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Christine Audiobook PACK in French [Book + 2 CD MP3] PDF, ePub eBook

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Christine Audiobook PACK in French [Book + 2 CD MP3]

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Christine Audiobook PACK in French [Book + 2 CD MP3] PDF, ePub eBook Master storyteller Stephen King presents the classic #1 national bestseller of the ultimate vehicle of terror! “This is the story of a lover’s triangle…It was bad from the start. And it got worse in a hurry.” It’s love at first sight for high school student Arnie Cunningham when he and his best friend Dennis Guilder spot the dilapidated 1958 red-and-white Plymouth Fury for Master storyteller Stephen King presents the classic #1 national bestseller of the ultimate vehicle of terror! “This is the story of a lover’s triangle…It was bad from the start. And it got worse in a hurry.” It’s love at first sight for high school student Arnie Cunningham when he and his best friend Dennis Guilder spot the dilapidated 1958 red-and-white Plymouth Fury for sale—dubbed “Christine” by its original cantankerous owner—rusting away on a front lawn of their suburban Pennsylvania neighborhood. Dennis knows that Arnie’s never had much luck in the looks or popularity department, or really taken an interest in owning a car . . . but Christine quickly changes all that. Arnie suddenly has the newfound confidence to stick up for himself, going as far as dating the most beautiful girl at Libertyville High—transfer student Leigh Cabot—even as a mysteriously restored Christine systematically and terrifyingly consumes every aspect of Arnie’s life. Dennis and Leigh soon realize that they must uncover the awful truth behind a car with a horrifying and murderous history. Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned, and heaven help anyone who gets in Christine’s way…

30 review for Christine Audiobook PACK in French [Book + 2 CD MP3]

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kerstin

    I have a real guilty-pleasure, love/love realtionship with Stephen King books. I don't care how literarily unhip that is. Christine was the first big-girl book I ever read--I was in the fourth grade and we'd just moved to California. I didn't have any friends or anywhere to go yet, so I spent my days poking around in the library, like any good nerd. I'd heard somewhere that Stephen King books contained scandalous curse words, so I picked it out of the library's King collection because the title I have a real guilty-pleasure, love/love realtionship with Stephen King books. I don't care how literarily unhip that is. Christine was the first big-girl book I ever read--I was in the fourth grade and we'd just moved to California. I didn't have any friends or anywhere to go yet, so I spent my days poking around in the library, like any good nerd. I'd heard somewhere that Stephen King books contained scandalous curse words, so I picked it out of the library's King collection because the title resembled my own name. I would never have been allowed to check that book out, so I read the whole thing on the sly, curled up on a bean bag in the back of the library, shitting my pants, and unable to explain to my parents why I suddenly refused to go through the garage to take the bins out on trash day. Ah, youth.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Joe Valdez

    Fans of the Netflix series Stranger Things who might be unaware of how freely the creators sampled '80s pop culture--right down to the title font--need look no further than three novels by Stephen King: one I've read (Firestarter), one I'm reading this month (It) and one I'll review now. Published in 1983--the same year that Stranger Things takes place--Christine is an often haunting and at times bittersweet tale about growing up; specifically, that time when adulthood threatens to detour cheris Fans of the Netflix series Stranger Things who might be unaware of how freely the creators sampled '80s pop culture--right down to the title font--need look no further than three novels by Stephen King: one I've read (Firestarter), one I'm reading this month (It) and one I'll review now. Published in 1983--the same year that Stranger Things takes place--Christine is an often haunting and at times bittersweet tale about growing up; specifically, that time when adulthood threatens to detour cherished friendships and careen others off Dead Man's Curve. Coincidentally, this tale includes an antique car possessed by evil. Unfolding through the fall of 1978 and into a bitter New Year in the fictional town of Libertyville, Pennsylvania, Christine is divided into three parts, the first and third narrated by Dennis Guilder, a twenty-two year old reflecting on his tragic senior year of high school. Captain of the football and baseball teams and All-Conference swimmer, Dennis is best friend to Arnie Cunningham, a childhood friend whose road detours into oily skin, chess and derision by many of their peers. The meek only child of two academics at Horlicks University, Arnie takes a bold but troubling step toward adulthood while cruising with Dennis in his '75 Plymouth Duster. Arnie falls in love at first sight with a 1958 Plymouth Fury he spots rusting in a yard. Dennis sees only a lemon, but is unable to convince his friend to walk away from it. With a nest egg built from his summer job with the Penn-DOT on a road crew, Arnie leaves a cash deposit with the car's owner, a nefarious coot with a bad back, lewd disposition and forked tongue named Roland D. LeBay; the old timer refers to the junker as "Christine." Believing his friend is being suckered, Dennis is taken aback by how enamored Arnie--a gifted machinist who has never owned his own wheels--is of the red and white street rod, which Arnie begins calling Christine. Dennis is certain that Arnie's parents, particularly his controlling mother, will scotch the deal. That's it, I thought, now feeling a little sad as well as upset. They'll beat him down and LeBay will have his twenty-five dollars and that '58 Plymouth will sit there for another thousand years or so. They had done similar things to him before. Because he was a loser. Even his parents knew it. He was intelligent, and when you got past the shy and wary exterior, he was humorous and thoughtful and ... sweet, I guess, is the word I'm fumbling around for. Sweet, but a loser. His folks knew it as well as the machine-shop white-soxers who yelled at him in the halls and thumb-rubbed his glasses. They knew he was a loser and they would beat him down. That's what I thought. But that time I was wrong. After witnessing Arnie fire the first shot in a rebellion against his parents, Dennis grows wary of Christine. Returning with Arnie to purchase the rustbucket from LeBay, Dennis climbs behind the wheel and receives a flash of the decaying car restored to new, and speaking to him. (Let's go for a ride, big guy, Christine seemed to whisper in the hot summer silence of LeBay's garage. Let's cruise.) He suddenly finds himself not wanting to walk in front of the car. Watching Arnie drive away in it, Dennis witnesses LeBay break down in tears. Holding firm that the old bastard has ripped his friend off, Dennis is told that he doesn't know half as much as he thinks he does. With the sun going down, Arnie and Dennis are able to reach Darnell's Do-It-Yourself Garage, where cigar chomping interstate trafficker Will Darnell has cornered the town's automotive needs. He takes advantage of Arnie, overcharging him for the stall and the tools the teen will need to restore his wheels. One of Arnie's classmates, a menacing hulk named Buddy Repperton, works at the garage and starts to harass Arnie, but when Repperton smashes one of Christine's headlights, Arnie fights back and bloodies him. Darnell fires Repperton and realizing he might be able to use a kid like Arnie, offers him a job making deliveries. Dennis warns his friend not to fall into debt with Darnell, but Arnie becomes hostile to any attempts to separate him from Christine. Dennis begins having bad dreams about Christine. Learning that Roland LeBay has passed away, Dennis accompanies Arnie to the funeral. He introduces himself to LeBay's estranged brother, George, and managing a word in private behind his friend's back, Dennis shares his apprehension over the '58 Plymouth Fury. George later reveals some troubling family history: LeBay's fury was legendary. He entered the Army at a bad time--the 1920s--working in the motor pool where he raged against the "shitters" he felt had it in for him. In 1958, LeBay bought Christine and became obsessed with the car, keeping it even after his six-year-old daughter choked to death in the backseat and his wife committed suicide in it. He believes that Arnie would be better off getting rid of the car. And as if he had read my thoughts of a few minutes before, he went on: "I don't believe in curses, you know. Not in ghosts or anything precisely supernatural. But I do believe that emotions and events have a certain ... lingering resonance. It may be that emotions can even communicate themselves in certain circumstances. If the circumstances are peculiar enough ... the way a carton of milk will take the flavor of certain strongly spiced foods if it's left open in the refrigerator. Or perhaps that's only a ridiculous fantasy on my part. Possibly it's just that I would feel better knowing the car my niece choked in and my sister-in-law killed herself in had been pressed down into a cube of meaningless metal. Perhaps all I feel is a sense of outraged propriety." Dennis observes dramatic changes in Arnie. His friend's skin clears up. While none of the girls who've known him as a pizzaface will take a second look at Arnie, a graceful transferring senior named Leigh Cabot is an exception; Dennis watches as the Viking queen he would've gotten around to asking out begins dating his friend instead. At lunch, Dennis comes upon Buddy Repperton circling Arnie with a switchblade while the bully's lackeys Don Vandenberg and Moochie Welch cheer him on. The two-on-three melee is broken up by the shop teacher. Certain that Repperton meant to cut Arnie, Dennis rats him out for the switchblade, resulting in Repperton's expulsion. He vows revenge. Arnie's transformation has an eerie parallel to the resurrection of Christine. Darnell marvels at how expertly Arnie was able to get his car road-ready without putting in the labor. Introduced by Arnie at a football game, Dennis notices that Leigh is no more comfortable around Christine than he is. Arnie's rebellion against his mother over the car intensifies and his father seems to reach a truce, paying for Arnie to park Christine at an airport garage instead of the house. Repperton finds out where Arnie is garaging his wheels and with the help of Don and Moochie, trashes it. Soon after, the boys are hunted down by the Plymouth Fury, which its victims recognize too late has no driver, or the corpse of Roland LeBay at the wheel. Leigh, who loves Arnie and would enthusiastically consent to sex if she didn't have to lose her virginity in Christine, is spooked by how precious her boyfriend is of his car. She's saved from choking to death in it only by the grace of a hitchhiker she urged Arnie pick up on their way home from McDonald's. Presenting him with an ultimatum, Arnie chooses Christine over Leigh. Laid up in the hospital with a broken leg, Dennis bonds with his best friend's girl over the disturbing changes she's recognized in Arnie. They connect the tragedy of Roland LeBay and the deaths in their town Christine. They also become romantically entwined, wary that anyone Arnie is angry with has met a gruesome end on the road. When he does find out, the teenage lovers have only one recourse. The first idea had been Leigh's--Molotov cocktails. We would, she said, fill some wine bottles with gasoline, take them to the Cunningham house in the early-morning hours, light the wicks ("Wicks? What wicks?" I asked. "Kotex ought to do just fine," she answered promptly, causing me to wonder again about her high-cheekboned forebearers), and toss them in through Christine's windows. The conceit of a 1958 Plymouth cruising the streets of America to the oldie but goodies of Chuck Berry or Richie Valens with a corpse at the wheel is laughable. It doesn't even seem like it'd be scary. King seems to have backed into his plot by wanting to write about teens, rock 'n' roll and cars, and realizing that cursed children or music had been done, reversed into the possessed car idea. What makes Christine a fantastic novel is a quality that King has sustained from his earliest work (Carrie, The Shining, The Dead Zone, Firestarter), which aren't about monsters chasing after characters but characters who realize they are the monster. I notice more elements that keep drawing me back to King's work. There's the change of seasons, for one. Road conditions under freezing weather play a crucial role in this novel, as do Christmas shopping and New Year's Eve countdowns. There are the characters (often kids) who know that monsters are in the lurk, but unable to convince adults, are forced to confront the threat themselves by improvising a plan, and thus, learning something about themselves and growing up. There is the bittersweet taste of innocence being lost in some way that can never be recovered. I feel myself becoming emotionally attached to the characters and invested in their wages again doom. As with some of King's doorstoppers (Christine is "only" 120,000 words), the novel took me over a week to finish, but it occurs to me that some of the most memorable road trips are the long ones, the journeys where the destination is earned and felt. I found the pleasure of delayed gratification wonderfully present in a longer novel, at least one with prose and dialogue as intimate as King's. Nothing definitively supernatural occurs until page 238 and rather than spook the reader right off the bat, King writes about childhood--using music, movies, sports, fast food and beverages--and slowly builds the tragic relationships of his characters, ultimately to the point of poignancy. Christine was adapted to film during the Stephen King Land Rush of 1983-1990, when a dozen of his novels, novellas or short stories were dragged to the screen. Featuring Keith Gordon as Arnie, John Stockwell as Dennis, Alexandra Paul as Leigh, the movie was directed by John Carpenter, whose previous thrillers traffic in pulsating doom, but here, as a director for hire, goes through the motions of a killer car movie devoid of the teenage angst or desolate winter of the novel. Its riches are those surrounding the kids and the car, with performances by Robert Prosky, Harry Dean Stanton and Roberts Blossom and the music of George Thorogood and The Destroyers, the best rock 'n' roll ever featured in a Carpenter film.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    3.5 Stars.BIG fan of Stephen King, but not so much of CHRISTINE. Reading a 700+ page book....especially one written by SK usually does not bother me in the least, but CHRISTINE was just too long....too wordy....was expecting more wicked deeds than the movie.The storyline IS creepy good with a possessed red 1958 Plymouth Fury....her deadlights and "moldering stench"....on the prowl seeking justice from anyone who dislikes her....so best stay out of her way.Besides a feared CHRISTINE, there's a gr 3.5 Stars.BIG fan of Stephen King, but not so much of CHRISTINE. Reading a 700+ page book....especially one written by SK usually does not bother me in the least, but CHRISTINE was just too long....too wordy....was expecting more wicked deeds than the movie.The storyline IS creepy good with a possessed red 1958 Plymouth Fury....her deadlights and "moldering stench"....on the prowl seeking justice from anyone who dislikes her....so best stay out of her way.Besides a feared CHRISTINE, there's a great cast of teen characters, bullies, weird parents and an evil presence from the beyond to keep things rolling along. AND, as in many KING novels, you'll find a variety of dark nightmares, hear many a cool oldie from the 50's and 60's and take a ride to the submarine races. (you're an oldie like me if you remember that one.)Not a favorite (for me), but NOT bad either.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kemper

    You never forget your first time, and the memories of my initial encounter with Stephen King when he lured me into the back of a 1958 Plymouth Fury and had his way with me are still clear over 30 years later. For the record, he wasn’t gentle. I was a wee lad of 13 when this came out, and Stephen King had established his reputation as America’s boogeyman after his breakout in the ‘70s. I wasn’t much of a horror fan and despite my increasing reading of ‘grown-up’ fiction had no interest in the King You never forget your first time, and the memories of my initial encounter with Stephen King when he lured me into the back of a 1958 Plymouth Fury and had his way with me are still clear over 30 years later. For the record, he wasn’t gentle. I was a wee lad of 13 when this came out, and Stephen King had established his reputation as America’s boogeyman after his breakout in the ‘70s. I wasn’t much of a horror fan and despite my increasing reading of ‘grown-up’ fiction had no interest in the King novels and movies that were freaking the adults out. Then one day I was sitting in the waiting room at the doctor’s office and read a magazine article about King and his new book centered on a haunted killer car. “That sounds pretty cool,” I thought. After my appointment, I went to the library which was right around the corner from my doctor’s office. (Ah, small towns...) I can’t remember if I actually was able to get it then or if I had to put my name on the hold list. I suspect that a new King novel probably had a waiting list. In either case, I soon got my grubby little mitts on a copy and read my first Stephen King novel. The countless hours since devoted to reading his work and the small fortune I’ve spent accumulating his books over the years are a testament to how deeply the hook was set. Looking back now, that seems kind of odd because Christine is not my favorite King novel. In fact, it’d be well down my personal list after others like The Stand, The Shining or The Dark Tower series. Still, it’s a pretty good King novel and was more than enough to put me on the King path that I’ve been on ever since despite the occasional rocky patches. I still remembered being surprised at how relatable the story was. The way I’d heard adults talk made me think that the entire book would be a bloodbath. Instead, I was shocked to see that King actually focused most of the early part of the book on a couple of small town high school guys who didn’t seem any different from the older teens I knew. I remember thinking that this was the first book I’d read that had people living in a way that seemed familiar to me. That’s why when the horror started creeping in from the edges; it made it that much worse. Geeky loser Arnie and high school stud duck Dennis have been friends since they were children. As they’re getting ready to start their senior year, Arnie spots a For Sale sign on a rusting piece-of-shit 1958 Plymouth Fury nicknamed Christine by its owner, a nasty old bastard named Roland LeBay. Despite Dennis’s best efforts to talk him out of it, Arnie insists on buying Christine which puts him at odds with his academic parents, especially his domineering mother who has managed to control every aspect of his life to that point. As Arnie works on what seems to be a miraculous restoration job on Christine, he becomes increasingly obsessed with the car and angry at the world. Dennis was uneasy about the vehicle from the beginning and gets more suspicious as his best friend seems less and less like himself. When people who crossed Arnie start turning up dead via bizarre vehicular homicides, Dennis’s dread of Christine leads him to believe the impossible. It’d be easy to dismiss this as the book about the evil car, but like most good horror there’s a more human theme lurking in the story. In this case it’s about how childhood friends can drift apart and how inexorable that can be in some circumstances. Dennis and Arnie wouldn’t be that much different than anyone who gets wrapped up in the changes that adulthood is about to lay on them only to look up and realize that the person who always used to be at their side has gone their own way. That’s a sad fact of life that King uses as the foundation of the book only he uses a murderous car as the wedge he drives between them instead of the more mundane distractions that usually do the job. The other hook that he hangs the story on is based on the old nerd-gets-revenge fantasy. Despite Arnie’s sweet nature he’s so incapable of standing up for himself that even Dennis finds him pathetic at times. When Arnie develops a backbone and begins dating the prettiest girl in school you can’t help but root for him even as you know that the cause of these changes is Christine and therefore can’t be a good thing. With all this going for it, then why doesn’t Christine rank higher in the King pantheon? A couple of factors drag it down. At the time it was published this was King’s longest book other than his epic novel The Stand, and that one was about the end of the world so some wordiness wasn’t out of line. Some of the bloat that would often characterize his later work was beginning to creep into this one. The set-up of Arnie and Dennis’s history and Arnie’s status as the unlucky geek of their school goes on too long. Also, the character of Dennis is just a little too good to be true. Not every teenage boy is a raging sociopath, but after a while I did find it hard to believe that a good looking star athlete with plenty of girls chasing after him would really be best friends with the school misfit as well as a loving and respectful son to his parents. Then there’s the fact that while the destruction of Arnie’s personality is a big chunk of the book the actual bloodshed comes at the wheels of Christine, and while King writes several gruesome death scenes and creates some very creepy moments it’s still just a car. Even with magical evil powers you still think you could get away by just going into a tall building and waiting until it runs out of gas. Despite the elements that keep it from being considered among his best work, Christine is still a good example of what King does best by mixing human weakness with supernatural elements to create a story that keeps you turning pages. Also posted at Kemper's Book Blog

  5. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    I went into this book thinking I'd be giving it a high rating, and considering it was written by Stephen King - my favourite author - I'm not surprised at all that I was proven to be correct. I feel like theoretically, this story could have been told in a much smaller amount of pages. After all, the premise isn't too complicated and it would have bee easy to rattle through all the events, just with the simple purpose of telling a scary story. But of course, Stephen King being Stephen King made th I went into this book thinking I'd be giving it a high rating, and considering it was written by Stephen King - my favourite author - I'm not surprised at all that I was proven to be correct. I feel like theoretically, this story could have been told in a much smaller amount of pages. After all, the premise isn't too complicated and it would have bee easy to rattle through all the events, just with the simple purpose of telling a scary story. But of course, Stephen King being Stephen King made this entire thing a lot more than a simple horror story and added a lot more depth to it. And that's exactly why he's my favourite writer! He made me fall in love with all the characters, even the ones I hated (yes, I am aware that this is a contradiction, but King develops his characters in such a fantastic way, you see the positive aspects of even the most evil beings, and thus, I can't bring myself to despise anyone 100%. They are all just so darn brillant and fascinating!). I normally would find the concept of a murdering car ridiculous and too over the top (I'm not really into paranormal stuff and things like that), but once again, I noticed how King can write about the most unbelievable things in a most believable way. If there would have been a note at the end, telling me all of this had really happened, I would have accepted it without asking any questions. That's how good of a storyteller he is! A highly entertaining and suspenseful read and a definite recommendation!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dirk Grobbelaar

    If I admitted that I probably enjoyed this more than The Shining – would that amount to sacrilege? Good Review vs Evil Review Good Review There isn’t much I didn’t particularly enjoy about the novel, except perhaps for one or two pacing issues. Then again, the book is only about 500 pages, which is a lot less than some of those other King books. It is incredibly creepy at times, which I found surprising, since the idea of a “haunted car” might seem a bit, well, corny. It’s everything but. In fac If I admitted that I probably enjoyed this more than The Shining – would that amount to sacrilege? Good Review vs Evil Review Good Review There isn’t much I didn’t particularly enjoy about the novel, except perhaps for one or two pacing issues. Then again, the book is only about 500 pages, which is a lot less than some of those other King books. It is incredibly creepy at times, which I found surprising, since the idea of a “haunted car” might seem a bit, well, corny. It’s everything but. In fact, the story is a curious cross between true nostalgia and horror. The musical theme prevalent throughout the novel, with references to songs about cars, was a nice touch. In keeping with the theme, King also incorporates a lot of throwaway references to American muscle cars into the story: “so and so drives a 66 Camaro” and the like. It adds a nice touch of authenticity. The sympathetic first person narrative of Parts 1 & 3 was striking and I really felt for [name withhold due to spoiler] when things started going awry. My horror had changed to a deep and terrible sorrow… I suppose that is really what this novel is about, and Christine is just a vehicle for a bigger story about obsession and possession. Terrible pun, I know, but unintended. Evil Review Of course the warning signs were there: the smell of decay every time I opened the book; the fact that the book kept popping up everywhere I went; and then, when my wife told me to choose between her and Christine… I suppose it is a bit of a problem if you start rooting for the baddie in a horror novel, but the way Christine goes after those shitters varmints is righteous, man! But seriously though, this is one cool book. It happens to be scary too… …and there she it is.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    Stephen King has sure gotten some mileage out of this whole “possessed-by-evil” thing. Or maybe it’s the fact that I’ve read The Shining this year wherein an abusive drunk is taken over by the Evil that is a hotel and it just seems that way. Anyway back to my original misbegotten and flawed theme: Evil’s out there and according to Stephen King it’s very possessive. In this book, of course, you’re dealing with a car, but not just any car – a car that’s been possessed by Evil. King kind of loses th Stephen King has sure gotten some mileage out of this whole “possessed-by-evil” thing. Or maybe it’s the fact that I’ve read The Shining this year wherein an abusive drunk is taken over by the Evil that is a hotel and it just seems that way. Anyway back to my original misbegotten and flawed theme: Evil’s out there and according to Stephen King it’s very possessive. In this book, of course, you’re dealing with a car, but not just any car – a car that’s been possessed by Evil. King kind of loses the chain of evil in this one. For the longest time, I assumed that Christine was the originating source of evilness, but as my favorite Mah Fah, Stepheny, pointed out and upon further reading of the actual book, it became sort of apparent that the car was in fact possessed by its original owner, who in turn possessed (I take a shot of something every time I type the word “possessed” or any form of the word, so bear with me) poor Arnie Cunningham in an effort to continue railing against “the shitters” of the world. It takes a long, long time before Christine, no matter who’s driving (or not) the damn car, to actually start running punks down and grinding them into hamburger and the narrative structure kind of sucks – Dennis, I was truly hoping you’d fall victim to Christine at some point, but it just wasn’t meant to be. This was a decent read with a fairly decent resolution. I mean how many ways are there really to get rid of a possessed (hey, there I go again, bottoms up) car. Is it me or does somebody else wish that Christine was just over the horizon and ready to chase down the two hoodlums pictured above? *sigh* Plus, a geographic sports lesson for Mr. King. This book was written back in 1983, when sports teams where usually broadcast on the local UHF station (as was the case with the Phillies), so why (or more relevantly, how?) would Dennis and Arnie be regularly watching the Philadelphia Phillies when the book takes place a few miles as the raven flies from Pittsburgh? Pennsylvania is a fairly big assed state from east to west and Pittsburgh has its own baseball team – they’re called the Pirates. This was a small detail that probably effected only me and I don’t know what possessed (*gulp*) me to even bring it up. Evil, Jeff? Were you possessed by evil? This was a buddy read with Daytona Dan 2.0, Aston Martin Ashley de la Hufflepuff, Speed Demon Stepheny, Tailgating Trish and le Grand Prix Ginger - the anti-“shitters”.

  8. 4 out of 5

    James Trevino

    Christine is Stephen King at his best. I am not kidding: it is my favorite book of his (Dark Tower fans, be gentle).... Christine is an old Plymouth that Arnie Cunningham decides to buy and repair. He gradually gets 'in love' with his car, and, as Christine is repaired, Arnie also changes, becoming darker and taking on some personality traits of Christine's former owner, Roland LeBay. The book's other main character is Dennis, Arnie's friend, who witness all these changes. Now the story may sounds Christine is Stephen King at his best. I am not kidding: it is my favorite book of his (Dark Tower fans, be gentle).... Christine is an old Plymouth that Arnie Cunningham decides to buy and repair. He gradually gets 'in love' with his car, and, as Christine is repaired, Arnie also changes, becoming darker and taking on some personality traits of Christine's former owner, Roland LeBay. The book's other main character is Dennis, Arnie's friend, who witness all these changes. Now the story may sounds silly, but this is King we are talking about. The books is heavily character driven. Arnie's arc is incredible to witness. His gradual turning from a loser/nerd to a smuggler (eventually) is mind-blowing. Dennis was also an interesting character, but a bit less so. The books is also a good reference point for anyone who loves a good love triangle. Yes, there is a love triangle here. Actually, there are two: the first one is the HELL LOVE TRIANGLE: (view spoiler)[Arnie-Christine-Leigh. (hide spoiler)] The second is the normal love triangle: (view spoiler)[Arnie-Leigh-Denis. (hide spoiler)] :)) The ending is classic King and if you have read one or two of his books you know what I am talking about. I hope we will see a sequel some day.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lyn

    I once saw a comedian who said something to the effect that Led Zeppelin could sing “Mary had a little lamb” and make it feel dark and evil and threatening. Then with a passable imitation of Robert Plant he went on to sing the children’s song but in the fashion of a 70s metal band. Funny. So too, can Stephen King tell us about a haunted car and have what would seem to be an absurd notion come alive with terror and dark menace. Remember Cujo, his 1981 novel about a rabid dog who terrorizes a town? I once saw a comedian who said something to the effect that Led Zeppelin could sing “Mary had a little lamb” and make it feel dark and evil and threatening. Then with a passable imitation of Robert Plant he went on to sing the children’s song but in the fashion of a 70s metal band. Funny. So too, can Stephen King tell us about a haunted car and have what would seem to be an absurd notion come alive with terror and dark menace. Remember Cujo, his 1981 novel about a rabid dog who terrorizes a town? He stretched that idea out into a pretty good book. It’s in the way he tells the tale; he guides us down a pedestrian path, seemingly normal and uneventful and then points out uncommon objects along the way, ramping up the creepy factor until by the end we are caught – hook line and sinker – and he is already pulling us out of the water, flailing and scared and believing in his black magic hoodoo. Christine, King’s 1983 homage to Springsteenesque car culture, is such a tale. It’s about a scary, haunted car, yes, but also its about teenage angst, and relationships, and group dynamics. It’s about winners and losers and the games we play with each other and about how honest we can be to others and with ourselves. It’s about the distinction between childhood and maturity, about boys and men and the lines we cross when we accomplish growing up. Its about good and evil and right and wrong. It’s about obsession and mortality. King is scary because he describes everyday life, but through a glass darkly, illuminating that part of the tale that he knows will strike a chord in us, will make us consider our own lives, our own souls, and ask some uncomfortable questions and accept some difficult truths. Or it’s just about an evil, haunted car and it’s fun to read. Made into a film in the same year by John FREAKING! Carpenter, this has all the right Stephen King elements to make this one of his more entertaining novels.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jason P

    My re-telling of the story "Christine" to my sixty-five year old immigrant mother, enjoy: Me: "Mom?....are you listening? The story is about a haunted car" Mom: "a what?" Me: "a car, mom - the story is about a haunted, evil car that can drive by itself, and it kills people. Because it's haunted." Mom: "a car can't do that...tell me a car can do that! You'd be lying." Me: "No, mom, I know a car can't do that, but this one can, and its killed a ton of people already. There's these two main characters, My re-telling of the story "Christine" to my sixty-five year old immigrant mother, enjoy: Me: "Mom?....are you listening? The story is about a haunted car" Mom: "a what?" Me: "a car, mom - the story is about a haunted, evil car that can drive by itself, and it kills people. Because it's haunted." Mom: "a car can't do that...tell me a car can do that! You'd be lying." Me: "No, mom, I know a car can't do that, but this one can, and its killed a ton of people already. There's these two main characters, right, and one guy's name is Arnie and his friend is Dennis - they go to school togeth..." Mom: "Oh yea, school is very important! I told your sister the same thing but she was all, "'I do what i want!'". Heh, now look where she is! Fast food....yeesh." Me: ".....uh...right. So...anyway, this mechanic, Roland D. Lebay, he sells the car whose name is Christine." Mom: "oh! Like the movie, right?! Maybe the two are the same!" Me: ".......yep...mom, the same. Can I finish telling you about the story, it's been almost thirty minutes." Mom: "ya, ya go ahead..." Me: " So Arnie and Dennis are strolling by Lebay's place when he sees a 1958 Plymouth Fury sitting outside all junked out. At first Lebay..." Mom: "So the car has the devil inside?" Me: "Yes" Mom: "Why's it there, who told the car to have the devil? Someone bad?" At this point I gave up and walked out of the room This has been, My re-telling of the story "Christine" to my sixty-five year old immigrant mother. Hope you enjoyed.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    Misfit Arnie Cunningham buys a 1958 Plymouth Fury named Christine and it's love at first sight. As he fixes the car and his obsession with it grows, his life spins out of control. 11/5/2013 I'm putting Christine in park for now since it's not revving my engine. It's as slow as a Plymouth Fury with the emergency brake on. Hopefully I'll pick it back up in a few weeks and it'll get my motor running.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Trish

    This is the story of Christine, a custom-painted red and white 1958 Plymouth Fury. You'd think that the story about a car didn't warrant a novel of a whopping 529 pages or that at the very least it would be boring and bloated. But this is Stephen King. Arnie, an acne-ridden teenage outsider, one day sees a car and it is love at first sight. Despite the financial burden, despite his parents' and friend's protests, he buys the car off the grumpy owner and starts working on her it. Slowly but surely This is the story of Christine, a custom-painted red and white 1958 Plymouth Fury. You'd think that the story about a car didn't warrant a novel of a whopping 529 pages or that at the very least it would be boring and bloated. But this is Stephen King. Arnie, an acne-ridden teenage outsider, one day sees a car and it is love at first sight. Despite the financial burden, despite his parents' and friend's protests, he buys the car off the grumpy owner and starts working on her it. Slowly but surely, "Christine" transforms back to her its' old glory. Just as slowly but surely, Arnie changes as well. Not just visually, he also gets more confident - and more angry. Are those changes more connected to the car than anyone could ever believe? Well, this is Stephen King so we already know the answer. ;) School bullies and crooks, oppressive and downright terrorizing parents, hormones driving one crazy - and a single-minded car with her its' undying love. But what exactly is driving Christine? That is the question, isn't it? Don't all the great poets say that lovers become one? BWAHAHAHAHAHAHA! Much of the book is told from Dennis' (Arnie's best friend's) point of view. That was refreshing as well since I haven't read too many books from first person perspective. It also added a sort of more authentic tone to what essentially is a very fucked up coming-of-age story. Again: it is Stephen King after all. *lol* It really surprised me how much I enjoyed this novel. Not just the school bullies and drug-smugglers getting run over (and yes, I enjoyed the bloody deaths, of course), but the overall story - the characters (I love to hate most King characters), the creepy atmosphere ... it was really fun and exciting from start to finish.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    If re-reading it now, by today's lens, one thing has become utterly clear. Christine is a YA novel. I mean, sure, Talisman and parts of the Shining are, too, but this is a bonafide Young Adult territory. We have High School outcasts, a huge page count of sporting events, first love, and standing up to be your own person against what your parents think right. Yes. Rebellion, jealousy, and an ancient evil possession made up of pure wrath. In other words, another average YA novel. Vrrrooom. Vrrroooooo If re-reading it now, by today's lens, one thing has become utterly clear. Christine is a YA novel. I mean, sure, Talisman and parts of the Shining are, too, but this is a bonafide Young Adult territory. We have High School outcasts, a huge page count of sporting events, first love, and standing up to be your own person against what your parents think right. Yes. Rebellion, jealousy, and an ancient evil possession made up of pure wrath. In other words, another average YA novel. Vrrrooom. Vrrrooooooom. Vrrrrrooooooooooooooom! :) Seriously, though. King even manages to turn all those sports and car maintenance bits into something fantastic even though I generally couldn't give a cat's fart over them in general. Arnie, Dennis, and Lee made the whole thing worth it. :) Oh, and all the music references blew me away back during my first read, so I took the time to check them all out when I was 14. No need to do that now, of course. But KNOWING the music makes quite a lot of difference this time. :)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Niki

    Okay, enough is enough. I've been putting off writing reviews for months, just because I prefer it when they're huge and well-thought out, with quotes, clear arguments for and against, and everything. Turns out though, I procrastinate like crazy when it comes to writing these, because "they need to be perfect"? Yeah, that's cancelled. I haven't been very active on here for ages, and that changes now. So, about Christine. The book started out beautifully. It had the right amount of foreshadowing an Okay, enough is enough. I've been putting off writing reviews for months, just because I prefer it when they're huge and well-thought out, with quotes, clear arguments for and against, and everything. Turns out though, I procrastinate like crazy when it comes to writing these, because "they need to be perfect"? Yeah, that's cancelled. I haven't been very active on here for ages, and that changes now. So, about Christine. The book started out beautifully. It had the right amount of foreshadowing and intrigue to keep me going for pages and pages. I loved the way Christine the car started haunting Arnie and also started changing him, subtly at first, hitting like a hammer next. The death scenes when Christine goes out on her own are written beautifully as well. I especially loved the scene when her dashboard lights turn into eyes when Leigh is choking. So what was my problem with the book? Well, it went on for far too long. I can't pinpoint the exact moment I first started thinking this, but I found myself reading like "Why doesn't this end?? What else is there??" Some time during that, the "spell" of the book wore off, and somehow it became tedious. But my biggest beef with the book is something else entirely: the fact that Christine (view spoiler)[wasn't actually a sentient car, but was just simply haunted by the ghost of her previous owner. That immediately made me lose interest, since I wanted a story about a monster (a sentient car would definitely qualify as a monster for me), not a story about an evil person who carried on being evil in his afterlife, and kind-of predictably ~never fully went away~. There are parts that imply that Christine was somehow already kind of sentient and evil herself even before LeBay got her and added his negative energy to her, for example there's a part about "the terrible female power in Christine" (paraphrased) But still, we're told that Christine only "moves by herself" when LeBay's ghost is driving her, which takes all of his will to pull off (Arnie says that the only times LeBay leaves him alone is when he's driving Christine) So, without the ghost, Christine wouldn't be able to move, and that makes her a haunted car, giving the book a very boring plot of "It was a human's fault all along!!" At least, boring for me. (hide spoiler)] Maybe the above criticism was just personal preference. For me, however, it would have been so much more interesting if (view spoiler)[LeBay was just Christine's victim and nothing more instead of being the mastermind behind it all (for lack of better word). (hide spoiler)] But hey, I'm not King, I'm not a bestselling author like him, so take that as you will.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dani Rose

    Thought I would hate this because the antagonist is a car. I thought it would be one of the weaker King novels but it was wonderful and I really liked it. You get so lost in the well written characters and setting.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    One of the better Stephen King books I've read in a while. I read this right after reading Salem's Lot and noticed a similar formula in King's writing. Like Salem's Lot, the first half of the book is devoted to character development and drawing you into the setting. There are some dark elements mixed in early on to keep you interested, and then the second half of the book really takes off and things go crazy. This time we're in Libertyville, PA (which is an awesome name for a fictional town). Ag One of the better Stephen King books I've read in a while. I read this right after reading Salem's Lot and noticed a similar formula in King's writing. Like Salem's Lot, the first half of the book is devoted to character development and drawing you into the setting. There are some dark elements mixed in early on to keep you interested, and then the second half of the book really takes off and things go crazy. This time we're in Libertyville, PA (which is an awesome name for a fictional town). Again, I will argue that King is a better fiction writer than a horror writer. What I loved about this book was how well I was pulled into high school in the later 1970s. I didn't graduate high school until the early part of this millennium, but I loved reading about Arnie and Dennis' friendship, their relationships with girls from school, football games, hanging out and getting pizza, and just being a teenager without a care in the world. The stuff about the crazy, possessed car was fun, too, but the horror rides shotgun to the rest of the story in my opinion. And, yes, spoiler alert: This book is about an evil car. It seems ridiculous, doesn't it? I don't know if any other writer could pull this off without making me want to roll my eyes, but I was really into the story. I didn't know what to expect, but I had a hard time putting this down, and I was honestly a little surprised. Oh, and even the ending was great! I feel like that isn't the case most of the time with Stephen King, but this one ended nicely, and I especially loved the epilogue. It ended the way it should have ended. If you read it, hopefully you'll see what I mean. King isn't my favorite author. In fact, sometimes I can't stand the guy. But, I always find myself coming back and reading through several of his books, then taking a long break because I get sick of him, then I come back again and I'm all cool with him, then I hate him again. Right now, I'm back in full King mode, but also mixing in some other stuff. When his books stop popping up on my shelves, you'll know he's pissed me off again. He's like a boomerang I can't throw hard enough.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Cristina

    I'm glad that Dennis is alive! This book was full of surprises, but I liked Christine. A serial killer in shape of a car. Genius!

  18. 5 out of 5

    J.K. Grice

    A personal favorite of mine, partly because I'm a classic car buff. However, I still feel like CHRISTINE is one of King's strongest books. Great characters and plot here, as well as very frightening imagery. I love this book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Baker

    I think this is my 40th King novel and I have just as many left to read, but I’m looking forward to it! King truly is a master storyteller. His storytelling feels so natural. His characters are always vivid and they all have distinct voices in dialogue. Those are the three areas of his writing that I hope I can learn and emulate in my own writing. I’m not always crazy about his pacing or his endings, but he’s still one of my favorite authors.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nick Iuppa

    Second time through, this time as an audiobook. This is the third King book I ever read, and it's been many years. I was amazed, going back, at the sheer power of the descriptions and the joy King found just scaring the crap out of everyone... wallowing in the horror, laying it on with no sense of restraint at all. The interior monologues border on hysteria a lot of the time. Arnie's near POSSESSION by an evil spirit (and a 20 year old Plymouth Fury) is brilliantly drawn. But the things that mos Second time through, this time as an audiobook. This is the third King book I ever read, and it's been many years. I was amazed, going back, at the sheer power of the descriptions and the joy King found just scaring the crap out of everyone... wallowing in the horror, laying it on with no sense of restraint at all. The interior monologues border on hysteria a lot of the time. Arnie's near POSSESSION by an evil spirit (and a 20 year old Plymouth Fury) is brilliantly drawn. But the things that most impress me are the friendship with Dennis (as told by Dennis), the hot, willing, teenage sexiness of Leigh, and the wisdom about parents and teens and life that are expressed so often in the meditations and dialogue of all the characters. There are incredible scenes that just won't leave me. I still haven't gotten over Christine fighting her way through that blizzard on her deadly mission, or the closing confrontation that could have been a model for all Hollywood mega battles to come. I should mention the quality of the narration in the audiobook; it is absolutely pitch perfect. If you like audiobooks and haven't heard this one... GET IT. I owned a Plymouth Fury once... not as old as Christine... but I know how seductive they can be. Tragically so many of those great old cars were destroyed in the making of a movie that just couldn't measure up to the book. All in all a great experience though, except, of course, for that last 3-word phrase written by Leigh on the back of a postcard showing a picture of the new Taos center for the performing arts. That really pissed me off.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Edward Lorn

    First off, I'm a King fanboy, but I'm a little different from other fanboys. Here's what I think: When King's good, he's the best in the business. When he sucks, he's still readable, but it pisses me the fuck off because I know what he's capable of. Being readable even when he's off his game is how he's maintained my fandom while Koontz and Saul eventually lost my monetary involvement. I will still read the latter, but only through NetGallery and library borrows. With every King release, I purch First off, I'm a King fanboy, but I'm a little different from other fanboys. Here's what I think: When King's good, he's the best in the business. When he sucks, he's still readable, but it pisses me the fuck off because I know what he's capable of. Being readable even when he's off his game is how he's maintained my fandom while Koontz and Saul eventually lost my monetary involvement. I will still read the latter, but only through NetGallery and library borrows. With every King release, I purchase the audio book for road trips, the ebook for reading, and the hardcover for my collection. When the paperback drops, I buy that for rereads, because I still prefer physical books to digital materials, and I refuse to crack open my first edition hardcovers. So yes, I am a fanboy. But I also know that King has had his shit books. Fortunately, only a third of this book drew a frown down my face. For those of you that want to cry "Hater!" I will explain. Extensively. Spoilers ahead. You have been warned. (view spoiler)[The beginning of this book gets five stars. I loved the interaction between Dennis and Arnie, and even loved the inclusion of Leigh. That familiar sense of dread that is felt throughout all of Stephen King's beginnings is showcased here. The character development is also quite strong with Christine. We know Arnie is going to go bad, and we hate that. But this is King. We signed up for this ride not to witness a happy ending but to see just how fucked up things are going to get before the final page is flipped. Then we hit part two like a milk truck sliding across icy tarmac before crashing into your local meeting of Lactose Anonymous. The middle of this book is a low three stars for me. We're ripped out of Dennis's intimate first-person POV and shoved wily-nily up the exhaust pipe of some strange omniscient narrator. Dafuq just happened? I want Dennis back. Gimme back Dennis, you uppity fuckwit! The narrative further devolves into a slasher film wherein the masked killer has been replaced by an unstoppable car. Some of these scenes are riveting, but others fall flat as cardboard, and still others are told completely off camera. It's as if King got tired of describing the killings so he... Hopped back into Dennis's head for the denouement (aka Part Three). What the farfegnugen? Okay, well, I guess I got my wish. I'm back with Dennis, and I'm enjoying the ride once more. People are still dying, but that's taken a back seat. In fact, the detective, the guy that's a huge part of part two, dies so far off camera I didn't at first realize he'd been run off the road. King breezes so quickly over his death that I thought it was some nobody, some inconsequential lout who just happened to shit in Lebay's cornflakes on one of his off days. But no. It's the main dick. His death is given a single paragraph, and we're back on the road. While reading this, I continuously came across parts I recalled and then whole sections I don't remember happening, like, at all. Which leads me to believe I only skimmed through this one when I first read it, quite possibly because the middle-way narrator switch upset me so completely. I remembered the shit truck instead of the CAT, like what's in the movie, but I completely forgot about Arnie and Regina's deaths. Do I still classify this as a reread? Ya betcha bald tires I do. And yes, I still enjoy the movie over the book. Carpenter's telling is succinct, but it does sacrifice the amazing character development of Part One, so take your pick. Tight story or some damn fine getting-to-know-you? Remember, though, that the getting-to-know-you sections end at Part Two and never, ever, come back. (hide spoiler)] Last but not least, I listened to most of this book. If you have the chance, and are into audio books, pick up the Audible edition narrated by Holter Graham. Dude was fantastic. Notable names: Trelawney (Carrie and Mr. Mercedes) In summation: I have no idea why King didn't write this entire book in third person. Having Dennis tell only two parts of this three act play makes zero sense because the book is supposed to be written by Dennis. But Dennis doesn't tell the second act. Faceless, nameless narrator does. My computer doesn't. compute. I threw a rod and cracked my head. If you don't think you'll mind this, I can dig it. You'll probably love this whole book. It's a rad story, and King manages to make a story about a killer car readable and, for the most part, entertaining. And not in a cheesy way, either. That alone is a massive achievement. Not the best thing King's written, but far from the worst. Now getcher motors running, and get the fuck out my face. Next stop: Pet Sematary... yay?

  22. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    This is one of the few King stories that I had never read. I don't know why I'd never read it, but it just seemed to me like reading about a car wasn't really my thing. I'm not a car girl. I drive one, but I don't dream about them, or get excited by them. I guess I was afraid that this book would be a few hundred pages of specs and details and owner's manual stuff, mixed in with a maniacal car tormenting stupid car-kids that would annoy me rather than making me hope they make it to the last page This is one of the few King stories that I had never read. I don't know why I'd never read it, but it just seemed to me like reading about a car wasn't really my thing. I'm not a car girl. I drive one, but I don't dream about them, or get excited by them. I guess I was afraid that this book would be a few hundred pages of specs and details and owner's manual stuff, mixed in with a maniacal car tormenting stupid car-kids that would annoy me rather than making me hope they make it to the last page. You'd think that after all the King books I've read, and all the times that I go to bat for King saying that he doesn't write tripe like I just described, that I would have expected better. But old judgements die hard, I think, and for as long as I can remember I thought that this book wouldn't be my kind of thing, so I'd never really rushed out to read it. But now I have, and I can tell my younger stupid self that I was wrong. Of course this book is about a car on the surface, but it's about love and friendship underneath. About how friendship and loyalty and trust can easily turn to hatred, betrayal and vengeance with the right set of circumstances. Christine is the right set of circumstances, that's for sure. I really enjoyed this story. I loved the two main characters, Arnie and Dennis, and how we get a full sense of their friendship before things start to go wrong. Dennis narrates the first and last sections in first person, and the middle section is a third person narrative which feels almost like an intermission. The second section is where King starts taking things to the next level... showing us little bits and pieces here and there that we wouldn't be able to see from Dennis himself. But I have to say that I really preferred Dennis's narration. I liked Dennis, he's funny, and smart and honest. I loved seeing a kind of protective friendship through the eyes of the friend higher up on life's totem pole. So often we see these kind of relationships from the outside, or from the picked on friend who almost hero-worships the protector friend, but in this case, we get to see the other side, and I respected Dennis all the more for the normality of it. He didn't see himself as a hero, or as doing some nice deed a la the Boy Scouts, or as being charitable toward someone who needed the help. He was just a friend who wanted to keep his friend from being hurt as much as possible. The banter between them that was like a light-hearted male cover for their true friendship touched me. The way that they were open and honest with each other, and intuitive enough in their friendship to know what the other needed at any given time, and close enough to go to bat for each other when needed just proves that there are such things as soul-friends, just as I think that there are soul-mates. I always love reading King for the way that he gets right to the heart of things and opens them up and starts poking around, pointing out different component parts and the way that they work together to make the whole. He takes a little piece of life, and he shows us what it's made of by throwing a wrench in the works and seeing what happens and then writing it down for posterity. The wrench in this case is a bad-mannered car and a teen who never had anything of his own to take pride in. Arnie's transformation from pimply, bespectacled, mom-micromanaged chess nerd to angry, bitter, single-purpose hardcase was fascinating. Christine became the focus of his life, his life-line. Everything else became background noise and unimportant. I kept thinking, "He's smart, he'll see what's happening, right?" but no. And not just because the book would have nowhere to go if he did, but because it was believable that he wouldn't. The blinders were on, and the outside, rational world was beyond them. I was surprised by the ending. All along, I thought that it would go one way, and then when it didn't I was as shocked as anyone. I love when that happens, and I love when, without even knowing it, I've invested a part of myself in the characters end up hurting right along with them. King seems to be able to get this reaction out of me every time I crack one of his books. ...And people think he's just a horror writer.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Stefan Yates

    Christine is not one of Stephen King's greatest works by any means, but it is still a good story with moments of real suspense and terror. I feel that one of King's biggest short-comings with this novel was having the tale told by a future Dennis. To me, this takes away a lot of suspense from some of the most tense scenes in the book because the reader is being told the tale by a character who is involved in a near-death experience, therefore revealing that the narrator survived his experience. Christine is not one of Stephen King's greatest works by any means, but it is still a good story with moments of real suspense and terror. I feel that one of King's biggest short-comings with this novel was having the tale told by a future Dennis. To me, this takes away a lot of suspense from some of the most tense scenes in the book because the reader is being told the tale by a character who is involved in a near-death experience, therefore revealing that the narrator survived his experience. As far as I'm concerned, one of the things that makes reading a King novel so compelling is that as a reader one can never be entirely sure which characters (if any) will survive whatever ordeal they happen to be faced with. By having one of the main characters narrate the tale, King has taken away the uncertainty about whether or not Dennis will survive. Other than that qualm, the only other nit that I have to pick with Christine is that at times the narrative gets a bit long winded. In my opinion, this novel is perhaps 100 to 150 pages longer than it really should have been. I enjoy Kings rambling style and long winding road to the climax, but some smart editing here and there could have tightened this tale up considerably and really improved the vehicle (pun intended) of building up the sheer terror of the story. All in all, though, this is a really good tale about friendship, love and the forces of evil that appear to shatter all that is good.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Robert Parsons

    This is a book about an evil car. Stephen King explorers the relationship between a man and his vehicle. Normally this involves a few cans of polish, a camera and plenty of bragging about your pride and joy. The problem is "Christine" is so much more than a car. This is a car with attitude and supernatural powers. It is a car to love until the car kills everyone you know and appears virtually indestructible. After reading Herby, Christine was quite a shock. Poor old Herby would be quivering in hi This is a book about an evil car. Stephen King explorers the relationship between a man and his vehicle. Normally this involves a few cans of polish, a camera and plenty of bragging about your pride and joy. The problem is "Christine" is so much more than a car. This is a car with attitude and supernatural powers. It is a car to love until the car kills everyone you know and appears virtually indestructible. After reading Herby, Christine was quite a shock. Poor old Herby would be quivering in his boots, and as for Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, that old has been is a non starter. This is a book for those who believe their car is much more than a car. The lesson here is, be careful what you wish for.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Daviau

    I think this is probably my least favourite King book I’ve read so far. It’s my first time reading it and I found it so slow going. It took forever me to get into it and I felt like it was just dragging on and on. The idea was so promising but I thought it lacked a lot of King’s usual OOMPH for me. I felt zero connection to any of the characters, they felt flat and two dimensional to me. And that makes it hard for me to enjoy a book because me connecting to characters is very important to my enj I think this is probably my least favourite King book I’ve read so far. It’s my first time reading it and I found it so slow going. It took forever me to get into it and I felt like it was just dragging on and on. The idea was so promising but I thought it lacked a lot of King’s usual OOMPH for me. I felt zero connection to any of the characters, they felt flat and two dimensional to me. And that makes it hard for me to enjoy a book because me connecting to characters is very important to my enjoyment of a story. I really loved the idea of Christine though, and that’s why this story is still getting three stars and not a lower rating.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    Finished this book last night. This was my first real attempt at a Stephen King novel. The Mist had me warmed up to King and I figured I'd snag an other good ol' book of his from my library. Unlike the mist, this finally had an ending (which I'm glad about because after over 500 pages, I would have screamed if it left it with no closure). Sure, it wasn't exactly the happiest and there were still a few things left open ended but it was sufficient. My only question now is: Does Stephen King have ra Finished this book last night. This was my first real attempt at a Stephen King novel. The Mist had me warmed up to King and I figured I'd snag an other good ol' book of his from my library. Unlike the mist, this finally had an ending (which I'm glad about because after over 500 pages, I would have screamed if it left it with no closure). Sure, it wasn't exactly the happiest and there were still a few things left open ended but it was sufficient. My only question now is: Does Stephen King have random sex scenes that for the most part don't lead anywhere in every book? I've asked one person's opinion and the disappointing answer is yes. It's not overwhelming at least and it's tolerable. One thing I will say for King is that he's done a great job making people seem real. Too many times the characters are almost too definable in books and the quirkiness/individuality goes too far. There have been very few characters that I can't say "hey, this guy reminds me of this other random person I know...." about. Along with that, he sets a great suspenseful and eerie mood. I am a weanie when it comes to scary books/movies so I grabbed Christine thinking I'd be fine. I finished it last night and ended up staying up for an other half hour because I didn't want to close my eyes. Again, I'm a super scaredy cat but I still didn't expect a book about an evil car, of all things, to make me jump.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Robert Collins

    This for me is my favourite early King & one of few stand out stories about 1950s car like Cujo or Pet Cemetery this special. A vintage book about a vintage car this has rock n roll theme with a subject that is impossible yet it's fantastic John Carpenter did great movie of the book & unlike lot of movies did not spoil the book maybe that has helped me with memory of this book but at 24ys old this was book I loved

  28. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    **The Stephen King Goodreads Discussion Group is doing a re-read of his works from the beginning to the end. It’s been a long time since I have really immersed myself in Uncle Stevie’s world, but a rate of a book a month, I am all in. My goal is to read and review each one with as much honesty and reflection that I can give. ** Background – “Christine” was the 16th book by King and originally published in 1983. My over-sized paperback and Kindle list the length of the novel as 644 pages. Plotline **The Stephen King Goodreads Discussion Group is doing a re-read of his works from the beginning to the end. It’s been a long time since I have really immersed myself in Uncle Stevie’s world, but a rate of a book a month, I am all in. My goal is to read and review each one with as much honesty and reflection that I can give. ** Background – “Christine” was the 16th book by King and originally published in 1983. My over-sized paperback and Kindle list the length of the novel as 644 pages. Plotline – This book begins in the summer of 1978, when high school buddies, Dennis Guilder and nerdy Arnie Cunningham, notice an old run-down custom painted, red and white 1958 Plymouth Fury sitting out behind a country house. Arnie immediately demands they stop to look at the car, and it’s love at first sight for him. Arnie convinces the owner, an elderly man named Roland Lebay to sell him “Christine”, the owner’s name for the broken-down car. However, while waiting for Arnie, Dennis finds himself siting in Christine’s front seat and experiencing a scary vision of when the car was new twenty years before, and it scares him. Dennis’ fears start to come true as Arnie’s relationship with Christine develops in strange and dark ways. At first, Arnie starts to change for the better. He develops a new-found confidence. His acne somehow disappears. And he even meets a pretty high school transfer student, Leigh Cabot, and starts dating her. Then things start to change for the worse. Arnie’s behaviors become more assertive. His newfound confidence develops from self-assurance into outright aggressive behavior. And his car, Christine seems to have supernatural powers, as well as human characteristics like jealousy, which manifests itself in very destructive ways. It doesn’t take Dennis and Leigh long to start to thinking there is something wrong with Christine, but the challenge of separating Arnie from his true love, Christine, seems impossible… Thoughts and Reflections – This is the type of book that if you try to describe to others, it will sound cheesy and almost silly. But somehow King finds a way to not only make it work, he delivers a current day Shakespearian tragedy. He uses an inanimate object – a haunted car - to examine the strengths and weaknesses of key life relationships, including true friendship, first love, and family bonds. Foundational and ones that we can all relate too, bringing with them emotional and nostalgic memories. This is a story of friendship. Dennis and Arnie’s friendship run’s deep, built on a childhood of bonding and taking care of one another. Dennis is Arnie’s protector and defender. When Christine comes along and replaces Dennis in Arnie’s life, their friendship is torn apart and tested beyond all reasonable expectations. Watching Arnie go down the dark side really hammers away at Dennis, and makes him confront how far he is willing to sacrifice to try and save Arnie. This story is about first love. Arnie’s love for Christine. Arnie’s love for Leigh. And Dennis’ love for Leigh. A man’s love for his first car or his first teenage love are key important milestone that we can all relate too. They are great memories that rarely fade over time; rather they grow sentimentally rich in reflection. There’s nothing more sentimental than thinking about the first car we owned, how it smelled, and how we worked to make it look good. Even more so, was our first teenage love that brought our greatest joy and then broke out heart. This story is about the bonds of family. The relationship between Dennis and his family members is contrasted with that of Arnie and his parents. Dennis is able to talk with and communicate his issues with his parents in an open and trusting manner, while Arnie’s been playing a passive resistant game with his mother since childhood. King explores the realities of parenting and the positive influence that familial support can give to someone going through real struggles. King shows how family can be a strength to getting us through dark and scary things. Other Notes – This novel was adapted into a film that was directed by John Carpenter, and released in the same year as the book. Also, in April 2013, PS Publishing published a 30th Anniversary limited edition. Overall – It’s been over twenty-five years since I last read this book, and I am pretty amazed at how well it stands the test of time. King has crafted a tight-knit book about the strength of key foundational relationships - using a small-town setting, realistic family situations, and a haunted car - to demonstrate that the real horrors in life do not come from supernatural powers, but from the humanity within ourselves when faced with the fears of loneliness, bullying, and loving others.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Erin *Proud Book Hoarder*

    Finally have read this one. Great book - it almost completely follows the movie but there is a major difference to be had. While the events are the same basically, the story behind it is altered majorly. I was a bit peeved about Dennis and Leigh, and it was odd with King's point of view -- for the first 200 pages or so he told the story through first-person (Dennis, the friend.) Suddenly, he switches to multiple viewpoints until page 350 or so. Then he stays in first person, Dennis only, for the Finally have read this one. Great book - it almost completely follows the movie but there is a major difference to be had. While the events are the same basically, the story behind it is altered majorly. I was a bit peeved about Dennis and Leigh, and it was odd with King's point of view -- for the first 200 pages or so he told the story through first-person (Dennis, the friend.) Suddenly, he switches to multiple viewpoints until page 350 or so. Then he stays in first person, Dennis only, for the rest of the book. So strange! The very end was well done and I wish it wasn't over in a way. Nifty ensemble of characters, quickly paced, unique story with various ups and downs, and a sad, bittersweet touch. The main focus is triangles - Arnie, Dennis, and Leigh --- and Arnie, Lebay, and Christine. Now, the below is rambling on why I think the book is changed from the movie, in that it was Lebay who made Christine alive and was the real power rather than it being an evil powerful car by itself. It's filled with spoilers so don't read if you haven't read the book. (view spoiler)[ Just read it, finished it for the first time tonight. Thoroughly enjoyed it and put up a short review. I agree the character of Arnie was sad and he was very likable. Confused on the possession too. It seems to me that LeBay made Christine alive somehow rather than how the movie shows it? When the brother is telling Dennis during their first conversation about his brothers obsession with the car, he mentions that Lebay was always hunting for a car and then finally ordered one and had custom things done to it like the paint job. This would indicate to me he ordered that style of car in the way he wanted, but that he never saw it in person prior, right? So either the car was a normal car and it was supernaturally began with their link, or else the car he just happened to pick was Christine, already inhabited. However, if the second is the truth -- then why would Christine let herself sit in a bodyshop or dealer? And, if she always liked to keep everything the same with her stubborn personality, why did she allow herself to be custom painted and keep that paint? This is what's been nagging me about Christine being alive herself from the start. Additionally, instead of making it about Christine - once LeBay was revealed, it seemed mainly about him the duration of the book, in control of Christine basically. It would seem because of that that he is the driving force. Even the very end of the book now ends with "His undying fury", rather than hers. King changed it as readers learned more and read further. The other thing I think of is if Christine was alive and changed the peoples lives and absorbed them, so to speak, then why would she merge LeBray and Arnie? Why would she not leave him as he is and slowly change him into another version of himself? If she just changes people and gets them addicted to her, that would explain Lebray, but it wouldn't explain Arnie merging with Lebray until Lebray was the main driving lifeforce behind the car. Otherwise, a previous owner would also have been merged in Lebray I think. And it's made clear with backstory that Lebray was always an evil sort of man, way before he met Christine. The last hang-up I have is, why did the car deteriorate so bad under Lebrays watch? I guess it did not have as much power or restoration before being purchased by Arnie? Dennis seems to start finding that out at the end. So, again, that would mean previously Christine - before Arnie and Lebay merged, did not have as much power by itself? And that the merging of the two would make the car as alive as it was, which would again indicate they were the only owners ever of Christine....thus meaning it was Lebray again rather than Christine possessing him at first. (hide spoiler)]

  30. 5 out of 5

    David

    OH MY GODS! What a f*cking treat! I totally loved this book. I cannot remember why I passed it over way back when. I was on-board the King express from THE SHINING and forward, reading every release. Even buying the hardbacks, which was an unbelievable treat in my boyhood home. What a special pleasure to have hidden away from myself. An early King masterpiece. I'd forgotten that he could be this good! It's made me re-evalutate King. I have to re-read his early works that I loved so. And I've got OH MY GODS! What a f*cking treat! I totally loved this book. I cannot remember why I passed it over way back when. I was on-board the King express from THE SHINING and forward, reading every release. Even buying the hardbacks, which was an unbelievable treat in my boyhood home. What a special pleasure to have hidden away from myself. An early King masterpiece. I'd forgotten that he could be this good! It's made me re-evalutate King. I have to re-read his early works that I loved so. And I've got to go back and read that small handful I've missed over the passing decades. CHRISTINE I am surprised to say is one of his best novels. I think I would have to rank it in the top 5 or so. Wow. What a writer. A 700 page novel that races by. No bloat here, as you'll see in some other King works. It is a perfect American horror novel. Can't recommend this one enough.

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