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White Rose PDF, ePub eBook A gorgeous and timely novel based on the incredible story of Sophie Scholl, a young German college student who challenged the Nazi regime during World War II as part of The White Rose, a non-violent resistance group. Disillusioned by the propaganda of Nazi Germany, Sophie Scholl, her brother, and his fellow soldiers formed the White Rose, a group that wrote and distributed A gorgeous and timely novel based on the incredible story of Sophie Scholl, a young German college student who challenged the Nazi regime during World War II as part of The White Rose, a non-violent resistance group. Disillusioned by the propaganda of Nazi Germany, Sophie Scholl, her brother, and his fellow soldiers formed the White Rose, a group that wrote and distributed anonymous letters criticizing the Nazi regime and calling for action from their fellow German citizens. The following year, Sophie and her brother were arrested for treason and interrogated for information about their collaborators.

30 review for White Rose

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea (chelseadolling reads)

    This was pretty average for me. I thought that combining two things I don't read a lot of (historical fiction and books written in verse) would be a really exciting way to approach the story, but I ultimately just ended up feeling like I didn't get enough time in the story or with the characters to appreciate everything that happened.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mackenzi

    Gorgeous. Blurb to come.

  3. 5 out of 5

    JenacideByBibliophile

    Disclaimer: This book was sent to me by the publisher, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, via Edelweiss+ for an honest review. RESPONSE Fritz tells me Officer’s mail Isn’t Censored, That I should Feel free To say What I like, Which is good Because I have Plenty To say. If you want to know what true beauty, conviction, bravery and strength looks like….read this book. White Rose is the rebellion story that begs to be witnessed. White Rose is the story of how a young German student, Sophie Scholl, became part of an an Disclaimer: This book was sent to me by the publisher, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, via Edelweiss+ for an honest review. RESPONSE Fritz tells me Officer’s mail Isn’t Censored, That I should Feel free To say What I like, Which is good Because I have Plenty To say. If you want to know what true beauty, conviction, bravery and strength looks like….read this book. White Rose is the rebellion story that begs to be witnessed. White Rose is the story of how a young German student, Sophie Scholl, became part of an anti-Nazi resistance group that was formed by her brother Hans, Willi Graf and Christoph Probst. Having grown up as members of Hitler Youth and experiencing the brutality of war, the boys craved a Germany that followed rules of justice rather than one of genocide. And so, the White Rose was formed in June of 1942 and was made up of many University of Munich students who protested the mass murders of Adolf Hitler and the Nazi regime. Though the group only lasted until 1943, hundreds of copies of six political resistance leaflets were drafted and distributed across Germany, in the hopes of inspiring German citizens and students to revolt against oppression. AFTERMATH We soon learn there’s been An enormous wave Of arrests throughout Germany Of hundreds of teenagers Including Hans, on his military base All of them accused Of getting together In youth groups other than The Hitlerjugend Singing banned songs Reading banned books Things we do Because Ideas Cannot Be Banned. The group drafted six leaflets in total and distributed hundreds across Germany until the capture of its members. Due to the lack of paper and stamps that were available, the mailing of leaflets to different members of the White Rose was incredibly dangerous. The number of stamps and envelopes purchased by one person was tightly monitored by the Gestapo, and any suspicion of anti-Nazi propaganda was swiftly dealt with by arrest and biased trials at the People’s Court of Berlin, which usually ended in death by guillotine or imprisonment. 1940 … Fritz doesn’t understand Why this defiance matters So much to me, Won’t acknowledge That our strongest weapon Is our refusal To follow blindly. Vati says nothing But his smile My father’s approval When I stand up For what’s right Means the world. The beautiful and daunting telling of the White Rose group is so much more than I imagined it would be. When I requested this title from Edelwiess, I wasn’t even aware that it was a story told in poetry! But after reading it, I can’t imagine it being told in any other way. These poems give these brave young adults a HUGE voice. Their conviction and feelings are screaming through to the reader on every stanza, every page. The members of this group quickly become a friend you could have known from school, a neighbor, a sibling. They are familiarized to you by their thoughts, and brought in close by their actions and movements. Kip Wilson has woven their story, and their actual letters to one another, into this riveting and gut-pummeling piece of artwork. By the end of the book I was fueled with an anger for what happened to these people, but also left in awe for how brave and fiercely they stood up for their beliefs of a better Germany. SELFLESSNESS Letter to Fritz: June 1940 Dear Fritz, People shouldn’t be Ambivalent About the world around Them simply because Everyone else Is ambivalent. People who Refuse To open their eyes Are more than ambivalent- They are guilty. How can we expect Justice In this world If we’re not prepared to Sacrifice ourselves For what’s right? My only complaint is that I wanted more time with this book…and more time for these beautiful people who took a stand when so few others in their country would. It is a frightening thought, to stand up against a power and force so strong as the Nazi regime. But it is a truly beautiful notion, to think that these young adults made up their own minds on what they thought was right, and then acted on it until their deaths. Books like this, that tell the true story of people like Sophie and Hans Scholl, Kurt Huber, Alexander Schmorell, Willi Graf and Christoph Prost, who stood up against tyranny with their lives, is what makes me incredibly happy to be human. A REALIZATION … Our deaths Will mean Something. The world will react, And someday Someone Will punish The people Who are doing These terrible things. The ribbon widens, Flooding My mind With a river of hope.

  4. 5 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    The White Rose was a German non-violent student resistance group that protested against the Nazi regime for a few years in the 1940s. The group mainly conducted an anonymous leaflet and graffiti campaign. https://hitraveltales.com/munich-soph... There are now many books about the group, many of which focus on Sophie Scholl, the younger sister of Hans, and his University of Munich Professor Kurt Huber, all of whom were executed for treason in resisting and defaming the Nazi state. I'm reading it wi The White Rose was a German non-violent student resistance group that protested against the Nazi regime for a few years in the 1940s. The group mainly conducted an anonymous leaflet and graffiti campaign. https://hitraveltales.com/munich-soph... There are now many books about the group, many of which focus on Sophie Scholl, the younger sister of Hans, and his University of Munich Professor Kurt Huber, all of whom were executed for treason in resisting and defaming the Nazi state. I'm reading it with my middle school daughter who was recently on the crew of a play about The White Rose. We also read Antigone, a related text, and will read two other more informational non-fiction texts. Kip Wilson’s book, probably most appropriate for middle school readers, is a great place to start in learning about the group and exploring the roots of student activism, as it is a verse novel, alternating between the thirties and the time of their interrogation and trial in the forties. We learn a bit about her activist father who was also jailed for a time, and others who take part in the struggles. Some of the best moments focus on letters between Sophie and her boyfriend Fritz, fighting on the Russian front: Letter to Fritz: June 1940 Dear Fritz, People shouldn’t be Ambivalent About the world around Them simply because Everyone else Is ambivalent. People who Refuse To open their eyes Are more than ambivalent- They are guilty. How can we expect Justice In this world If we’re not prepared to Sacrifice ourselves For what’s right? Hans and Sophie Scholl were executed on February 22, 1943. Professor Huber was executed on July 13, 1943. From the perspective of a narrative arc we already have a good idea they will be killed, so this is a challenge in the story. Sophie comes from an activist family, her brother is an activist, and Sophie is one from the very beginning. There’s no real moral "struggle" or character development in the story, as she sees the wrong and she fights bravely against it. But it’s still inspirational and accessible and tells a really important and well-written story of German student resistance, something that isn’t commonly highlighted in historical accounts of WWII. Her hope, as she faced death, was that: The world will react, And someday Someone Will punish The people Who are doing These terrible things. Unfortunately, the horrible fact of the killing of several members of the group actually had a chilling effect on German resistance, but maybe now, as some of us, and young people in particular, face fascism and injustice anywhere, we and they can take Wilson’s story of Sophie as inspiration. Wilson quotes Thomas Mann, who in a radio broadcast on July 27, 1943, said, “Good, splendid young people. You shall not have died in vain; you shall not be forgotten.” Here’s a brief article if you are considering reading more about this group or Sophie: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Joshee Kun (조수아)

    I once loved my country, but now the only thing that shames me is that I'm German. I'm not a fan of poetry, but I enjoyed how this book depicted the life of a German girl who was brave enough to stand up to the diabolic Hitler. Usually, when people talk about the first or second World War, the Germans, in general, are the antagonists. After all, they murdered countless Jews in their infamous concentration camps. However, gleaning from the text, it's a sad truth that the mentioned latter dictator I once loved my country, but now the only thing that shames me is that I'm German. I'm not a fan of poetry, but I enjoyed how this book depicted the life of a German girl who was brave enough to stand up to the diabolic Hitler. Usually, when people talk about the first or second World War, the Germans, in general, are the antagonists. After all, they murdered countless Jews in their infamous concentration camps. However, gleaning from the text, it's a sad truth that the mentioned latter dictator ruined the lives of his own people. Hence, we should be objective and not hold every German responsible for his unfathomable cruelty. White Rose was also the name of Sophie's group/organization that aimed to enlighten citizens to the darkness of Hitler's advocacy. With the help of her brother Hans and other courageous young adults, Sophie printed tons of anti-Hitler propaganda and distributed them across the nation. Despite the threat of incarceration and death, Sophie continued to fight for what she believed was right. I initially hoped for a happy ending, but this novel proved that stories about war rarely conclude that way. For me, the best thing about this book was Sophie and Han's relationship as siblings and co-rebels. When Hans had to use his medical skills to help the German army fight against Russia, Sophie never failed to send him letters and pray for his safety. Moreover, they always saw eye to eye on matters concerning Hitler. Sophie was the one who thought of publishing revolutionary leaflets, but Hans was the one who made her dream a reality. Finally, the siblings hang out all the time since they had the same circle of friends. Sophie and Hans were together until the end, and it was hard to read about their "inevitable" demise. If you're a fan of strong family bonds in YA, this literary debut will not disappoint you. Ultimately, I gave White Rose 4 stars because of its inspiring and scholarly content. If I lived during Hitler's time, I wouldn't be brave enough to be a martyr like Sophie and Hans. This is the second historical book I've read this year, and I can hardly wait to start another one. However, until now I'm not sure if changing the format or s p a c i n g of a standard narrative counts as poetry. xD

  6. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

    4.5 Thank you NetGalley, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Children's Book Group, and Kip Wilson for the opportunity to read an early copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. What initially drew me to this book wasn't necessarily the description of the book itself, but the fact that it is written in poetic form. As an Ellen Hopkins fan, I love reading works written in a poetry style. The problem is, some authors nail the craft, and some are just not good. Great news: Kip Wilson's poetic form is 4.5 Thank you NetGalley, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Children's Book Group, and Kip Wilson for the opportunity to read an early copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. What initially drew me to this book wasn't necessarily the description of the book itself, but the fact that it is written in poetic form. As an Ellen Hopkins fan, I love reading works written in a poetry style. The problem is, some authors nail the craft, and some are just not good. Great news: Kip Wilson's poetic form is gorgeously dazzling, and not a disappointment! The only thing that makes this a 4.5 instead of a 5 is that there are some stylistic choices that can be executed better, and perhaps in the final version they will be altered. For example, when another person (not the narrator) is talking, the lines or stanza is indented and in italics, but so is the dialogue tag. Having the dialogue tag in italics too threw me off a bit. Another thing I thought was super creative was stretching out certain words with spaces, such as "l o n g," and other words of similar meaning, making the word literally longer or stretched on the page. This happens about four or five times, but the stretch is in a line with other words. This would be an even greater effect if the word was isolated and spaced out even more: "l o n g" Aside from a few minute things like that, I loved the poetic form of this piece and the language has amazing flow. It was fun and easy to read, all while being an educational journey. This story takes place during World War II in Germany, during Hitler's reign. One of the aspects I love about this novel is its reflection on actual history. The end of the book has a sort of glossary that highlights who the people actually, historically were, as well as defining some of the German words (I didn't see the glossary until I finished the book, since it's e-book and not print. This wasn't a huge deal for me since I'm familiar with German and was able to figure out some words based on context). This historical accuracy and development for the novel is no surprise, considering Kip Wilson's Ph.D. in German Literature. The narration features a young girl named Sophie Scholl, an activist in the White Rose group--a non-violent resistance group in Nazi Germany. Although this story is told from the perspective of one living during the events of WWII, I find that, despite there being a number of novels out there that feature this time period, this one is unique in its telling and resonates with events today. As an English teacher myself, I know a number of educators who would be interested in this book for Literature Circles/Book Club Groups, and it's workable for grades 7-12. This book would also be a nice alignment to read in English class if students are simultaneously studying the Holocaust. Overall, highly recommend to young readers, Holocaust historians, historical fanatics, and educators!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jillian Reynolds (Jillian Loves Books)

    I will read this over and over again.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Samm | Sassenach the Book Wizard

    Wow okay so this was my first book written in verse. I was lucky enough to go to Berlin for school in 2012 where I got to visit the Sophie and Hans memorial. It's small but just important so I'd suggest going if you get the opportunity. It's disappointing how few people know about what Sophie and the White Rose resistance did. It's disappointing that their deaths weren't a catalyst for change. It's disappointing our world is circling back to Nazi's being a thing because apparently, we learnt fuck Wow okay so this was my first book written in verse. I was lucky enough to go to Berlin for school in 2012 where I got to visit the Sophie and Hans memorial. It's small but just important so I'd suggest going if you get the opportunity. It's disappointing how few people know about what Sophie and the White Rose resistance did. It's disappointing that their deaths weren't a catalyst for change. It's disappointing our world is circling back to Nazi's being a thing because apparently, we learnt fuck all from World War II. I think wondering "how the hell did people let things get like that" is always something we'll wonder about genocides especially which is why this book is important. Just because you aren't the target, doesn't mean it's not your problem. We forget that so often as humans until that evil or government suddenly sets its eyes on us. Basically: -fuck Nazis -fuck bigots -fuck the state of Georgia -use your fucking voice and privilege to make a better world -vote

  9. 4 out of 5

    Allison C

    This is a really meaningful book told in verse. It does not have a happy ending, and although I was kind of sad (I usually like books with happy endings), I really couldn’t see the book going any other way for it to still be as meaningful and realistic. I liked how the story was told in verses and I found it more interesting. However, I found that the random changes in perspective were kind of confusing but they were readable. The changes between past and present were good from a storytelling vi This is a really meaningful book told in verse. It does not have a happy ending, and although I was kind of sad (I usually like books with happy endings), I really couldn’t see the book going any other way for it to still be as meaningful and realistic. I liked how the story was told in verses and I found it more interesting. However, I found that the random changes in perspective were kind of confusing but they were readable. The changes between past and present were good from a storytelling view but I have a personal preference of books told in chronological order. I don’t usually read and like much historical fiction (which is the main reason why I didn’t give this book more stars) but I think it’s a really good book for those who enjoy that genre. Anyways, I’m glad I read it though and I appreciate how the author brought attention to one important defiance in Nazi Germany.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Strolle

    oof

  11. 4 out of 5

    Em

    3.5 stars!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Liza Wiemer

    WHITE ROSE was phenomenal. The novel is inspired by the true story of Sophie Schnoll, a brave young woman who desperately wanted her fellow Germans during Hitler’s rule to recognize the madness consuming her beloved country. Beautifully written in free verse poetry, this fast-paced, courageous novel gives voice to the evil of fascism when the world turns a deaf ear. Have courage, my dear friends to like yourself for who you are and in a world so desperate for morality, hold on tight to integrity WHITE ROSE was phenomenal. The novel is inspired by the true story of Sophie Schnoll, a brave young woman who desperately wanted her fellow Germans during Hitler’s rule to recognize the madness consuming her beloved country. Beautifully written in free verse poetry, this fast-paced, courageous novel gives voice to the evil of fascism when the world turns a deaf ear. Have courage, my dear friends to like yourself for who you are and in a world so desperate for morality, hold on tight to integrity, self-respect, and kindness! All the stars for WHITE ROSE

  13. 5 out of 5

    Natalia

    "May we all be as noble one day" I honestly don't know where to begin. Reading this book was an experience. The fact that Kip Wilson chose verse to portray a story like this is still fascinating me. I was honestly skeptical but I felt more rushed, more on my toes, more sense of urgency reading the pages in this way. Urgent is what this book is so the choice was genius. This book tells the story of a Nazi resistance group called White Rose, a group that was brave enough to mail leaflets and share w "May we all be as noble one day" I honestly don't know where to begin. Reading this book was an experience. The fact that Kip Wilson chose verse to portray a story like this is still fascinating me. I was honestly skeptical but I felt more rushed, more on my toes, more sense of urgency reading the pages in this way. Urgent is what this book is so the choice was genius. This book tells the story of a Nazi resistance group called White Rose, a group that was brave enough to mail leaflets and share what would be considered treasonous materials with others at the time. They wanted to wake up the German conscience and let them see the atrocities that were happening. There weren't many members, but they were determined. We see this story through several POVs, but mainly through the eyes of Sophie. It is Sophie who opens the story in the midst of an intense investigation by Robert Mohr, the Gestapo investigator. In those first two verses in the book, I had so many visuals. Maybe it's because I have read a lot of Non-fiction about this time in history, but I could see her there being interrogated, them being angry, her sense of dread. This is why you keep reading. Every couple of pages the verses go from the present to the past and vice versa, helping to fill in the gaps of any questions you might have had. It fills a timeline between 1938-1943 in snippets of memories, events, thoughts, and letters. You get to see the inner workings of a German Family that did not sympathize with the Reich. Some were for it some were against it and this is a point of view rarely touched on. There must have been Germans who didn't think what Hitler did was right. It begs the question, Why didn't they do anything? Why were they complicit? "Boom, Boom" "Boom, Boom" Every time the lines above came up in the book, I read it like a heartbeat, I found it strange. However, this must have been Sophie's feelings about everything that was going on in her life. Sophie is strong in so many ways, strong mind, strong will, she had an uncanny way of seeing the world, considering how complacent everyone else outside her family was being. In reality, it is scary to remember how ambivalent society was during that time yet, Sophie refused to be quiet just to be safe. I'm sure there were others, they were just afraid to speak up. Her actions make us face one daunting question, would we sacrifice ourselves for the sake of doing the right thing? Would we speak up if we were in her shoes? In this political climate, it is important that we have some kind of answer to this question because injustices are happening all around us. "Today you'll hang us, but you'll be next" Most of us must know how the story ends but I won't spoil it for those who don't. Sophie, Hans, and Cristoph, who are also members of the White Rose experience it all together. They all hoped that what they did would cause revolt and change but they didn't. Even to me, it was the first time encountering the story of this brave group and those who stood tall in the representation of it. White Rose and Sophie might not have caused a wave then but I hope they do now. I hope a whole new generation is inspired by the members of the White Rose and Sophie, and this brilliant book. I hope it makes every single reader think, question others, and ask of society, will you stay silent? It isn't your family today but it could be. So will you be the first person to take a step for what's right? That's is what Sophie told the judge, "Someone needed to make a start." Rating 5\5 ❤❤❤❤❤ What I liked about this story was that it was genuine. Kip Wilson made an effort to make Sophie as realistic as possible based on historical documents available about this amazing young woman and those in the White Rose group. It's only fiction because you couldn't possibly know everything Sophie was thinking at the time and even then, she tried to write those in the way of her personality and bring her character to life. Sophie loved and hurt in a realistic manner, she tried and failed, she was for the Reich and then She wasn't. She was human and I think that is what Kip Wilson wanted us to now. That for all our flaws, we can still choose to do the right thing. "I did the best I could for my country. I don't regret what I did and I'm ready to accept the consequences for my actions."

  14. 4 out of 5

    Laura Gardner

    “We have a duty to share the truth with the masses." How far are you willing to go to fulfill that duty? Sophie Scholl gave her life in the attempt to share the truth with people in Germany during World War II. Her story, beautifully written by Kip Wilson, is the subject of White Rose, a must-purchase novel in verse for middle school and high school libraries. Sophie Scholl was a member of the White Rose, a secret resistance group in Nazi Germany that strove to organize against Hitler's regime. H “We have a duty to share the truth with the masses." How far are you willing to go to fulfill that duty? Sophie Scholl gave her life in the attempt to share the truth with people in Germany during World War II. Her story, beautifully written by Kip Wilson, is the subject of White Rose, a must-purchase novel in verse for middle school and high school libraries. Sophie Scholl was a member of the White Rose, a secret resistance group in Nazi Germany that strove to organize against Hitler's regime. Hans, Sophie's brother, wrote treasonable leaflets that Sophie then helped distribute around the university to bring awareness and promote a revolution against Hitler. Eventually the White Rose was discovered by the Gestapo and several members, including Sophie and Hans, were executed. Some readers will be confused by the jumps in time back and forth from her interview with the Gestapo to the start of her resistance efforts and eventually back to her childhood when Hans and Sophie were enthusiastic members of the Hitler Youth and eager nationalists. Sophisticated readers, however, will love the suspense and intensity this effect creates. Besides free-verse poems from Sophie's perspective and letters from Hans and her boyfriend, Ftitz, there are also occasional poems from the Gestapo investigator, which add additional tension. This is a powerful novel about difficult choices in the face of facism and brutality. Rather than stay silent and complicit, Sophie chose to fight back. Her story is inspirational and so necessary in these similarly fraught times.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Beatrice

    Verse isn’t my prefered method of storytelling, but I did enjoy it in this one. Though this, of course, is a bit of a mix between reality and fiction, I think the author did a good job portraying Sophie Scholl as the living, breathing person that she was.

  16. 4 out of 5

    C.P. Cabaniss

    *I received an ARC of this novel at Yallfest 2018.* I have only read one or two novels written in verse and I don't think the style is for me. I don't tend to hold details in my head as much when reading this format. I got better at it as I read this one, because I started thinking about it in a different way, but it still didn't hit me as hard as something like this might have had it been written differently. One thing that I liked a lot about this was the constant shift between The End and Befo *I received an ARC of this novel at Yallfest 2018.* I have only read one or two novels written in verse and I don't think the style is for me. I don't tend to hold details in my head as much when reading this format. I got better at it as I read this one, because I started thinking about it in a different way, but it still didn't hit me as hard as something like this might have had it been written differently. One thing that I liked a lot about this was the constant shift between The End and Before. This is a type of storytelling that I enjoy and I think it worked well here. Our main character in this story is a real person, so we already know what the outcome of the story will be, but it's neat to piece things together with this shift back and forth between different times. I am always interested in learning about history surrounding World War Two, so I did like learning more about something that I knew little about. I have heard of Sophie Scholl, I think, but never looked much beyond surface information, so it was interesting to have her story (a version of her story at least) told and to try and imagine what she might have thought and felt. This is worth a read if you enjoy World War Two or novels written in verse. I would have connected more had it been a traditional novel, but I did find it informative and thought provoking.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Stoolfire

    I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. White Rose by Kip Wilson is absolutely stunning novel in verse about the life of Sophie Scholl. Scholl was an anti-Nazi political activist and pamphleteer with the non-violent resistance group called the White Rose. The detail and research that has gone into presenting her story and the story of the group is amazing. It's also quite gut-wrenching to read considering that I already knew her fate before going into the story. While n I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. White Rose by Kip Wilson is absolutely stunning novel in verse about the life of Sophie Scholl. Scholl was an anti-Nazi political activist and pamphleteer with the non-violent resistance group called the White Rose. The detail and research that has gone into presenting her story and the story of the group is amazing. It's also quite gut-wrenching to read considering that I already knew her fate before going into the story. While novels in verse aren't usually my thing, this 100% worked for me and I can't recommend it highly enough. If you're a fan of The Book Thief by Markus Zusak and Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein, do yourself a favor and pick up Kip Wilson's White Rose. I can't wait to see Wilson's future projects. Thanks again, NetGalley!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jessica | Booked J

    Review also found here at Booked J. I was sent an ARC of this novel from the publisher in exchange for my honest review. This does not change my view in any shape or form. It's Sunday, and I'm feeling like my only accomplishment this week was in reading White Rose. It's just completely taken over my thoughts in the best way imaginable and I'm a little bit of an emotional wreck over it. So much to say, so few ways to express it adequately. I guess all I can do is try. Good literature presents its Review also found here at Booked J. I was sent an ARC of this novel from the publisher in exchange for my honest review. This does not change my view in any shape or form. It's Sunday, and I'm feeling like my only accomplishment this week was in reading White Rose. It's just completely taken over my thoughts in the best way imaginable and I'm a little bit of an emotional wreck over it. So much to say, so few ways to express it adequately. I guess all I can do is try. Good literature presents itself to us in a manner that makes us pause and take notice. It gets under our skin and lives there with us, burrowed, until we're gone. The words within it never pause, but it feels like our hearts do. White Rose is one of those books. It takes history and tells it to us in the most intimate of ways: through verse. In truth, it is such a beautiful, thought-provoking and utterly unforgettable read. For those who don’t know the history behind the activists within White Rose, this is the perfect read to learn more. Kip Wilson doesn't dip in and out on creative liberties vs. the actual history; it is all beautifully done and doesn't cheapen the real story. Although it is historical fiction told in verse, it packs a serious punch and tells us the story of Sophie Scholl—who, in university, along with her brother Hans, and like minded friends, took great risks in speaking out against H*tler. The group is remembered for printing and distributing pamphlets against the regime and the fallout via their arrests and eventual execution. As Kip Wilson tells the story in verse, the intimacy behind White Rose is all the more striking to readers and impossible to put down. The fact that it is told in verse makes it all the more vivid and deeply moving and I can't stress that enough. As readers, we get to watch as Sophie grows and grows into the acts of defiance and rebellion that would solidify her name in history. In a time where so many stood by idly, this young woman, and her friends, and her family, didn't. It is in these acts of defiance that we feel the story as more than just a chapter of history. White Rose is one of the best releases of 2019 and frankly, one of the most poignant YA debuts of all time. I couldn't forget it, even if I wanted to.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jenni Walsh

    Wow, this book. It's about a young (real life) German girl, Sophie Scholl who acted as a pampleteer in the White Rose resistance against Hitler, the Nazi party, the Third Reich. What a powerful premise. However, I had hesitations to read. Not because of that very alluring subject matter, but because the novel is written in verse and... that intimidated me ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ I wrote poetry in my adolescent days, but I don't believe i've written it, studied it, or read it since college. I was nervous the sto Wow, this book. It's about a young (real life) German girl, Sophie Scholl who acted as a pampleteer in the White Rose resistance against Hitler, the Nazi party, the Third Reich. What a powerful premise. However, I had hesitations to read. Not because of that very alluring subject matter, but because the novel is written in verse and... that intimidated me⁣ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⁣ I wrote poetry in my adolescent days, but I don't believe i've written it, studied it, or read it since college. I was nervous the story wouldn't feel deep enough or that I wouldn't connect with the characters or even that I'd misunderstand the meaning (man, I remember some confusing poetry in my college courses). ⁣ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⁣ Silly, Jenni. What Kip Wilson has written is remarkable. It was impossible not to connect with Sophie, to not feel her pain and regret and sorrow and fear and disgust. I was SO IN on this book. In fact, I enjoyed the directness of each line. And even with that quick pace and those concise lines, man, did each word pack a punch. This book truly was powerful and I read it in a single setting, hooked as soon as my brain and eyes picked up the cadence of Kip's beautiful writing.⁣ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⁣ I'm glad I read it printed (well, my kindle as an egalley) because the formatting also adds to the story, but I think this would also be really great to listen to on audiobook.⁣ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⁣ WHITE ROSE by Kip Wilson releases April 2nd and I'd highly recommend that you spend some time with Sophie and Kip Wilson's prose. Both are inspiring

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mandi

    Even though it says based on a true story I must have missed that when I started this book. I really enjoyed reading something that I never heard about but have been reading historic fiction and nonfiction for years. This book is written in verse and it's about the White Rose group made up of German University Students who distributes pamphlets that speak out against Hitler's regime. The students were made up of one woman and the rest men. 4🌟🌟🌟🌟

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah

    I'm not generally a fan of books like this, made up of instapoetry. This does not prove an exception, even though I love reading about the White Rose. I was upset with the liberties the author took--things she briefly acknowledges in the Author's Note--because this story is so important, because--as she herself notes--most information about the White Rose is in German (meaning that her "liberties" could misinform readers), and because they add nothing to the story. I also think it's rude to posi I'm not generally a fan of books like this, made up of instapoetry. This does not prove an exception, even though I love reading about the White Rose. I was upset with the liberties the author took--things she briefly acknowledges in the Author's Note--because this story is so important, because--as she herself notes--most information about the White Rose is in German (meaning that her "liberties" could misinform readers), and because they add nothing to the story. I also think it's rude to posit that someone could be bisexual when there is NO PROOF. I don't want people to look up to Hans as an LGBTQ icon when Kip Wilson has no evidence to suggest that he even was. Bisexuality is fraught enough; we don't need bi icons that were not actually bi. (If someone comes across proof, of course I would be thrilled to learn that Hans was bi! But I believe in proof. He isn't a made-up character, and this book isn't supposed to be unhistorical like My Lady Jane (in which the authors derail history completely, but in a hilarious and amazing way); it's a serious "true-to-how-it-happened" book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Selene

    3.5 Stars

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mary Ann

    Portrait in courage of a young woman's resistance to the Nazi regime.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alex (not a dude) Baugh

    The people I tend to admire most are the ordinary citizens who find themselves in extraordinary circumstances and who act bravely in the face of danger. Which probably explains why I like resistance stories do much. One of those people who has always been high one my list is Sophie Scholl, the young German university student who stood up to the Nazis and paid with her life. So naturally, I was pretty excited when I read that a novel in verse about Sophie and the other members of the White Rose r The people I tend to admire most are the ordinary citizens who find themselves in extraordinary circumstances and who act bravely in the face of danger. Which probably explains why I like resistance stories do much. One of those people who has always been high one my list is Sophie Scholl, the young German university student who stood up to the Nazis and paid with her life. So naturally, I was pretty excited when I read that a novel in verse about Sophie and the other members of the White Rose resistance was being published. And when I was offered an ARC of Kip Wilson's work, I jumped at the chance to read it. I was not disappointed. Wilson definitely did Sophie justice in this fictionalized biography. Told in free verse, Wilson opens her fictionalized biography of Sophie with her arrest in 1943 and her first interrogation by the Gestapo, then immediately sends the reader back to 1935 and happier, almost carefree days with her large, loving family. At first, Sophie and older brother Hans are willing members of the Hitler youth - she in the Bund Deutsche Mädel (BDM) and he in the Hitlerjugend (HJ). But as more restrictions are imposed on Germans, and especially on German Jews, Sophie begins to see Hitler's regime for what they really are. By the time she's at university with Hans, Sophie has done much soul-searching, worrying that her silence makes her complicit in the regime's shameful actions, and now she desires only to do the right thing - to stand up for her beliefs. Soon, a leaflet comes her way, and judging by the inky fingers on Hans's hands, she suspects he has something to do with it, and angered that he has used her idea: "Duplicating leaflets and sharing them with the world - this was my idea. My own brother excluded me, probably thinking, She's only a girl." (pg. 139) Calling themselves the White Rose, Sophie is determined to be part of her brother's resistance group and work on the anti-Nazi leaflets they produce. Once she is finally let in, her job is to make sure the leaflets get into the hands of an many people as possible, including some influential people. While the Sophie and the other members of the White Rose work against the Third Reich, readers also follow the efforts of Robert Mohr, the Gestapo investigator who is determined to find and arrest the traitors who are "the masterminds of this plot" to undermine the Nazi government. We hear from Hans, Christoph Probst, who was executed along with Sophie and Hans, Sophie's friend Fritz, even Jakob Schmid, the school custodian who turned them in, and more, making this a really in-depth, well-rounded narration. But one of the things I really liked was how Wilson shows readers that Sophie, Hans and their friends were also typical kids, getting together and listening to music and just enjoying each other's company. Their passion and their friendships are kind of things that makes them so easy to identify with. Although, Wilson arranged White Rose in a non-linear way, going back and forth in time to present events relevant to understanding how and why the Scholl siblings did what they did, it is not at all confusing, but rather heightens the tension and at the same time, makes the actions of the White Rose all the more inspiring. Of course, we know how things turn out for Sophie and the White Rose resistance, but Wilson has nevertheless created a nail-biting story that gives some insight based on extensive research into what the key figures might have been thinking and feeling, both the pursued and the pursuers. Sophie Scholl never regretted what she did, and went to her death believing that the world would take notice of what she did, learn from it, and carry on the work of defeating the Nazis: "Because I am courageous and matter-of-fact about what I hope will happen now: That the world will see and the world will know and the world will make them stop." (pg. 332) Sadly, that didn't happen in Nazi Germany but because White Rose is such a well-done work of historical fiction, it will hopefully resonate with readers in today's world. Wilson's back matter includes a list of the Dramatis Personae, a Glossary of German words and phrases used, a list of Selected Sources for more investigation, and an Author's Note. You can also find a Reader's Guide that uses both White Rose by Kip Wilson and We Will Not Be Silent: The White Rose Student Resistance Movement that Defied Adolf Hitler by Russell Freedman courtesy of Versify Books. This book is recommended for readers age 12+ This book was sent to my by the publisher, Versify

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kavanand (Reading for Two)

    White Rose is an important and timely book. It tells the story of Sophie Scholl, a young German woman who was part of group called the White Rose that resisted the Nazi government during World War II. Sophie, her brother, and their friends were university students who wrote and distributed anonymous letters and pamphlets condemning the Nazi regime. This is a really valuable book. As we get further away from World War II, it's important to keep the memories of what happened alive. In a regime wher White Rose is an important and timely book. It tells the story of Sophie Scholl, a young German woman who was part of group called the White Rose that resisted the Nazi government during World War II. Sophie, her brother, and their friends were university students who wrote and distributed anonymous letters and pamphlets condemning the Nazi regime. This is a really valuable book. As we get further away from World War II, it's important to keep the memories of what happened alive. In a regime where most people just went along with the horrors, it's inspiring to read about people who tried to make a difference. Sophie and her friends were just normal people who found a way to stand up to tyranny, at great personal cost. The novel is written in verse, which I think was a good choice, as it lends a certain gravitas to the story. The poems are very straightforward and readable, and even readers who aren't used to poetry shouldn't be put off. There are many lines I could quote, but here's a brief passage that's representative. After sitting on the sidelines like a caged tiger for a week, I can't wait to face my fear to break out of my complancency to do whatever I can. I found the book very moving, and I think the story will resonate with teen readers. I highly recommend it. I received an ARC from the publisher via Amazon Vine.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Courtney Pate

    Thank you to Versify for a free copy of White Rose in exchange for an honest review. These thoughts and opinions are my own. Oh man. Where do I even start. First, let's talk about this cover. It's beautiful. I love the solitary girl standing with her hand in the air. A sign of resistance and doing what's right, because really, that's what this book is all about. Next, I loved that the novel was written in prose. I felt like it gave such depth to the story and just really punched it home. This is Thank you to Versify for a free copy of White Rose in exchange for an honest review. These thoughts and opinions are my own. Oh man. Where do I even start. First, let's talk about this cover. It's beautiful. I love the solitary girl standing with her hand in the air. A sign of resistance and doing what's right, because really, that's what this book is all about. Next, I loved that the novel was written in prose. I felt like it gave such depth to the story and just really punched it home. This is a story about Sophie, who is a German during WW2. She doesn't like what her government is doing, especially pertaining to the Jewish people. Sophie decides to do something about it. White Rose is based on a true story. It's so interesting to see a novel from a German's point of view. Most WW2 novels I read are from a Jewish pov. I loved that change and I loved that it showed not all Germans were bad. There were some who disagreed and tried to fight the regime, even if it meant capture and death. I loved that this was a story of resistence. It's a story of fighting the power, knowing what is happening is wrong, and doing something about it. It's a story of standing up for those who can't stand up for themselves, regardless of the consequences. It's such a powerful tale, and so timely. In the back of the novel, there was a list of characters included. It let you know the fates of all the characters in the novel in real life. That was so interesting to me. It made me fully realize these were REAL people who did REAL things in the face of adversity and an all encompassing power trying to repress anyone who wasn't "perfect". I would recommend this book again and again. It was a quick read since it was written in prose, but it was SO POWERFUL. It left me wanting to do more, be more, speak up more.

  27. 4 out of 5

    J.L. Slipak

    MY THOUGHTS: I received this book in exchange for my honest review. Another Wow! A powerful and profound story, written in verse, about a group of teens willing to raise their voices against the genocide against the Jews being committed by the Nazis and Hitler during WWII. The journey this group endured to stand firm against the war and Hitler’s regime is both heart-wrenching and intoxicating. More stories need to be written about this historical event to keep awareness brilliantly exposed in order MY THOUGHTS: I received this book in exchange for my honest review. Another Wow! A powerful and profound story, written in verse, about a group of teens willing to raise their voices against the genocide against the Jews being committed by the Nazis and Hitler during WWII. The journey this group endured to stand firm against the war and Hitler’s regime is both heart-wrenching and intoxicating. More stories need to be written about this historical event to keep awareness brilliantly exposed in order to prevent history from repeating itself. I was impressed with the writing and the style used. Not only was it unexpected (story in verse), but it was done so well that I enjoyed the story immensely. I can only hope that the author’s message is completely understood by others. The author’s notes tell how events that this book was based on actually happened. She goes on to explain how White Rose affected the war and her thoughts. Just reading that part of the book brought everything home. Throughout the book, the author did a great job in relating to Sophie’s feelings and thoughts about the Holocaust. Very impressive, yet sad book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Wren

    This wasn't an easy story to read. I knew the ending far ahead of looking at the book. Still, I admire Sophie and her friends and I wanted to read her story and remember. Poetry is an interesting choice as a medium for Sophie's story. Sometimes the back and forth with the present and "the end" made things a bit difficult to understand, as well as the back and forth between Sophie and her pursuer. I think this could have benefited from just a bit more. I felt deeply for Sophie's parents at the en This wasn't an easy story to read. I knew the ending far ahead of looking at the book. Still, I admire Sophie and her friends and I wanted to read her story and remember. Poetry is an interesting choice as a medium for Sophie's story. Sometimes the back and forth with the present and "the end" made things a bit difficult to understand, as well as the back and forth between Sophie and her pursuer. I think this could have benefited from just a bit more. I felt deeply for Sophie's parents at the end and for Fritz. I wish I knew more about Fritz's feelings about fighting for Germany and what kind of conflict that created for him internally. Wilson's use of lengthy German words make this book too difficult for the majority of my junior high students, and that's a shame. I understand the choice in using them, but English would be preferable in the YA market, I believe. Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with an e-ARC of this book before its publication in exchange for an honest review.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Wren

    This wasn't an easy story to read. I knew the ending far ahead of looking at the book. Still, I admire Sophie and her friends and I wanted to read her story and remember. Poetry is an interesting choice as a medium for Sophie's story. Sometimes the back and forth with the present and "the end" made things a bit difficult to understand, as well as the back and forth between Sophie and her pursuer. I think this could have benefited from just a bit more. I felt deeply for Sophie's parents at the en This wasn't an easy story to read. I knew the ending far ahead of looking at the book. Still, I admire Sophie and her friends and I wanted to read her story and remember. Poetry is an interesting choice as a medium for Sophie's story. Sometimes the back and forth with the present and "the end" made things a bit difficult to understand, as well as the back and forth between Sophie and her pursuer. I think this could have benefited from just a bit more. I felt deeply for Sophie's parents at the end and for Fritz. I wish I knew more about Fritz's feelings about fighting for Germany and what kind of conflict that created for him internally. Wilson's use of lengthy German words make this book too difficult for the majority of my junior high students, and that's a shame. I understand the choice in using them, but English would be preferable in the YA market, I believe. Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with an e-ARC of this book before its publication in exchange for an honest review.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Kaufmann Blackton

    I do not know very much about the resistance organization of the White Rose, but after reading this book, it seems like there is not a whole lot of information available about them due to their tragic, early demise. Nevertheless, I learned several things about Sophie and Hans Scholl and their resistance efforts through this novel in verse. The format of verse, in my opinion, did nothing to aide or to inhibit the story. It just was. Maybe it would be different if read aloud. However, I believe th I do not know very much about the resistance organization of the White Rose, but after reading this book, it seems like there is not a whole lot of information available about them due to their tragic, early demise. Nevertheless, I learned several things about Sophie and Hans Scholl and their resistance efforts through this novel in verse. The format of verse, in my opinion, did nothing to aide or to inhibit the story. It just was. Maybe it would be different if read aloud. However, I believe the content of the poetic narrative has merit. I plan on sharing this story with my students, and I am sure they will be touched by the Scholls' efforts in a hostile community. "Our strongest weapon is our refusal to follow blindly" (pg. 69) "People who refuse to open their eyes are more than ambivalent- they are guilty" (pg. 74)

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