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The Phantom Menace

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The Phantom Menace PDF, ePub eBook A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away, an evil legacy long believed dead is stirring. Now the dark side of the Force threatens to overwhelm the light, and only an ancient Jedi prophecy stands between hope and doom for the entire galaxy. On the green, unspoiled world of Naboo, Jedi Master Qui-Gon Jinn and his apprentice, Obi-Wan Kenobi, arrive to protect the realm’s youn A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away, an evil legacy long believed dead is stirring. Now the dark side of the Force threatens to overwhelm the light, and only an ancient Jedi prophecy stands between hope and doom for the entire galaxy. On the green, unspoiled world of Naboo, Jedi Master Qui-Gon Jinn and his apprentice, Obi-Wan Kenobi, arrive to protect the realm’s young queen as she seeks a diplomatic solution to end the siege of her planet by Trade Federation warships. At the same time, on desert-swept Tatooine, a slave boy named Anakin Skywalker, who possesses a strange ability for understanding the “rightness” of things, toils by day and dreams by night—of becoming a Jedi Knight and finding a way to win freedom for himself and his beloved mother. It will be the unexpected meeting of Jedi, Queen, and a gifted boy that will mark the start of a drama that will become legend.

30 review for The Phantom Menace

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alejandro

    Here come the prequels! JEDI AND SITH MEET AGAIN! During the Original Trilogy of Star Wars, we find out a detail here and another there, about what happened to the Republic and the rise of the Empire. Of course, those little details, matter not much, since after all, good ol’ Georgie wrote what he wanted in the prequels, not matter if they were contradictory with the previous released information in the original trilogy. For thousand years, peace had prevailed in the galaxy and the Republic was Here come the prequels! JEDI AND SITH MEET AGAIN! During the Original Trilogy of Star Wars, we find out a detail here and another there, about what happened to the Republic and the rise of the Empire. Of course, those little details, matter not much, since after all, good ol’ Georgie wrote what he wanted in the prequels, not matter if they were contradictory with the previous released information in the original trilogy. For thousand years, peace had prevailed in the galaxy and the Republic was protected by the Jedi Order… …but the Sith hadn’t dissapeared as people think and a masterplan was about to be applied with the goals of turning the Republic into an Empire and the destruction of the Jedi Order… …and everything began in the little planet of Naboo and a commercial blockade… …along with a small detour to the planet of Tatooine. Sooo, from here on, I will do some specific comments and explain differences between the movie and book, so if you haven’t watch the film, be warned of keeping reading on… Qui Gon-Jin rules! He’s the best Jedi ever. Period. However, I think that the whole trouble of being stranded in Tatooine could be managed better (but of course, we wouldn’t have Star Wars, so maybe it wasn’t shortsight, but things that should happen in benefit of the story), since they need a spare part to fix their Nubian cruiser and the Republic money wasn’t good in Tatooine… …but hey! The Nubian ship is almost peachy-keen shape but the hyperdrive system, so… …why not sell the dang Nubian ship, and buying some less fancy cruiser instead, even it was smart to change of vehicle to avoid being followed, they only needed a cruiser big enough for two Jedis, a queen, her cohorts, a security captain and the pilots… …and they could avoid requiring the help of certain kid that years later would become kinda some little trouble to the Jedi Order. Moreover, while Qui Gon-Jin couldn’t do his Mind Trick on Watto, it seemed that Watto did something to Qui Gon-Jin since Watto told him that nobody else had that kind of Nubian spare parts and he believed him, since he didn’t try with any other store, hey! Who knows? Maybe there was some other business alien with that kind of spare parts and even accepting Republic money, but of course, why distrust someone so trustworthy like good ol’ Watto?! Geez! It’s curious that the Senate is dealing with a trouble of a commercial blockade at Naboo, and their “brilliant impartial” solution is deposing the current Supreme Chancellor and naming a new one that he’s from Naboo! And it’s absurd that when Naboo is facing an invasion, it’s sent only two Jedis, aaaaah!... …but when everything was solved and there is a party with music and food, the whole dang Jedi Council travel there! Geez! SO WHAT’S DIFFERENT HERE ANYWAY? The story didn’t began on the book on Naboo, but you have two chapters introducing little Anakin and his life as slave at Tatooine, the construction of C-3PO, including a revealing incident where he tries to heal a wounder Tusken Raider and he ponders about what he could do if somebody would hurt his mother. Also, it’s told the previous Pod Racing where Anakin “saved most of Watto’s pod”. There is an aditional scene showing the natural kindness of Anakin, when he invited Qui-Gon Jin and Padme, some food in a street tent, even when the very Anakin isn’t able to buy some for him. Padme has a last name, Naberrie, which is contradictory of the way that she’s referred in Episode II. Anakin tells Padme that he’ll marry her in the future, and while Padme didn’t take it seriously since he’s just a kid, he tells her that he won’t be a boy forever. Obi-Wan Kenobi relationship was quite damaged for a while in the narrative when Qui-Gon Jin insisted of teaching Anakin and all that that involved. Darth Maul has a lot more dialogue in the novel than in the movie. There is a detailed account about what happened with the Sith Order and how Darth Bane changed all with his Rule of Two. Yoda was against of teaching Anakin (and most likely Mace Windu was against too) but the rest of the Jedi Council voted in favor.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    This is the first time I've read a book written "based on" a movie. Not a bad effort. In some ways better than the movie because the reader is taken inside the point-of-view characters. Terry Brooks, of course, is an accomplished author and did not hurt his reputation with this novel. One major shortcoming of both book and movie (and therefore probably Lucas', rather than Brook's, fault) came into clearer focus in the book. No one recognized Padme as Amidala until she reveals herself. Not Anakin, This is the first time I've read a book written "based on" a movie. Not a bad effort. In some ways better than the movie because the reader is taken inside the point-of-view characters. Terry Brooks, of course, is an accomplished author and did not hurt his reputation with this novel. One major shortcoming of both book and movie (and therefore probably Lucas', rather than Brook's, fault) came into clearer focus in the book. No one recognized Padme as Amidala until she reveals herself. Not Anakin, who thinks he loves her and is the most Force-sensitive person ever, and not two trained Jedi. No one. (We assume, of course, all the Nabooians--including Palpatine/Sidious--are in on the scam, though if Palpatine knew, why didn't he warn the Neimoidians, since her now-you-see-her-now-you-don't act contributed to their undoing?) What's the deal? What's the Force good for if it can't discriminate one person from another? You can feel someone die half a galaxy away but you can't recognize the person standing next to you was not the one hiding behind the white makeup yesterday. And to add insult to injury, Brooks tells us R2-D2 was the first to recognize Padme as Amidala. Too funny. Not to mention that Jedi Masters can stand right next to Palpatine and not recognize who/what he is. Yeah, yeah, he's blinding them, but they ought to at least see that something's not right. But if we didn't have that, the whole first trilogy would collapse under the weight of it's own paradoxes, wouldn't it? Anyway, not Brooks' fault. He did a good job with what he was given. And the rest of us--well, some of us--are just left wishing Anakin had turned out good. But then we wouldn't have had the second trilogy, which came first, therefore we had to have it whether the first trilogy worked or not. Right?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Crystal Starr Light

    "The opinions of others whether you agree with them or not are something you have to learn to tolerate" Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan, two Jedi knights (well, one is a Master, the other his Padawan, but who's counting?), are surreptitiously sent to Naboo to negotiate a treaty to put an end to the blockade the Trade Federation has on the planet. But negotiations are short when the Neimoidians try to kill them and now the Jedi try to get Queen Amidala, ruler of Naboo, to Coruscant, to spur the Republic into "The opinions of others whether you agree with them or not are something you have to learn to tolerate" Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan, two Jedi knights (well, one is a Master, the other his Padawan, but who's counting?), are surreptitiously sent to Naboo to negotiate a treaty to put an end to the blockade the Trade Federation has on the planet. But negotiations are short when the Neimoidians try to kill them and now the Jedi try to get Queen Amidala, ruler of Naboo, to Coruscant, to spur the Republic into action. NOTE: Based on unabridged audiobook and novel. I Liked: Terry Brooks was given an huge task: put the first Star Wars movie for over 15 years into novel form. The previous authors had pretty much taken the screenplay and frilled it out a bit for novel form. But Brooks bucks that. He includes three distinct scenes that are never seen in the movie and were never filmed. One is how Anakin destroys his pod in the first unseen race. This is fundamental to showing Anakin's skill and how the Force is with him in the Boonta Race (which he wins). The second is a scene where Anakin shows compassion on a Tusken Raider. That scene is really poignant especially in light of Attack of the Clones. Instead of hearing how compassionate Anakin is, we get to see it. And the third is a nice summary of the demise of the Sith Order and the rise of the Rule of Two (okay, now we have Jedi Vs. Sith and Path of Destruction, but you have to realize in 1999, we had neither). Besides these two specific scenes, Brooks takes time to slow things down from the hectic editing of the movie and explain the things that don't quite make sense. Why does Qui-Gon bring the clumsy Jar Jar into Mos Espa? Why does Obi-Wan throw Jar Jar into the droid hold? These are only two of the myriad of minor questions you might have if you just watched The Phantom Menace. I also liked the insight into characters like Obi-Wan Kenobi (who was irritated by his master's constantly bringing along people for no reason), Qui-Gon (who rebelled because he felt the Force), Jar Jar (who really wasn't as stupid as the movie portrayed him), and Anakin (we get to see some of his dreams, which eerily reminds us of Clones). Brooks has a nice writing style, easy to understand, nice to listen to, good pacing, and nice descriptions. I had just finished reading Cloak of Deception, which in my review, I noted that it tended to overdescribe, and I was glad that Brooks didn't do that. Also, Brooks was pretty adept at transcribing the podracing scenes and the action scenes. I Didn't Like: It's hard, I'll admit, to review a novelization of a movie. It has to stay true to the movie, and yet add something more, else why read the book and not watch the movie? Unfortunately, other than a few unique scenes, there really is very little reason to pick up this novel. Firstly, I still didn't like how Anakin comes off as being a young adult and no where near the 9 that he is in the movie and in the book. I know part of this problem is in fact the movie, but Brooks doesn't help by having Anakin have way too many romantic thoughts about Padme--way more than a typical 9 year old should have. Another thing that REALLY bugged me was how Brooks never bothers to write from Padme's point of view. I know this might have blown the secret, but still, Padme/Amidala is a HUGE part of the movie, the main reason for it, from one point of view, and we can't have a single scene written from her? This might not sound like a problem until Brooks has to force Anakin and Jar Jar into the Senate Hall (?!) so that they can hear the big speech she gives the Senate. What the...??? Just put Amidala there! Stop treating her like a one-shot love interest and make her a character! A problem I had with Obi-Wan, actually with many characters, is how racist they appear. Obi-Wan says he doesn't want Jar Jar to tag along because he was a "foolish looking creature". So if Jar Jar was a sexy Twi'Lek it would be okay? Also, I grew embarrassed reading about Panaka's "dark skin" that was mentioned whenever he was in a scene. Why is this necessary? Why didn't anyone comment about Obi-Wan's "white skin"? Also, Padme stereotypes Neimoidians as all being cowards, and I absolutely loathe all-species stereotypes. The repetition was unnerving. You could make a drinking game out of how often we read about Qui-Gon being "leonine" or someone being "chagrined" (that last one made me want to double face palm). By far, the biggest problem with this book is how emotionless it comes across. I know that sounds odd, but although we learn more about characters, I still felt an emotional distance from everyone, as if the novel had merely been transcribed from the script (and in more than one place, it was very nearly). When you read a novelization of a movie, you want to learn more information from it, to grow close to the characters, understand what is going on in their heads, feel their feelings. I don't feel that Brooks ever tore down that barrier and truly brought me closer to any of the characters. Dialogue/Sexual Situations/Violence: None. Twi'Lek slave girls. A few characters die. There is a large battle at the end and several smaller skirmishes. Overall: If I had to compare this to the movie, I would definitely say it is better. There is better flow, more clarification, and less wooden acting (and bad scripts). However, it still has its problems: namely never letting Padme speak for herself or letting us emotionally attach to the characters. If you haven't seen the movie, read this book. If you have seen the movie, then I would skip.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bettie

    Description: A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away, an evil legacy long believed dead is stirring. Now the dark side of the Force threatens to overwhelm the light, and only an ancient Jedi prophecy stands between hope and doom for the entire galaxy. On the green, unspoiled world of Naboo, Jedi Master Qui-Gon Jinn and his apprentice, Obi-Wan Kenobi, arrive to protect the realm’s young queen as she seeks a diplomatic solution to end the siege of her planet by Trade Federation warships. At the s Description: A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away, an evil legacy long believed dead is stirring. Now the dark side of the Force threatens to overwhelm the light, and only an ancient Jedi prophecy stands between hope and doom for the entire galaxy. On the green, unspoiled world of Naboo, Jedi Master Qui-Gon Jinn and his apprentice, Obi-Wan Kenobi, arrive to protect the realm’s young queen as she seeks a diplomatic solution to end the siege of her planet by Trade Federation warships. At the same time, on desert-swept Tatooine, a slave boy named Anakin Skywalker, who possesses a strange ability for understanding the “rightness” of things, toils by day and dreams by night—of becoming a Jedi Knight and finding a way to win freedom for himself and his beloved mother. It will be the unexpected meeting of Jedi, Queen, and a gifted boy that will mark the start of a drama that will become legend. Just a reminder, shelves and ratings for Star Wars are purely for the films, which are fantastic fun.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kevis Hendrickson

    Although it isn't going to set yor pants on fire, the novelization of The Phantom Menace is actually quite a good book. One of the reasons why many people disliked the film version of The Phantom Menace is because the film didn't focus on its main character, Anakin Skywalker, who would one day become the future Lord of the Sith, Darth Vader. In the book, however, the story hones in on Anakin, and explores his life as a slave, laying down the narrative foundation for us to understand why Anakin b Although it isn't going to set yor pants on fire, the novelization of The Phantom Menace is actually quite a good book. One of the reasons why many people disliked the film version of The Phantom Menace is because the film didn't focus on its main character, Anakin Skywalker, who would one day become the future Lord of the Sith, Darth Vader. In the book, however, the story hones in on Anakin, and explores his life as a slave, laying down the narrative foundation for us to understand why Anakin becomes the man he does. Several key scenes which didn't make it into the film such as Anakin's fight with the Rhodian Greedo establishes Anakin's hidden and unpredictable fury. Also, where the film fails to explain how or where Anakin learns to fly, the book explains such matters in detail. I would recommend The Phantom Menace to all Star Wars fans simply becuase it fills in the gaps of narrative information that we don't get in the film, much of which I might add is actually information that George Lucas couldn't squeeze into the film due to its truncated running time and haphazard storytelling. There is some obscure Sith-lore to be found in this book that will peek the interest of Star Wars fans. Terry Brooks deserves props for taking many of the more pedestrian scenes in the film and giving them meaning in the book. As expected, the final lightsaber duel between Qui-gonn Jinn, Obi-Wan Kenobi, and Darth Maul is quite thrilling. There are a few books (sci-fi and fantasy) that deal with the timeless tale of a young boy growing up to become a deadly agent of evil. But of them all, The Phantom Menace is in a class by itself in telling the tale of the childhood of the most infamous villian in all of science-fiction.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    There's an interesting re-edit of Star Wars Episode 1: The Phantom Menace out there, called The Phantom Edit. It's one person's edit of the original movie, with as much of the moronic Jar-Jar, annoying Anakin, and redundant storyline removed as possible. It's an improvement, though the movie still falls far short of the original trilogy. Unfortunately, this book goes in the opposite direction. The author expounds on both the Jar-Jar and the Anakin idiocy, often taking it to extremes (for example, There's an interesting re-edit of Star Wars Episode 1: The Phantom Menace out there, called The Phantom Edit. It's one person's edit of the original movie, with as much of the moronic Jar-Jar, annoying Anakin, and redundant storyline removed as possible. It's an improvement, though the movie still falls far short of the original trilogy. Unfortunately, this book goes in the opposite direction. The author expounds on both the Jar-Jar and the Anakin idiocy, often taking it to extremes (for example, when Anakin first meets Padme in Watto's shop, the conversation in the book ends with Anakin stating that he is going to marry Padme...). The additional plot explanations are welcome, but those mainly manage to expose the absurdity of the storyline to the reader. This is not how to treat Star Wars. This is Star Wars for 7-year-olds. For excellent examples of how to treat Star Wars in book form, see virtually anything by Timothy Zahn.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bram

    I'm going to play the ultimate nerd contrarian and admit that I love this movie and novelization. It's probably just heavy nostalgia for one of my last pre-puberty summers, but I'm ok with that.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nienke

    “In this life you're often born one thing and die another. You don't have to accept that what you're given when you come in is all you'll have when you leave.” With this being said by an old pilot, we witness Anakin's change of life right before our eyes. From being a slave on a desert planet he becomes a new Padawan-learner at the age of nine. Which is, in terms of the Council, old, but destined to be the Chosen One, the Council accepts him. Therefore, he should be the one to bring balance to “In this life you're often born one thing and die another. You don't have to accept that what you're given when you come in is all you'll have when you leave.” With this being said by an old pilot, we witness Anakin's change of life right before our eyes. From being a slave on a desert planet he becomes a new Padawan-learner at the age of nine. Which is, in terms of the Council, old, but destined to be the Chosen One, the Council accepts him. Therefore, he should be the one to bring balance to the Force, however it's being doubted by Yoda. We get to know different planets and witness battles between the dark- and the light side. Jedi fighting against Sith lords. People fighting for power and people who are not ready to hold that much power. We see the changes Anakin Skywalker goes through, without his mom, leaving his home planet and his old life behind and being prepared for a new one, without knowing the consequences, but doing it anyway, because this is the only thing he ever wanted, he ever dreamed of. To see the galaxy, to become the best starpilot anyone has ever known and most importantly; to free his mother. I just rolled into the Star Wars fandom, like three weeks ago and I absolutely loved the movies. So, therefore I wanted to read the novelizations. To be honest: I am not disappointed! What am I saying? This was freaking great! This was extraordinary. Some parts were beyond words and so well written and thought through. We get to know so much more. Crucial things and things that add just that little touch to the story. Things I've missed in the movies were found here. This book has so many point of views, which is great in this situation, because we follow all the important characters and get to know every corner of the story. From dark to light, wise to unknowing and slave to queen. Terry Brooks did an excellent job on George Lucas' screenplay and I can't wait for the sequels!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

    Considering this is based on a movie that has some pretty bad dialogue and some serious pacing issues, it isn't actually that bad of a read. It's a pretty quick read, which is also good because nothing feels too drawn out, and it also lets you into the characters heads a bit more.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tiara

    2.5 stars. Filled bits of the movie out some, but still suffers from being The Phantom Menace.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Dunning

    Lots of action. A fun read. I've never seen the first movie.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Venice Somerhalder

    I read this first before I watched the movie and I gotta say, I did the right thing. :)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Allison ☾

    Well this was 100% more satisfying to me than watching the movie. Padme was a much stronger character, Anakin was more inspiring, Obi Wan was more interesting and Qui Gon was more complex. The whole thing was great. The Jedi Knights were peacemakers; that was the nature of their order and the dictate of their creed. For thousands of years they had served the Republic, a constant source of stability and order in a changing universe. She was young, but it was rumored she was prodigiously talent Well this was 100% more satisfying to me than watching the movie. Padme was a much stronger character, Anakin was more inspiring, Obi Wan was more interesting and Qui Gon was more complex. The whole thing was great. The Jedi Knights were peacemakers; that was the nature of their order and the dictate of their creed. For thousands of years they had served the Republic, a constant source of stability and order in a changing universe. She was young, but it was rumored she was prodigiously talented and extremely well trained. It was said she could hold her own with anyone in a political arena. It was said she could be circumspect or bold when necessary, and was wise beyond her years. “Well, I’m afraid I can’t marry you…” Padme paused, searching her memory for his name. “Anakin,” he said. “Anakin.” She cocked her head. “You’re just a little boy.” His gaze was intense as he faced her. “I won’t always be,” he said quietly. “The Republic doesn’t exist out here,” Shmi Skywalker interrupted quickly, her voice hard. “We must survive on our own.” “Viceroy,” Darth Sidious spoke softly in the sudden silence, “this is my apprentice, Lord Maul. He will find your lost ship.” Anakin Skywalker wasn’t afraid of anything. Was he? Most times he thought he was brave enough that he would never be afraid. But in that most secret part of himself, he knew he was cheating the truth. He might not ever be afraid for himself, but he was sometimes very afraid for his mother. “You have been well trained, my young apprentice,” Darth Sidious soothed. “The Jedi will be no match for you. It is too late for them to stop us now. Everything is going as planned. The Republic will soon be in my control.”

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jenna

    About as good as its source material, which is not saying much. I found myself bored through most of this. The parts in the movie that don't really further the plot (eg pod race, space battle at the end) are at least pretty to look at on screen; that doesn't translate well to words on a page. And the changes from the film dialogue generally make it more awkward and unbelievable (Anakin's repeated announcement about his future with Padme, for example). The Darth Plagueius book did a good job of fl About as good as its source material, which is not saying much. I found myself bored through most of this. The parts in the movie that don't really further the plot (eg pod race, space battle at the end) are at least pretty to look at on screen; that doesn't translate well to words on a page. And the changes from the film dialogue generally make it more awkward and unbelievable (Anakin's repeated announcement about his future with Padme, for example). The Darth Plagueius book did a good job of fleshing out The Phantom Menace and giving us some backstory and motivations that were sorely lacking. Unfortunately, reading The Phantom Menace again is very disappointing in comparison.

  15. 4 out of 5

    C.

    This book, to me, was mostly a pointless rehash of a mediocre (at best) movie, but without the impressive special effects that made the movie worth seeing...once. I read this only because my sister claimed it would would make me like Jar-Jar, or at least empathize with him. It did not. I would rather the Jedis had to carry around a bucket of feces than have Jar-Jar tag along with them. It would have been funnier than Jar-Jar's so called catch-phrase spouting comic relief, and it would have been o This book, to me, was mostly a pointless rehash of a mediocre (at best) movie, but without the impressive special effects that made the movie worth seeing...once. I read this only because my sister claimed it would would make me like Jar-Jar, or at least empathize with him. It did not. I would rather the Jedis had to carry around a bucket of feces than have Jar-Jar tag along with them. It would have been funnier than Jar-Jar's so called catch-phrase spouting comic relief, and it would have been only slightly more incomprehensible.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Stahl

    A Heartbreak Hipster Review A long, long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away ... I was a shy, meek, slightly confused nine-year-old virgin. It was all a very long time ago ... "but only if you measure it in years". Pokémon cards were the primary source of one's superiority; sharing a bedroom with a bunch of other boys was not yet an eyebrow-raiser; the prospect of working through the holidays was little more than a sick joke; and 'Star Wars: The Phantom Menace' was the greatest movie of all time. A Heartbreak Hipster Review A long, long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away ... I was a shy, meek, slightly confused nine-year-old virgin. It was all a very long time ago ... "but only if you measure it in years". Pokémon cards were the primary source of one's superiority; sharing a bedroom with a bunch of other boys was not yet an eyebrow-raiser; the prospect of working through the holidays was little more than a sick joke; and 'Star Wars: The Phantom Menace' was the greatest movie of all time. Now - before you freak out and think I'm a fucking idiot - let me acknowledge that the film itself is quite a shameful one. While I personally wouldn't say that it's an all-round shit movie, I would admit that all three prequels are largely inferior to the original films. But putting aside its many downfalls, such as: 1) Young Annikan Skywalker being a little shitstalk. 2) Ewan McGregor leaving his acting skills on his bedside table. 3) Jar Jar Binks, and the intriguement that is Queen Amidala. 4) George Lucas's obvious reluctance to put anymore effort into the saga. I still can't help but feel a certain nostalgic fondness for this movie. I'm sorry. What it really comes down to is being an idiot, and just enjoying the movie for its sheer mindless stupidity. I was able to do it then - back in 1999 - and I can still do it now. I will always defend it in comparison to the second film. Now that one was shit. These days, there's only one thing that makes it worth watching at all ... And Natalie Portman isn't even that hot ... She's not ... hot at all ... please excuse me ... The point I'm trying to make is that I know the movie kinda sucks, but I still like it regardless. And so I take it that was my only motivation for reading this book. I remember asking my mum for it on Christmas '99 - "Would you even read it, though?" "Yeah, I'll definitely I'll read it" - and not reading it for like six years. And even though I did eventually read it, that was still a long time ago, and I honestly can't recall that much about it. But I do remember liking the book. I remember being mesmerized ... Absolutely mesmerized ... By how much deeper Terry Brooks takes his readers into the story that surrounded this flimsily written mess. While nobody liked the young kid as Annikan - and would have applauded the movie if they had Darth Maul decapitate him - I still appreciated the author's decision to explore the little bastard's lifestyle, before he stumbled upon Oskar Schindler's ne'er do well, hippie brother. For anyone who ever played that awesome computer game, which was licensed by the movie, and allows you to play through multiple characters, doing shit that never happened in the film - I can only compare this book to that. Don't go getting the wrong impression, and assume that there's much more extra material in the book, because that isn't quite true. But nevertheless, Terry Brooks did have the decency to give the world of Star Wars fans something a little better, a little more inventive and interesting, than the popcorn blockbuster made by Mr Lucas and his wallet. No disrespect to George, of course. But for anyone that wanted more from 'The Phantom Menace' ... this is probably the closest you could get. Nothing too amazing ... but with the exception of Goldeneye, novelizations can't get much better than this. More of my reviews here: https://www.goodreads.com/story/show/...

  17. 5 out of 5

    Iset

    Let us cover the skill and style of writing in question first, before we come to my quibbles over certain plot elements which were, to be fair, mostly Lucas’ fault and nothing to do with the author of this book who has only faithfully followed Lucas’ vision. Obviously any author who is writing the novelisation of a film is under pressure to produce something that is not just an exact replica word for word of the lines in the script. It is very obvious that this has been a major consideration of Let us cover the skill and style of writing in question first, before we come to my quibbles over certain plot elements which were, to be fair, mostly Lucas’ fault and nothing to do with the author of this book who has only faithfully followed Lucas’ vision. Obviously any author who is writing the novelisation of a film is under pressure to produce something that is not just an exact replica word for word of the lines in the script. It is very obvious that this has been a major consideration of Terry Brooks here, but I’m not entirely sure that’s been a good thing. Almost every line has been altered in some way, even if it’s a very subtle change, or if the words are the same, Brooks places a different tone or spin on them, and it all feels very engineered and very deliberate. Apart from the slight feel that the alteration of lines just so they won’t be exactly the same as the film is all too engineered, it’s mostly an acceptable piece of work. There are also a couple of side stories, particularly pertaining to Anakin’s life on Tatooine, that can be seen as both good additions or unnecessary distractions – on the one hand, for those wishing to know a little more on the details of Anakin’s life on Tatooine, and seeking out entirely new material that did not appear in the film, these side stories will be welcome diversions, but on the other hand, the experienced Star Wars fan will know perfectly well that they are completely unnecessary to the main story, and especially if you find young Anakin as a character rather dull, it is possible to become somewhat impatient with these sections of the book. Personally I shuttled between the two feelings, becoming bored with Anakin’s encounter with the spacer and dreams of a different life, but intrigued at Anakin’s encounter with the Tusken Raider. I have to say though, Anakin’s reactions as he flies into the space battle are truly cringeworthy. I know, I know, technically it was George that put him into that faintly ridiculous situation in the first place, but Brooks gives the boy some appalling dialogue here that do not in fact appear in the film. The solid descriptions however still produce a steady core to this novel, despite these minor hiccups. My other remaining quibbles with the book are mainly with plot points, which are really nothing to do with the author, but the finger of blame points firmly at George Lucas here. I’m referring, of course, to the whole immaculate conception nonsense and the complete farce of the midi-chlorians... but if I get into that here I'll get into the problems with the film, and such a discussion is not for here. 6 out of 10.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Madeline

    This was! So much better! Than the movie!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Amalia Dillin

    So. I don't think the blame for the awfulness of this book rests at all on Mr. Brooks' shoulders. Let's just make that clear up front. The writing itself is not bad, given what he had to work with. The STORY, Characters, and everything else is just Terrible. Reading the novelization, without the distraction of the special effects and flashy action sequences makes it that much clearer. Too often, the answer to "why would this character do this?!" or "why did totally obvious solution x not occur t So. I don't think the blame for the awfulness of this book rests at all on Mr. Brooks' shoulders. Let's just make that clear up front. The writing itself is not bad, given what he had to work with. The STORY, Characters, and everything else is just Terrible. Reading the novelization, without the distraction of the special effects and flashy action sequences makes it that much clearer. Too often, the answer to "why would this character do this?!" or "why did totally obvious solution x not occur to anyone?" is "because the story needed it to be stupid this way." It is so CONTRIVED, start to finish, that I have lost my ability to even. But. Do I dare attempt to make it through the novelization of Episode II?

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brandt

    This is a pretty solid adaptation from Terry Brooks who is most known for his Shannara novels. These sorts of adaptations can be insights as to how the eventual movie gets made. For instance, did George Lucas really intend to start The Phantom Menace off with a pod race? That's how Brooks presents it to us, and while it does work in the novel, it probably would have vilified The Phantom Menace for Star Wars fans more so than it already is. (It's honestly not that bad of a movie folks--it's no At This is a pretty solid adaptation from Terry Brooks who is most known for his Shannara novels. These sorts of adaptations can be insights as to how the eventual movie gets made. For instance, did George Lucas really intend to start The Phantom Menace off with a pod race? That's how Brooks presents it to us, and while it does work in the novel, it probably would have vilified The Phantom Menace for Star Wars fans more so than it already is. (It's honestly not that bad of a movie folks--it's no Attack of the Clones. These novelizations are still canonical Star Wars and there's extra nuggets here that rabid fans will probably want to check out (if they haven't already.)

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lizzie Twachtman

    I really enjoyed this book! It's a great edition to the Star Wars expanded universe, both new and Legends. Though I could have used less Gungans...always less Gungans! You get a lot more from Anakin than you do in the movie which helps to add to his ultimate journey to the Dark Side. His relationship with Padme seems far less creepy and more intentional. And the tension between Yoda and Qui-Gonn was really palpable in the book, while it's only sort of hinted at in the movie. All in all, I reall I really enjoyed this book! It's a great edition to the Star Wars expanded universe, both new and Legends. Though I could have used less Gungans...always less Gungans! You get a lot more from Anakin than you do in the movie which helps to add to his ultimate journey to the Dark Side. His relationship with Padme seems far less creepy and more intentional. And the tension between Yoda and Qui-Gonn was really palpable in the book, while it's only sort of hinted at in the movie. All in all, I really enjoyed this book and felt that it filled in a lot of the blanks left by the movie.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Asghar Abbas

    Wait, the Shannara guy wrote this? Commissioned by Lucas himself? I don't know why I am finding this so funny. I am currently reading The Sword of Shannara, yes Cindy I am still not done yet :) please wait for me to catch up, and whilst it is a gentle facsimile of Lord of the Rings, this novelization, to call it that is a stretch really, often fondly called the straight off screenplay, was as bland as the first movie in the prequel trilogy.

  23. 5 out of 5

    ade_reads

    I Love the book and the movie. And this book is basically the same as the film, except greatly expanded. And, of course, the book allows us to get into the heads of the characters and find out what they are thinking. The best thing about the novelization is the added scenes, the scenes cut from the film, and the background information.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jill booksandescape

    Star Wars: Episode I: The Phantom Menace by Terry Brooks is the novelization of the movie of the same name. Episode I is my favorite of the saga, and I really loved how this book brought even more scenes and dialogue into the story. I recommend that any Star Wars fan read the novelizations of the films as well.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sandra

    my boyfriend is the biggest Star Wars nerd I know, so I have to keep my shit up.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dark-Draco

    As this is written by the great Terry Brooks, you know it's going to be a little better than the average novelisation. It's been a while since I saw the film, but I really enjoyed this version of the story as there was more about what the characters were thinking and some of their motivations make a lot more sense here. Of course, on the flip side, it's impossible not to imagine the characters as their actor counterparts, but I didn't really mind that - Jar Jar is a lot less annoying here! Altho As this is written by the great Terry Brooks, you know it's going to be a little better than the average novelisation. It's been a while since I saw the film, but I really enjoyed this version of the story as there was more about what the characters were thinking and some of their motivations make a lot more sense here. Of course, on the flip side, it's impossible not to imagine the characters as their actor counterparts, but I didn't really mind that - Jar Jar is a lot less annoying here! Although is anyone else a little weirded out by the perceived age gap between Anakin and Padme? It's maybe not quite so obvious in the first film, but it was something that you can't help but pick up in the novel. It's not a mind blowing story, but it is easy to read, entertaining and filled with some great and funny moments. Looking forward to reading the next one.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa

    My verdict: The movie < This book < What another author could have done with the story. The Phantom Menace is probably my least favorite Star Wars movie. That doesn't mean there aren't things I enjoy about it (the aesthetic, some of the characters), but it's really hard to deny that there were probably more bad/mediocre things about it than good. Like lots of other people I was rather let down by it, which luckily wasn't the feeling I had after I had finished this book. Low expectations and My verdict: The movie < This book < What another author could have done with the story. The Phantom Menace is probably my least favorite Star Wars movie. That doesn't mean there aren't things I enjoy about it (the aesthetic, some of the characters), but it's really hard to deny that there were probably more bad/mediocre things about it than good. Like lots of other people I was rather let down by it, which luckily wasn't the feeling I had after I had finished this book. Low expectations and all that jazz. Spoilers for everything that happens basically. I simply assume that you've already watched the movie before you read the book. Here is the thing: The movie had potential. Hell, even the story it told wasn't really bad. It was just how it was told. The dialogue being atrocious was the biggest crime in my opinion. Luckily a book can do away with most of that or at least the reader doesn't have to watch the actors (of various talent levels) struggle through it. It also gives us a lot more about the inner workings of the characters, to make us connect with them better. So let me first mention the things I thought this book improved on: - The Qui-Gon/Anakin relationship. I'm as surprised as you probably are, but it was my favorite part of the book. The Jedi master was still all about Anakin being the next Space Jesus (you don't keep saying that to a child jfc), but I also felt like they developed a really nice surrogate father/son dynamic that I found really quite cute and engaging. I was also pretty upset that Anakin didn't get an immediate reaction to his death, because I live for that kind of drama. - I think afterwards I understood the Qui-Gon/Obi-Wan relationship also a bit better. Their inner thoughts really revealed how different these two people were, no matter how much they loved each other. Obi-Wan's jealousy towards Anakin was also a nice touch. -Anakin's specialness. It was turned up to 11 with scenes that weren't in the movie and I think they were needed. They both showed that he was a very kind child and that there was already something brewing in him (I do retain that a good therapist would have reigned that in). I would have probably hated the clubbing over the head with THIS CHILD IS SPECIAL in any other book where I didn't know where the story was going. - Apropos, I'd also say his creepiness and obsession with Padmé got played up, which was good foreshadowing (the "angel" thing still makes me cringe, though). It's kind of cute when a little boy tells you he's going to marry you one day, but when he still acts that way several years later, the alarm bells should ring (... unless you fall in love with him I guess). Speaking of: Not mentioning Padmé here, because I always thought she was great in this movie and the book really didn't try to change that. You go, girl! Things that didn't work in the movie, so it's not the book's fault: - The Jedi Order being dicks and kind of not making sense. You all sense the anger in Anakin? According to all sources, he's an otherwise kind child, so maybe don't tell him he's a lost cause who would never become a good Jedi ever and give him the right counselling and there won't be a problem. Also anger is not the Jedi way? How is that healthy? What do you DO with your anger? It's a natural thing. Might I also point towards Obi-Wan being super furious after Qui-Gon's death? Is he dangerous now, too? None of you should ever raise children. (I'll probably have more to say about that after reading the other books, because Yoda's most stellar advice is still in our future). - Anakin's life as a slave probably wasn't the best and not being free is never a good thing, but it all seemed so... vanilla? The book actually really tried to make it more awful with tracking devices that will explode when a slave tries to flee, but he still came home every night to a warm house, a meal, his own room and a mother who loved him. He had friends, he loved pod-racing and he had apparently enough time off to work on a droid. Don't get me wrong, I'd never wish his life on a child, but one kind of imagines Darth Vader's past to be more... traumatizing? - C3PO and R2D2 being in this in major roles. One of them I could have taken, but both? And they actually became Anakin's friends? "Coincidences" like this make the universe seem terribly small. - Jar Jar Bings being the worst character. I dare say he worked a bit better than in the movie (probably cause no wonky CGI), but reading his dialogue gave me a headache. Okay and now we're down to what I didn't like about the book specifically: The writing style. It wasn't terrible or anything, but it was also not good enough to make the book stand on its own. I don't think someone who hasn't seen a Star Wars movie would be able to finish this book. The vocabulary was pretty limited and the foreshadowing was clunky (This would have been the perfect opportunity to make Palpatine seem like a genuine good guy, but somehow he was even shadier here than he was in the movie.). There was also quite a few of minor stuff like Padmé being mentioned by name ("..." said Padmé.) before she got even introduced to anyone and I'm pretty sure some small details later in the story didn't ad up with stuff that got mentioned earlier. I also have to admit that I kind of skipped over both pod-races in this books, cause I'll never find them not dull. All in all I'm pretty satisfied, but also forever sad that no one has managed to wring all the potential this story had/has out of it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nicis

    So, 2 things in general: 1. I love Shmi Skywalker and I hope they give her a book, a comic, ANYTHING, because shes the real origin of everything in this drama family and we don't know enough about her. 2. I liked the extra Anakin scenes, they paint a better picture of the child he was (the scene with the old lady in the market is beautiful) but he's also 1000% more creepy in his Padmé obsession, like, he's really not OK and raised a lot of red flags in mind when he's only like 10 years old. To AotC So, 2 things in general: 1. I love Shmi Skywalker and I hope they give her a book, a comic, ANYTHING, because she´s the real origin of everything in this drama family and we don't know enough about her. 2. I liked the extra Anakin scenes, they paint a better picture of the child he was (the scene with the old lady in the market is beautiful) but he's also 1000% more creepy in his Padmé obsession, like, he's really not OK and raised a lot of red flags in mind when he's only like 10 years old. To AotC now! (Pd. Este es el primer libro que termino como en 4-5 meses y se siente tan bien????)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Madi Hamilton

    Although these books were all written after the movies were released, it makes for a less exciting read because I know everything that’s going to happen. The Phantom Menace is also my least favorite of the prequels, but I did enjoy the added insights the book provided and learning more about the story.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dasha Burgandy

    I am glad that I decided to read this book. Because those movies were NOT good. It has given me a new perspective with this Star Wars trilogy.

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