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Relevance: Making Stuff That Matters PDF, ePub eBook

4.6 out of 5
49 review

Relevance: Making Stuff That Matters

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Relevance: Making Stuff That Matters PDF, ePub eBook After years studying remarkable companies and speaking to some of the most influential leaders around, Tim Manners has discovered a solution to the marketing woes of many brands. Stop worrying about demographics, fads, and cutting-edge advertising. Instead, focus on relevance. Manners shares how the best of the best create solutions to their customers’ problems and help th After years studying remarkable companies and speaking to some of the most influential leaders around, Tim Manners has discovered a solution to the marketing woes of many brands. Stop worrying about demographics, fads, and cutting-edge advertising. Instead, focus on relevance. Manners shares how the best of the best create solutions to their customers’ problems and help them live happier lives. You’ll learn how: Levi’s reasserted relevance when it created wardrobe solutions for men. Dunkin’ Donuts stopped trying to mimic the look and feel of Starbucks and found success by delivering a simple, quick cup of joe. Hasbro reinvented board games for today’s time-pressed consumers. Kleenex’s new germ-fighting tissues helped keep the company relevant by turning a useful product into a necessary one. Staples stopped wasting its shoppers’ time with extraneous products. Nintendo’s simple design for the Wii appealed to consumers of all ages and game designers alike, allowing it to outsell its competitors. The path to sustainable growth for your brand begins with designing meaningful solutions and providing them when and where people need them most. Relevance will teach you how to become—and remain—indispensable.

49 review for Relevance: Making Stuff That Matters

  1. 4 out of 5

    trav

    The main idea of the book is that if a business can become relevant to consumers, then that business can thrive. I think that's a great take on branding and was enough of a germ of an idea to get me to pick up the book. But the book never really grew from there, for me. After some basic "problems with the business mindset" kind of stuff, Manners presents six "Relevant Solutions". These are insights, innovation, investment, design, experience and value. Do any of these ideas sound new to you? Me e The main idea of the book is that if a business can become relevant to consumers, then that business can thrive. I think that's a great take on branding and was enough of a germ of an idea to get me to pick up the book. But the book never really grew from there, for me. After some basic "problems with the business mindset" kind of stuff, Manners presents six "Relevant Solutions". These are insights, innovation, investment, design, experience and value. Do any of these ideas sound new to you? Me either. The book is mainly a series of "stories from the field" as various business folks relay their experiences with their brands. Of course, Apple is there and the car manufacturers. Manners did seek out Patagonia, who I thought had the most valuable insights in the book. They seem to concentrate on growing inside each sales channel, rather than chasing the Nike's of the world. So that was cool. After many of the from-the-trenches stories the author adds a bullet point to try and sum up the story. Many of which seem kind of generic and dated. So while, in this internet-empowered era I do think businesses must work hard to serve each and every customer and bring value to their product, in essence, become relevant, I'm hoping to find more books out there that might delve a little deeper into each of Manners "Relevant Solutions".

  2. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    This is a difficult one to rate because I really can only compare marketing books against OTHER marketing books. If I compare it against the other stuff I read, it would be a lower rating. I love the layout of the book and how its proportions are about half the size of a typical book. Each vignette on a particular company success story is typically no more than a page and a half. It doesn't read like a college textbook, and perhaps that is what folks that gave the book one star were looking for This is a difficult one to rate because I really can only compare marketing books against OTHER marketing books. If I compare it against the other stuff I read, it would be a lower rating. I love the layout of the book and how its proportions are about half the size of a typical book. Each vignette on a particular company success story is typically no more than a page and a half. It doesn't read like a college textbook, and perhaps that is what folks that gave the book one star were looking for in this book. The book has the same style of Tim Manners daily e-mails "Cool News". If you walk away confused about how to promote your business, that might be the intent as I see the message is there is no perfect way: it all depends on the "relevance" of your brand. Relevance is always changing as people age, get more money, etc. In all fairness, some companies just get lucky in my opinion, so making some of these execs sound like heroes is a stretch. But it's a fun read overall.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    The person who recommended this mentioned only reading the first 75 pages to get the point. That is probably about right. After a certain point, it becomes a little repetitive and feels like the intellectual equivalent of cotton candy. Although the general premise is certainly true, its idea that relevance is delivered through things like authenticity, quality, and thoughtfulness as opposed to hype and style is fairly obvious.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

    I'm really loving this book. It talks about how to be successful, we have to focus on the core of solving problems, making what you offer a necessity rather than just a luxury. (Scarcity helps as well) While I love it because it confirms many of my own personal beliefs about communication and community, it is a very interesting read and well written.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Erin

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kristian

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tyler

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mario Barragan

  10. 4 out of 5

    Filipe Carvalho

  11. 4 out of 5

    Abhisek

  12. 5 out of 5

    Maureen

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bansi Patel

  14. 4 out of 5

    John_s

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mickey Dee

  17. 5 out of 5

    Brandi

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ben Verwys

  19. 4 out of 5

    Eliza

  20. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jorge Esteban

  22. 4 out of 5

    Gustavo

  23. 4 out of 5

    katja

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bex

  25. 4 out of 5

    Eldaa

  26. 4 out of 5

    Todd sigaty

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jen Chau

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    John

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rachael

  31. 5 out of 5

    Kaspar Minosiants

  32. 4 out of 5

    Tarek Amr

  33. 5 out of 5

    Derek Neighbors

  34. 5 out of 5

    David

  35. 4 out of 5

    Micah

  36. 5 out of 5

    MattA

  37. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  38. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn Frank

  39. 5 out of 5

    Paul Vincent De Leon

  40. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Smith

  41. 5 out of 5

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  43. 4 out of 5

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  44. 5 out of 5

    Amy Heath

  45. 4 out of 5

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  46. 4 out of 5

    Cutter900

  47. 5 out of 5

    Billy Spyros

  48. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Moore

  49. 4 out of 5

    Fiona Cheng

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