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Cribsheet: A Data-Driven Guide to Better, More Relaxed Parenting, from Birth to Preschool PDF, ePub eBook

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Cribsheet: A Data-Driven Guide to Better, More Relaxed Parenting, from Birth to Preschool

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Cribsheet: A Data-Driven Guide to Better, More Relaxed Parenting, from Birth to Preschool PDF, ePub eBook From the author of EXPECTING BETTER, an economist's guide to the early years of parenting With EXPECTING BETTER, award-winning economist Emily Oster spotted a need in the pregnancy market for advice that gave women the information they needed to make the best decision for their own pregnancies. By digging into the data, Oster found that much of the conventional From the author of EXPECTING BETTER, an economist's guide to the early years of parenting With EXPECTING BETTER, award-winning economist Emily Oster spotted a need in the pregnancy market for advice that gave women the information they needed to make the best decision for their own pregnancies. By digging into the data, Oster found that much of the conventional pregnancy wisdom was wrong. In CRIBSHEET, she now tackles an even great challenge: decision making in the early years of parenting. As any new parent knows, there is an abundance of often-conflicting advice hurled at you from doctors, family, friends, and the internet. From the earliest days, parents get the message that they must make certain choices around feeding, sleep, and schedule or all will be lost. There's a rule--or three--for everything. But the benefits of these choices can be overstated, and the tradeoffs can be profound. How do you make your own best decision?

30 review for Cribsheet: A Data-Driven Guide to Better, More Relaxed Parenting, from Birth to Preschool

  1. 5 out of 5

    April

    I am reviewing an ARC of this book I received through Edelweiss. I LOVED Oster's first book Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know. It relieved a lot of my concerns about pregnancy and childbirth and I would consider reading it again if I have a second child. I recommend it to all new moms. I was super excited that she now has a book for babies and toddlers because my son is just under two. I was hoping for some insight into thin I am reviewing an ARC of this book I received through Edelweiss. I LOVED Oster's first book Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know. It relieved a lot of my concerns about pregnancy and childbirth and I would consider reading it again if I have a second child. I recommend it to all new moms. I was super excited that she now has a book for babies and toddlers because my son is just under two. I was hoping for some insight into things like feeding and discipline. What I didn't like: Most of my disappointment with the book comes from the difference in available data on pregnancy and on small children. There are a lot more variables, as she will tell you, once a child is out in the world and these variables only get more complicated as the child gets older. It's hard to tell whether staying at home or working or having a nanny really affects a child's educational achievements because there are so many other contributing factors in families that choose each of those options. Because of this, most of the scientific suggestions are vague. The entire book can almost certainly be summed up as "Studies suggest that x has more positive effects, but the effects are not positive enough to outweigh a negative impact on your family's individual lifestyle." For example... She goes pretty deep into sleep training (I was biased as pro-sleep training going in, so take that into consideration). She concludes that sleep training generally does not cause harm and results in better sleep for both children and parents. HOWEVER, she points out that if sleep training will cause you anxiety and you are happy with an arrangement that doesn't involve sleep training, then that will most likely be better for your family. That's pretty much how all the recommendations go. That's something I really liked about her analysis, but it also meant I didn't get the same sense of comfort from data that I got from the first book. What I liked: The same things that were great about Expecting Better are present here. She takes apart studies on everything from breastfeeding to potty training. What I learned from the book is that any of the things we obsess about at each stage probably don't have the impact that we fear it will. Toward the beginning she elucidates a bit on the "Mommy Wars" and the reasons we fight so hard to justify our decisions and, unfortunately, deride the parenting decisions of others. It feels important that we are doing the best thing for our kids objectively. And if what we are doing is objectively right, then other moms are objectively wrong. This book tears that apart. Like Amy Poehler said in Yes Please, "Good for you, not for me." This book helps you look at the cost/benefit analysis of things like early toilet training and Montessori preschools and make your own informed decision that is probably different from your sister's, but also better for your family. There's an anecdote she tells at the end of the book where she frets about the possibility her daughter being stung by a bee to her pediatrician. When she asks the pediatrician for advice, the pediatrician says "Don't think about it." It's not good advice for every situation, but for certain ones it's perfect. I don't think this book is as "must read", but if you need a little perspective or feel like you're doing it all wrong, it is a helpful tool for affirming your decisions and making sure they match your family's values.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kate Lobo

    90% of the book can be distilled into: the research and data on xyz is inconclusive, so do what’s best for your family and it’ll probably all be fine. Didn’t really learn anything super significant, except that apparently economists think that having a higher quantity of children means they will be lower quality. Not really my style of parenting book

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mazie Lynn

    As a parent, it is quite difficult for me to suspend all bias in favor of the evidence and I do not believe this author has been able to either. Although she admits her particular bias in one section of the book (spanking), a few snarky comments in other sections leave me feeling as though she has other unclaimed biases in play. There was some helpful fodder for thinking through the many issues parents confront in the earliest days, months, and years of their children's lives, but I suspect folk As a parent, it is quite difficult for me to suspend all bias in favor of the evidence and I do not believe this author has been able to either. Although she admits her particular bias in one section of the book (spanking), a few snarky comments in other sections leave me feeling as though she has other unclaimed biases in play. There was some helpful fodder for thinking through the many issues parents confront in the earliest days, months, and years of their children's lives, but I suspect folks drawn to a book like this will still spend a great deal of time researching on their own. Maybe some researchers will appreciate the gaps in evidence noted in this book and begin work filling them in. Oh, and, she and her medical editor seem to have overlooked that diastasis recti abdominis is often the reason for the "mommy tummy" she deems as mysterious.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Manal Omar

    Now that Sultan and I are expecting, we decided to do much reading on parenting (and by that I mean i do the reading, he does the listening). This is my first parenting book, and I can say it passed with flying colors as a perfect starter! Emily Oster writes about early parenthood, how to manage and deal with all the little stuff that nobody tells you about as a first-time parent, and she supports all of that with "excellent" data. She also goes beyond the early months until preschool. Shedding Now that Sultan and I are expecting, we decided to do much reading on parenting (and by that I mean i do the reading, he does the listening). This is my first parenting book, and I can say it passed with flying colors as a perfect starter! Emily Oster writes about early parenthood, how to manage and deal with all the little stuff that nobody tells you about as a first-time parent, and she supports all of that with "excellent" data. She also goes beyond the early months until preschool. Shedding light over concepts that have been mistaken or falsified. All you need to know about cognitive development, physical development, lanaguage senseiitvety, and all that matters after your child steps out of toddlerhood. I'd give big thumps up to Oster's incredibly fluid style of writing. It only tells me what a great professor she is, and how lucky her students are! she has the ability to simplify everything and make it understandable and easy to catch. Thank you Emily Oster.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jillian Doherty

    As a first time, new mom I was very interested in Oster's down to earth views on parenting, especially with her practical background. She quickly addresses common themes of not knowing what information to trust, and pointing out a better-established recourse. Everything from the scary days after delivery, to what to do when nothing makes sense, to how to work toward better relationships with your partner. She also gives earnest information how all the practicality of newborn to toddle As a first time, new mom I was very interested in Oster's down to earth views on parenting, especially with her practical background. She quickly addresses common themes of not knowing what information to trust, and pointing out a better-established recourse. Everything from the scary days after delivery, to what to do when nothing makes sense, to how to work toward better relationships with your partner. She also gives earnest information how all the practicality of newborn to toddler life - from swaddling, punishing, school prep and letting things go (which i do feel there is a parental pressure to equally do and not do). My favorite part is that she summarized each chapter with refreshingly clear bullets at the end of each part - so helpful!! Galley borrowed from the publisher.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Gretchen Alice

    Like I mentioned before, I’m not pregnant, I just dig science. And this is a pretty good compilation of research related to baby stuff, though a lot of the advice boils down to do what works for your family so both baby and parents are in a good mental head space to deal with the stress of having a new person. Also, vaccinate your kids, obviously.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Bryan

    Mostly not relevant for me anymore - with a 28-month old, I've already made most of the infant and toddler decisions discussed in this book. But, I love her approach and agree that data is interesting and empowering. I identified with her very much. My favorite chapter title: "Wait, you want me to take it home?" which is exactly how I felt when discharged from the hospital with a 2-day old infant.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Maya

    I loooved Oster’s “Expecting Better” (and recommend it to every pregnant friend), and I waited months for “Cribsheet” to come out. This book has the same data-informed approach and friendly tone. However, it just didn’t seem like this book was packed with as many reassuring aha’s as Expecting Better was. The fertility and pregnancy topics that Oster covered in EB were largely grounded in research that is hard for a layperson to find and even harder to interpret. By contrast, the early childhood I loooved Oster’s “Expecting Better” (and recommend it to every pregnant friend), and I waited months for “Cribsheet” to come out. This book has the same data-informed approach and friendly tone. However, it just didn’t seem like this book was packed with as many reassuring aha’s as Expecting Better was. The fertility and pregnancy topics that Oster covered in EB were largely grounded in research that is hard for a layperson to find and even harder to interpret. By contrast, the early childhood topics that are covered in Cribsheet are Very easily researched and well reported by news outlets and parenting sites on a regular basis. I had already run across most of the data Oster cites here in my own research over my son’s first 11 months of life. I do think I would have found this book to be much more useful had I read it in the first couple months. So I would recommend to new parents as worth reading, albeit less essential than Expectjng Better.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cory

    With a few exceptions, the overall gist is that there isn't a ton of high quality research to prove one parenting choice is better than another so you should use your judgement and do what's best for your family. I do think this is an important message but there was nothing groundbreaking here for me.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    I’m not a huge fan of parenting books- there is seldom anything “new” or revolutionary. This book is less about advice and looking at global numbers. Vaccines - great. Infant crying - it’s awful and there’s not much you can do about it. Safe sleep - important, but looks at the data from an unemotional standpoint. Sleep training - doesn’t hurt the kid, can be good for everyone’s mental health. Breastfeeding - not as great as we pretend it is. Potty training - happens later than it used to, your k I’m not a huge fan of parenting books- there is seldom anything “new” or revolutionary. This book is less about advice and looking at global numbers. Vaccines - great. Infant crying - it’s awful and there’s not much you can do about it. Safe sleep - important, but looks at the data from an unemotional standpoint. Sleep training - doesn’t hurt the kid, can be good for everyone’s mental health. Breastfeeding - not as great as we pretend it is. Potty training - happens later than it used to, your kid will eventually use the toilet. Basically, you’re probably not actually screwing up your child, which is nice to hear.

  11. 4 out of 5

    M. Nasiri

    It is my Blinkist read about parenting. Cribsheet provides a unique and insightful perspective on early-childhood parenting – that of an economist. Given its focus on decision-making, cost and benefit analysis, risk assessment, and data interpretation, the academic discipline of economics provides a useful framework for thinking about the difficult decisions that new parents have to make when raising their babies. (Blinkist summary)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I adore this book just as much as I did Expecting Better. It will join EB as my #1 recommendation to anyone planning to get pregnant, pregnant, or with young kids.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Indra

    I wish I came across this book a year and a half ago! As a spreadsheet lover and a somewhat paranoid at times, “helicopter” parent, this was incredibly insightful and soul nurturing. I just wish it had more in detail chapters on very specific topics and more data! 😂

  14. 4 out of 5

    Alicia Bonk

    Read this book, make your own evidence-based decisions that work for your family, and stop worrying about what others are doing or saying with their children. Audiobook- totally recommend! It was nice being able to not pay 100% attention on subjects I didn’t need evidence based convincing on.. such as vaccinating your children (yes, please do). So much good information in here... one of my favorites: breastfeeding does have benefit on infants in early months, but after that, no major benefits co Read this book, make your own evidence-based decisions that work for your family, and stop worrying about what others are doing or saying with their children. Audiobook- totally recommend! It was nice being able to not pay 100% attention on subjects I didn’t need evidence based convincing on.. such as vaccinating your children (yes, please do). So much good information in here... one of my favorites: breastfeeding does have benefit on infants in early months, but after that, no major benefits compared to formula. Biggest benefit of breastfeeding was for the mother - lowers chances of breast cancer by 20-30% (sign me up). I could go on forever about this book. I will stop there.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Edinburgh

    I didn’t really read the whole thing, I skimmed parts of it, because they are not relevant to my life right now. But I love the data she presents. It’s very reassuring, and not alarmist, as all other data on parenting seems to feel. I will probably buy this when I am closer to this stage of life.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Grider

    Another quick and interesting read from Oster. I didn't enjoy this as much as 'Expecting Better' but that may just be because there are less studies for her to dive into for older kiddos. My main takeaways from this book were that parents should: read to their kids ASAP, sleep train, and pick a discipline method and stick with it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Missy Heard

    In this generation, mom’s have it rough with all the controversial “Mommy war” things such as breastfeeding, being a stay-at-home mom or a working mom, what school to send your kids to, potty training methods, how to discipline, etc. The list goes on and on. As a person who loves FACTS, the author - an economist - dives into the strongest studies to help you make choices that are best for you and your family.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Shahedah

    This is a partial review since I haven’t actually read the whole book yet - only the chapters on the immediate days/months after labour. But it’s a winner for me and I’ll be buying this to keep on hand and refer to over the next 5-6 years. I love Emily Oster’s matter-of-fact and completely non-judgemental style. The way she presents the data, decision-making models and the options available just makes me feel much more competent and relaxed, and eases a lot of my anxieties. This is a partial review since I haven’t actually read the whole book yet - only the chapters on the immediate days/months after labour. But it’s a winner for me and I’ll be buying this to keep on hand and refer to over the next 5-6 years. I love Emily Oster’s matter-of-fact and completely non-judgemental style. The way she presents the data, decision-making models and the options available just makes me feel much more competent and relaxed, and eases a lot of my anxieties. Ultimately there is no one right way to parent, but this book is so wonderful for helping you find the right way for you and your family.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Paige

    This book is a solid follow-up to Expecting Better, covering the first few years of life. I really liked it and it aligns perfectly with my own parenting philosophy. So why three stars? Well, reading parenting books is more like "homework" than anything. Luckily this one is short and to the point. If you are looking for reinforcement on your own views of circumcision, solid food, sleep training, etc. then look elsewhere. For almost every issue, Oster reviews the data and then concludes there's n This book is a solid follow-up to Expecting Better, covering the first few years of life. I really liked it and it aligns perfectly with my own parenting philosophy. So why three stars? Well, reading parenting books is more like "homework" than anything. Luckily this one is short and to the point. If you are looking for reinforcement on your own views of circumcision, solid food, sleep training, etc. then look elsewhere. For almost every issue, Oster reviews the data and then concludes there's no solid evidence in favor of one approach or another. (There are a few exceptions of course - vaccinations, putting babies to sleep on their backs, etc.) This is a pretty sharp contrast to the book on pregnancy, where the issues seem to be easier to study. Sadly, this book is unlikely to convince any reader of anything they don't already believe (i.e., to vaccinate their kids), so in a way it's pointless. I still appreciate Oster going out there to fight the good fight!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Eliz L

    Good overview of the many decisions required of new parents and what the body of research says about their impact on kids and parents.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    I was kind of disappointed in this in the end. It's not Emily Oster's fault. I again enjoyed her approach to reading and translating research , but for most parenting questions there are very little. What little there is seems to give us much direction. Expecting Better seemed to have more to go on, which makes sense! There is more science to pregnancy than to raising an individual human. It sort of goes along with the general sense I had already that everything is easier if you are wealthy and I was kind of disappointed in this in the end. It's not Emily Oster's fault. I again enjoyed her approach to reading and translating research , but for most parenting questions there are very little. What little there is seems to give us much direction. Expecting Better seemed to have more to go on, which makes sense! There is more science to pregnancy than to raising an individual human. It sort of goes along with the general sense I had already that everything is easier if you are wealthy and educated and after that, a lot of it's up to the kid. The most evidence is around the really early hospital and feeding/sleeping decisions so I would recommend it to anyone in the midst of baby not sleeping or breastfeeding misery because there is a lot to support you relaxing about sleep training and, a lot of frustrating information on how much the benefits of breastmilk are oversold. Though there were a few moments in this where I felt like she was being flip. Not so much about the research but by throwing in thoughts or suggestions that weren't actually research based. Maybe that's fine but it wasn't what I was looking for in this book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kara

    There are always more neuroses around the corner when you’re parenting. Dr. Oster’s economist take on parenting is refreshing. Here’s the data to make informed decisions, and most of that data comes down to: do what works for you, and try to worry less. I wish I’d had this book when my kid was younger.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lesley

    In summary, there's a lot of parenting advice online that is based on bad data (or no data at all). Emily presents what data is known, but with the caveat that parents also need to consider what works best for them and their family. When our loved ones get pregnant, they will now be getting a copy of Cribsheet and Expecting Better.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

    Her first book was so much more decisive and helpful. This book was basically “the data doesn’t tell us much.... there are some studies that I don’t think are very good that maybe sort of kind of suggest something, but in the end we we really just don’t know.”

  25. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    This is loads better than Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know in following through on the promise of "here's the research that's been done so far and how you might make a decision about this." With the exception of the subsection on nipple confusion*, the content lines up with other reading I've done. I suspect this might be because with pregnancy advice, there was a resistance to unnecessary changes in pre-existing habits, whereas with This is loads better than Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know in following through on the promise of "here's the research that's been done so far and how you might make a decision about this." With the exception of the subsection on nipple confusion*, the content lines up with other reading I've done. I suspect this might be because with pregnancy advice, there was a resistance to unnecessary changes in pre-existing habits, whereas with the actual raising of kids, it could be approached with more of a fair blank slate. I appreciate that there's a lot of room to apply your own values and adapt to your particular family situation. I think there could probably be more done to err on the side of, "what seems likely we might have evolved to be better adapted for," but I often think that anyway. *I think there's a legitimate beef with the term "nipple confusion" to dissuade against pacifier usage or bottle feeding if you have goals to exclusively breastfeed, but I think the author may have misunderstood the mechanisms behind why pacifier usage and bottle feeding would detract from breastfeeding goals. Probably it should be called "insufficient demand to drive up milk supply" or "bottle preference" instead--using pacifiers to allow comforting from sucking could replace nursing that's needed to establish demand for milk supply, and bottle feeding without paced bottle feeding allows for much faster eating with much less work, which could lead to pumping over nursing, which can also lead to supply concerns and less adapting of the breastmilk to the child's needs like creating antibodies to illnesses they might have. Perhaps these effects are not that large, but it seems a stretch to me to then conclude that pacifier use and bottle feeding have no effect on breastfeeding duration.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Logan Hughes

    An overview of the actual science around a number of hot topics in parenting - 'Mommy Wars' fodder, where personal feelings quickly eclipse objectivity and polarize people into extreme stances such as "If you sleep train your child you are abusing them" or "If you don't sleep train your child you are abusing them." Cool-headed Oster explains what the studies show, when we have them, and what they don't show: why, for example, a study that shows correlation may not be showing causation. She also An overview of the actual science around a number of hot topics in parenting - 'Mommy Wars' fodder, where personal feelings quickly eclipse objectivity and polarize people into extreme stances such as "If you sleep train your child you are abusing them" or "If you don't sleep train your child you are abusing them." Cool-headed Oster explains what the studies show, when we have them, and what they don't show: why, for example, a study that shows correlation may not be showing causation. She also repeatedly emphasizes the importance of customization and personal choice. One of the fallacies of Mommy Wars arguments is that they often proscribe a one-size-fits-all approach to parenting, but topics such as whether it's better for your children to go to day care or have a stay-at-home parent, to be breast fed or have formula, etc., often depend on your particular family's circumstances, what alternatives are available to you, what drawbacks and limitations may exist for your family that don't exist for others, and, yes, the parents' preferences. You, as a parent, count too! I am not a parent, and so I didn't personally connect to this book as much as I did to Oster's previous book about pregnancy (maybe because judgment of pregnant people feels like more of a direct expression of general misogyny to me than judgment of parents, and I'm more personally angered by misogyny than parent-phobia). That said, I think it would be an excellent book for any parent of a baby or toddler.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    Another excellent, research based parenting book that's essential reading. She makes some controversial observations: --Studies show that sleep training works without detrimental affects. Let that baby cry (well, not a super young baby) --While there's evidence that watching more than 3 hours of TV a day can cause a decline academically in children under 4, there's not really any evidence about less than that. Also, despite what seems like a constant barrage of anti-screen time studies Another excellent, research based parenting book that's essential reading. She makes some controversial observations: --Studies show that sleep training works without detrimental affects. Let that baby cry (well, not a super young baby) --While there's evidence that watching more than 3 hours of TV a day can cause a decline academically in children under 4, there's not really any evidence about less than that. Also, despite what seems like a constant barrage of anti-screen time studies, there actually haven't been many research studies into its affects. --Children before 18 months that attend daycare perform slightly less well academically up to fifth grade, while children who go to daycare after 18 months perform slightly better academically than average. After fifth grade? They all perform about the same to all the kids (including those with a stay at home parent) That last point was most helpful to me. I want to put my 16 month old in a part time daycare when she turns two, but there's so much guilt out there about how children need a stay at home parent. Well, it looks like it doesn't really matter. Of course, it does matter financially. This is a book I'll be recommending. It doesn't cover all the things (or even most the things) I worry about--especially in the first year--but its research is vital.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    I agree with Becks' Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know. It's not because of the writing or approach, which are both strong, but there are just more fundamental limitations that Oster can't do anything about. One limitation is clearly the research base. The pregnancy process biologically has to have a lot of similarities so it's easier to see how differences in environment and behavior might affect it, while child rearing is so much more I agree with Becks' Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know. It's not because of the writing or approach, which are both strong, but there are just more fundamental limitations that Oster can't do anything about. One limitation is clearly the research base. The pregnancy process biologically has to have a lot of similarities so it's easier to see how differences in environment and behavior might affect it, while child rearing is so much more varied and the outcomes we'd want to know have a really long time horizon--like what will this mean about future behavior and intelligence. In the absence of strong research and data Oster can do a good job talking about how to approach a decision, but it's just harder to shed a ton of light on an issue. However, there's a more basic problem that makes this book just not quite as effective--it's findings are roughly in line with what en vogue parenting styles are now. What made Expecting Better so great was it took all the typical old wive's tales we used to hear about things like you can't drink coffee or eat soft cheeses or deli meats and explained why that conventional wisdom wasn't quite right. To that end, she took advice a lot of pregnant women get and explained how it's just not correct and what the evidence was. Here, however, a lot of the advice seems to follow just what people tell you. She looks at whether babies should sleep on their back and finds they should sleep on their back--as everyone tells you now. She says sleep training works, again a super popular thing to do. Other things, such as the notion that the kid doesn't have to sleep in the same room as you for the first year, may not be conventional wisdom but are just so obvious from a practical perspective. Some of this is encouraging. It suggests that much of the nonsense we put pregnant women through may not be quite as entrenched in parenting (breastfeeding being the major exception). But it's also a clear case where we really need researchers to be doing more in this field.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    I was torn between giving this book 2 or 3 stars, but I went with her presumption that no one would ever want more than 2 kids and gave her 2 stars. Somewhere in the first part of this book, I was curious as to what she wrote about VBAC (vaginal birth after Cesarean) in her earlier work. She spent a whopping page on it and her conclusions were "meh, better not." No discussion of rupture, no discussion of success rates or complications that can result from repeated C-sections such as accreta, no I was torn between giving this book 2 or 3 stars, but I went with her presumption that no one would ever want more than 2 kids and gave her 2 stars. Somewhere in the first part of this book, I was curious as to what she wrote about VBAC (vaginal birth after Cesarean) in her earlier work. She spent a whopping page on it and her conclusions were "meh, better not." No discussion of rupture, no discussion of success rates or complications that can result from repeated C-sections such as accreta, no comparison between maternal death rates for elective repeat cesareans and successful VBACs, etc. Obviously, while a major public health issue, it's one that she doesn't care about, because who would ever want to have more than two children? This book was similarly wishy-washy and safe. Swaddle... or don't. Breastfeed... or don't. Room in with your baby... or don't. Circumcise... or don't. I'm not really seeing why this book is necessary because it adds nothing to the parenting discussion. The upshot is that pretty much nothing you do will severely harm your children aside from spanking them, sharing a bed with them if you're an alcoholic smoker, or failing to vaccinate them, all of which are pretty much common sense.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Thanks to the publisher, via Netgalley, for an advance e-galley for honest review. Many parenting books tend to go in one of two directions: very scientific or very emotionally based. Cribsheet is a great book for those of us who like data and statistics to back up decisions, and Emily Oster does an excellent job throughout balancing different viewpoints and interpreting the data that supports or refutes various claims.. Where I think this book would be most useful is to have in the home (o Thanks to the publisher, via Netgalley, for an advance e-galley for honest review. Many parenting books tend to go in one of two directions: very scientific or very emotionally based. Cribsheet is a great book for those of us who like data and statistics to back up decisions, and Emily Oster does an excellent job throughout balancing different viewpoints and interpreting the data that supports or refutes various claims.. Where I think this book would be most useful is to have in the home (or pick up from the library) as a reference to pick up when dealing with various parenting milestones. While it's packed with lots of fantastic information, it's not necessarily one that begs to be read as a whole, and instead would be more useful to have available when the time comes to make decisions.

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