Hot Best Seller

Conscious Coaching: The Art and Science of Building Buy-In PDF, ePub eBook

4.6 out of 5
30 review

Conscious Coaching: The Art and Science of Building Buy-In

Availability: Ready to download

File Name: Conscious Coaching: The Art and Science of Building Buy-In .pdf

How it works:

1. Register a free 1 month Trial Account.

2. Download as many books as you like (Personal use)

3. Cancel the membership at any time if not satisfied.


Conscious Coaching: The Art and Science of Building Buy-In PDF, ePub eBook In the world of strength and conditioning, learning how to move others—not just physically, but also psychologically and emotionally—is paramount to getting the most out of them. People are the ultimate performance variable, and understanding how to effectively blend knowledge of proper training with the nuances of human behavior is integral to helping athletes achieve the In the world of strength and conditioning, learning how to move others—not just physically, but also psychologically and emotionally—is paramount to getting the most out of them. People are the ultimate performance variable, and understanding how to effectively blend knowledge of proper training with the nuances of human behavior is integral to helping athletes achieve their ultimate goals. Unfortunately, while much attention has been given to the science of physical training, little attention has been given to the science of communication. Conscious Coaching: The Art and Science of Building Buy-In bridges this gap. Readers learn the foundational principles of improving relationships, enhancing engagement, and gaining the trust of athletes through targeted communication. And, every bit as important, readers also learn concrete strategies to apply these principles in day-to-day coaching situations they will inevitably encounter. The result is a game-changing book that sets the stage for coaches to create a culture of success not only within sport, but also beyond. Conscious Coaching is a movement and its time has come.

30 review for Conscious Coaching: The Art and Science of Building Buy-In

  1. 5 out of 5

    Samantha MacIntosh

    Overblown phrasing and a clumsy writing style. He misuses fancy words a lot so you get the feeling he’s trying a little too hard. The archetypes are woolly and seemed to go on forever. A lot of this is replicable wisdom that you’d find in very basic behavioural psychology and tired management courses. I didn’t get a thing out of this book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Title& Author: Conscious Coaching: The Art and Science of Building Buy-In by Brett Bartholomew Publisher & Year: Bartholomew Strength; 2017 REVIEW: “We can know everything about an athlete's body, yet we have no idea what's going on inside their heads. Your athlete needs to know that you care and that you are available.” – Coach Daniel Noble There has certainly been a lot of buzz surrounding this book, and after reading Conscious Coaching I can see why. More than anything this book is the f Title& Author: Conscious Coaching: The Art and Science of Building Buy-In by Brett Bartholomew Publisher & Year: Bartholomew Strength; 2017 REVIEW: “We can know everything about an athlete's body, yet we have no idea what's going on inside their heads. Your athlete needs to know that you care and that you are available.” – Coach Daniel Noble There has certainly been a lot of buzz surrounding this book, and after reading Conscious Coaching I can see why. More than anything this book is the first of its kind, in my opinion, that discusses the topic of the athletes’ own individual mind and the challenges strength coaches face to make their athletes better people as a whole. I always enjoy books that a) challenge me as a coach to be better and b) provide tools I can utilize on a daily basis, this entire book accomplishes these two factors in spades. There is an art and science to coaching athletes; Conscious Coaching provides an avenue for which we strength coaches can make an impact in and out of the sporting realm. Spanning just 5 chapters and 260ish pages, there is so much content that you can’t afford to just read this book once. The first two chapters introduce the “conscious coaching” concepts and describes the importance of figuring out your own temperament before being able to help your own athletes. The third chapter introduces archetypes of different athletes strength coaches might come across in their careers. Each archetype is broken down with a brief description of strengths, weaknesses, and how to connect to that particular athlete. Also, each personality type has corresponding real life examples from various coaches throughout the profession that explain their own experience working with that particular archetype. Lastly, the book finishes with Bartholomew’s own anecdotes and lessons from his experience in the field of strength and conditioning. Conscious Coaching is about establishing those ever important relationships with athletes and this book gives you the tools to do just that.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ian .

    Actually thought this book isn't training/sports based, own fault that I didn't read the summary carefully. Book has a lot of information, much of it based on the author's own (sometimes anecdotal) experience. There are references to different science researches as well, but still. The "Stereotypes" section was really long and the author laid out around 20 different stereotypes, all in the context of sports. In the end it was nearly impossible to differ some stereotypes from the other. Plus the Actually thought this book isn't training/sports based, own fault that I didn't read the summary carefully. Book has a lot of information, much of it based on the author's own (sometimes anecdotal) experience. There are references to different science researches as well, but still. The "Stereotypes" section was really long and the author laid out around 20 different stereotypes, all in the context of sports. In the end it was nearly impossible to differ some stereotypes from the other. Plus the solutions how to handle different kind of personality types, were all kind of similar: communication, get to know the person, gain respect.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tricia Friedman

    While this focuses on coaching in the world of athletics, I was thrilled to see the parallels for any type of coach or teacher. The book has fantastically specific examples and anecdotes and is rich with practical wisdom.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    I thought this book by an athletic training on coaching would have more transferable skills to non-athletic coaching areas than it did, but instead I read a LOT about strength and conditioning.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tobias Sjösten

    Brett uses strength coaching as his application but the teachings in this book really extends well beyond that field. I learned a lot from this book and from the way it was taught I feel it'll be very easy to put this into practice, to become a better coach and leader.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rocco Venizelos

    Excellent read!!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Josh Mason

    If this is cutting edge content for sport/strength and conditioning coaching then what are they learning? A poorly contrived book that seems to be an effort to better the sport coaching community but is light on any appropriate science. In fact, much of the authors concepts are just poorly digested psychology which only serves to demonstrate two things. The author is not a content expert and should have stayed in his lane or had a co-author for certain parts of the manuscript. Archetypes? Carl J If this is cutting edge content for sport/strength and conditioning coaching then what are they learning? A poorly contrived book that seems to be an effort to better the sport coaching community but is light on any appropriate science. In fact, much of the authors concepts are just poorly digested psychology which only serves to demonstrate two things. The author is not a content expert and should have stayed in his lane or had a co-author for certain parts of the manuscript. Archetypes? Carl Jung would have told this author that this is not valid science and so is acting as if you can identify traits of athletes without assessment or appropriate training. Knowing a little bit about something does not mean expertise is obtained as is knowing things is not the same as understanding. Secondly, there is a gaping hole in how our coaches are trained in the most important aspects - working with people. It's clear this was an attempt to bridge such gaps but it fails on all accounts.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    Full disclosure: I did not finish this book. I didn't even come close. If I had done my research to determine that this was a self-published book, I probably would have thought twice about picking it up. Nothing against self publishing, but these sorts of books simply do not need to go through the same level of scrutiny as traditionally published books. That was clear here. I also feel hoodwinked because the recommendation came from a writer and coach I respect, as one of his "top books of 2017" . Full disclosure: I did not finish this book. I didn't even come close. If I had done my research to determine that this was a self-published book, I probably would have thought twice about picking it up. Nothing against self publishing, but these sorts of books simply do not need to go through the same level of scrutiny as traditionally published books. That was clear here. I also feel hoodwinked because the recommendation came from a writer and coach I respect, as one of his "top books of 2017" . . . but as it turns out, he was listed as an editor on the book. So maybe he really did think the book was that great, but as an outsider, I found it boring, painfully slow to get to the point, and overly academic in style (but not content).

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jay Hennessey

    This was a great read/audio that I highly recommend to anyone who coaches athletes. I was especially intrigued with the concept of framing the different types of athlete archetypes - while I am sure it would be easy to poke holes in the explanation or recommendations, the broad concept is really sound. First, understand the different types of archetypes of whom you will likely be exposed to in your coaching. Then think about each athlete - what archetype or archetypes do they fit; then consider This was a great read/audio that I highly recommend to anyone who coaches athletes. I was especially intrigued with the concept of framing the different types of athlete archetypes - while I am sure it would be easy to poke holes in the explanation or recommendations, the broad concept is really sound. First, understand the different types of archetypes of whom you will likely be exposed to in your coaching. Then think about each athlete - what archetype or archetypes do they fit; then consider what approach will likely be most productive. In addition to the archetypes, the author provided a lot of great pragmatic advice, best characterized as “feel or approach”. It was obvious that the author had spent a lot of think thinking deeply about what he had done at his best and worst in coaching athletes and was eager to share his experience. This book seems like one of many “must reads” for coaching looking to continue their development. For me, I also found a ton of relevance to parenting or understanding other peoples perspective. It was a good Emotional Intelligence touch up as well.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay Simmons

    How to meet your athlete where they are to create buy-in, not only with them, but within ourselves. How to recognize and adjust your technique for individuals as one size doesn't fit all. This has helped me in the gym and in the office. Bret Bartholomew uses his experience in multi facets of coaching to summarize techniques for improving relationships, creating engagement, and better communication. The reason for 3 stars is the 2nd half of the book describes different types of athletes, how they How to meet your athlete where they are to create buy-in, not only with them, but within ourselves. How to recognize and adjust your technique for individuals as one size doesn't fit all. This has helped me in the gym and in the office. Bret Bartholomew uses his experience in multi facets of coaching to summarize techniques for improving relationships, creating engagement, and better communication. The reason for 3 stars is the 2nd half of the book describes different types of athletes, how they are, how they learn best, and how to meet them where they are. I thought it was a big long winded, and in addition, if I have 20 athletes, I cannot cater to 20 different types of athletes, in the manner he lays out. I still need to have authority over the class.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sean

    Best book I've read! This book highlights the behavioral side of coaching. Everyone is so focused on the science and as !y experience in the fitness industry has shown me, it doesn't matter how much you know of you can not relate to the client or build buy in. This book breaks down how to just that, which in turn, if you take these principles and put them into action you will become a better and note successful coach.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Bryan

    The first few chapters were gripping. I truly enjoyed reading his personal story. In fact I wish he'd write a separate book about his life because I would gladly read it. But as he started diving into his methodology, I started feeling that he's reaching beyond his grasp. I was under the constant feeling that he's trying so hard to sound smart and knowledgeable. I wish he'd kept his language and message simple and clear, just like the first few chapters.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    The points the author makes are valid and important. The anecdotal story from other professionals in the industry make the book engaging. However, I had a horrendously difficult time getting past the awful grammar. It's feels as though each chapter is a ridiculously long paragraph, each "paragraph" running pages. It was grit that got me through this book.

  15. 4 out of 5

    John

    This book is clumsily written and was published in need of a solid edit. With that said, the content is still somewhat worthwhile to those new to teaching or coaching. The author purports that all athletes fall into a specific archetype, then provides analysis on how best to coach and bond with this archetype. I think the advice is generally sound, though somewhat repetitive.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Scott Sommerlatte

    A book worth reading over and over. Great learning tool! Great book! It gives great examples of how to become a better coach but also a better mentor in the strength and conditioning world but also in the entire medical world. Great examples and stories that can be used throughout every day life. This is a book that you can read over and over and still learn something new.

  17. 4 out of 5

    SallyJean Penna

    A treasure trove of.wisdom This book.was a fantastic read- lots of useful .information for the aspiring coach about how to be better at your job. The bibliography is another great resource. Well-researched and thorough without being dull.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Amir Hossein Fassihi

    A strength training coaches techniques that consider the fact that he is dealing with humans and many details related to working with humans come before the science of exercise. This book contains many lessons for nonsports related domains such as business coaching.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    The perspective he provides is really good, but the hard science he used to back up his emphasis on the "soft science" of coaching is all insanely dubious evopsych stuff or myers-briggs type personality testing.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Terrazas

    Even though I'm not an athletic coach, I found this book useful from a management perspective.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Joey Stark

    This book puts right what is in front of your face into words. Its amazing on how easily and naturally you can translate this book into your own training.

  22. 4 out of 5

    J.T.

    A useful book, and one I’ll probably re-read as I continue to learn.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Adam Clark

    Great book This is a must read for anyone in the industry. Great book that has easily applicable steps. Highly recommend it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dave Nash

    Audiobook, great to follow, highly recommended

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kent White

    I really wanted more from this book. Lots of archetypes that really don’t apply easily outside of an athletic domain.

  26. 5 out of 5

    David John

    Enjoyed the breakdown this book had of items that coaches need to keep in mind as they go to work developing their athletes. Thought it was also excellent that different types of athletes were provided as well as coaches who have worked with those types in the real world. I think that another book can be made that deeply explores these types of athletes that can be encountered in coaching, since there was great information covered that is worth expanding upon.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michael Smith

  28. 5 out of 5

    David Williamson

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jacob Davis

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mark M

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.