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Cribsheet: A Data-Driven Guide to Better, More Relaxed Parenting, from Birth to Preschool PDF, ePub eBook

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Cribsheet: A Data-Driven Guide to Better, More Relaxed Parenting, from Birth to Preschool

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Cribsheet: A Data-Driven Guide to Better, More Relaxed Parenting, from Birth to Preschool PDF, ePub eBook From the author of EXPECTING BETTER, an economist's guide to the early years of parenting With EXPECTING BETTER, award-winning economist Emily Oster spotted a need in the pregnancy market for advice that gave women the information they needed to make the best decision for their own pregnancies. By digging into the data, Oster found that much of the conventional pregnancy wi From the author of EXPECTING BETTER, an economist's guide to the early years of parenting With EXPECTING BETTER, award-winning economist Emily Oster spotted a need in the pregnancy market for advice that gave women the information they needed to make the best decision for their own pregnancies. By digging into the data, Oster found that much of the conventional pregnancy wisdom was wrong. In CRIBSHEET, she now tackles an even great challenge: decision making in the early years of parenting. As any new parent knows, there is an abundance of often-conflicting advice hurled at you from doctors, family, friends, and the internet. From the earliest days, parents get the message that they must make certain choices around feeding, sleep, and schedule or all will be lost. There's a rule--or three--for everything. But the benefits of these choices can be overstated, and the tradeoffs can be profound. How do you make your own best decision?

30 review for Cribsheet: A Data-Driven Guide to Better, More Relaxed Parenting, from Birth to Preschool

  1. 4 out of 5

    April

    I am reviewing an ARC of this book I received through Edelweiss. I LOVED Oster's first book Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know. It relieved a lot of my concerns about pregnancy and childbirth and I would consider reading it again if I have a second child. I recommend it to all new moms. I was super excited that she now has a book for babies and toddlers because my son is just under two. I was hoping for some insight into things like I am reviewing an ARC of this book I received through Edelweiss. I LOVED Oster's first book Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know. It relieved a lot of my concerns about pregnancy and childbirth and I would consider reading it again if I have a second child. I recommend it to all new moms. I was super excited that she now has a book for babies and toddlers because my son is just under two. I was hoping for some insight into things like feeding and discipline. What I didn't like: Most of my disappointment with the book comes from the difference in available data on pregnancy and on small children. There are a lot more variables, as she will tell you, once a child is out in the world and these variables only get more complicated as the child gets older. It's hard to tell whether staying at home or working or having a nanny really affects a child's educational achievements because there are so many other contributing factors in families that choose each of those options. Because of this, most of the scientific suggestions are vague. The entire book can almost certainly be summed up as "Studies suggest that x has more positive effects, but the effects are not positive enough to outweigh a negative impact on your family's individual lifestyle." For example... She goes pretty deep into sleep training (I was biased as pro-sleep training going in, so take that into consideration). She concludes that sleep training generally does not cause harm and results in better sleep for both children and parents. HOWEVER, she points out that if sleep training will cause you anxiety and you are happy with an arrangement that doesn't involve sleep training, then that will most likely be better for your family. That's pretty much how all the recommendations go. That's something I really liked about her analysis, but it also meant I didn't get the same sense of comfort from data that I got from the first book. What I liked: The same things that were great about Expecting Better are present here. She takes apart studies on everything from breastfeeding to potty training. What I learned from the book is that any of the things we obsess about at each stage probably don't have the impact that we fear it will. Toward the beginning she elucidates a bit on the "Mommy Wars" and the reasons we fight so hard to justify our decisions and, unfortunately, deride the parenting decisions of others. It feels important that we are doing the best thing for our kids objectively. And if what we are doing is objectively right, then other moms are objectively wrong. This book tears that apart. Like Amy Poehler said in Yes Please, "Good for you, not for me." This book helps you look at the cost/benefit analysis of things like early toilet training and Montessori preschools and make your own informed decision that is probably different from your sister's, but also better for your family. There's an anecdote she tells at the end of the book where she frets about the possibility her daughter being stung by a bee to her pediatrician. When she asks the pediatrician for advice, the pediatrician says "Don't think about it." It's not good advice for every situation, but for certain ones it's perfect. I don't think this book is as "must read", but if you need a little perspective or feel like you're doing it all wrong, it is a helpful tool for affirming your decisions and making sure they match your family's values.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jillian Doherty

    As a first time, new mom I was very interested in Oster's down to earth views on parenting, especially with her practical background. She quickly addresses common themes of not knowing what information to trust, and pointing out a better-established recourse. Everything from the scary days after delivery, to what to do when nothing makes sense, to how to work toward better relationships with your partner. She also gives earnest information how all the practicality of newborn to toddler life - fro As a first time, new mom I was very interested in Oster's down to earth views on parenting, especially with her practical background. She quickly addresses common themes of not knowing what information to trust, and pointing out a better-established recourse. Everything from the scary days after delivery, to what to do when nothing makes sense, to how to work toward better relationships with your partner. She also gives earnest information how all the practicality of newborn to toddler life - from swaddling, punishing, school prep and letting things go (which i do feel there is a parental pressure to equally do and not do). My favorite part is that she summarized each chapter with refreshingly clear bullets at the end of each part - so helpful!! Galley borrowed from the publisher.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Bryan

    Mostly not relevant for me anymore - with a 28-month old, I've already made most of the infant and toddler decisions discussed in this book. But, I love her approach and agree that data is interesting and empowering. I identified with her very much. My favorite chapter title: "Wait, you want me to take it home?" which is exactly how I felt when discharged from the hospital with a 2-day old infant.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I adore this book just as much as I did Expecting Better. It will join EB as my #1 recommendation to anyone planning to get pregnant, pregnant, or with young kids.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Indra

    I wish I came across this book a year and a half ago! As a spreadsheet lover and a somewhat paranoid at times, “helicopter” parent, this was incredibly insightful and soul nurturing. I just wish it had more in detail chapters on very specific topics and more data! 😂

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mazie Lynn

    As a parent, it is quite difficult for me to suspend all bias in favor of the evidence and I do not believe this author has been able to either. Although she admits her particular bias in one section of the book (spanking), a few snarky comments in other sections leave me feeling as though she has other unclaimed biases in play. There was some helpful fodder for thinking through the many issues parents confront in the earliest days, months, and years of their children's lives, but I suspect folk As a parent, it is quite difficult for me to suspend all bias in favor of the evidence and I do not believe this author has been able to either. Although she admits her particular bias in one section of the book (spanking), a few snarky comments in other sections leave me feeling as though she has other unclaimed biases in play. There was some helpful fodder for thinking through the many issues parents confront in the earliest days, months, and years of their children's lives, but I suspect folks drawn to a book like this will still spend a great deal of time researching on their own. Maybe some researchers will appreciate the gaps in evidence noted in this book and begin work filling them in. Oh, and, she and her medical editor seem to have overlooked that diastasis recti abdominis is often the reason for the "mommy tummy" she deems as mysterious.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Maya

    I loooved Oster’s “Expecting Better” (and recommend it to every pregnant friend), and I waited months for “Cribsheet” to come out. This book has the same data-informed approach and friendly tone. However, it just didn’t seem like this book was packed with as many reassuring aha’s as Expecting Better was. The fertility and pregnancy topics that Oster covered in EB were largely grounded in research that is hard for a layperson to find and even harder to interpret. By contrast, the early childhood I loooved Oster’s “Expecting Better” (and recommend it to every pregnant friend), and I waited months for “Cribsheet” to come out. This book has the same data-informed approach and friendly tone. However, it just didn’t seem like this book was packed with as many reassuring aha’s as Expecting Better was. The fertility and pregnancy topics that Oster covered in EB were largely grounded in research that is hard for a layperson to find and even harder to interpret. By contrast, the early childhood topics that are covered in Cribsheet are Very easily researched and well reported by news outlets and parenting sites on a regular basis. I had already run across most of the data Oster cites here in my own research over my son’s first 11 months of life. I do think I would have found this book to be much more useful had I read it in the first couple months. So I would recommend to new parents as worth reading, albeit less essential than Expectjng Better.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alicia Bonk

    Read this book, make your own evidence-based decisions that work for your family, and stop worrying about what others are doing or saying with their children. Audiobook- totally recommend! It was nice being able to not pay 100% attention on subjects I didn’t need evidence based convincing on.. such as vaccinating your children (yes, please do). So much good information in here... one of my favorites: breastfeeding does have benefit on infants in early months, but after that, no major benefits co Read this book, make your own evidence-based decisions that work for your family, and stop worrying about what others are doing or saying with their children. Audiobook- totally recommend! It was nice being able to not pay 100% attention on subjects I didn’t need evidence based convincing on.. such as vaccinating your children (yes, please do). So much good information in here... one of my favorites: breastfeeding does have benefit on infants in early months, but after that, no major benefits compared to formula. Biggest benefit of breastfeeding was for the mother - lowers chances of breast cancer by 20-30% (sign me up). I could go on forever about this book. I will stop there.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lesley

    In summary, there's a lot of parenting advice online that is based on bad data (or no data at all). Emily presents what data is known, but with the caveat that parents also need to consider what works best for them and their family. When our loved ones get pregnant, they will now be getting a copy of Cribsheet and Expecting Better.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

    This is loads better than Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know in following through on the promise of "here's the research that's been done so far and how you might make a decision about this." With the exception of the subsection on nipple confusion*, the content lines up with other reading I've done. I suspect this might be because with pregnancy advice, there was a resistance to unnecessary changes in pre-existing habits, whereas This is loads better than Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know in following through on the promise of "here's the research that's been done so far and how you might make a decision about this." With the exception of the subsection on nipple confusion*, the content lines up with other reading I've done. I suspect this might be because with pregnancy advice, there was a resistance to unnecessary changes in pre-existing habits, whereas with the actual raising of kids, it could be approached with more of a fair blank slate. I appreciate that there's a lot of room to apply your own values and adapt to your particular family situation. I think there could probably be more done to err on the side of, "what seems likely we might have evolved to be better adapted for," but I often think that anyway. *I think there's a legitimate beef with the term "nipple confusion" to dissuade against pacifier usage or bottle feeding if you have goals to exclusively breastfeed, but I think the author may have misunderstood the mechanisms behind why pacifier usage and bottle feeding would detract from breastfeeding goals. Probably it should be called "insufficient demand to drive up milk supply" or "bottle preference" instead--using pacifiers to allow comforting from sucking could replace nursing that's needed to establish demand for milk supply, and bottle feeding without paced bottle feeding allows for much faster eating with much less work, which could lead to pumping over nursing, which can also lead to supply concerns and less adapting of the breastmilk to the child's needs like creating antibodies to illnesses they might have. Perhaps these effects are not that large, but it seems a stretch to me to then conclude that pacifier use and bottle feeding have no effect on breastfeeding duration.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    Another excellent, research based parenting book that's essential reading. She makes some controversial observations: --Studies show that sleep training works without detrimental affects. Let that baby cry (well, not a super young baby) --While there's evidence that watching more than 3 hours of TV a day can cause a decline academically in children under 4, there's not really any evidence about less than that. Also, despite what seems like a constant barrage of anti-screen time studies, there actu Another excellent, research based parenting book that's essential reading. She makes some controversial observations: --Studies show that sleep training works without detrimental affects. Let that baby cry (well, not a super young baby) --While there's evidence that watching more than 3 hours of TV a day can cause a decline academically in children under 4, there's not really any evidence about less than that. Also, despite what seems like a constant barrage of anti-screen time studies, there actually haven't been many research studies into its affects. --Children before 18 months that attend daycare perform slightly less well academically up to fifth grade, while children who go to daycare after 18 months perform slightly better academically than average. After fifth grade? They all perform about the same to all the kids (including those with a stay at home parent) That last point was most helpful to me. I want to put my 16 month old in a part time daycare when she turns two, but there's so much guilt out there about how children need a stay at home parent. Well, it looks like it doesn't really matter. Of course, it does matter financially. This is a book I'll be recommending. It doesn't cover all the things (or even most the things) I worry about--especially in the first year--but its research is vital.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    I agree with Becks' Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know. It's not because of the writing or approach, which are both strong, but there are just more fundamental limitations that Oster can't do anything about. One limitation is clearly the research base. The pregnancy process biologically has to have a lot of similarities so it's easier to see how differences in environment and behavior might affect it, while child rearing is so much I agree with Becks' Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know. It's not because of the writing or approach, which are both strong, but there are just more fundamental limitations that Oster can't do anything about. One limitation is clearly the research base. The pregnancy process biologically has to have a lot of similarities so it's easier to see how differences in environment and behavior might affect it, while child rearing is so much more varied and the outcomes we'd want to know have a really long time horizon--like what will this mean about future behavior and intelligence. In the absence of strong research and data Oster can do a good job talking about how to approach a decision, but it's just harder to shed a ton of light on an issue. However, there's a more basic problem that makes this book just not quite as effective--it's findings are roughly in line with what en vogue parenting styles are now. What made Expecting Better so great was it took all the typical old wive's tales we used to hear about things like you can't drink coffee or eat soft cheeses or deli meats and explained why that conventional wisdom wasn't quite right. To that end, she took advice a lot of pregnant women get and explained how it's just not correct and what the evidence was. Here, however, a lot of the advice seems to follow just what people tell you. She looks at whether babies should sleep on their back and finds they should sleep on their back--as everyone tells you now. She says sleep training works, again a super popular thing to do. Other things, such as the notion that the kid doesn't have to sleep in the same room as you for the first year, may not be conventional wisdom but are just so obvious from a practical perspective. Some of this is encouraging. It suggests that much of the nonsense we put pregnant women through may not be quite as entrenched in parenting (breastfeeding being the major exception). But it's also a clear case where we really need researchers to be doing more in this field.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Paige

    This book is a solid follow-up to Expecting Better, covering the first few years of life. I really liked it and it aligns perfectly with my own parenting philosophy. So why three stars? Well, reading parenting books is more like "homework" than anything. Luckily this one is short and to the point. If you are looking for reinforcement on your own views of circumcision, solid food, sleep training, etc. then look elsewhere. For almost every issue, Oster reviews the data and then concludes there's n This book is a solid follow-up to Expecting Better, covering the first few years of life. I really liked it and it aligns perfectly with my own parenting philosophy. So why three stars? Well, reading parenting books is more like "homework" than anything. Luckily this one is short and to the point. If you are looking for reinforcement on your own views of circumcision, solid food, sleep training, etc. then look elsewhere. For almost every issue, Oster reviews the data and then concludes there's no solid evidence in favor of one approach or another. (There are a few exceptions of course - vaccinations, putting babies to sleep on their backs, etc.) This is a pretty sharp contrast to the book on pregnancy, where the issues seem to be easier to study. Sadly, this book is unlikely to convince any reader of anything they don't already believe (i.e., to vaccinate their kids), so in a way it's pointless. I still appreciate Oster going out there to fight the good fight!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Thanks to the publisher, via Netgalley, for an advance e-galley for honest review. Many parenting books tend to go in one of two directions: very scientific or very emotionally based. Cribsheet is a great book for those of us who like data and statistics to back up decisions, and Emily Oster does an excellent job throughout balancing different viewpoints and interpreting the data that supports or refutes various claims.. Where I think this book would be most useful is to have in the home (or pick Thanks to the publisher, via Netgalley, for an advance e-galley for honest review. Many parenting books tend to go in one of two directions: very scientific or very emotionally based. Cribsheet is a great book for those of us who like data and statistics to back up decisions, and Emily Oster does an excellent job throughout balancing different viewpoints and interpreting the data that supports or refutes various claims.. Where I think this book would be most useful is to have in the home (or pick up from the library) as a reference to pick up when dealing with various parenting milestones. While it's packed with lots of fantastic information, it's not necessarily one that begs to be read as a whole, and instead would be more useful to have available when the time comes to make decisions.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Probably one of the best baby books out there, or at least my style of baby book: a book that says "shit man look at all these books and studies out there, let's go ahead and break down what they all say and which guidelines and recommendations and techniques come from sound statistical analysis and which ones are total horseshit." Didn't come away from this with any new insight but I did come away with lots of my own biases strengthened and confirmed and isn't that the whole point of reading ad Probably one of the best baby books out there, or at least my style of baby book: a book that says "shit man look at all these books and studies out there, let's go ahead and break down what they all say and which guidelines and recommendations and techniques come from sound statistical analysis and which ones are total horseshit." Didn't come away from this with any new insight but I did come away with lots of my own biases strengthened and confirmed and isn't that the whole point of reading advice-based nonficction anyway? "Ha, I already knew this. Good book!"

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mainon

    Emily Oster's first book, Expecting Better, was my pregnancy bible. I deeply appreciated her fact-based, data-driven approach to evaluating common pregnancy concerns and recommendations. She's an economist with a background in scientific health studies, and it shows. I felt so much more informed to make choices in pregnancy after reading her book. This book, Cribsheet, tries to do the same with the first few years of parenting. Choices about breastfeeding, co-sleeping, circumcision, discipline, m Emily Oster's first book, Expecting Better, was my pregnancy bible. I deeply appreciated her fact-based, data-driven approach to evaluating common pregnancy concerns and recommendations. She's an economist with a background in scientific health studies, and it shows. I felt so much more informed to make choices in pregnancy after reading her book. This book, Cribsheet, tries to do the same with the first few years of parenting. Choices about breastfeeding, co-sleeping, circumcision, discipline, monitoring your child's development -- she looks at all of these. The problem is that there seems to be a lot fewer of the really helpful studies or evidence-based conclusions than there were for the pregnancy questions. So although her approach remains the same, I don't have quite the overwhelming feeling of "I'm prepared for these parenting decisions" the way I did with pregnancy decisions. Still, I'm very glad I read it, and I trust it will be useful as I get closer and closer to my own post-birth years (beginning in just a few months, now!).

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ben Iverson

    More parenting books like this, please! I really like Oster's style of (1) turning to the data, (2) being willing to state that we just don't know the right answer a lot of the time, and (3) recognizing that there are trade-offs in every decision, so not everyone will make the same choice. Even though I'm on kid #5 and already pretty set in my ways, there was plenty that I learned in this book, and I found it interesting throughout. I think maybe the only caveat is that you have to be willing to More parenting books like this, please! I really like Oster's style of (1) turning to the data, (2) being willing to state that we just don't know the right answer a lot of the time, and (3) recognizing that there are trade-offs in every decision, so not everyone will make the same choice. Even though I'm on kid #5 and already pretty set in my ways, there was plenty that I learned in this book, and I found it interesting throughout. I think maybe the only caveat is that you have to be willing to wade through a lot of numbers to get much out of the book. Not a problem for me at all, but fair warning. And, even if that isn't really your thing, I think it is totally worth pushing through it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Maggie

    Highly recommend. No parenting book--until this one!--has actually made me feel calmer than when I started it. I love Oster's approach. By applying the data, she makes an irrefutable case for or against certain parenting decisions (vaccines, spanking, etc), but where the data doesn't lean one way or the other, she provides the evidence that exists and makes an unbiased recommendation (with the exception of spanking--she names her biases there which I appreciated). She covers a LOT without making Highly recommend. No parenting book--until this one!--has actually made me feel calmer than when I started it. I love Oster's approach. By applying the data, she makes an irrefutable case for or against certain parenting decisions (vaccines, spanking, etc), but where the data doesn't lean one way or the other, she provides the evidence that exists and makes an unbiased recommendation (with the exception of spanking--she names her biases there which I appreciated). She covers a LOT without making anything overwhelming. I'd love to read it again in a few years as a healthy reminder!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    This book can be considered a follow up to Oster's "Expecting Better." She goes through many of the big decisions parents make after a child's birth: breastfeeding vs. formula, co-sleeping vs. crib, staying at home vs. working outside the home, punishment, vaccines, screen time, etc. She is not a doctor and does not claim to be (she's an economist who teaches at Brown) so she analyzes all of the studies performed on these often controversial topics and then leaves the reader to make their own co This book can be considered a follow up to Oster's "Expecting Better." She goes through many of the big decisions parents make after a child's birth: breastfeeding vs. formula, co-sleeping vs. crib, staying at home vs. working outside the home, punishment, vaccines, screen time, etc. She is not a doctor and does not claim to be (she's an economist who teaches at Brown) so she analyzes all of the studies performed on these often controversial topics and then leaves the reader to make their own conclusions. I found this book to be SO REASSURING because it dispels the myth that a lot of what you hear about raising a baby is based on fact. For example, we constantly hear that co-sleeping is dangerous. But it turns out that if neither parent binge drinks or smokes, it's actually less dangerous than driving in a car with an infant. Definitely a worthwhile read and I will be considering everything she presents along with my trusted doctor and my kid's pediatrician.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Paul Veldhouse

    Reading this book as a pediatrician was helpful. I will say it largely reinforced a bunch of the things that I already knew. However it helped me put a little more empirical data in my back pocket. It is a great summary of a lot of evidence that can be hard to sort out. I also love the whole idea of helping people just relax by looking at the data and realizing there are going to be different solutions for different families and that’s ok.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin

    Very funny and lots of great information, especially with regards to a framework for decision making. I especially appreciate her emphasis on including parents' preferences (especially the mother's, which is often overlooked) in decision making, and the advice from her pediatrician to "try not to think about that" with regards to all the potentially dangerous situations your child(ren) could get into. Much like Expecting Better, I found it very reassuring.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Zach

    Full disclosure, I only read the chapters after age one. Why? Because I raised four children to the age of 1 and I don't need to relive it. Too much trauma. Plus--to paraphrase Philip Larkin-- you screw so much up when you're a mom or a dad. Had I known there was data-driven parenting I still would have been terrible at it most of the time. But I like the idea of reading this book BEFORE YOU HAVE THE LIVING, SCREAMING, SHITTING HUMAN(S).

  23. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Although I felt that many of the later sections were just short segments that basically amounted to there being no evidence one way or another, the bulk of the book was a really interesting look at the various studies and research about parenting. And if nothing else, it did make me feel a whole lot better about my own parenting, so I'm giving it a (biased) five stars for that alone.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kate Lobo

    90% of the book can be distilled into: the research and data on xyz is inconclusive, so do what’s best for your family and it’ll probably all be fine. Didn’t really learn anything super significant, except that apparently economists think that having a higher quantity of children means they will be lower quality. Not really my style of parenting book

  25. 5 out of 5

    Max Bolingbroke

    Not as interesting as "Expecting Better" - this is no slight on the author, but rather simply because science has mostly failed to establish any well-supported large effects in the area of early childhood development. Ultimately you'd get more out of reading "The Nurture Illusion" which is at least upfront about the futility of parents trying to improve the lives of their children :-)

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cory

    With a few exceptions, the overall gist is that there isn't a ton of high quality research to prove one parenting choice is better than another so you should use your judgement and do what's best for your family. I do think this is an important message but there was nothing groundbreaking here for me.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Krysta

    Love the writing, information, and approach this book offers. Very helpful to parents in helping provide a framework and information for making informed decisions that are right for YOU and YOUR FAMILY. Definitely recommend this book. Love that it is easy and entertaining to read in addition to providing a lot of data to help in making decisions.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Patrick

    Another great book by Oster. I think I preferred the first slightly, because it could be more prescriptive. This book covers a more complicated subject and almost by definition or at least by design can't be as prescriptive. At least not until there is more data.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Marta

    Great read for first time parents or those who need a refresher when a new baby is born. Similar in style and outcome to Michel Cohen’s The New Basics which I recommend parents looking for a medical handbook.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Summer

    I enjoyed this take on a baby tips book - present the facts & statistics, the costs & benefits, and ultimately telling you to choose which way makes the most sense for you and your entire family.

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