Hot Best Seller

The Queen of Attolia PDF, ePub eBook

4.6 out of 5
30 review

The Queen of Attolia

Availability: Ready to download

File Name: The Queen of Attolia .pdf

How it works:

1. Register a free 1 month Trial Account.

2. Download as many books as you like (Personal use)

3. Cancel the membership at any time if not satisfied.


The Queen of Attolia PDF, ePub eBook Revenge When Eugenides, the Thief of Eddis, stole Hamiathes's Gift, the Queen of Attolia lost more than a mythical relic. She lost face. Everyone knew that Eugenides had outwitted and escaped her. To restore her reputation and reassert her power, the Queen of Attolia will go to any length and accept any help that is offered...she will risk her country to execute the perfect Revenge When Eugenides, the Thief of Eddis, stole Hamiathes's Gift, the Queen of Attolia lost more than a mythical relic. She lost face. Everyone knew that Eugenides had outwitted and escaped her. To restore her reputation and reassert her power, the Queen of Attolia will go to any length and accept any help that is offered...she will risk her country to execute the perfect revenge. ...but Eugenides can steal anything. And he taunts the Queen of Attolia, moving through her strongholds seemingly at will. So Attolia waits, secure in the knowledge that the Thief will slip, that he will haunt her palace one too many times. ...at what price? When Eugenides finds his small mountain country at war with Attolia, he must steal a man, he must steal a queen, he must steal peace. But his greatest triumph, and his greatest loss, comes in capturing something that the Queen of Attolia thought she had sacrificed long ago...

30 review for The Queen of Attolia

  1. 4 out of 5

    Emily May

    Now I finally understand why everyone seems to like this book so much more than the first. You see, The Thief is a wonderful little book filled with excellent writing, an interesting protagonist, an exciting fantasy world and a great big twist near the end. The Queen of Attolia had all of this, but it just had more of everything. It was everything I loved about the first book... on steroids. Every character and every sentence - damn it, every word even! - is important, serves it's own purpose an Now I finally understand why everyone seems to like this book so much more than the first. You see, The Thief is a wonderful little book filled with excellent writing, an interesting protagonist, an exciting fantasy world and a great big twist near the end. The Queen of Attolia had all of this, but it just had more of everything. It was everything I loved about the first book... on steroids. Every character and every sentence - damn it, every word even! - is important, serves it's own purpose and is never wasted. This is a characteristic in books that is rare but oh so wonderful when you manage to find it. Being told in 3rd person, unlike book one which was from Eugenides POV, allows the reader to see the bigger picture and to better understand the world that forms the backdrop of this series and the political relationships between Attolia, Eddis and Sounis. But, oddly, at the same time I felt like we also got to know Eugenides far better than in The Thief, and I loved him all the more in this second installment. He's such a perfectly imperfect character, he's flawed, he's brave without being ridiculously self-sacrificing, he's a little devil and yet you can't do anything but be on his side. Whatever happens to him in the next book has suddenly become very important to me. And it's not just Eugenides... I mean, how easy would it have been for the author to make the Queen of Attolia nothing more than a villain sat on a foreign throne? But that's not the story Megan Whalen Turner is trying to tell. Like I said, Turner doesn't waste characters and her use of 3rd person in this novel lets us readers see the real queen behind that stone mask of cruelty. Of all the qualities I like characters to have, complexity is quite possibly my favourite. But I think the book was really sold to me when Turner managed to successfully pull off a romance that surprised me, pleased me and just generally worked without being soppy or cheesy. A young adult novel with romance that doesn't make me cringe? Genius.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tatiana

    Update 1/6/19 This may be my book soulmate. Original review If I were ever to write a book, this is the one I would want to see my name on. I am not very good at writing positive reviews, so this will probably sound cheesy, but I totally loved every word, every sentence of this story! "The Queen of Attolia" is a second book in Megan Whalen Turner's series about the Thief of Eddis Eugenides. I moderately liked the first book, mostly for its conciseness and intricate world-building rooted in Greek his Update 1/6/19 This may be my book soulmate. Original review If I were ever to write a book, this is the one I would want to see my name on. I am not very good at writing positive reviews, so this will probably sound cheesy, but I totally loved every word, every sentence of this story! "The Queen of Attolia" is a second book in Megan Whalen Turner's series about the Thief of Eddis Eugenides. I moderately liked the first book, mostly for its conciseness and intricate world-building rooted in Greek history and mythology, but this second book exceeded any kind of expectations I had had. It is just so much better than "The Thief" written from Eugenide's 1st person POV. "The Queen of Attolia" is written in 3rd person which allows us to understand the workings of minds of all major players - King of Sounis, Queens of Attolia and Eddis, magus, etc. The story starts when Eugenides is caught by Attolian guard. The Queen of Attolia executes her revenge on the Thief, and in a way that almost breaks Gen. Queen of Eddis, enraged by her Thief's plight, embarks on a war with Attolia, and Sounis starts his attack on both neighboring countries in an attempt to unite the territory against the outside threat of Mede. What follows is a complex story of politics, diplomacy, military strategies and intrigue. I am not lying when I say I loved every word of this book. Because every word of it is important, there is no fluff or filler, every sentence matters. That is probably why it took me 3 days to finish this 300-page book, I simply didn't want to miss anything! But there is more. I really loved the character developments in this book. Just like in "The Thief," we never fully know the narrators. In many ways, they remain anonymous to us, but whatever is revealed, is layered and complex. I enjoyed following Eugenides' transformation from a snarky selfish boy into a strong man. And let me tell you, the romance in this book totally catches you off-guard and certainly pushes boundaries. I can't wait to read the next book - "The King of Attolia" and see where Turner takes her characters next. Why, of why does it take her on average 5 years to write each book?

  3. 4 out of 5

    ❄️Nani❄️

    Long overdue for a reread. Gen, my one and only, we meet again. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ I want to climb on the highest rooftop and scream at the top of my lungs - I LOVE THIS MAGNIFICENT SERIES WITH EVERY FIBRE OF MY BEING! but I feel even that won't do my feelings—and this series—justice. Give me a fantasy/fantasy-esque book with heavy political intrigue and you’ve got my undivided attention.  Reading a novel filled with court intrigue, heavy conflicts - more behind the scenes conniving an Long overdue for a reread. Gen, my one and only, we meet again. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ I want to climb on the highest rooftop and scream at the top of my lungs - I LOVE THIS MAGNIFICENT SERIES WITH EVERY FIBRE OF MY BEING! but I feel even that won't do my feelings—and this series—justice. Give me a fantasy/fantasy-esque book with heavy political intrigue and you’ve got my undivided attention.  Reading a novel filled with court intrigue, heavy conflicts - more behind the scenes conniving and pulling strings than actual battles, complicated stories full of clever manoeuvres and characters Is. My. Jam! I could never get enough. And given the somewhat slowness of its predecessor, I was not prepared for the magnificent surprise that was The Queen of Attolia. Wow! I felt almost every emotion while reading this. Anger, hate, love, sadness, rage (so much rage) and oh the confusion! Before I even got to page 50 my jaw was wide open with shock and amazement.  The more I thought I knew the less I actually knew anything when the whole plot took a completely different direction than I’d expected.  And the characters! I truly didn’t know what to make of them.  Let’s start with The Queen of Attolia - okay, wow. Throughout the book I hated her. I admired her. I was enraged by her. I freaking loved her and by the end, I was simply in awe of her. Eugenides. What the actual hell. Alright, before I move on, let me preface this by saying, the next book in the series The King of Attolia, put Eugenides on the number two spot of my top five favourite male characters in fantasy. Ever. What a character. What. A. Character! Now, onto the topic at hand, I have never been so damned confused by a character (Confusion, as you can see, is the theme of this review). He was nothing like I’d expected! Especially when compared to the Eugenides of book one, The Thief. It was almost like they were two different people. In a good and a bad way. One thing I did love was that he was not the all-perfect, all-brave, badass protagonist we’re used to seeing who could simply do no wrong or whom no one could best. In fact, he rarely got things right, in this book at least. I was happy to see him humanised and humbled by some extremely disturbing, albeit significant events. He did mess up, got bested at times and he was also painfully vulnerable and weak when the situation demanded it. However, he was also amazingly clever when he needed to be. I love him. I can't say it enough. The plot was amazing and every chapter gripped my attention from start to finish and nothing dragged, nor was there ever a single boring moment.  Why some books have to end, I will never, in my life, understand.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Elise (TheBookishActress)

    If I am the pawn of the gods, it is because they know me so well, not because they make my mind up for me. Okay, wow, this was... way better than book one. I love how this one plays around with point of view, showing us both Eugenides’ views on Attolia and Attolia’s view on Eugenides: it’s an excellent view into both of their characters. While I think Whalen Turner occasionally relies too much on not letting you into the head of a character so she can execute a plot twist, we still get an exce If I am the pawn of the gods, it is because they know me so well, not because they make my mind up for me. Okay, wow, this was... way better than book one. I love how this one plays around with point of view, showing us both Eugenides’ views on Attolia and Attolia’s view on Eugenides: it’s an excellent view into both of their characters. While I think Whalen Turner occasionally relies too much on not letting you into the head of a character so she can execute a plot twist, we still get an excellent look into these characters, a view that feels dimensional if perhaps not full. The other thing I liked about this book is something I knew I would — political intrigue. Whalen Turner does such a grand job with the power moves, the wars, the intrigue of it all. This one is narratively all over the place, but it is made to work. It feels like a wide story rather than an incoherent one. The plot twists and plot reveals are consistently interesting and often surprising. I also love that the two lead female characters we get in this book are both such powerhouses. And hey, maybe it’s time to talk about badass girls — Attolia and Eddis both make for such excellent political leaders, each in their own way. This book may be led by Eugenides, but I think it’s more about Attolia and Eddis and the power in different kinds of strength. Attolia has lost sight of that in her own power, her own life of ruthlessness. The Queen of Attolia is basically a takedown of the idea of petty competition between women and the idea that there’s only one way to be strong for a queen; Attolia and Eddis contrast so wonderfully. And oh my god, my favorite part of this whole book was Attolia. She is such a good antivillain. We start out seeing her as a complete and total villain, and end seeing her as a very well humanized antihero. Her redemption arc — or, to be more specific, reframing arc — is the best part of this book, and absolutely worth reading for. I mean, I like Eugenides too. He's a mess and a delight. But mostly I’d die for her. Something I did think was missing for me was my investment in the first half of the book; we’re basically thrown into a political situation we only got a glimpse of in book one, and it’s difficult to really get invested in the world and the characters. I also think a few of the plot twists are kind of easy to guess and the time between them too extended. I wished for less lagging between the big moments and big twists. But: I think the conclusion completely makes up for it. This book aged fantastically in my mind; I read this in April and it's August and I'm still thinking about how much I adore this specific book. It kept me invested and I so want to continue with my journey through this world. here are my other series thoughts: book one - ★★★☆☆ book two - ★★★★☆ book three - ★★★★☆ book four - ★★★★☆ book five - ★★★★☆ book six - TBD Blog | Goodreads | Twitter | Youtube

  5. 4 out of 5

    Alienor ✘ French Frowner ✘

    [Edited with my favorite SPOILERISH quotes - hidden behind a spoiler tag, because I'm not a monster] 4.5 stars, rounded up because...well, if you must know, because Eugenides. Hellooo, name's Anna, I just finished The Queen of Attolia and my mind is utterly blank. I'd say I'm speechless, but everyone knows that I always confuse talking with breathing so nope, not happening. However I am genuinely sorry but I don't think I'll be able - or even want to - put my thoughts into words this time. First [Edited with my favorite SPOILERISH quotes - hidden behind a spoiler tag, because I'm not a monster] 4.5 stars, rounded up because...well, if you must know, because Eugenides. Hellooo, name's Anna, I just finished The Queen of Attolia and my mind is utterly blank. I'd say I'm speechless, but everyone knows that I always confuse talking with breathing so nope, not happening. However I am genuinely sorry but I don't think I'll be able - or even want to - put my thoughts into words this time. First because there are many outstanding reviews out there already, given that I'm late to the Gen-is-awesome party ; the second - and perhaps the most important - reason would be that I want to warn you, yes, YOU THERE, you who haven't read this series yet, and who wander oblivious, unaware of the merits of this little gem, you, I strongly advise you to stay clear from any review and savor these novels blind. (she says, after providing links to other reviews... the irony is not lost on me XD) Trust me, the experience will be better (why am I under the impression that I'm some sort of dungeon mistress here, that I do not know). If you really need a little more incentive, trust this : The Queen of Attolia is splendidly plotted, its word is inhabited by characters you will adore and want to protect under fire (when you won't be strangling them, but), including strong women (yes PLURAL), a poisonous snake (I KNEW HE WAS A SLYTHERIN COME HOME GEN BABY) and a minister of war who doesn't know that he's hilarious (to me), the writing... well do tell, what can I say about a writing so compelling that I've read the damn book in a few hours, barely stopping to eat? Huh? Now if you would excuse me, I might forget to look at my watch (3:55am, dammit!) and maybe start The King of Attolia, because if you should know something about me, it's this : my restraint is so thin, I wouldn't see its threads if I looked at them in full light, and I'm not one bit ashamed. My favorites ""quotes"" (more like scenes) are full of BIG spoilers, so don't look at them if you haven't read the book, but aw damn, I love these characters so much <3 (view spoiler)[ "Bending over Eugenides, she grabbed his head by the hair above his forehead and twisted. Eugenides's eyes opened, and his feet trashed in panic. Looking up at her, with her face filling his field of vision, he stopped moving as if suddenly paralized. "Goatfoot," she said, "do you understand what is going to happen to you?" I guessed at this moment that she was wearing his earrings, and I was not so discreetly cheering like a maniac XD "Attolia snapped, "You have any mistresses and I'll cut your other hand off." Besides her, Eddis stiffened. Attolia raised her chin to meet the look that her seneschal had said would melt lead. Eddis opened her mouth, but before she could put her thoughts into words, Eugenides laughed. Laughing, he dropped his head onto the bed; then he looked up to grin at Attolia. She looked back at him, and her cheeks flushed. She said, with sincerity, "You are a poisonous little snake." Eeeeeeps I defy you to not smile at this part <3 "I did that next. She said there would be a hunting party leaving this morning; perhaps I'd like to join." "And?" Eddis asked, looking at his arm. He hadn't ridden well enough to hunt on horseback even before losing his hand. "I told her I'd already been hunted in Attolia, thank you very much." "Oh, Gen," sighed Eddis." BAHAHAHAHAHAHA I LOVE YOU GEN "Nooo," he said, and he looked over at her. In his eyes Eddis saw a hint of something she couldn't remember having seen there before. Panic. "I didn't think about being king," he said, his voice hoarse, either from worry or from the bruises around his neck. Eddis stared. "Your capacity to land yourself in a mess because you didn't think first, Eugenides, will never cease to amaze me. What do you mean you didn't think about being king? Is Attolia going to marry you and move into my library?" I'll never stress enough how much I love their siblings dynamics. "What will you do now?" "Oh" - he tried unsuccessfully to keep the tremor out of his voice - "grovel, I suppose." "I've heard you do that before," said Attolia, briefly amused in spite of herself. Eugenides swallowed. "That was begging," he said with a better effort at lightness. "There wasn't much opportunity from groveling last... time." He stumbled, then added evenly, "I am very good at groveling." MY HEART "Eddis looked at her minister, curious. "Your head? she asked. Attolia explained. "He had to be forcibly dissuaded from strangling his son." "So have we all from time to time," Eddis said seriously. One of Attolia's eyebrow rose in carefully conveyed surprise. Eddis took not of the expression, amused to have found at last, she was certain, the original of the look Eugenides had copied. She smiled. Attolia hesitated, then smiled herself, very briefly. In her expression Eddis saw hope for her Thief, and her heart lightened." Damn, there are TOO MANY, I'll need to update this later, because Gen's waiting^^ (hide spoiler)] PS. Am I the only one wondering how old Gen is, exactly? My reviews for the other books of the series : ۩ Book 1, The Thief ★★★★ ۩ Book 3, The King of Attolia ★★★★★ [ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS I'VE EVER READ] ۩ Book 4, A Conspiracy of Kings ★★★★ For more of my reviews, please visit:

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    $1.99 Kindle sale, Feb. 10, 2019. This is the great but hard-hitting sequel to The Thief (which, fair warning, you absolutely need to read first). This is a fantastic fantasy series, with a strong flavor of Ancient Greek mythology and life. The gods are real and they care, in a remote way, but they can be cruel. My highest recommendation for this series! If you haven’t read it, you’re missing out! Review posted at www.fantasyliterature.com: Megan Whalen Turner’s The Queen of Attolia, the second bo $1.99 Kindle sale, Feb. 10, 2019. This is the great but hard-hitting sequel to The Thief (which, fair warning, you absolutely need to read first). This is a fantastic fantasy series, with a strong flavor of Ancient Greek mythology and life. The gods are real and they care, in a remote way, but they can be cruel. My highest recommendation for this series! If you haven’t read it, you’re missing out! Review posted at www.fantasyliterature.com: Megan Whalen Turner’s The Queen of Attolia, the second book in her QUEEN’S THIEF fantasy series, begins much the same as The Thief, the first book in this series: Eugenides (Gen) the thief is in prison. This time it is the Attolians who have captured him, but he’s made them, especially their queen, even more angry than he had the kingdom of Sounis in the first volume. From this similar beginning, however, the plot veers in some completely unexpected directions. Whalen Turner explained this in a Publisher’s Weekly interview:I could have written a whole series about fun, cool, exciting things Gen could get away with, but they would all be leading up to a point where he did something he didn’t get away with. The next significant thing that was going to happen to Gen would be when he got caught. It was inevitable. So I started Queen there. I knew some people would be upset but I trusted they would also see it had to happen eventually. To write something else would be a kind of lying to ourselves.It’s difficult to say much more without spoiling the story. This book, even more than most, is one that should be read without being spoiled. The first part of The Queen of Attolia is heart-wrenching and difficult reading, however. The first time I attempted to read it, about a dozen years ago, I foundered on the rocky part of the plot and didn’t finish it. However, after reading the third book in this series, The King of Attolia, and falling in love with the characters all over again, I came back to The Queen of Attolia to give it a second try, about five years ago. I made it through the book that time and rated it three stars; I was still much more enthused about the other two books in the series than this volume. However, on this read, my third try, I’m rating it a strong four stars. Rereading the entire series, it has become more apparent how cleverly Whalen Turner has plotted this book, how well the books’ plots interlock with each other, and how brilliant and devious her characters are. Small nuances in the plot can carry significance. Each main character has layers and hidden depths. They can be charming and maddening, sympathetic and brutal, all at the same time. And the ancient Greece type of world, with gods and goddesses that are real and intervene occasionally in the lives of mortals, is fascinating:“Stop whining,” Eugenides said. “What?” Eddis’s expression shifted from wary to puzzled. “That was the message. For me, alone among mortals, the gods send their messenger to tell me to stop whining. That’ll teach me to go hide in a temple.”For a young adult fantasy, The Queen of Attolia has a surprising amount of complexity and depth. Due to the painful and disturbing content in some parts of the book, I don’t recommend this for middle grade readers, but the rewards for more mature readers are great. 2 3 4 enthusiastic stars. Next time I read it it'll probably jump to 5!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jo

    Oh my god. Honest to goodness spoiler lies within. (view spoiler)["Unable to guess the answer, she asked, "Who am I, that you should love me?" "You are My Queen," said Eugenides. She sat perfectly still, looking at him without moving as his words dropped like water into dry earth. "Do you believe me?" he asked. "Yes," she answered. "Do you love me?" "Yes." "I love you." And she believed him. (hide spoiler)] And if that isn't the most perfect, gut-wrenching way to finish a book, I don't know what is. I'm n Oh my god. Honest to goodness spoiler lies within. (view spoiler)["Unable to guess the answer, she asked, "Who am I, that you should love me?" "You are My Queen," said Eugenides. She sat perfectly still, looking at him without moving as his words dropped like water into dry earth. "Do you believe me?" he asked. "Yes," she answered. "Do you love me?" "Yes." "I love you." And she believed him. (hide spoiler)] And if that isn't the most perfect, gut-wrenching way to finish a book, I don't know what is. I'm not sure if I can even write a review for this book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Eliza

    2.5/5 Stars Well, I gave it a go and continued on with this series, with the hope that my 3 star rating for The Thief would be higher with this second novel. Heck, I expected a higher rating, because people kept on telling me, "The second book is loads better!" And? Was it? Well. To me, sorry to say, but it really wasn't. So, I guess I'm in the minority, once again. What the first novel in this series had, that The Queen of Attolia lacked, (to name a few) were: lively characters, an exiting advent 2.5/5 Stars Well, I gave it a go and continued on with this series, with the hope that my 3 star rating for The Thief would be higher with this second novel. Heck, I expected a higher rating, because people kept on telling me, "The second book is loads better!" And? Was it? Well. To me, sorry to say, but it really wasn't. So, I guess I'm in the minority, once again. What the first novel in this series had, that The Queen of Attolia lacked, (to name a few) were: lively characters, an exiting adventure, and more humor (I suppose). Even though I wasn't too fond of the first novel, reading this one made me realize that the characters felt more real in The Thief, than in this book. Though, I will admit that Gen was much more developed in this novel. We got to figure out more about him (his strengths and weaknesses), which I really quite enjoyed. (view spoiler)[For example, his depression after having his hand cut off. (hide spoiler)] However, his improved character didn't make up for the rest of the lot that fell flat. Also, do I even need to even bring up that random romance that just came out of the blue? C'mon. That was so sudden. Wasn't it? I thought so. With the second point, this novel did have adventure, I won't deny that. But it wasn't like the first book. In the first book we followed Gen (step-by-step) throughout his entire journey. But in this novel, we would hear about events that had occurred within lengthy paragraphs or quick conversations. This book just made me think of the saying: All talk, no action. It sums up this novel up so well. There were hardly any real scenes of action (the prologue was the strongest part of the book because the action in it was great), which was something I didn't like. Lastly, this novel was much darker and held little to no humor. While I completely understand why this novel was darker (it wouldn't feel right to be anything else), I just didn't like how different it felt compared to the previous novel. They almost don't feel like they belong in the same series. I don't know ya'll. I almost feel like I'm missing out on something with this series - but I guess it's just not my cup of tea. Overall, I will say there were many scenes in this novel that were much stronger than its predecessor - however, there were also many other scenes that lacked more than The Thief had. So with this I can say, that I probably will not continue this series. Though, I still might. Don't hold me to it. Right now, it's in the air.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Catie

    This was even better the second time around, and I'm so thrilled that I get to see Kamet again in the new book! He really does deserve his own story. Original Review: When I finished reading The Thief, I expressed some hope that the next books in the series would have a faster pace. Well, this is me eating those words. As far as I’m concerned, she can be as slow as she wants! The Queen of Attolia is a book to be savored. It is beautiful and rich, with complex, suffering, gorgeous characters that I This was even better the second time around, and I'm so thrilled that I get to see Kamet again in the new book! He really does deserve his own story. Original Review: When I finished reading The Thief, I expressed some hope that the next books in the series would have a faster pace. Well, this is me eating those words. As far as I’m concerned, she can be as slow as she wants! The Queen of Attolia is a book to be savored. It is beautiful and rich, with complex, suffering, gorgeous characters that I just want to spend all day with. It is also packs quite an emotional punch. In this book, we finally get to spend time with the real Eugenides. No more false obnoxiousness and bad manners. Don’t worry though, he still has that inner spark of cunning. As the book begins, he is captured by the icy Queen of Attolia, who initially orders his execution but then decides to do something even more damaging. The collision between Eugenides and Attolia sets into motion the breakdown of the fragile relationships between the three neighboring countries of Sounis, Eddis, and Attolia. As the nations start warring, the Medeans stand poised to insert their control. This book has all the great elements of a twisty political intrigue, but I think that at its heart it’s all about the internal battles of the characters. It’s about the devastation that comes when one’s identity is lost, and one must start anew. It’s about the struggle to hold on to the tiny bit of goodness inside, when the world demands so much ruthlessness. It’s about managing to hold on to faith and trust and grace when the whole world seems to be turning its back. It was so completely refreshing to read a romance not based on sappy, goofy, kind, caring love. Megan Whalen Turner presents an honest and challenging kind of love. There is an understanding here that sometimes relationships are built not on easy, careful acquaintance, but by collision, confrontation, and shared tragedy. It is definitely the title character, The Queen of Attolia, whose struggle affects me the most. I love her cold, quiet, powerful control combined with her inner fragility. I love how her history was revealed in little glimpses that made me more and more sympathetic to her. Reading this book actually makes me like the first book more, because I know so much more of the backstory. Now on to book three….

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bibi

    Love, love this book- and series, it helps that Ms Turner wrote one of the best (and adorable) male leads ever.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Limonessa

    I elected Froi as my favorite male character of the year for 2011, but Eugenides definitely gets second place. The Queen of Attolia is the second book in The Queen's Thief series by Megan Whalen Turner and in this review THERE WILL be spoilers. If you haven't read the first book, The Thief, I strongly suggest you not to continue reading this. I think that, if you liked The Thief, you'll probably like this book even more. I'd rather not get into the synopsis to leave all details undiscovered but I elected Froi as my favorite male character of the year for 2011, but Eugenides definitely gets second place. The Queen of Attolia is the second book in The Queen's Thief series by Megan Whalen Turner and in this review THERE WILL be spoilers. If you haven't read the first book, The Thief, I strongly suggest you not to continue reading this. I think that, if you liked The Thief, you'll probably like this book even more. I'd rather not get into the synopsis to leave all details undiscovered but this book is way more complex than the first one. A big detail that makes the reading experience completely different is that, while The Thief was told in our Eugenides' unreliable narrator's first person POV, The Queen of Attolia is narrated in third person omniscient, therefore giving the reader a glimpse into all protagonists' minds and actions and a better understanding of the political mechanisms of the story. So while, on the one hand, this latter technique is more "complete" for the reader, who's not constrained into one single character's biased and purposefully misdirected point of view, on the other hand, this book lacks, for obvious reasons, the big jaw-dropper that made the first book so special. While in The Thief, the whole book revolved around obnoxious Gen who played the lion's share, in The Queen of Attolia other characters finally get to play protagonists' roles and the reader gets the chance to form a personal opinion on them, unfiltered by Gen's eyes. Eugenides is very much changed from the first book. He's still obnoxious, but more charmingly so. His relationship, hid friendship with Eddis reminded me often of Finnikin and Isaboe in Finnikin of the Rock, I have to say. He grows quite a lot in the course of the book and I really connected with his character. He's bound to break your heart very early in the story, be warned and he's not a character that will leave you indifferent. Attolia was also a great character to discover, perhaps one of the more fascinating and complex. A fierce woman, she is constantly underestimated by her enemies but she is also a victim of her environment, a woman who had to build herself with steel, who has been fed to the sharks from childhood and had to learn to fight and survive, or be eaten. Hints about the nature of her relationship with Eugenides are detectable right from the start of the story and, even though I still did not quite see where Eugenides' love came from, I was really pleased with how it was developed. I'm not giving this book the highest rating because, even though to a lesser extent, I had problems with the pacing, like for The Thief. It was a tad too focused on political intrigues and descriptions of war strategies for my taste. I felt caught up and extremely involved in some scenes with Eugenides or Attolia protagonists, but rather detached and slightly bored during conquering of islands and naval deployments. Furthermore, I don't know it if was specifically my edition of the book that lacked one but I felt in dire need of a map to follow all this moving around of people and ships. Maybe, with the help of a little map, I would have been able to follow better the action and I wouldn't have felt so uninterested. Still, I was very satisfied with the book, I love Turner's writing style, concise and very a propos "military" I daresay and will be looking forward to secure a copy of the next book The King of Attolia. My dear Eugenides, what will you surprise us with next?

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lightreads

    Well well! So our pleasant, feather-brained little fantasy romp grew a bigger, bitchiner sequel. Turner made the very good choice of switching from first person to roaming third, and tossed us straight in to political intrigue and war and post trauma. So – and, frankly, this is one of those spoilers that has to be revealed because talking about the book without it is like talking about Harry Potter without talking about magic . . . this sentence was going somewhere. Since when is drunk reviewing Well well! So our pleasant, feather-brained little fantasy romp grew a bigger, bitchiner sequel. Turner made the very good choice of switching from first person to roaming third, and tossed us straight in to political intrigue and war and post trauma. So – and, frankly, this is one of those spoilers that has to be revealed because talking about the book without it is like talking about Harry Potter without talking about magic . . . this sentence was going somewhere. Since when is drunk reviewing this hard? Anyway this book! Which I liked very much, this book is about acquired disability, and identity changed by trauma, and all of that stuff. I reflexively withdraw from books with sudden acquired disability plotlines. I am predisposed for dislike from two directions: I have the lifelong disabled person’s disdain for badly done flailing and trauma and howling and “how will I ever survive I’d rather be dead” (um, you may have heard me demurely mention this on a previous occasion), and at least in the past four years I’ve also had the periodic raw-nerved sensitivity of sudden loss that can’t tolerate acquired disability actually done well. So it’s not that my standards are high so much as that they are . . . complicated. So reading this book and watching myself respond to it was actually really instructive in pinpointing what works in acquired disability stories and what doesn’t. What I liked about this book was that the acquired disability and the post-violence trauma were different processes. People almost never get that right, but they really are. Even when they spring from the same event, and even though they are both fundamentally a kind of violence done to identity, they . . . operate in different keys. They are different necessities to reconcile the old identity with the new circumscribed reality, with what you can’t do now and with what everyone else thinks you can’t do (also two different things). The other thing I liked was that the disability in this book was not about fetishizing pain or woobiness, but instead about fetishizing the person who came out the other side. The former is far more frequently creepy than the latter. And here the process is nicely drawn, with some beautiful moments in Gen’s long, quiet winter in his room, feeling out the new boundaries of his body one tiny increment at a time. And, “I thought I was doing so well.” Oh, yes. Here’s what I didn’t like. I think it is cheap and it is easy for author’s to shorthand their character’s post-disability trauma entirely into their discomfort with the injury being seen. It does make sense – the gazes of others are of course self-definitive, and this is a thing that people go through. But when you channel so much of the aftermath trauma into body discomfort you’re playing with fire. Because disability is not biological. It is not somatoform. Disability is a sociological condition rooted in the embedded culture’s incapacity to, I don’t know, embrace universal fucking design, and the resultant discord it projects back at the disabled person. I realize I’m being all modern social theory at a little young adult fantasy book, but you know what? You do have to deal with the physical pragmatics, but when you get bound up in this idea of body-based disability shame, you’re permanently stuck in the physical and you can’t get anywhere else. Anywhere a lot more interesting, frankly. Also, modern theory is just how I roll when I’m tipsy. So anyway. It’s a book about a smart-mouthed kid who gets hurt, and how he gets up again after, and how it hurts the people around him, and how it hurt the person who hurt him. Big stuff, for a silly little young adult fantasy.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

    Just like the first book in the series The Queen of Attolia was a decent old school coming of age YA fantasy story. The world was heavily inspired by Greek mythology. Even to the point of sharing some of that same mythology! The story mixed action, political intrigue, and adventure but ended up being told at a fairly sedate pace. The plot and story in this sequel was engaging enough. Gen has gained a bit of fame after his exploits in the first book but he needs his wits as well as his spying and Just like the first book in the series The Queen of Attolia was a decent old school coming of age YA fantasy story. The world was heavily inspired by Greek mythology. Even to the point of sharing some of that same mythology! The story mixed action, political intrigue, and adventure but ended up being told at a fairly sedate pace. The plot and story in this sequel was engaging enough. Gen has gained a bit of fame after his exploits in the first book but he needs his wits as well as his spying and thieving skills to help Eddis keep her people from war. Tensions and bickering between the nations of Eddis, Attolia, and Sounis are high and if that was not bad enough The Medean Empire looks to have gained a foothold in the Court of Attolia. The Mede are a scary enough threat that they are feared by all three countries! Eddis and Gen have to be both creative and lucky to keep their country free and at peace. Megan Whalen Turner has a slightly distant writing style and her books tend to have a sedate pace to them but for all that her writing still tends to be weirdly engaging and her characters have just enough about them that they do have some emotional resonance for me. I felt like The Queen of Attolia was an upgrade on The Thief in almost every regard even if it was not a massive upgrade. The story in this one was more engaging with the big focus being on the political strife between the three nations of the region. Adding in the threat of the Mede added an extra dimension to things. The other big upgrade in this second book was having both the Queen of Attolia and the Queen of Eddis as secondary POV characters. I felt it really helped flesh out both characters and that they were both interesting and added a lot to the story. Another big plus for me was the fact that the stuff with the magic and the Gods of this world was kept at a minimum in this book. I'm more of a fan of the mundane adventure and political intrigue in this series so having the focus in those areas really helped me enjoy this instalment of the series more than the first. I'm just not a giant fan of the Gods of this series as they feel like weak imitations of the Greek Pantheon. That said, I did feel like the few moments the Gods did feature in this book were well done and helped enhance the story. I figured out most of the big twists and turns well in advance but I still feel like they were well done by Turner and I enjoyed both the journey and the destination of the story. I feel like Turner did an especially good job at handling what could have been an awkward romance for Gen. All in all I felt like this was an enjoyable book and a solid upgrade on the first book in the series so I'm looking forward to reading the next book in the series to see what else is in store for Gen and the three nations! Rating: 3.5 stars. I'm rounding down but I was close to rounding up! Audio Note: I listened to the older Jeff Woodman version of the audio this time. I feel like it was a good call. Steve West did an OK job with the last book but I switched to Woodman this time and feel like I enjoyed his take on the world and characters a tiny bit better. West can make some of the characters sound overly bitter and whiny and I feel like Woodman did not fall into that trap and that resulted in a more enjoyable take on the story. I'll go with the Woodman versions of the series from here onwards until I'm forced to switch back to Steve West. Mind-boggling really that Woodman recorded four books in the series and was not retained for the sequels. It is probably one o those weird moments when the audios changed publisher mid-series. Fair play to the new publisher HarperCollins for having West rerecord the whole series as I do love consistency of interpretation even if I'm going to go with the Woodman versions while I can lol!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Robin (Bridge Four)

    4.25 Gen Stole My Heart Stars I had a great time reading this with a few friends at Buddies Books & Baubles I liked The Thief it was a solid 3 star read, it took a little while to get into but the ending was very solid. The Queen of Attolia though….well let’s just say that it had some very unexpected and crazy surprises in store for me. It was so much better than the first book with complex characters and more than one twist I wasn’t expecting. I really love it when a book blindsides me with 4.25 Gen Stole My Heart Stars I had a great time reading this with a few friends at Buddies Books & Baubles I liked The Thief it was a solid 3 star read, it took a little while to get into but the ending was very solid. The Queen of Attolia though….well let’s just say that it had some very unexpected and crazy surprises in store for me. It was so much better than the first book with complex characters and more than one twist I wasn’t expecting. I really love it when a book blindsides me with something that I never saw coming and there were exactly 3 instances in this book where I had no clue ‘that’ was going to happen until the bomb dropped. This series might seem to read a little slower than some other fantasy novels because a lot of the tension and build up is political intrigue and posturing. It is about cunning and sneakiness, who is telling the truth, who is lying and is everything what it seems or something else entirely. I like smart dialogue like that where I’m trying to figure out the true motives and intension of all those involved. I had inklings and suspicions of the actions and reactions of all the characters but I never once knew for sure and to me that is extremely entertaining. The characters and their emotions are complex and intricate. I started this book disliking the Queen of Attolia, shortly into this I despised her, then I grew to maybe feel some empathy for her, to finally possibly understanding her and perhaps maybe now I have an smidgen of like happening for her. It was an emotional journey and I can say definitively that I have a healthy respect for her character. She is smart, cunning, manipulative and merciless sometimes. But The Queen of Attolia is a great three dimensional character doing her best to rule a country full of Baron’s who do not want to be ruled by her and she is so alone. There was a shadow behind the wardrobe, a deeper one at the edge of the window curtains. She sat up against her pillows. She pulled the bedclothes up as far as they would go and suppressed a perverse wish to have her old nurse come to chase away the darkness, perverse because she didn’t know if she wanted the shadows to be empty or not. She sat watching until the day dawned and the shadows lightened and were gone. Eugenides totally WOWED me. His growth in this book alone is amazing. He is not just the scheming prankster of a boy he once was. He went through some very traumatic experiences in this book and they have changed him. He is different now, but we the readers get to travel with him through that transformation and it is not always easy. This book is sometimes much darker than the previous installment. Eugenides might have taken a little time to bounce back after his tragedy but he got there with a little nudging. ”Stop whining. Eugenides said. “What?” Eddi’s expression shifted from wary to puzzled. “That was the message. Fe me, alone among mortals, the gods send their messenger to tell me to stop whining. That’ll teach me to go hide in the temple.” I had so much fun watching Eugenides get back on his feet and up to his old tricks. Everyone better watch out, he has a new ambition and plan that I think he was willing to go to the grave for. Eddis is another great character and smart Queen. It is so interesting to compare how similar and different she and Attolia are. Each is ruthless for their people and will do anything for those they care about. They are both smart, cunning and able to see into the true motivations of those around them. But where Attolia is surrounded by people trying to take a kingdom away from her Eddis is surrounded by family, friends and subjects that would protect and keep her in power at any cost. Eddis is allowed to seem softer and kinder because of this but do not let that fool you she is just as ferocious. “Magus,” she said from the doorway. “I’d heard that you had come.” Eugenides swung to look at her. “You started a war in my name without telling me?” he asked. “You will have to excuse me,” said the queen to the magus as if she hadn’t heard. “I overslept, or I would have greeted you earlier.” “Are we at war with Attolia?” Eugenides demanded. “Yes,” said his queen. “And Sounis?” asked Eugenides. “Nearly,” said Eddis. Being a Queen at war leaves no room for sympathy in most. The battle between the two Queens showed how each used their strengths to maneuver against opponents. I enjoyed the alternating PoVs to get a full picture of the story. I was happily surprised by the direction this story took and I had a great time trying to figure out who was going to outmaneuver who. I think Eugenides wins in that regard though. I think he could test a monk’s patience and get Gandhi into trouble. I’m really interested in seeing what he will do in his new role for the next book. Barron’s Beware Eugenides is coming for you is really all I can think of saying on that.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Peep (Pop! Pop!)

    I really wanted to like this book. I really did. I loved the first one, you know. I thought Gen was hilarious and really someone I'd like to have around with - even if he was annoying. The Queen of Attolia started out really good. I really was not expecting anything like that to happen. It was very surprising and I almost thought it was a dream. Where the first book had twists that had me smiling and gaping, this one had few. It was just ok. Eugenides had grown and changed so much that the only r I really wanted to like this book. I really did. I loved the first one, you know. I thought Gen was hilarious and really someone I'd like to have around with - even if he was annoying. The Queen of Attolia started out really good. I really was not expecting anything like that to happen. It was very surprising and I almost thought it was a dream. Where the first book had twists that had me smiling and gaping, this one had few. It was just ok. Eugenides had grown and changed so much that the only reason he is likable is because everyone else tells you and reminds you. Almost none of his original charm is there. He's quiet and brooding. Granted, he has reason to - but that doesn't mean I have to like it. And just when I thought the action would pick up and that there would be another twist absolutely nothing happens. It just keeps going until the end. I don't want to post spoilers so I can't elaborate, but I really thought that more was going to happen. The story just kind of ended in a ho-hum manner. A great portion of the book is devoted to talking about war and war strategy and where one army is and what this minister or Baron is thinking and it all became quite tiring after a while. Like I said, I really wanted to like this book and had high expectations. Looking back this isn't the first time that I've disliked a four star book and something tells me that it won't be my last.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Vinaya

    I have such mixed feelings about this book. I can't deny that it's an amazing book, but at times, I just wanted to throw it away and howl in frustration -- not because any of the characters were misbehaving, but because of the twists and the turns and all the bad things that I don't like happening to anyone. I think I should never write a book, ever, because I hate doing unpleasant things to my characters, and as for killing off characters I like -- forget it! The Queen of Attolia is one hell of I have such mixed feelings about this book. I can't deny that it's an amazing book, but at times, I just wanted to throw it away and howl in frustration -- not because any of the characters were misbehaving, but because of the twists and the turns and all the bad things that I don't like happening to anyone. I think I should never write a book, ever, because I hate doing unpleasant things to my characters, and as for killing off characters I like -- forget it! The Queen of Attolia is one hell of a ride. If The Thief was fairly predictable, well, Turner makes up for it in spades with this book. I started saying WTF!!! about five pages into the book, and I didn't ever stop until the end of the book. Turner's writing just gets better and better. It's sort of like how I felt towards the Kate Daniels series. After the first book, I was shrugging my shoulders saying, What's all the hype about. And then I read the second book, and the third, and I couldn't stop or put the books down even though I hadn't slept in forty-odd hours, and my eyes were gummy and I looked like someone from the zombie apocalypse. The Thief was kind of the same experience. The first book was good, and I really liked it, but the second book was EPIC! (Sorry to steal your adjective, Jillian!) *** SPOILERS *** I love Gen, no two ways about it. He stays true to character in The Queen of Attolia, with flair, but no flamboyance. Turner does a brilliant job with his character, making him clever-as-hell, but very, very human. SO imagine my shock when this model character suddenly declares a hitherto unsuspected love for his nemesis! To fall in love with someone who so obviously scares the crap out of you, who tortures you till you've lost your reason for living, well, that just feels unhealthy. So when I first heard Gen's declaration, I was not buying the love story. That was one of the parts where I wanted to chuck my book against the wall, so it's a good thing I was reading an ebook. I wanted to scream NO NO NO, you were doing SO well! But you know what, Turner managed to make the whole thing believable! I'm not saying I'm totally convinced, and I had some The Fountainhead-type flashbacks, but I could deal with the love story, and that is saying a lot, considering how Turner spends most of the first half of the book making us hate The Queen of Attolia, despite her occassional glimpse of humanity. Again, the thing with the Mede ambassador was no big surprise, but this time I'm convinced Turner actually set it up that way. *** SPOILERS END HERE *** This book wrenched me out of my complacent Urban Fantasy hole, where it's all action with very little emotion (at least the stuff I've been reading lately!) turned my perceptions topsy turvy and made me want to cry, and cheer and laugh. I loved the experience, even if I hated some parts of the book. Some side characters I'd love to see more of are Sophos, who does not appear in this book at all, the Magus of Sounis, whom I'd like to see a lot more of, and Gen's father, who is so awesome for someone who gets about ten lines in total! I can't wait to go read the third book, and for anyone who hasn't gotten hooked on this series yet, go buy the book RIGHT NOW!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Iris

    2.5 Edit: I originally rated this 3 stars, but... This book was just SO disappointing, so I'm bringing it down to 2.5. I just... don't even know what was this book. It was REALLY disappointing. Ummm... What on earth was this book? I enjoyed it, but... It was really all over the place. And it was significantly worse than the first book. And just... What even happened here?! Likes - Gen is a likeable MC. - Eddis is amazing! - I really like the Magus... and, um... the role he played in this one was ver 2.5 Edit: I originally rated this 3 stars, but... This book was just SO disappointing, so I'm bringing it down to 2.5. I just... don't even know what was this book. It was REALLY disappointing. Ummm... What on earth was this book? I enjoyed it, but... It was really all over the place. And it was significantly worse than the first book. And just... What even happened here?! Likes - Gen is a likeable MC. - Eddis is amazing! - I really like the Magus... and, um... the role he played in this one was very enjoyable. (view spoiler)[I like it when the MC's kidnap my favourite characters apparently...? Um... It creates good tension I guess... Yeah okay, I really don't know. I'm weird, okay? (hide spoiler)] - The writing is good. - The world is unique, and very well developed. - Interesting political tension. Dislikes - What the heck was that romance?! (view spoiler)[NO! JUST NO! Like, what on earth?! Attolia is sort of evil, and I sort of hate her, and WHYYYYYYYY?!?!?!?! And also HOW is this relationship healthy? Because I do NOT see it. AT ALL. (hide spoiler)] Honestly I hesitate to even call it romance, because there was NO development AT ALL, and just what even? It doesn't even make any sense. - The plot was all over the place. And just... sort of really boring. - The pacing was 1). Very unclear. & 2). Really bad. - The majority of this book was boring. - Not enough Sophos (aka. none). - Too much Attolia. - Did I mention I was BORED?! Yeah... it was NOT the best book I've ever read. I'll continue the series, because the first book was so good, and I really like (some of) the characters, but... they'd better be better than this one or I'm rioting.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alaina

    Wow. It took me a long ass time to dive into book 2 and I pray that I wont make that mistake when deciding on diving into the next one. The Queen of Attolia was so freaking good. I don't know what it is about this series but the audiobooks are so freaking entertaining. I just fall into the world and relax. I enjoy everything and anything that is happening. When it comes to loving a series, it's all about the characters. In this, you will meet Eugenides, aka Gen. He was caught on one of the night Wow. It took me a long ass time to dive into book 2 and I pray that I wont make that mistake when deciding on diving into the next one. The Queen of Attolia was so freaking good. I don't know what it is about this series but the audiobooks are so freaking entertaining. I just fall into the world and relax. I enjoy everything and anything that is happening. When it comes to loving a series, it's all about the characters. In this, you will meet Eugenides, aka Gen. He was caught on one of the night raids and he might end up losing his head. Irene, the Queen or Her Majesty, was an intriguing character because of her being so freaking paranoid about everything. Poor girl - so I could see why she would want to chop off my poor Gen's head AND I can totally be thankful that it didn't happen. Throughout the book, Gen's Queen (and cousin) wants revenge for him. So at this point I was expecting a GoT battle but ya know - more epic. War came.. and it was good. I enjoyed it but I wanted more. Besides all of that, a lot happens in this book which kind of made my head hurt keeping track of everything. Pretty sure someone was kidnapped, another takes drugs, and there's a "relationship" being talked about. It's kind of like an episode of Riverdale or something. I was in it for the long haul guys and ate it allllll up. Overall, I love Gen. Absolutely love this character because he just keeps getting better and better with each page. I need book three like I need a glass of water. Hopefully I can dive into it next month, if not before then.

  19. 4 out of 5

    mich

    ”You aren’t the boy hero anymore.” “Was I ever?” If you're familiar at all with this series, then you'll have already heard that this book is way better than the first one. But I'll just confirm it again anyway - cuz it IS. So much better. This is the story of two young, intelligent queens, Eddis and Attolia; it is a story full of political maneuvering and plays for power, of military strategizing and cunning. And in the midst of it all is Eugenides, the Queen’s Thief, who, true to form, will su ”You aren’t the boy hero anymore.” “Was I ever?” If you're familiar at all with this series, then you'll have already heard that this book is way better than the first one. But I'll just confirm it again anyway - cuz it IS. So much better. This is the story of two young, intelligent queens, Eddis and Attolia; it is a story full of political maneuvering and plays for power, of military strategizing and cunning. And in the midst of it all is Eugenides, the Queen’s Thief, who, true to form, will surprise you in ways you least expect. Complex characters -- I LIKE them. The writing made for an interesting experience for me. It had a sort of distance to it, and normally that would make me feel detached and disconnected from the characters but that was not the case here. Rather, it lent an air of mystery to them - you never quite knew anyone's true motivations. Sure, you suspect things, but nothing feels cut and dry, not until actual revelations are made. I LIKE it. Note: If you read the first book and thought it was boring, I can see how this one may bore you also. The pace and storyline IS more exciting and intriguing than The Thief, BUT there are a lot of "slow" parts also made up of political and war strategizing. Personally, though, I was fine with it, and thought any shortcomings in pacing were more than made up for with the awesome characterizations.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nariman

    I can't say anything about this book that would give it its worth or express how it affected me , the rating and putting the book in my favorites tells you very well how much I loved this book and loved every thing in it , and I don't know how to write reviews about the books I love anyway..... All I want to say is : this story in the hands of any other writer would've been much much longer , I am amazed at Megan Whalen Turner's ability to use the exact amount of words that can deliver the most e I can't say anything about this book that would give it its worth or express how it affected me , the rating and putting the book in my favorites tells you very well how much I loved this book and loved every thing in it , and I don't know how to write reviews about the books I love anyway..... All I want to say is : this story in the hands of any other writer would've been much much longer , I am amazed at Megan Whalen Turner's ability to use the exact amount of words that can deliver the most effect needed - no more , no less - , in this book no words are wasted , non you can cut and gain the same effect.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

    This was mind-bendingly good: rich and intricate, capable of conjuring up more twists and turns in 300 pages than some books do in 500, full of knotty characters, and with a surprising romance that I found myself infinitely more invested in than I could ever have guessed from the first book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Giovanna

    “He lies to himself. If Eugenides talked in his sleep, he'd lie then, too." I liked The Thief but at the same time I didn't love it. Sure, it was a good start but I was curious to see why The queen of Attolia has such a high rating. Well...I understand now. The queen of Attolia is ten times better than the first one. The character development, the plot: cleverly done, well written, if I had more time I would have read this one in a sitting. Gen goes through so much; he started as a clever but als “He lies to himself. If Eugenides talked in his sleep, he'd lie then, too." I liked The Thief but at the same time I didn't love it. Sure, it was a good start but I was curious to see why The queen of Attolia has such a high rating. Well...I understand now. The queen of Attolia is ten times better than the first one. The character development, the plot: cleverly done, well written, if I had more time I would have read this one in a sitting. Gen goes through so much; he started as a clever but also light-hearted thief and he became so much more. After a rough start (my heart was bleeding for him guys y.y) and tough events he finally could pull himself up and show that after all he really can steal anything (view spoiler)[even with just one hand. (hide spoiler)] . He can steal a person. A queen. Peace for his queen. "I'll be your minister--" "Of the exchequer? You'd rob me blind." "I would never steal from you," he'd said hotly. "Oh? Where is my tourmaline necklace? Where are my missing earrings?" "That necklace was hideous. It was the only way to keep you from wearing it." "My earrings?" "What earrings?” The queen of Attolia gives some space to other characters as well, while The Thief was focused only on Gen. I really liked this, I love multiple third person pov, and in this case we had so many interesting characters. I really liked Eddis, she is a woman in a position of power and while she needs Gen at her side, she is a strong female figure. And Attolia. Such a complex character that made me go through so many different emotions: I hated her, I actually insulted her while reading, and then I admired her. She seems cold and she can be, but she also so cunning and clever, a woman that can beat someone who wants to mislead her at his own game. (view spoiler)[“I cut off your hand. I have been living with your grief and your rage and your pain ever since. I don't think-I don't think I had felt anything for a long time before that, but those emotions at least were familiar to me. Love I am not familiar with. I didn't recognize that feeling until I thought I had lost you in Ephrata. And when I thought I was losing you a second time, I realized I would give up anything to keep you-my lip service to other gods, but my pride, too, and my rage at all gods, everything for you.” (hide spoiler)] Also, let me tell you, the plot was cleverly crafted. The author was slowly adding pieces to the puzzle but I couldn't figure out the final result. And the ending definitely surprised me, that twist was so sharp, I would have never seen it coming. (view spoiler)[“Would you have your hand back, Eugenides? And lose Attolia? And see Attolia lost to the Mede?' Eugenides's eyes were open. In front of his face the floor was littered with tiny bits of glass that glittered in the candlelight. 'You have your answer, Little Thief.” (hide spoiler)] A complex plot, full of political intrigue rather than action can always keep me on my toes. If you have started this series and even mildly enjoyed the first one you need to continue the series. NEED TO.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nomes

    It is easy for me to see why this is a beloved book for so many people. It is intelligent, clever, twist-y, tightly written and has many gasp-did-that-just-happen moments. It also has strong, admirable characters and a tortured, brave hero in Gen. It's the kind of fantasy not just written for teens, but smart enough to stand outside the YA genre on it's own. As for me, I have the lowest rating out of all my friends on here O.o What can I say? It's a book worthy of 5 stars, for sure. But I never ra It is easy for me to see why this is a beloved book for so many people. It is intelligent, clever, twist-y, tightly written and has many gasp-did-that-just-happen moments. It also has strong, admirable characters and a tortured, brave hero in Gen. It's the kind of fantasy not just written for teens, but smart enough to stand outside the YA genre on it's own. As for me, I have the lowest rating out of all my friends on here O.o What can I say? It's a book worthy of 5 stars, for sure. But I never rate the book, per se (it's hard enough rating as it is sometimes. I am often in a quandary over the whole star rating thing). My star ratings are an indication of my love/enjoyment of the book. Here, my three stars say I liked it: I could see it's quiet brilliance but it just (sadly, weirdly) didn't do much for me. I enjoyed my time with it but it didn't capture me (or bewitch me) as it seems to have done for everyone else. (this review isn't so much a review as a reason for my (lower) rating. As I know many of you will wonder what went wrong, haha. Nothing, just not a "me book" (Although I tried to love it, I really did ~ also, I actually think I enjoyed #1 The Thief more, contrary to popular opinion)

  24. 5 out of 5

    Justine

    And the read-along continues, After the events in The Thief. I felt detached someway with the series, but as like I always do when a possible slump is coming up, I would read reviews or spoil myself with the book I wanted to read. I succeeded in that order. I may, umm, have peek into the last page of The Queen of Attolia. AND, PHEW, AM I SHAKEN. GOOD. To pick it up and finally be up to date and ahead of the read-along group. Sorry, I am not sorry. The world building has expanded more, which made i And the read-along continues, After the events in The Thief. I felt detached someway with the series, but as like I always do when a possible slump is coming up, I would read reviews or spoil myself with the book I wanted to read. I succeeded in that order. I may, umm, have peek into the last page of The Queen of Attolia. AND, PHEW, AM I SHAKEN. GOOD. To pick it up and finally be up to date and ahead of the read-along group. Sorry, I am not sorry. The world building has expanded more, which made it more compelling for me to read. My experience than with the sequel grows more impatient and grows more intrigue into which events will unfold. The story-telling element about the gods and goddesses were once again done in The Queen of Attolia. I portion I very much love. The narration has changed, it is multifaced. It is changed into the third point of view. A reader can see glimpses of different character takes on a certain scenario they are all bound in. It is fitting and more effective too, for the bigger picture crafted by Turner. Geographically expanded. The locations are far more extensive and detailed. The political game intrigue is bigger than it already was. When it comes to the brewing war, the finance, the moves planned against each nation, the manpower, everything! Tables were always turning to which directions I cannot even forgo. Another the take on the twist for romance had shaken me awake. I find it unsettling at first but the supplication of history surely will throw off other readers out there too. The characters had improved in-depth characterization and development. Eugenides -had shown the side of how his disability is affecting his life. In which I find tastefully done. Done in a manner that one naturally goes through. The thoughts and the support around. I love that The Queen of Attolia sent out the message of positivity out of it. Attolia – I liked her then in The Thief but I had a feeling that she’ll be back, hence book two’s title known by me before beginning the series. She had displayed a wonderful character that had captured me. Her strong persona, and her rulerships way. Eddis – I saw her this new side of her, as a ruling queen and as Gen’s close relative. Script and banter among characters’ were charming. There had been a time where I may have been screeching weirdly. I couldn’t contain myself to publicly burst due to the goodness of these scripts. Giving the special highlights for the last chapters. One would be bursting out loud reading them. It had both contained humor and witty comebacks from both characters. Pulling off that twist into a satisfying ending. trigger warning/content: ableist slurs, murder, war themes. More Queen of Attolia • Instagram • Twitter • Ko-Fi

  25. 4 out of 5

    Melissa McShane

    This powerful sequel to The Thief is one of my very favorite books. Powerful and unflinching, it touches on topics like revenge, hatred, love, and forgiveness in a compelling story I love re-reading--though not very often, because it's neither simple nor superficial in the telling. I'm putting the rest in spoiler territory because I don't want to keep track of what is and is not a spoiler, and the spoilers happen really early in the book. If you haven't read the book, please do. (view spoiler)[I w This powerful sequel to The Thief is one of my very favorite books. Powerful and unflinching, it touches on topics like revenge, hatred, love, and forgiveness in a compelling story I love re-reading--though not very often, because it's neither simple nor superficial in the telling. I'm putting the rest in spoiler territory because I don't want to keep track of what is and is not a spoiler, and the spoilers happen really early in the book. If you haven't read the book, please do. (view spoiler)[I wrote in my review of The Thief that I'd forgotten Gen meets the Queen of Attolia in that book. What I had not forgotten is how complex a character she is--how from the beginning Gen troubles her mind and her heart. Having been goaded into cutting off his hand as punishment for stealing from her, she then can't stop thinking about him. I wonder how much of that is related to Moira having betrayed Gen to her, who doesn't believe in any gods (and why would she?). But it's comforting, and confounding, to watch her falling in love when she has no concept of it and no reason to love anyone, let alone the Thief of Eddis. Gen's reaction to being maimed is both heartbreaking and perfect. He goes through natural stages of grief and loss, and it takes a really long time for him to recover even to the point he does by the end of this book. And he's not fully recovered then, as we see in the sequel. Megan Whalen Turner said of this story that there were a lot of stories she might tell about Gen, but the next one (I'm paraphrasing), the important one to him, was the story of what happens when he's caught. Gen's character changes in profound ways because of what Attolia does to him, stripping away the childish flouting of authority but leaving him the certainty of who and what he is. He's still cocky and headstrong, but now it's because he's earned it. And the romance. When Gen tells Attolia/Irene (I tend not to think of her by her name until The King of Attolia) that he loves her, I feel most profoundly her confusion and dismay and even anger, because she cut off his damn hand and how can he possibly be telling the truth? Gen's relationship with her is and will always be complicated--having nightmares about being tortured by your beloved will do that--but I've never felt it was impossible. The very last scene, where the two of them talk about love and whether it matters or not, sticks with me: Attolia has done something that ought to put her beyond the reach of his love, and he loves her anyway. Loves her for who she is. The book is complex because it's happening on so many levels, but the one I can't stop thinking about is the long game the gods are playing with Gen, with Irene, with the Mede, with everyone. Gen's encounter with the goddess at the end, after Attolia reveals that it was the gods who told her how to capture him, says everything about how we so often don't see what's really going on until much later. The nameless goddess says: Softly Eugenides asked, "Why did my gods betray me?" "Have they?" asked the goddess as softly. "To Attolia, to the Mede..." Eugenides stuttered. "Would you have your hand back, Eugenides? And lose Attolia? And see Attolia lost to the Mede?" It's a telling question. What would you give up for your heart's desire? If Attolia's soul, and her love, could only come at the cost of Gen's hand, how much of a sacrifice would that be? The solution Eddis and Gen come up with, of Gen marrying Attolia and becoming King of Attolia, is a clever one on several levels (which might as well be the tagline for this novel, It Works On Every Level), not least because it gives Gen scope for his talents beyond the immediate needs of Eddis. Whether The King of Attolia is better than this one is a matter of personal preference, but I know I try not to read one without reading the other. This one, however, is truly brilliant. (hide spoiler)]

  26. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    4.5 STARS What a step up from The Thief! While I was massively underwhelmed by the first book’s attempt at a plot, the Queen of Attolia is an example of plotting at its finest. It had everything I felt was lacking in the first novel, while retaining what I loved, namely the complex and distinct characters. The writing was punchy and concise, and managed to cover a huge amount of plot in only 350 pages. This is no fluffy, romance-heavy fantasy novel – thank the Lord - but a novel centred around 4.5 STARS What a step up from The Thief! While I was massively underwhelmed by the first book’s attempt at a plot, the Queen of Attolia is an example of plotting at its finest. It had everything I felt was lacking in the first novel, while retaining what I loved, namely the complex and distinct characters. The writing was punchy and concise, and managed to cover a huge amount of plot in only 350 pages. This is no fluffy, romance-heavy fantasy novel – thank the Lord - but a novel centred around political intrigues and genuinely cunning characters, not the Barbie characters I'm so often bombarded with by the fantasy genre. Novels like this are rare gems amongst the wash of contemporary YA fantasy and need to be treasured at all costs. My one gripe, and this is actually a pretty major gripe no matter how trivial it may seem, is that, while both books are told from Gen’s perspective, The Thief is first-person and The Queen of Attolia is third-person. I see why the second book needed to be third-person – it had the odd scene from other perspectives including the eponymous Queen of Attolia – but why in the name of literary consistency was book one told in first person then? It just shows a lack of foresight and planning on Whalen-Turner’s part, and I really dislike that in authors. I read the second immediately after the first so the sudden shift felt jarring and just plain wrong. Consistency is key in any book series. Anyway, besides that, it was pretty much close to perfect. Cannot wait to continue the series.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bipasha

    "Steal peace, Eugenides" Approximately 150~ pages later... "You were the princess Irene the first time we met." "It means peace." BOO-YAH. IN YO FACE.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Max

    AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

  29. 5 out of 5

    Phee

    A great case of the sequel surpassing the first book. I can’t talk about any of the plot for this book without completely spoiling book one. And part of the beauty of these books is the clever plot. So instead I will talk about the characters, which in this book are many faceted and much more developed. We again follow our charming little thief Eugenides from book one and we also follow the Queen of Eddis and the Queen of Attolia. There are other characters but these are the main ones we follow. A great case of the sequel surpassing the first book. I can’t talk about any of the plot for this book without completely spoiling book one. And part of the beauty of these books is the clever plot. So instead I will talk about the characters, which in this book are many faceted and much more developed. We again follow our charming little thief Eugenides from book one and we also follow the Queen of Eddis and the Queen of Attolia. There are other characters but these are the main ones we follow. I loved the development for Eugenides in this book. You see a completely different side to him in this one. He is still whiny and arrogant, but something happens early in this book that changes he life forever. We see him change so much. He grows up that’s for sure. But he is weak as well. We see him terrified, we see him broken, we see him depressed and in despair. We see that he can fail and that the Gods ain’t always on the side you think they are. What I really loved about his character in this book was that his role changed. Don’t get me wrong, he is still very much the Queen’s Thief. But his methods have to change as do the items that he steals. The events of book one show you that Eugenides is tremendously clever, but you get to see much more of that cleverness in this one. And his smart thinking is very handy in the politics of this world. The character of Queen of Attolia was fantastic. Her character and her actions made me feel all sorts of emotions. At first I was terribly angry at her, believe me you will be too. I hated what she did and I hated her. As the book goes on you learn more about her. When you hear the story of how she became Queen your opinion of her will change. I guarantee it. I felt sorry for her and I started to appreciate what a strong woman she is. She is unsuspecting and ridiculously intelligent. She was underestimated because she was a woman and my oh my did she show them her strength. But you never know the full game she is playing. Or who her pawns are. She was a great character towards the end too. Although the ending did make me roll my eyes a little. The politics. Wow, they really make this book. I love it when you get to see the decisions getting made. Because you get all the different POV’s, you get to see all sides of the coin. Each side has its own merits, strengths, weaknesses and flaws. None of the Countries are completely right or good and none of them are completely wrong or evil. Depending on the view point you are following, each of the Countries are the heroes. The ending, as I said earlier was a little hmmm predictable and cheap? I mentioned in my review for book one that I guessed how it was all going to play out. Well in this one I knew the endgame (warning do not read the character summaries at the end of the book, Spoilers are everywhere!) so I knew how it was going to end. But I didn’t know the journey. I was waiting and waiting for Eugenides too pull of something really impressive and I just didn’t happen I’m afraid. Don’t get me wrong, I think in Gen’s fucked up little mind his feeling are true. They might not make sense but I think there is truth to them. But I think they didn’t make sense at this point in the story. Maybe after more time had past and he wasn’t so bitter. As in the first book, I really liked the storytelling aspect to this book. You can just tell that one day, someone is going to be sat round a campfire telling someone the story of Eugenides the Queens Thief. I’m looking forward to book three. Eugenides has some serious work and manipulation ahead of him. I’m eager to see how he solves his next challenge.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Angie

    Wow. I just...wow. Talk about a sequel. In fact, I'm pretty sure that as sequels go The Queen of Attolia should be the standard textbook in a class entirely devoted to how to write a killer sequel. The kind of sequel that will leave your readers completely unable to contain their glee at how it was just as good as they weren't daring to hope it would be. The kind that makes them keep their husbands up at night expounding upon the splendor that is such a sequel. A note on the cover: I truly love Wow. I just...wow. Talk about a sequel. In fact, I'm pretty sure that as sequels go The Queen of Attolia should be the standard textbook in a class entirely devoted to how to write a killer sequel. The kind of sequel that will leave your readers completely unable to contain their glee at how it was just as good as they weren't daring to hope it would be. The kind that makes them keep their husbands up at night expounding upon the splendor that is such a sequel. A note on the cover: I truly love the "new" covers. I do. But this one kind of makes me want to run and hide under the covers. And I'm glad I didn't see it until after I read the book. Rather, I went in blissfully unaware of what awaited me. A note on a spoiler: I generally try to avoid them. This review, however, may have to be an exception as there is one key plot element early on that is, well, integral to everything that happens thereafter. I can't find a way to dance around it, so consider yourself forewarned. The Thief of Eddis is on a secret mission for his queen in the heart of enemy territory. As he slips away into the night, something goes massively, horribly wrong and he is run down and captured by Attolian guards. For his audacity, Attolia takes his right hand and sends him back to his queen broken and on the brink of death. While Eugenides struggles to comes to terms with his drastically altered life, Eddis declares war on Attolia for his sake and the three countries are quickly at each other's throats. As their losses mount, Eugenides realizes there is one more thing he can steal from Attolia that will save his country from destruction. But, given their last encounter, does he have the courage to venture into Attolia again and face her one more time? Truth? I spent a a fair bit of time holding back sobs while reading this book. You see I fell in love with Eugenides. And he does not have an easy time of it here. The thing is he is so very awesome that you know he'll be okay. He has to be okay. But, still, his anguish and rage are so palpable it's hard to watch. And at the same time, my favorite scenes are the beautifully alternating passages in which Gen tries and fails and tries to piece his life together while, a world away, Attolia sits on her throne, staring blankly out the window, agonizing over what she did. It's so unexpected and had me glued to the page. And Turner's not kidding around with the love story. When it comes it takes your breath away. On top of it all this book's got a perfect ending. It'll make you smile through your tears.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.