running, and anyone who feels the same way will appreciate this beautifully written, searingly honest memoir.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Amy Johns

    I love this memoir. It has all my favorite things: running, relationships with fathers, sisters, children, depictions of the outdoors... Very well written, touching, and insightful.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Molly

    I loved this book. Highly, highly recommend regardless of whether you are a runner or not.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Joanne Kelly

    I am not a runner. Heck, I struggle to get in 6000 steps a day. But I loved this book. What I shared with Arnold is a complicated relationship with my father that required a great deal of processing as he died. And the intense internal dialog that takes place as a mother goes about balancing her own needs with those of her children and husband. The second half of the book was more about running, and I found it less riveting than the first half. But in both parts, Arnold's language, especially wh I am not a runner. Heck, I struggle to get in 6000 steps a day. But I loved this book. What I shared with Arnold is a complicated relationship with my father that required a great deal of processing as he died. And the intense internal dialog that takes place as a mother goes about balancing her own needs with those of her children and husband. The second half of the book was more about running, and I found it less riveting than the first half. But in both parts, Arnold's language, especially when she is talking about feelings, is lyrical. I only wish she had done a better job of integrating the two halves. I read a library copy, but I am now going to invest in a copy to keep on my shelf.

  14. 5 out of 5

    William Fluke

    Can’t believe how many high ratings Goodreads reviewers have given this book. Very disappointing from someone who loves memoirs and loves running. First third of book had me interested but then author falls apart (in her life) and her writing style falls apart. I expect an ultra runner to be a self absorbed type and Katie Arnold is way self absorbed. Her grieving over her Dad leave her mother (hardly spoken about at all even though she raised her), her husband, and her two daughters in the dust. Can’t believe how many high ratings Goodreads reviewers have given this book. Very disappointing from someone who loves memoirs and loves running. First third of book had me interested but then author falls apart (in her life) and her writing style falls apart. I expect an ultra runner to be a self absorbed type and Katie Arnold is way self absorbed. Her grieving over her Dad leave her mother (hardly spoken about at all even though she raised her), her husband, and her two daughters in the dust. The last 100 pages were hard to gut through as it was like reading her running logs! I expect Arnold is a better journalist than this memoir would represent and believe her Editors could have helped shape this into something more readable. Her aimlessness in life and lack of appreciation for her gifts and blessings make me wish she would find Christ in her life (not Buddhist runners!?). If you want a good memoir- this is not one. If you want a good book on running- this is not one. Arnold may be better suited for magazine articles in Outside magazine. One of her daughters might write a good memoir about their life and how their pouty/self centered Mother effected their lives once they look back.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    I loved this book. I started it thinking it was a runner’s memoir, but instead found that it was an excellent commentary on grief, living, dying, mothering, loving, finding peace and the drive to run. I related so much to Katie’s story of running to deal with the grief of losing her father. Through running, she gained clarity to tell her story of healing and coming to terms with loss. Very well-written and engaging.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    What a completely engaging, wonderfully written story about a forty year old woman looking back on her childhood, her beloved mother and father, their divorce, and her passion for long distance running. The author's past is revealed slowly; her life as a runner and as a wife and mother alternate and intersect but I often felt that her need, no, compulsion to run was so intense, that no matter how much she missed her children when she was off on a long distance race, she was compelled to run. At What a completely engaging, wonderfully written story about a forty year old woman looking back on her childhood, her beloved mother and father, their divorce, and her passion for long distance running. The author's past is revealed slowly; her life as a runner and as a wife and mother alternate and intersect but I often felt that her need, no, compulsion to run was so intense, that no matter how much she missed her children when she was off on a long distance race, she was compelled to run. At times she acknowledges her husband's resentment, even though she generally describes him as extraordinarily supportive...easy going and calm. I often found myself wondering what book he'd write if he were to describe his life as Katie's husband. Katie acknowledges that he does the bulk of the "work" in their life, that her paid work as a writer hardly pays for childcare. Training and races seem to take up an enormous portion of her life. So, I'm struck by the work--by the family tension in both her childhood and in her adulthood beginning her own family Her honesty about this struck me. I know that an honest memoir is usually more readable, more gripping. And Katie Arnold is clearly up to the task of looking at herself, her dreams, and how her life impacts her daughter and her husband. When she is thinking about her childhood, each of her parents, her sister and her friends, her daughters and her husband, the gorgeous landscapes through which she runs---oh, can Katie Arnold describe terrain--I found page after page dazzling and true. Natalie Goldberg, the Buddhist teacher and writer, is her friend and often her running or walking companion. I image the spiritual foundation of Natalie's writing and thinking have had a huge influence on Katie. passage after passage I marked for either the beauty or the wisdom of the language. Here is a moment from childhood: "I understood for the first time that I was part of the world and me. I was part of it, but separate. I was separate from my sister in the next room, from my green rain slicker hanging on the doorknob...Separate,even--as unthinkable as it was--from my mother in the kitchen. I sat there feeling my atoms crawl and move in my body in a way that they crawled and moved in no one else's body, and I felt distinct for the first time in my life--fuller and bigger than I had only moments before. The realization was so obvious, it was startling. I was not a story I'd made up. I was real, embodied. I occupied space within a place and time. Time was finite, here one moment, and then gone. I was a girl now, but one day I would not be. The inescapability of it astounded me. Who was I, and what was I going to do with myself?" Some of these be SPOILERS And this about her dad: "He's roved so many places, all on his own, a whole disticnt life without us. I find that oddly comforting. He's had so much to love in this world. It's a relief to realize that maybe we won't be his greatest loss after all. 109 173: In a few months, I'll turn forty, but here, hair caked with silt, shoulders freckled, I feel young for the first time all year. I want just this: to move my body until it's tired and dirty, to write stories and sleep outside and love my girls and Steve as long and hard as possible. I know this as clearly as I know there's no way of knowing anything really. I'll have to fling myself forward with equal parts conviction and ease, just like the river. If I'm going to die, I want to live. 191 fear isn't good or bad. It's our resistance to it, our fear of fear, our anxiety, that makes us suffer so. 228 Katie wants silence, spaciousness and freedom, and the idea of it. Practice: the difference between the western and eastern idea of practice. 229...odd poetry practice. 237 Time has distorted the trip so that, when I remember it now, it seemed dominated by an excessive, even cruel amount of dragging, when perhaps we had to do it only once or twice. Memory can be so catastrophic. 239/40 For the Navajo people, the point of running is not to be faster than anyone. We were raised to get up every morning as the sun is rising and run east to meet the birth of a new day. It's also a prayer. You are out there moving, breathing in all positive things. 277 "You're sad Pippa started school" she said simply. "Be in the sadness. Don't make stories around it." Her words stopped me in mid stride. I made her say them again. "You're just sad. For a split second I held everything in my mind, all the piece organizing themselves: the sorrow I'd felt as a girl was so big, it seemed as though it would swallow me if I let it. Instead I made up tales and suppositions, trying to crack the case, even when sometimes there was no answer. Maybe the answer had been in front of me all along. Maybe I;d just been sad. And maybe that's what growing up means: You don't have to believe all your own stories anymore. You get to choose." Throwing away cranberries her dad had bought and frozen, Katie was overcome with a sadness so complete that it seemed to contain everything: "love, fear, rage, regret disappointment, tenderness, shame, surprise, anguish, even awe. For a moment I understood. I "had" felt it after all. Grief is all of these things and more...It is beyond category, as fathomless as desire, as luminous as joy. It will break your heart and fill it up again. 311 one of those moments with her husband Steve 314 what she'd hoped for from running.

  17. 4 out of 5

    D.B. Moone

    I won’t rehash what Running Home is about as the book description from the publisher’s page gives you all you need to know and more. After reading the description of Running Home by Katie Arnold, you instinctually what is meant by, “I’m running to forget and remember.” The loss of someone we love throws everything about our life off balance, and mainly if it’s a parent or a parent that had abandoned you as a child. Everyone grieve’s differently, just as everyone experiences a myriad of emotions, I won’t rehash what Running Home is about as the book description from the publisher’s page gives you all you need to know and more. After reading the description of Running Home by Katie Arnold, you instinctually what is meant by, “I’m running to forget and remember.” The loss of someone we love throws everything about our life off balance, and mainly if it’s a parent or a parent that had abandoned you as a child. Everyone grieve’s differently, just as everyone experiences a myriad of emotions, whether it’s anger, regret, despair, depression, anxiety, acceptance, forgiveness, etc.. The litany of emotions suffered when we lose someone we had a connection to is as long as the list of ways in which each of us makes it through our grief. In Arnold’s case it was going from jogger to running an ultramarathon, and to be clear Arnold is not recruiting running as a means of grieving the loss of a loved one. Running Home is a memoir, and if you read the author’s bio, you know from the beginning that Arnold is an outdoorswoman, and as she has written for the magazine Runner’s World, we know she is a runner. Her description of becoming a long distance runner that led to her running an ultramarathon and the pain, endurance, and difficulties of running may not be grasped by those who are not runners and have no interest in learning about the sport of running. In this case, the reader may hop their way through Running Home and miss the authentic emotions Katie writes of following her father’s death, but also the feelings from her childhood that centered around the relationship she had with her father. An author that can write about emotions so distinctly that we feel the sentiment, which is a talent that is not effortless for all writers. This is a strength that Arnold has, whether she is writing about her feelings of abandonment by her father as a child, her feelings and emotions as an adult, her love for her father, her feelings upon learning of his terminal illness, followed by his death. I applaud Arnold for her ability to hit the mark when writing about her emotions that come through strongly, whether as a child or a mother of two. The other thing Arnold does exceptionally well as a writer is sharing her childhood memories while simultaneously incorporating her feelings during the events of her childhood in a way that holds you captive. I am sure that many in the world can relate to the point of feeling the emotions of a childhood akin to Arnold’s youth, and her life. To read my complete review, please visit my blog www.dbmoone.com Thank you to Random House, Katie Arnold, and NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    David

    inspiring recap of her quirky running career (her first marathon was running alongside Dean Karnazes on one of his 50 marathons/50 states/50 days events, interviewing him for Outside magazine profile) as she becomes a champion ultramarathoner. She has a knack for writing about trail adventures [ex. rim to rim to rim Grand Canyon run with a couple friends) in a non-sappy but appreciative way. Most of the book, however, concerns her memories of her late father, who left the family to take up with h inspiring recap of her quirky running career (her first marathon was running alongside Dean Karnazes on one of his 50 marathons/50 states/50 days events, interviewing him for Outside magazine profile) as she becomes a champion ultramarathoner. She has a knack for writing about trail adventures [ex. rim to rim to rim Grand Canyon run with a couple friends) in a non-sappy but appreciative way. Most of the book, however, concerns her memories of her late father, who left the family to take up with his secretary when the author was something like 3 years old. They had visits after that, and there are poignant scenes of, for instance, reading through his papers after he dies and finding out just how many affairs he'd had. That aspect of the book just didn't connect with me for the most part, though. It may be that you have to live it from the inside, or at least know the guy, to find it super-mysterious. At the risk of being simplistic, from 20,000 feet it looks to me like this guy got bored of his life as a homeowner/job guy/Dad of two little kids and let his wandering eye get the better of him. Not admirable, but also not unprecedented or incredibly counterintuitive. We don't have anything very articulate to go on from his p.o.v. -- sounds like he wrote her a long letter about it when she was grown up, but it gets filtered down to a pretty basic "sorry i hurt you and your sister; wasn't your fault". ----------------- on an unrelated note, I meant to mark my 1,000th goodreads review but lost track. this is my 1,001st. I did manage to reorder them such that the 1,000th is now one I liked a lot. Started in May 2008 at the behest of my friend and former student, and I'm very grateful to her. It's changed the way I read, making me more attentive to thinking along the way about what features/content/stylistics stand out to me for good or ill. I remember bonking at about 200 books and planning to quit reviewing them all and be more selective, as it was getting to feel like homework. But I pushed through it and now just find getting on goodreads to be a natural part of finishing a book. I think the key was giving myself permission to just post a rating and a couple of lines if I have nothing much to say on a given book. They don't all provoke essays, to say the least. thanks for reading. Back to our regularly scheduled reviewing, Dave

  19. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    If you are looking for book to inspire you to go run an ultramarathon, this might not be the book for you. If, however, you are looking for a book to inspire to you learn more about yourself and accept yourself more, possibly through running ultramarathons, then this is definitely the book for you! In fact, Ms. Arnold doesn't even really begin to touch on running until about halfway through the book. Instead, the book follows Ms. Arnold as she works through her emotions following her parent's di If you are looking for book to inspire you to go run an ultramarathon, this might not be the book for you. If, however, you are looking for a book to inspire to you learn more about yourself and accept yourself more, possibly through running ultramarathons, then this is definitely the book for you! In fact, Ms. Arnold doesn't even really begin to touch on running until about halfway through the book. Instead, the book follows Ms. Arnold as she works through her emotions following her parent's divorce, her own post partum depression, and ultimately her father's death. At several moments while reading, I felt like I was looking into a mirror as Ms. Arnold hashed through her feelings of self-worth and fear of all the 5 million things that could possibly go wrong at any given moment. Oh yes! This is me! So while I finished the book only a couple steps closer to the idea of running an ultra, I felt much closer to the idea of giving myself credit for who I am. Isn't that the best gift a book can give you? Thank you to NetGalley and Random House for providing this book in exchange for an honest review.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Lavender Smith

    I'm an ultrarunner who admires Katie Arnold athletically, but you don't have to be a runner or know anything about the sport to treasure this book. The running aspect of the book is a theme, an inspirational bonus, showing the therapeutic power of running and what it takes to become an accomplished ultrarunner. But really, it's a book about family legacy and personal growth. If you share our demographic of finding yourself in midlife handling the dual roles of raising kids while coping with one I'm an ultrarunner who admires Katie Arnold athletically, but you don't have to be a runner or know anything about the sport to treasure this book. The running aspect of the book is a theme, an inspirational bonus, showing the therapeutic power of running and what it takes to become an accomplished ultrarunner. But really, it's a book about family legacy and personal growth. If you share our demographic of finding yourself in midlife handling the dual roles of raising kids while coping with one or both parents’ decline and passing, of coping with anxiety and loss, and of reflecting on long-simmering questions about your childhood and your relationship to your parents, then you will relate to this book and appreciate its insights. Katie's skill as a writer will transport you to vivid scenes from a latchkey childhood back East in the 1970s, to young adulthood in Santa Fe in the 1990s, to the struggles of new motherhood in the 2000s—a life filled with many real and metaphorical runs all the way up rugged peaks and back down. Highly recommended.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

    As a runner, I could definitely relate to a lot of thoughts shared by the author: the need to run to run (without also focusing on racing, timing yourself, etc.), the devasting finality of serious injuries, and the joy in finding flow. I appreciated her comment that progress should be the goal and that fear and anxiety are barriers you need to be able to find your way around (in both life and running). The inclusion of the photographs of her father, David Arnold, made the book special. The autho As a runner, I could definitely relate to a lot of thoughts shared by the author: the need to run to run (without also focusing on racing, timing yourself, etc.), the devasting finality of serious injuries, and the joy in finding flow. I appreciated her comment that progress should be the goal and that fear and anxiety are barriers you need to be able to find your way around (in both life and running). The inclusion of the photographs of her father, David Arnold, made the book special. The author shares the archives she is uncovering throughout the text with the reader. It was a nice way of making her father seen, even though he never achieved as much as the potential his wife thought he had. I think when taken as a personal narrative of the author's experience of losing her father and her relationship with running, the story is strong and personal. As such, it is obviously limited in many ways, but I think it does a good job of showing how interconnected running and life can be.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Elena

    As Katie was grieving her father's death to cancer and dealing with severe postpartum anxiety, running up and down the canyons and mountains near her Sante Fe, New Mexico hometown became therapeutic. Soon, she was pushing herself to run ultra-marathons, and along the way, she tested her own limits and processed the pain, grief, fears, and anger surrounding her father's battle with cancer. This is an inspiring ode to ultra-running and the ways it helped her heal emotionally but it was also a raw, As Katie was grieving her father's death to cancer and dealing with severe postpartum anxiety, running up and down the canyons and mountains near her Sante Fe, New Mexico hometown became therapeutic. Soon, she was pushing herself to run ultra-marathons, and along the way, she tested her own limits and processed the pain, grief, fears, and anger surrounding her father's battle with cancer. This is an inspiring ode to ultra-running and the ways it helped her heal emotionally but it was also a raw, vulnerable look at loss, anxiety, and slowly putting back your broken pieces after loss. Rating: PG-13 (lots of language) Reminded me of: other ultra-marathon memoirs I enjoyed, including What I Talk About When I Talk About Running by Haruki Marukami, My Year of Running Dangerously by Tom Foreman, Born to Run by Christopher McDougell and other memoirs on an adult children processing their parent's death to cancer, The End of Your Life Book Club by Will Scwalbe and A Homemade Life by Molly Wizenberg

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    I won this book on Goodreads. This book is a two part memoir written by author Katie Arnold about the death of her father and the struggles before and after his passing and about the author's extreme sport ultra running. I marvel at the tenacity of what it takes to keep on running and I admire the author and the other people who choose to participate in this sport, through all the injuries, fatigue, and determination to complete the race courses. She even wants to continue to be active even when I won this book on Goodreads. This book is a two part memoir written by author Katie Arnold about the death of her father and the struggles before and after his passing and about the author's extreme sport ultra running. I marvel at the tenacity of what it takes to keep on running and I admire the author and the other people who choose to participate in this sport, through all the injuries, fatigue, and determination to complete the race courses. She even wants to continue to be active even when her doctor recommended to her to take it easy and just rest until she is better. One statement the author put into her book that piqued my curiosity is about the Marathon Monks of Mount Hiei. I want to do some more research on this and will read author John Stevens book on it. It really sounds interesting.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Many thanks to Random House Publishing Group for allowing me to read an advance copy of this memoir in exchange for an honest review. I thoroughly enjoyed Katie's memoir. The first section was easily five stars. She did a wonderful job of delving into childhood memories, sorting through them, and vulnerably expressing her thoughts and emotions. This part read quickly and was emotional and thought provoking. The second and third parts were also interesting, but they felt a little disjointed. As a f Many thanks to Random House Publishing Group for allowing me to read an advance copy of this memoir in exchange for an honest review. I thoroughly enjoyed Katie's memoir. The first section was easily five stars. She did a wonderful job of delving into childhood memories, sorting through them, and vulnerably expressing her thoughts and emotions. This part read quickly and was emotional and thought provoking. The second and third parts were also interesting, but they felt a little disjointed. As a former runner, it was interesting to get a glimpse inside of her mind as she honed her "craft". I understand that running is the way she reconciled her grief, but it almost feels like this could have been two separate books - one on childhood and grief, and one on running. I'd still highly recommend this memoir, and will encourage friends to read it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kris Mcpeake

    Excellent read. Following her emotional journey starting in chapter one where she learns of the reasons for her family's changes as a young girl, close relationship with her father and herself, learning to run and I cried when he passes. She tells of the many ways in the middle how she seeks help with the sadness and depression after his death while raising her family all while running. I can relate with her statement I'm a piler, not a filer and that multitasking is the biggest scam of motherho Excellent read. Following her emotional journey starting in chapter one where she learns of the reasons for her family's changes as a young girl, close relationship with her father and herself, learning to run and I cried when he passes. She tells of the many ways in the middle how she seeks help with the sadness and depression after his death while raising her family all while running. I can relate with her statement I'm a piler, not a filer and that multitasking is the biggest scam of motherhood. Katie allows us to be inside the runner's emotional and physical roller coaster. She brought bits and pieces of her father and family throughout this journey to find her path. Thank you Katie Arnold.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Trisha

    I wanted to read this book because I am a runner. I am not an ultra runner and have never done a trail run. I do love to go to Trails In Motion Film Tours. I was surprised by how immersed I became in this book. I kept thinking about it when I wasn’t reading it. Maybe it was the running... maybe it was the story of her life and the death of her dad. In ways her story touched me in the similarities of life. I’ve decided I want to go trail running now! Haha! I would love to see a Trails In Motion Fi I wanted to read this book because I am a runner. I am not an ultra runner and have never done a trail run. I do love to go to Trails In Motion Film Tours. I was surprised by how immersed I became in this book. I kept thinking about it when I wasn’t reading it. Maybe it was the running... maybe it was the story of her life and the death of her dad. In ways her story touched me in the similarities of life. I’ve decided I want to go trail running now! Haha! I would love to see a Trails In Motion Film about Katie! I will highly recommend this book to my friends! Thank you for sharing your story Katie! I received a complimentary copy of this book from NetGalley on behalf of the Publisher and was under no obligation to post a favorable review.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Renee

    I thought this was going to be a book about running. And it was, but it was really about being in the sandwiches of life. When you’re the PB&J caring for kids and parents, when you’re the cheese too old to be a kid and too young to have found your way as an adult...it contains great stories of loss and grief, of running, of family, of divorce, of parenting - such an honest portrayal of parenting that I especially appreciated. One problem, for me: she’s writing along, telling a story, describ I thought this was going to be a book about running. And it was, but it was really about being in the sandwiches of life. When you’re the PB&J caring for kids and parents, when you’re the cheese too old to be a kid and too young to have found your way as an adult...it contains great stories of loss and grief, of running, of family, of divorce, of parenting - such an honest portrayal of parenting that I especially appreciated. One problem, for me: she’s writing along, telling a story, describing a narrative, and then she skips something. Skips away. Context is lost and it’s jarring. It happens throughout and seems to be a personal style, but it made me lose the thread and mood.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie

    This book is written by a runner, a daughter, a mother, a wife, and a talented writer. Even if you fit into none of those categories, however, you will still find a massive takeaway from this book. I felt inspired as a human being at all times while reading this. Her tales of races and descriptions of the feeings she gets when she runs captivated me and empowered me. I am a fledgling runner and found her stories highly inspirational and entertaining. Aside from running, her thoughts also go to t This book is written by a runner, a daughter, a mother, a wife, and a talented writer. Even if you fit into none of those categories, however, you will still find a massive takeaway from this book. I felt inspired as a human being at all times while reading this. Her tales of races and descriptions of the feeings she gets when she runs captivated me and empowered me. I am a fledgling runner and found her stories highly inspirational and entertaining. Aside from running, her thoughts also go to the profound as she navigates her journey through grief and personal identity. I recommend this book highly!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jillian

    This book is a little like an ultra itself, thoughtfully paced and introspective and progressing in waves, certainly the highs and lows. I really savored this book and while I’m usually a quick reader, plowing through the books I love most, I found myself able to put this down — but not in a bad way — just to think. I did really enjoy the second half, which included most of the running, but the first half was also fascinating and made me consider my relationships, my own anxiety, and of course, This book is a little like an ultra itself, thoughtfully paced and introspective and progressing in waves, certainly the highs and lows. I really savored this book and while I’m usually a quick reader, plowing through the books I love most, I found myself able to put this down — but not in a bad way — just to think. I did really enjoy the second half, which included most of the running, but the first half was also fascinating and made me consider my relationships, my own anxiety, and of course, parenting. I tagged dozens of pages and passages that rung true and have already recommended this book to several friends. Well done.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Gray

    I'm not a runner but I found this memoir fascinating. Arnold used running to work through her grief at the loss of her father who had played such an important role in her life. Overcoming her paralysis in the aftermath meant taking the first step, which then became almost an obsession. Arnold becomes an ultra marathoner, an astonishing subset of athlete, through sheer will. Her determination is impressive, as is her writing. Thanks to net galley for the ARC. This is a story about a father and a I'm not a runner but I found this memoir fascinating. Arnold used running to work through her grief at the loss of her father who had played such an important role in her life. Overcoming her paralysis in the aftermath meant taking the first step, which then became almost an obsession. Arnold becomes an ultra marathoner, an astonishing subset of athlete, through sheer will. Her determination is impressive, as is her writing. Thanks to net galley for the ARC. This is a story about a father and a daughter and a woman and her own children as well as a story about a sport.

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