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The Scions of Shannara PDF, ePub eBook

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The Scions of Shannara

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The Scions of Shannara PDF, ePub eBook Since the death of Allanon, life in the Four Lands has drastially changed. Yet Par Ohmsford still has some power of the Wishsong. And when a message from the ancient Druid, Allanon, reaches them, Par is ordered to recover the long-lost Sword of Shannara, and the glory that once was the Four Lands....

30 review for The Scions of Shannara

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    I need a way to rate the book and then a way to separately rate the edition I got. I have the audio I got from OverDrive and the gain is so low that with the recording turned up all the way, my speakers turned up all the way and going into my computers audio controls and jacking them up all the way I could barely hear it. Recording value -1 star. The book is a return to the world of the original Shannara trilogy though much later. magic is outlawed and practically gone (funny how often that seems I need a way to rate the book and then a way to separately rate the edition I got. I have the audio I got from OverDrive and the gain is so low that with the recording turned up all the way, my speakers turned up all the way and going into my computers audio controls and jacking them up all the way I could barely hear it. Recording value -1 star. The book is a return to the world of the original Shannara trilogy though much later. magic is outlawed and practically gone (funny how often that seems to happen in "fantasy worlds") Our hero(es) are tasked with saving the world, by bringing magic back, by finding the Sword of Shannara. (Hey just because that's how this whole series started don't knock it. When you get a good plot idea [or find a good plot idea] like "recovering a magic sword" use it as often as possible....right?) Anyway, did you get that? It's sort of a multilevel quest. They have to bring back magic to save the world, but they have to find the Sword of Shannara to bring back magic. Well, to find the truth about magic and saving the world. Now if you find that a bit convoluted, "shame on you how dare you criticize a classic work of fantasy"? At least that's the reaction I tend to get when i express opinions like that. Go figure. And by the way...someone's pretty ungrateful as there was already a quest to find the Sword of Shannara and when it was found someone obviously didn't take care of it, AND it seems they've lost the Elf Stones to!!!! We just can't have nice things.... Not a bad book. If you get the audio I got, good luck on actually being able to hear it however. *Just had to correct a word.

  2. 5 out of 5

    maricar

    my first terry brooks novel, and purely by chance. since then, i was hooked. don't care if people say that brooks was a hack compared to tolkien. i like both authors--they have their own writing styles, and both are very good in their art. what is great about brooks and his shannara series is that every chapter is riveting. there were times when i really couldn't put the book down--i just wanted to gobble up every scene, every confrontation, every revelation. besides having fantastical character my first terry brooks novel, and purely by chance. since then, i was hooked. don't care if people say that brooks was a hack compared to tolkien. i like both authors--they have their own writing styles, and both are very good in their art. what is great about brooks and his shannara series is that every chapter is riveting. there were times when i really couldn't put the book down--i just wanted to gobble up every scene, every confrontation, every revelation. besides having fantastical characters, there's also humor, romance, and even serious emotional turmoil. plus, the way brooks describes his characters and the world around them is so textured and rich: one can feel the beat of the sun on the characters' faces, the merciless twists and turns of the forests that they traverse, the pounding adrenalin as they are pursued, even the despair and exhilaration that overcomes them at salient points of their journeys. surely only something a master storyteller could execute. i'll always be grateful that i discovered the shannara series thru the Scions--(well, after this novel, it was just romance between me and its other installments... ^_^ )

  3. 5 out of 5

    MC

    For The Sword of Shannara Trilogy, author Terry Brooks wrote three separate, but loosely-connected tales. In The Heritage of Shannara, he tells one large, epic tale over the space of four books. It was quite a departure from the pattern of the previous stories, and, if the first book is any indication, this seems to have worked quite well for Brooks. As the first book, The Scions of Shannara, opens, the world is a radically different place from the world that Brin and Jair Ohmsford inhabited at t For The Sword of Shannara Trilogy, author Terry Brooks wrote three separate, but loosely-connected tales. In The Heritage of Shannara, he tells one large, epic tale over the space of four books. It was quite a departure from the pattern of the previous stories, and, if the first book is any indication, this seems to have worked quite well for Brooks. As the first book, The Scions of Shannara, opens, the world is a radically different place from the world that Brin and Jair Ohmsford inhabited at the end of The Wishsong of Shannara. The Federation, which was once misguided, but still democratic, has become a repressive state that has completely taken over the Southlands through conquest, and has enslaved the Dwarfs, and seem to be intent on driving them to extinction. Magic is outlawed, the elves have disappeared, and a new breed of evil, called the Shadowen, has arisen. Their very presence is causing the Four Lands to sicken and die. Amidst this situation, the shade of the Druid Allanon enlists the help of former Druid Cogline to persuade the heirs of the Elven House of Shannara to come to the Hadeshorn, where his spirit rests, and hear his requests to them. He has tried to contact these folks before, in their dreams, and they will not respond. Par Ohmsford is afraid, Wren Ohmsford is ambivalent, and Walker Boh (an Ohmsford who took the name of one of his forebears) is outright hostile. All of them, even Par who is the most idealistic about the Druids, share a suspicion of Allanon due to his manipulations of their ancestors centuries ago during the Druid's lifetime. After much persuasion from Cogline, they eventually go to the Hadeshorn to hear Allanon's spirit talk to them. The shade shows them a horrific future in which the Shadowen rule the lands and the people are mindless cattle to be fed upon and tortured for the amusement of these demonic creatures. He then gives them their tasks – ones that seem impossible to fulfill. But if they don't accomplish these tasks, the land will be plunged into darkness forever. Terry Brooks really improved his skills as an author in the time between the publication of The Sword of Shannara and Scions. The plotting is tighter, the characterization is actually somewhat in-depth and not the somewhat shallow portrayal of the first book. I love Sword, but I have to be fair on pointing out the problems from which it suffered. Of course, the romantic subplots are still rather sloppily done, with the one in the current book only working because of the length of the time they two characters are mentioned as near each other being longer. Brooks isn't good at writing romances. His attempts could be listed under tvtropes.com's “Strangled by the Red String” index, in which characters are just paired off together with no believable build-up. For me the best part of Scions was that the characters were more believable. They didn't take up the mission with no qualms, but struggled with it. They have fears, doubts, and uncertainties. In short, they were characters that one can relate to. I appreciated this aspect. That is not to say that Scions was perfect. To be sure, it had it's problems. Mainly insomuch as that the story dragged in parts. And the explanation about how the Shadowen developed was understandable, but a bit sloppily explained. It's something that you have to think through to get, and have to depend on your knowledge gained from having read the previous trilogy, because it certainly isn't put all that clearly here. This was a terrific effort by Brooks, and I am already eagerly beginning the second book of the Heritage story, The Druid of Shannara.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mitali

    I first read this book about 3-4 years ago, but it was apparently so forgettable that I couldn't remember a thing about it apart from the very bare bones of the plot. Even when I started skimming through it to remind myself of more details (so that I could read its sequels), I had almost no memory of most of the scenes or even important characters, so I finally decided to reread the whole damn thing. Perhaps it's an exercise in masochism to reread something that my mind didn't think was worth ho I first read this book about 3-4 years ago, but it was apparently so forgettable that I couldn't remember a thing about it apart from the very bare bones of the plot. Even when I started skimming through it to remind myself of more details (so that I could read its sequels), I had almost no memory of most of the scenes or even important characters, so I finally decided to reread the whole damn thing. Perhaps it's an exercise in masochism to reread something that my mind didn't think was worth holding on to for barely a few years - yet at the end of it, I was mildly surprised to find that the book is quite engaging. Sure, it's derivative and filled with every fantasy cliché in the book. Sure, the prose is often hilariously awful. Yet, somehow, it's not a bad book on the whole, and can often be interesting. The basic story - though a fairly straightforward fantasy quest - is decent enough. Three of the Shannara descendants - Par Ohmsford, Walker Boh and Wren Ohmsford - are summoned by the shade of the Druid Allanon to carry out certain tasks. This table setting takes up half the book, since the stories of each of these three are spread out over the sequels. A little condensation would have helped the pacing considerably, especially the later parts of this book, which mostly follows Par's quest to retrieve the long-lost sword of Shannara. The number of scenes in which Par and his brother Coll hide out in dark sheds while waiting for an opportunity to go after the sword are extremely numerous and extremely boring, especially Par's indecision and second guessing over everything he does. The few scenes of action that punctuate these hideout scenes are pretty good, though. One thing I detest thoroughly is Brooks's tendency to constantly refer to characters by their geographical origin/race/occupation/etc. It's one thing when others in the rag-tag bunch of misfits, who may not know Par and Coll very well, refer to them both as 'Valemen'. But when the author himself keeps doing it constantly - even in scenes where no other characters are present - it gets extremely irritating. Ditto with his tendency to refer to Morgan as 'The Highlander' or Walker Boh as 'Dark Uncle' and so on. Speaking of Walker Boh - after rereading 'Scions of Shannara', I realized why I had quit the sequel 'Druid of Shannara' halfway: because of how extremely annoying Boh is (he's the main character in the latter). His angst is too ridiculous for words, especially because the 'dark past' he is supposed to have seems to amount to nothing more than 'They don't like me because I'm DIFFERENT!' Most of the time, he seems like a whiny teenager rather than an adult haunted by a grim past. A little more fleshing out of his background would have done wonders for the character. It might also have explained how he is directly descended from Brin Ohmsford (of Wishsong of Shannara fame), while Par and Coll are not, even though he's their uncle by blood. I could nitpick this book to death, but I'll stop now, because the bottomline is that despite the many flaws in this book, it remains mostly entertaining and a good ‘airplane read' (or in my case, a 'train read' for my daily commute). It's the kind of book in which if you think too hard about anything, it all falls apart. But if you let yourself get lost in the story, it can be quite enjoyable - so much so, that I feel motivated enough to read the second book again, Walker Boh be damned!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Roman Kurys

    So while I though the first Trilogy good, this has been GREAT! A fantastic ride through a good adventure courtesy of Terry Brooks. I really love how he continually brings up events from the last 3 books in a non invasive manner that flows well with the story and also at the same time serves as a reminder of the times in the past. This has made it much easier to get immersed in the story and plenty of times I found hours slip by unnoticed and had to make myself stop reading to go on about my day. So while I though the first Trilogy good, this has been GREAT! A fantastic ride through a good adventure courtesy of Terry Brooks. I really love how he continually brings up events from the last 3 books in a non invasive manner that flows well with the story and also at the same time serves as a reminder of the times in the past. This has made it much easier to get immersed in the story and plenty of times I found hours slip by unnoticed and had to make myself stop reading to go on about my day. This books continues in the manner that made the previous trilogy great. If you're looking for deep political intrigues of Dune or lots of backstabbing ways of the Song of Fire and Ice, this series is not it. However, if you're looking for a good adventure with plenty of unexpected turns in plot and just pure raw Essence of an adventure, this right here, is worth the time. I learned to appreciate Brooks' ability to entwined descriptions, thoughts of characters and dialogue into a seemless story telling that is very immersive and at the same time does t require a dictionary every 5 pages. If you like fantasy genre, this is definitely a great read, and I'll definitely be reading the next part in my future reading adventures ;) Roman "Ragnar"

  6. 4 out of 5

    Shannan

    I've been a fan of the various Shannara series' for a number of years but the Heritage series is probably my favourite. The brotherly bond with struggle and love is so well written that I really relate to Par and Coll. This is, in some ways, your standard sort of "epic fantasy" with elves, dwarves, humans, etc. but the personal stories carry it so much further than just any "standard" fantasy. I've read this series before, and I'll read it again! Love it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Anita

    Dull and unimaginative. Gave up after about 70 pages when I lost the will to read any more.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dark-Draco

    This is the first book in the second series of Shannara books. 300 years have passed since Brin destroyed the Ildatch, but the Four Lands are in turmoil. The Federation have begun to take over, enslaving the dwarves, fighting the trolls and banning magic. The elves have disappeared and dark Shadowen take over the bodies of the people they destroy. The shade of Allanon sends dreams to the three Ohmsford chidlren. Par has the power of the wishsong and is ordered to seek out the legendary Sword of This is the first book in the second series of Shannara books. 300 years have passed since Brin destroyed the Ildatch, but the Four Lands are in turmoil. The Federation have begun to take over, enslaving the dwarves, fighting the trolls and banning magic. The elves have disappeared and dark Shadowen take over the bodies of the people they destroy. The shade of Allanon sends dreams to the three Ohmsford chidlren. Par has the power of the wishsong and is ordered to seek out the legendary Sword of Shannars. Walker Boh has to restore Paranor and the Druids, while Wren Ohmsford has to bring back the Elves. Each is reluctant to do so, but each is drawn to their quest. The main story follows Par, although occassionally shoots off to the other stories. Par and his brother, plus Morgan Leah, meet up with the outlaw, Padishar Creel, who thinks he knows where the Sword is hidden. But when they attempt to take it, they discover that the Federation has been hiding something nasty. And Par has to face the worst kind off truth. Another fantastic book in the series. Action-packed, fast-paced, you just keep on reading from cover to cover...and want to reach for the next without taking a breath. Some of the themes have been done to death in the previous books and the identity of the traitor in their midst is a bit obvious, but you can overlook the minor faults in the rest of the brilliance! Definitely one of my favourite fantasy epics.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    This book was good, although I did not care for it as much as I cared for any of the three installments of the first Shannara series. This novel was clearly meant to be read with with other two books in the series, and was notably less of a standalone novel than any of the earlier books. It was, however, a great first part. The plot was slow to build, but did so steadily. The resolution was swift. Yet, even in resolution it had the distinct feel of a ledge, not the end of the story. Definite cli This book was good, although I did not care for it as much as I cared for any of the three installments of the first Shannara series. This novel was clearly meant to be read with with other two books in the series, and was notably less of a standalone novel than any of the earlier books. It was, however, a great first part. The plot was slow to build, but did so steadily. The resolution was swift. Yet, even in resolution it had the distinct feel of a ledge, not the end of the story. Definite cliffhangers for and ending. Looking forward to the next installment.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rick

    Following the typical fantasy formula a group of friends and strangers pull together to complete a campaign, but once the initial goal is reached a trinity of campaigns is introduced that divides what was a typical, singular campaign party. Once the divisions were established I had a bit of trouble following the new story line as it unfurled in three subplots. However, after about 100 pages I began to see just how well the author as bringing everything together and I began to really enjoy the ba Following the typical fantasy formula a group of friends and strangers pull together to complete a campaign, but once the initial goal is reached a trinity of campaigns is introduced that divides what was a typical, singular campaign party. Once the divisions were established I had a bit of trouble following the new story line as it unfurled in three subplots. However, after about 100 pages I began to see just how well the author as bringing everything together and I began to really enjoy the back and forth between the divergent stories. One thing I loved, and I hope this isn't giving to much away, is the introduction of the character Mole. Mole, to my imagination, seems like a character out of Narnia or even out of Alice's Wonderland. I only wish the book spent a little more time exploring Mole's character. All in all Scions is a return to the great writing of the books that would have been considered preludes to The Sword of Shannara. A solid story with multiple good stories contained therein.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Squire

    #14/29 in my Epic Shannara Quest. Three-hundred years after his death, the druid Allanon is at it again, calling upon the descendants of the Elven house of Shannara to stamp out evil threatening the Four Lands. This time he has three of them to contend with, each with their own personalities and egos. ?"...There is a history that needs repeating. There are adventures to be shared and battles to be won. This is what Fate has decreed for you and me!" This is the problem with the beginning of this new #14/29 in my Epic Shannara Quest. Three-hundred years after his death, the druid Allanon is at it again, calling upon the descendants of the Elven house of Shannara to stamp out evil threatening the Four Lands. This time he has three of them to contend with, each with their own personalities and egos. ?"...There is a history that needs repeating. There are adventures to be shared and battles to be won. This is what Fate has decreed for you and me!" This is the problem with the beginning of this new series. Brooks is repeating himself, conveniently giving himself a main protagonist who is a bard of sorts and keeps his family's heritage alive by telling stories of the events of the original Shannara trilogy, amplified by the wishsong (he is constantly recalling information from his stories for the benefit of newcomers to the world of Shannara). The reader also crosses paths with Padishar Creel, the great, great. great--ad naseum--grandson of Pannamon Creel from The Sword of Shannara. But repetition aside, Brooks' story here is strong and once he gets to the city of Tyrsis, and we get to see how the city has changed over the last 400 years, The Scions of Shannara becomes it's own creature. Full of colorful characters and sequences that are wonderfully imaginative and exciting, Brooks is also showing his development as a writer--he is starting to employ an economy of language that gives his story a momentum not found in his previous Shannara works (to this point, only the original trilogy, which were pretty dense linguistically). Overall, a fine, entertaining read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jeffery Moulton

    I am a longtime Terry Brooks fan but have primarily focused on his Magic Kingdom and Word and the Void stories. So I haven't yet completed all of the Shannara books and decided it was time to do so. This book is the first I've read since Wishsong. Wishsong wasn't my favorite Brooks book, so I wasn't sure how much I would like this one. I am happy to report that I really enjoyed this story and the characters. It was interesting to see what Brooks had done with the world and the battle sequences w I am a longtime Terry Brooks fan but have primarily focused on his Magic Kingdom and Word and the Void stories. So I haven't yet completed all of the Shannara books and decided it was time to do so. This book is the first I've read since Wishsong. Wishsong wasn't my favorite Brooks book, so I wasn't sure how much I would like this one. I am happy to report that I really enjoyed this story and the characters. It was interesting to see what Brooks had done with the world and the battle sequences were top notch. It felt a little forced in a few places--where characters were sent to locations or into events more because it served the plot than through any organic need, but these problems were minor and, as a whole, the book was superior to both Sword and Wishsong. I recommend it to any Brooks or epic fantasy fan. I am excited to find out what happens next.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Martti

    The whole of this book annoyed me, because in a sense this is just an introduction to the next book. An annoyingly long introduction. It was kind of a same emotion when reading Harry Potter books, where you discover that the first four-five books have been just a wait for the Real Plot to surface. I think I would have been fine just to read the couple of last chapters and be done with it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    T.A.

    I don't remember how many times I've read this book, it's quite a few, but the last time was probably over 10 years ago. Picking it up and reading it again was like meeting up with a friend I've not seen in years but we talk as it it was last week. All the classic parts of a great fantasy novel and a great read, I'll be reading book two later today.

  15. 5 out of 5

    John Taylor

    This is the book that started it all for me, the one that got me reading, that got me into fantasy, and introduced me to a lifelong fansession with Terry Brooks. And although I've read and enjoy Sword of Shannara more, this was the one that started it all for me. If Mr. Brooks ever happens upon this review, thank you for a life made more fantastic through your stories.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jason Carpenter

    This was an awesome story, written as well as any other Terry Brooks book I've read. The characters are deep and interesting and the battle between good and evil is shown to be much more complex than just the good guys versus the bad guys. I highly recommend this book to anyone who appreciates a well-written, rich, and complex fantasy.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ian McGaffey

    This was good story, but it got off to a slow start. As the first book in the trilogy it makes sense that it wasn't all resolved, so I'm interested in finishing the trilogy to find out how the characters finish their quests.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ariel Paiement

    Exciting and enthralling. It kept me turning pages the entire time. The first two chapters were a little slow, but the rest of it was good. I would highly recommend this book to others!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Branwen *of House Targaryen*

    This is the first book in the 'Heritage' series of Shannara and I absolutely LOVED it! This series just keeps getting better and better!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bookworm Smith

    Terry Brooks books are just so good! They are fast paced when they need to be - it's nice to have a lot of action! But, they also weave a deep story with lots of detail...which makes the 400+ pages just fly by. This story continues building on the original Sword of Shannara series - bringing back the sword, the elfstones, the wishsong - the story is a similar adventure/quest to find the magical item and defeat the evil/magical demons. Which means lots of worldbuilding and magical action scenes. T Terry Brooks books are just so good! They are fast paced when they need to be - it's nice to have a lot of action! But, they also weave a deep story with lots of detail...which makes the 400+ pages just fly by. This story continues building on the original Sword of Shannara series - bringing back the sword, the elfstones, the wishsong - the story is a similar adventure/quest to find the magical item and defeat the evil/magical demons. Which means lots of worldbuilding and magical action scenes. The only thing I find slightly offputting about these books is that the main characters tend to whine about their magic more than they need to. Come on guys you have a magical powers - what could be cooler than that!? Another great perk of this book is that I got it at a used store with the entire series for about $4 for all!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Cheri

    The "ten generations" concept is interesting, removed enough to be a new story, and yet... it's not, really. It's still Allanon's half-told stories, the Ohmsford's reluctant forays into hero-hood, and evil things' efforts to thwart it all and let darkness taint the land. In a word, classic fantasy. Nothing surprising, just good old fantasy. Like well-worn jeans. The writing continues to improve, which is nice. Brooks's irritating initial quirks have ironed themselves out. Enjoyable commute distr The "ten generations" concept is interesting, removed enough to be a new story, and yet... it's not, really. It's still Allanon's half-told stories, the Ohmsford's reluctant forays into hero-hood, and evil things' efforts to thwart it all and let darkness taint the land. In a word, classic fantasy. Nothing surprising, just good old fantasy. Like well-worn jeans. The writing continues to improve, which is nice. Brooks's irritating initial quirks have ironed themselves out. Enjoyable commute distraction!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Connie Fogg-Bouchard

    chasing shades Par and Coll seek freedom from a place where real magic is a legend and illegal. what they get is the reawakening of the Lunsford magic, affecting all of the children of Shannara. excellent follow-up series to the Sword of Shannara

  23. 4 out of 5

    NathanDoussot

    "The Scions of Shannara" is one of many books set in The Four Lands, which is populated by humans, elves, dwarves, trolls and other peoples. We mainly view this story from the viewpoint of 2 brothers, Par and Coll Omhsford. They journey through an oppressed land, where magic is outlawed and many non-humans are subjected under a totalitarian rule, all the while beings called shades propagate and seek to take over the land. They set out on a search for the Sword of Shannara, which has been lost fo "The Scions of Shannara" is one of many books set in The Four Lands, which is populated by humans, elves, dwarves, trolls and other peoples. We mainly view this story from the viewpoint of 2 brothers, Par and Coll Omhsford. They journey through an oppressed land, where magic is outlawed and many non-humans are subjected under a totalitarian rule, all the while beings called shades propagate and seek to take over the land. They set out on a search for the Sword of Shannara, which has been lost for generations, to prevent all life from being destroyed. In my opinion, this book was not that great. It has a Tolkien-esque world like a lot of other fantasy and I don't feel it distinguishes itself from the majority of the genre. The dialogue was awkward at times and I never really felt invested in the characters. At some points it really felt like a slog reading this. This is why I am giving it 2/5 stars.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Goldilocks275

    This is a generic fantasy story. Expect dwarves, monsters, magic and a whole lot of walking. Points deducted for the repetitive scenes involving walking, fighting, sneaking and pretty much everything else. Points in favor of the well-constructed ending and multiple cliff-hangers.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Fredrick Danysh

    The Four Lands are in danger of being destroyed by evil as magic is ignored and forgotten. The Ohmsford and Boh descendants who possess any magic are summoned by the ghost of the Druid Allanon. They will face many dangers including the Shadowmen as they approach the meeting.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    This is the point at which Shannara series goes from amateurish Tolkien fanfic to actually readable, imho. (Although when I was 9 I loved them all.)

  27. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

    After finishing the original Shannara trilogy, my husband insisted we continue our journey into the world by starting this quartet. It's his favorite. It's definitely a different world you step into with this one. Taking place 300 years after The Wishsong of Shannara, we find a land that's owned by the big, bad "Federation," a place where the elves have disappeared, the dwarves are systematically oppressed and magic is forbidden. The stories from the previous trilogy are now myth and legend. Wha After finishing the original Shannara trilogy, my husband insisted we continue our journey into the world by starting this quartet. It's his favorite. It's definitely a different world you step into with this one. Taking place 300 years after The Wishsong of Shannara, we find a land that's owned by the big, bad "Federation," a place where the elves have disappeared, the dwarves are systematically oppressed and magic is forbidden. The stories from the previous trilogy are now myth and legend. What hasn't changed however, is the Ohmsford family's calling to save the world. I enjoyed this book, and I definitely found myself connecting to the characters. (Especially when things start to happen towards the end. Oh the feels!) I still maintain that The Elfstones of Shannara is my favorite. (There's just something I really liked about Will and Amberle and the story) but this was much better than Wishsong and I'm definitely looking forward to finding out more about Par, Walker Boh, Wren and the crew.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Octavia Cade

    "It was ok" really does sum this up for me. I've read a number of the Shannara books, and some of them work for me more than others. The ones I like better tend to have more women in them for a start - Wren and Teel are only bit players here, and the beginning relationship between Damson and Par (who I cannot, cannot help but think of as Plum and Golf Boy, the names in this series are truly terrible) is something I find deeply unconvincing. Mostly, though, it's the length (too long for what it is "It was ok" really does sum this up for me. I've read a number of the Shannara books, and some of them work for me more than others. The ones I like better tend to have more women in them for a start - Wren and Teel are only bit players here, and the beginning relationship between Damson and Par (who I cannot, cannot help but think of as Plum and Golf Boy, the names in this series are truly terrible) is something I find deeply unconvincing. Mostly, though, it's the length (too long for what it is I think, but my tolerance for bloat in SFF becomes ever shorter) and, above all, the characters. Rather, the characterisation. The Shannara books I warm to least have a very "been there, done that" feel about them and this one's no different. I feel like I've read all these characters before, in other Shannara novels. The descendants are exactly the same as the ancestors; it all feels very cut and paste to me. Oh, look, it's Shea and Flick wandering through the woods with Menion Leah again. Wait, one of them has duck feet. The differentiation! That said, I do find the Shadowen creepy so it gets extra points for that. And for the one stab of real emotion I felt when reading that the Meade Gardens had been destroyed. The Federation needs to die in a fire for that alone...

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nitesh

    I really love this book. i don't have any idea of 2nd book; it's not related to par ohmsford. Even though it's not related to par ohmsford i'm gonna read it. i'm in a suspense right now , how coll is in the cell, and what will happen to walker boh!, is he alive or not. at last i loved this book, this was my first genre.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Max

    Great start of the Heritage of Shannara series. You could start your Shannara adventure with this one, but it has quite some references to the earlier works. I found it very enjoyable, even though it's a standard Terry Brooks story.

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