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Origin PDF, ePub eBook Robert Langdon, Harvard professor of symbology, arrives at the ultramodern Guggenheim Museum Bilbao to attend the unveiling of a discovery that "will change the face of science forever." The evening's host is Edmond Kirsch, a forty-year-old billionaire and futurist, and one of Langdon's first students. But the meticulously orchestrated evening suddenly erupts into chaos, an Robert Langdon, Harvard professor of symbology, arrives at the ultramodern Guggenheim Museum Bilbao to attend the unveiling of a discovery that "will change the face of science forever." The evening's host is Edmond Kirsch, a forty-year-old billionaire and futurist, and one of Langdon's first students. But the meticulously orchestrated evening suddenly erupts into chaos, and Kirsch's precious discovery teeters on the brink of being lost forever. Facing an imminent threat, Langdon is forced to flee. With him is Ambra Vidal, the elegant museum director who worked with Kirsch. They travel to Barcelona on a perilous quest to locate a cryptic password that will unlock Kirsch's secret. Navigating the dark corridors of hidden history and extreme re-ligion, Langdon and Vidal must evade an enemy whose all-knowing power seems to emanate from Spain's Royal Palace. They uncover clues that ultimately bring them face-to-face with Kirsch's shocking discovery...and the breathtaking truth that has long eluded us.

30 review for Origin

  1. 4 out of 5

    Emily May

    Where do we come from? Where are we going? Yes, it's the new Dan Brown book. Yes, it's pulpy and ridiculous. But I have to say it-- it was really entertaining, too. The thing about Brown is that he's a mediocre-at-best writer with really fascinating ideas. If you spend too much time analysing individual scenes and sentences, then you're going to start to see the cracks, big and small. Big cracks like world-renowned scientists jumping to ludicrous conclusions, and small cracks like world-renowned Where do we come from? Where are we going? Yes, it's the new Dan Brown book. Yes, it's pulpy and ridiculous. But I have to say it-- it was really entertaining, too. The thing about Brown is that he's a mediocre-at-best writer with really fascinating ideas. If you spend too much time analysing individual scenes and sentences, then you're going to start to see the cracks, big and small. Big cracks like world-renowned scientists jumping to ludicrous conclusions, and small cracks like world-renowned scientists suddenly knowing nothing about a subject so that Robert Langdon can inform them (and the reader) of some exciting tidbit. And Langdon himself must be the stupidest genius ever written. He knows absolutely everything about everything until it's convenient for him to not know something so someone can explain it to him. BUT, for some reason, Brown's plots and codes and puzzles are interesting enough to... kind of make it okay. At least for me. I love all the information about history, science and religion. I love how you can look up the organizations mentioned and find that they are all real. It's very much a plot over writing book, but sometimes that can be exactly what you need. Mindless, pageturning entertainment. In Origin, famous scientist and billionaire Edmond Kirsch is about to make a world-changing announcement. His research and technology have led him to make a discovery about the origin of humankind, as well as their future destiny, that will shake the foundations of the world, tear apart religions, and change absolutely everything. He has essentially found answers to the two questions: Where do we come from? and Where are we going? It's hard not to be drawn in by these universal questions. Then when the announcement event goes horribly wrong and it seems his discovery might be buried forever, Robert Langdon and Ambra Vidal must go on a clue-solving, code-breaking spree across Spain to uncover Kirsch's discovery. Throughout, all I could think was "what could his discovery be?" It would need to be something dramatic enough, something with impact... and, well, personally I loved the reveal. Fake news now carries as much weight as real news. Origin draws on current events and hot topics to make it more relevant to today's world. Brown touches on subjects like "fake news", the advancement of technology and artificial intelligence, and the dark corners of the Internet. He may not be an amazing writer - whatever that means - but he does play on universal thoughts, fears and questions. It makes for a very compelling tale. I wouldn't recommend this to anyone looking for excellent writing, well-developed characters and a whole lot of sense-making. But if you want to sprint through an almost 500-page novel at breakneck pace and escape from thinking for a while, then it is very enjoyable. Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Youtube

  2. 4 out of 5

    Petra

    Update: I just finished the book. It's not the best Robert Langdon book in my opinion but it's entertaining as hell. As always if you are looking for some quality writing this is not the book for you. However I love these books. I love that I can look up a building or a piece of art or a religious organization I never heard of and they are all real. So if that's your cup of tea I would recommend this book for you. Yes Robert Langdon is my guilty pleasure so sue me! I can't wait for this !!!!! I kn Update: I just finished the book. It's not the best Robert Langdon book in my opinion but it's entertaining as hell. As always if you are looking for some quality writing this is not the book for you. However I love these books. I love that I can look up a building or a piece of art or a religious organization I never heard of and they are all real. So if that's your cup of tea I would recommend this book for you. Yes Robert Langdon is my guilty pleasure so sue me! I can't wait for this !!!!! I know the critics hate Dan Brown and I know that his name has become a punchline. But still I don't care I like his books. They make me want to take long walks in Florence, Rome, The Vatican and Istanbul. They make me want to spend days exploring museums and admiring the art and architecture. I learn trivial information like the word quarantine comes from the italian word "quaranta" meaning forty, as all ships were required to be isolated for forty days before passengers and crew could go ashore during the Black Death plague epidemic. Is it high literature? Most certainly not. But it's an intense, fast paced and intriguing book you can't put down which keeps you guessing until the last page. Is that so bad? I'm gonna say no. So yes i'm gonna read this book and every other book that's gonna be published by Dan Brown in the future.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    All right, Danny boy, let's see what you've got for us this time. Anyone want to take bets on how many times he mentions the Mickey Mouse watch? Man, I hope that thing gets smashed under a garbage truck.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    Dan Brown is back with some of his best work in a while. I was not a huge fan of his last two – Inferno and The Lost Symbol. I think for me they seemed kind of stale after Angels & Demons and The Da Vinci Code. Origin is now probably my second favorite of his (behind Angels and Demons). Some of the key points: Religion and Science – this is a big battle in our world today. It is an exhausting battle for someone like me who goes to church but also loves science. I worry that the feeling is star Dan Brown is back with some of his best work in a while. I was not a huge fan of his last two – Inferno and The Lost Symbol. I think for me they seemed kind of stale after Angels & Demons and The Da Vinci Code. Origin is now probably my second favorite of his (behind Angels and Demons). Some of the key points: Religion and Science – this is a big battle in our world today. It is an exhausting battle for someone like me who goes to church but also loves science. I worry that the feeling is starting to be that the two cannot exist together. Dan Brown does a great job of addressing this debate in this book (even though at times I was worried that it was going to end up just being another annoying commentary on the same debate) Lead Female Characters – Brown amuses me with every new lead female character. It is always a scientist, art expert, museum curator, etc. who just so happens to be one of the top 5 most beautiful women alive (he has 5 Langdon books, each with one of those top 5 ;) ) The Dan Brown formula – I will say that each of Brown’s book has basically the same structure. A mystery starts (usually in a museum, church, famous building). Langdon meets a woman (see above). Langdon and this woman run around trying to solve the mystery. Yes, that formula is here. However, that felt okay this time. The last two books it felt like old hat – almost like he was phoning it in. But, with this one I was kind of glad to get back into the same formula and he developed the plot and suspense well. If you like Dan Brown – I recommend this. If you thought maybe the Langdon series had no gas left – I recommend this. If you want an interesting, thought-provoking mystery with a lot of suspense – I recommend this.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sean Gibson

    If you’re reading this in an effort to determine whether or not you want to read Origins, I’m going to make two assumptions: 1) You’ve already read the previous books in the series and, as such, need no introduction to Robert Langdon or Dan Brown’s art/history/symbol/puzzle MO; and 2) You’re not looking for sparkling prose (because, if you are, it’s a little bit like going to an all-you-can-eat $5.99 buffet and getting pissed that there’s no caviar and foie gras). Dan Brown is the Hootie and the B If you’re reading this in an effort to determine whether or not you want to read Origins, I’m going to make two assumptions: 1) You’ve already read the previous books in the series and, as such, need no introduction to Robert Langdon or Dan Brown’s art/history/symbol/puzzle MO; and 2) You’re not looking for sparkling prose (because, if you are, it’s a little bit like going to an all-you-can-eat $5.99 buffet and getting pissed that there’s no caviar and foie gras). Dan Brown is the Hootie and the Blowfish of thriller writers. A smash hit cultural phenomenon early on (like Darius Rucker and the boys), Brown subsequently suffered an unfairly disproportionate critical backlash from holier-than-thou critics who (perhaps not incorrectly, if a bit unfairly and unnecessarily) savaged his writing style and mocked the formulaic nature of his books (which, yes, are a bit like an episode of Home Improvement: Tim creates a crazy situation, Tim screws up, Tim and Wilson have a backyard heart-to-heart, Wilson says something wise, Tim utterly bollixes up communicating the advice to Jill but succeeds in heeding it to fix what he screwed up, Al’s beard gets made fun of, cue credits (…and it just occurred to me that no one under the age of 35 gets that reference, and, if you do get it, you’re sitting there thinking, “Why did he just reference a show whose popularity was utterly inexplicable when considering the quality of its content?”); because, that’s why). Were The Da Vinci Code (in Brown’s case) and Cracked Rear View (in Hootie’s case) good enough to warrant their absurd sales and global buzz? Probably not. But, neither were their subsequent offerings so impossibly bad that they deserved the mockery that ensued (Inferno, for example, has some fun puzzles and history, and I stand by Fairweather Johnson—“The Earth Stopped Cold at Dawn” might be Hootie’s finest work). Look, Hootie and the Blowfish wasn’t the first bar band that broke big, and Dan Brown didn’t invent the historical thriller/mystery/puzzle genre, but they both reinvigorated their respective niches, and significantly expanded the audience receptive to such offerings. A lot of subsequent bands and writers owe these cats a debt of gratitude, as they have been able to make a decent living peddling similar (if often inferior) fare thanks to that receptivity—or, if not a decent living, maybe what I like to call “gumball money” (that is to say, pennies), as in the case of the questionable talent responsible for inflicting The Camelot Shadow (not to mention its prequel The Strange Task Before Me: Being an Excerpt from the Journal of William J. Upton) on the world (of all the things Dan Brown should apologize for, its giving the author of those debacles the idea that he could graft a Brownian approach onto a Victorian setting). (I am just shameless, no?) All that said, what about Origins? Well, it’s no Da Vinci Code, I’ll tell you that… I kid. Well, no, I really don’t—it’s not as compelling, or as ingeniously crafted, a book as Da Vinci or Angels & Demons, largely because, save for one impressive feat of mental prestidigitation involving an ampersand, Langdon’s most awe-inspiring moment of symbolic insight is explaining the hidden symbol in the FedEx logo, which has nothing to do with the book’s central mystery and is, I’m sure, known about by anyone with functional eyes. Instead, Langdon relies on oodles of help from, quite literally, deus ex machina—a state-of-the art AI named Winston, the creation of the man whose murder serves as the book’s inciting incident. That, combined with the book’s focus on modern art, a scene in which Langdon is a fish out of water (or, more accurately, a squiggle out of a square, based on what I know about the composition of modern art), makes for a less engrossing and thrilling ride through intricately crafted (if often implausible) historical puzzles than past outings. Still, there’s something to be said for the book’s concluding chapters, which ultimately convey an uplifting message of hope and unity. Maybe I’m naïve (or, at least, wish I still could be naïve), but there’s something charmingly square about Langdon (and his creator) that, in an age of divisive rhetoric, intolerance, and unbridled hatred for that which is “other” (regardless of who you are and which side of history you think you’re on) resonates and gives an otherwise average (by Brown standards, at least) tale a favorable gloss. Next time, though, let’s get back into something Langdon actually knows about, eh?

  6. 4 out of 5

    Anuradha

    When Anuradha Herur woke up this morning, at the crack of dawn, she was in no way prepared for the absolute dismay she would have to face during the day. As she pulled her long, black hair into a bun, she contemplated the decision she had made the previous night. She had decided, bravely, to read Dan Brown's new treatise on the amalgamation of history and technology, religion and science. As she thumbed through the massive tome, she was, despite her initial trepidation, caught unawares of how cr When Anuradha Herur woke up this morning, at the crack of dawn, she was in no way prepared for the absolute dismay she would have to face during the day. As she pulled her long, black hair into a bun, she contemplated the decision she had made the previous night. She had decided, bravely, to read Dan Brown's new treatise on the amalgamation of history and technology, religion and science. As she thumbed through the massive tome, she was, despite her initial trepidation, caught unawares of how crummy the book was going to be. You see, in this opus, Anuradha had to face her worst enemy yet. Purple prose coupled with a storyline so dreadful, she had to prod herself into finishing it. Anuradha was no quitter. She had endured much worse before. As she boarded the metro for her morning class, she looked at her reflection in the window of the train and sighed. Today was going to be a long day. It was in no way going to help the bags under her eyes, but she knew she had to do it. She had to prove it to herself, if nothing else. It was like nothing she had read before. She read in horror as she saw Langdon fly into his "white male saviour" mode and try and save the world in a day. "If he can save the world in one day, I can read this book in the same time", she reflected. She had read enough of Brown's books to know that her troubles had only just began. She chuckled to herself wisely, knowingly. She knew what was coming, and she was prepared for it. At the same time, she couldn't help but wonder, how much preparation was enough preparation? She took deep, calming breaths and trudged along. She gave a small yelp of pain as she read about every leap, jump, explosion, care chase and art piece mentioned. "Great, there has to be JARVIS in this", she muttered to herself, as her neighbour looked at her with disgust. Little did he know about exactly how much was at stake. She groaned as she read about the quintessential "assassin", the hot lady, her other love interest and the old-fashioned people determined to hurt Langdon. She gave an inward chuckle when she concluded that of course, Langdon wouldn't be the one hurt. Little by little, she started piecing the plot together, when alas, she had to get down for her class. Her German class, though usually interesting, held little interest for her today. All she wanted was more time to figure out who the villain was, and to know if her prediction was right. But as it had to, on such a crucial day, time was a total shrew. Anuradha practically ran out of the class, her arms and legs flailing around her. She didn't find a seat on the way back, so she had to manage standing. It was okay. Everything would be okay if she was right. "I can bet that (view spoiler)[JARVIS (hide spoiler)] is the villain", she texted her brother, but alas, the train went underground and she lost network. She cursed in the dark and continued to read the damned book. Soon, as it had to happen, her stop came and she had to get down again. "This book is going around in circles. Why do all books have to be the same. And why do they have to be so big?" she grumbled. She was hungry, tired, and just wanted the ordeal to be over. She looked up at the sky, groaned because of the sun, and began her long walk home. Heavy bag on her back, and a doorstopper of a book in her hand. She was only halfway done, and she didn't know if she would survive the day. "Tell mom and dad I love them", she texted her brother again. "Stop being so melodramatic", he texted back. You're going to be just fine. She gave a grim half-smile to herself. Little did he know. Halfway through the book, though, she was tempted to take the wise princess Elsa's advice and let it go, but she persisted. This was her Everest and she was going to conquer it. She sipped her coke and continued, rubbing her perspiring brow and kneading her forehead. She was going to do it. She was going to weave through the copious info dump and live through the terrible storyline. "I can finish it. I am sure of it", she whispered to herself and smiled. And then, she reached *that* part of the book. The part where Dan Brown tries to (and he really does try) make it as dramatic as possible, but she pretty much knew what was coming. There was no surprised gasp when she read it. A knowing smile, yes. She knew where he was going with this. To her, it was very obvious. "Could really be this easy? This weak?" she thought to herself. (view spoiler)["I mean, we have been talking about singularity for years. It's pretty much a given", she said to herself. "This only reiterates my conclusion about JARVIS". (hide spoiler)] It went much faster from there, after all, she was almost at the end. (view spoiler)["Ha ha, Brown, making the the Father and the father gay", she thought, and then grinned at herself. She was good with puns, she was. Of course there had to be that element of "forbidden love". Which Langdon book is complete without that? (hide spoiler)] "You have got to stop making these things so obvious, my dear Brown", she thought. "Just a few more pages, you can do it", she pushed herself. "You'll get a chance to write that review you've been meaning to, you know how much you want to do it", she said to herself. And then, suddenly, she screamed, "I knew it, I knew it. You're predictable as fuck Langdon", as her mother looked at her in amusement. (view spoiler)["Breaking the laws of robotics, ha Brown? Trying to mess with the truth?", she said softly. (hide spoiler)] And then, suddenly, she was free. She had done it. She had finished the book. She could breathe the air around her, enjoy the chirping of the birds. She smiled softly to herself. She had done it. She was victorious. The next book was going to be another adventure. Another day. She also hoped to herself, beyond hope, that maybe some day, Dan Brown will actually learn to write. "Well, a girl can dream", she thought. If you think this review is terrible, imagine how bad the book was. I tried making it Dan Brown-esque, but I don't think I was very successful in my attempt. Purple prose is not my strength. Parts of it have been overdramatised for effect. I will never wake up at the crack of dawn. Of course, it's missing symbols, codes and poetry, but this was all the time I had. Maybe I'll build on this when I have more time. The book though, is just awful. I appreciate that Brown takes time before his books to do his "research", I do. I also understand that Asimov's laws aren't the gospel truth. If you've churned out some seven books, however, this doesn't matter anymore. What matters is that the research and language are still shite. Essentially, I have nothing to look forward to here. Also, please for the sake of all that is sane and good, the obsessive and excessive describing of everything needs to stop. It makes my head hurt. There is such a thing as too much, and this book was just that. I will give Danny this though, this book was leaps and bounds better than his previous book, and even marginally better than his third. -- INITIAL REVIEW: Once was fun, twice was okay. The fourth time had me saying "kill me now". Curiosity killed the cat, and someday it will kill Anuradha. Will it be this book that does the trick? We can only wait... Side note: The final cover of the book hasn't been released yet, and the expected date of publication is a good eight months from now. How does this book already have a rating of 3.89? Me wonders.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mohammed Arabey

    Finally will travel again with my idol, Professor Dan Brown Robert Langdon.. This time to Spain.. With an unfamiliar world to him, the world of Modern Art, and on a quest to answer two of the most profound questions in human history. But since I only obsessed with read Illustrated Editions... May the God help me to wait in patience رواية العبقري، مجنون الرموز واصل الإنسان والديانات والحضارات، روبرت لانجدون "الشهير بدان براون" أخيرا ستظهر...أكتوبر القادم هذه المرة لانجدون لأول مرة يصطدم بعالم الفن الحد Finally will travel again with my idol, Professor Dan Brown Robert Langdon.. This time to Spain.. With an unfamiliar world to him, the world of Modern Art, and on a quest to answer two of the most profound questions in human history. But since I only obsessed with read Illustrated Editions... May the God help me to wait in patience رواية العبقري، مجنون الرموز واصل الإنسان والديانات والحضارات، روبرت لانجدون "الشهير بدان براون" أخيرا ستظهر...أكتوبر القادم هذه المرة لانجدون لأول مرة يصطدم بعالم الفن الحديث المعاصر !! وسؤالين من اهم الأسئلة في تاريخ البشرية ما هما السؤالين؟ لا استطيع الانتظار حقا لاستكمال مجموعتي الاثيرة والتي جمعت بين اسرار جماعات التنويريين في مواجهة الكنيسة في القرون الوسطي، وبين اسرار الفاتيكان وصراع الدين والعلم واسرار فرسان الهيكل والجماعات السرية الاوروبية والكأس المقدس وعبقرية دافنشي السابقة لعصرها وأسرار الماسون وبناءهم العالم الجديد الحر ، امريكا، وعلومهم المتشعبة من الحضارات السابقة والاديان والعقل البشري وحتي اسرار دانتي والجحيم الذي تنبأ به مالتوس بسبب الزيادة السكانية كل هذا يأتي في سلسلة روبرت لانجدون المثيرة...والان نحن في انتظار تلك المحطة الجديدة Please release the Illustrated Edition in the same time. Mohammed Arabey First pre-review 28 Sep. 2016

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ron Charles

    Dan Brown is back with another thriller so moronic you can feel your IQ points flaking away like dandruff. “Origin” marks the fifth outing for Harvard professor Robert Langdon, the symbologist who uncovered stunning secrets and shocking conspiracies in “The Da Vinci Code” and Brown’s other phenomenally best-selling novels. All the worn-out elements of those earlier books are dragged out once again for Brown to hyperventilate over like some grifter trying to fence fake antiques. This time around, t Dan Brown is back with another thriller so moronic you can feel your IQ points flaking away like dandruff. “Origin” marks the fifth outing for Harvard professor Robert Langdon, the symbologist who uncovered stunning secrets and shocking conspiracies in “The Da Vinci Code” and Brown’s other phenomenally best-selling novels. All the worn-out elements of those earlier books are dragged out once again for Brown to hyperventilate over like some grifter trying to fence fake antiques. This time around, the requisite earth-shattering secret is a discovery made by Edmond Kirsch, a computer genius with a flair for dramatic presentations and infinite delays. Kirsch has called the world’s intelligentsia to the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain, where he plans to reveal his findings to the world because. . . . To read the rest of this review, go to The Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/entert...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Helene Jeppesen

    DNF. Even though I spent quite some money on this book, I can’t finish it. That’s because this book is an exact replica of all of Dan Brown’s previous books about Robert Langdon and I’m so bored and frustrated with how unoriginal this is. The same protagonist who finds himself in the same kind of situation and makes the same decisions. The structure of the plot is the same with short chapters that all end on “cliffhangers”, and to top it all off Dan Brown throws in a beautiful female - just like DNF. Even though I spent quite some money on this book, I can’t finish it. That’s because this book is an exact replica of all of Dan Brown’s previous books about Robert Langdon and I’m so bored and frustrated with how unoriginal this is. The same protagonist who finds himself in the same kind of situation and makes the same decisions. The structure of the plot is the same with short chapters that all end on “cliffhangers”, and to top it all off Dan Brown throws in a beautiful female - just like in all of his previous novels about professor Langdon. I feel like Dan Brown wrote this book on autopilot and I’m not liking it one bit. Even though I’m not going to finish reading it, I have a pretty good feeling I know how it’s all going to end. *yawn* I wonder if Dan Brown won’t find himself losing a lot of fans exactly because of this unoriginality of his - even though he might be hoping for the opposite because in writing what we’ve already been loving for years.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Carol (Bookaria)

    I first fell in love with Dan Brown's books when I read Deception Point and Digital Fortress many years ago. I used to get the audiobook CDs from the library and I would listen to them on my commute. His novels kept me completely captivated. Now let's talk about Origin, his latest novel. This is the 5th Robert Langdon novel and it has the same elements of the previous books in the series: a crime in a relevant location such as a museum, a mystery to solve, a beautiful and smart woman that teams I first fell in love with Dan Brown's books when I read Deception Point and Digital Fortress many years ago. I used to get the audiobook CDs from the library and I would listen to them on my commute. His novels kept me completely captivated. Now let's talk about Origin, his latest novel. This is the 5th Robert Langdon novel and it has the same elements of the previous books in the series: a crime in a relevant location such as a museum, a mystery to solve, a beautiful and smart woman that teams up with Robert Langdon and assists him in solving said mystery, conspiracy theories, religious intrigue, and interesting and scientific historical facts. Although some parts were interesting, the novel did not engaged me. The author did not charm me like his previous novels did in the past. I did enjoy the chapters where a character named Winston made an appereance. What was interesting about him? You will have to read to find out, I feel that revealing it might be a spoiler. Overall it was ok, I recommend it to those who have enjoyed his previous Robert Langdon novels.

  11. 4 out of 5

    G.H. Eckel

    There are some laughably bad and some insanely-good parts in this novel. If you like Dan Brown, your skin will already be toughened for the bad writing in parts and you will be thrilled with the genius parts. This novel, like Brown's others, will not pull at your heartstrings; it's very much an intellectual adventure--just like you'd expect from a Harvard professor who seems to have no sex drive nor any desire to fall in love. He's in love with ideas and he makes the reader fall in love with ide There are some laughably bad and some insanely-good parts in this novel. If you like Dan Brown, your skin will already be toughened for the bad writing in parts and you will be thrilled with the genius parts. This novel, like Brown's others, will not pull at your heartstrings; it's very much an intellectual adventure--just like you'd expect from a Harvard professor who seems to have no sex drive nor any desire to fall in love. He's in love with ideas and he makes the reader fall in love with ideas too. The obscure facts in the novel titillate our intellectual appetite and Brown delivers again on fleshing out a mysterious world hiding in plain sight. Where do we come from? Where do we go? These phrases act as a refrain throughout the novel. They're the two things all humans want to know. The brilliant part of this is that we, as readers, really do want the answers and Dan keeps us hanging on until the end. The bad part of the refrain is that the phrases are repeated so often you start to scream. Robert Langdon is a brilliant Harvard professor who has an eidetic memory and is the world-leading authority in symbology. He is invited to attend the unveiling of a discovery that promises to change mankind's understanding of ourselves and the universe we live in, in the same way Galileo and Einstein did. The speaker is Edmond Kirsch, Langdon's former student, a genius ala Jobs and Wozniak, who has created a quantum computer with a personality that passes the Turing test. (view spoiler)[ Just before the Kirsch can answer the refrain, he's shot and killed (hide spoiler)] . The mystery that lasts throughout the book is: can Langdon discover and reveal Kirsch's discovery? What endears Langdon to us besides his intellectual acumen is that he is always a fish out of water: he's a Harvard scholar with a Mickey Mouse watch who is thrown into the middle of a murder scene and becomes the target of the real murderers. The scholar running for his life, keeping one step in front of the bad guys is the juice that keeps the plot flowing, and allows Langdon to prove himself a hero. The good: brilliant concept. The twist at the end about the computer is unexpected and easily missed; it is as chilling as it is understated. (view spoiler)[The computer is responsible for sending Kirsch's killer because it would create the maximum audience for Kirsch's announcement. The computer was devoted to taking care of Kirsch's desires and interprets killing him as aiding him. The end of the novel wrestles with the man/machine singularity in the near future. (hide spoiler)] The descriptions of the churches in Spain and the danger Langdon goes through keep the plot moving. Langdon is Langdon with the Mickey Mouse watch and we love him. The less than spectacular: The novel falls too much into a formula discovered in Brown's previous books: * The bad guys are religious zealots who are willing to kill to protect their turf rather than be open to other points of view. * Langdon travels puritanically with a beautiful sidekick. This time she is a beautiful curator who is about to marry a prince. * Langdon has to solve interesting, symbolic puzzles. Unfortunately, there are far fewer in this novel than in previous ones. Dan leans on the formula too heavily and it is becoming tired. But he is smiling all the way to the bank. The writing in places is laughably bad, for example, the text says that Langdon walks into a church that is inside a carved-out portion of a mountain. The next sentence is Langdon thinking, "I am standing inside the carved-out inside of a mountain." OMG, Dan! Come on. LOL. In other places, the POV jumps around from one person to another (called head-hopping). And Dan takes the liberty of dropping out of POV altogether and lecturing us, as author, about some historical fact or symbol his minions have discovered in their research to form some of the interesting "real" facts behind the novel. (view spoiler)[Finally, there's intrigue around the prince and other clerics that serve as plot complications but Brown bails out of them at the last minute. Everyone turns out to be a good guy and just made honest mistakes. Or they die just before the end of the novel! That's bad writing. (hide spoiler)] Still, even with all of these detractors, the novel is great fun. There's very good world building and the computer, Winston, helps provide an interesting answer to the refrain said a thousand times. You won't be bored; the plot moves well and the two lead characters are fun to watch. I will be interested to read the obscure facts and relics in the next novel that the Harvard professor will surely bring out of obscurity and decode for simpletons like me.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Dan Brown is back with another explosive addition to the Robert Langdon series, after a less than enthusiastic fourth book. When iconoclast and renowned atheist Edmund Kirsch speaks, the world listens. His premonitions along all fronts have been earth-shattering and by enriching his statements with the use of computers, Kirsch adds a level of 21st century to his Nostradamus character. Meeting with senior representatives of the world’s three major monotheistic religions, Kirsch tells of an announ Dan Brown is back with another explosive addition to the Robert Langdon series, after a less than enthusiastic fourth book. When iconoclast and renowned atheist Edmund Kirsch speaks, the world listens. His premonitions along all fronts have been earth-shattering and by enriching his statements with the use of computers, Kirsch adds a level of 21st century to his Nostradamus character. Meeting with senior representatives of the world’s three major monotheistic religions, Kirsch tells of an announcement that he wishes to make to the world in which he will refute their importance. There seems to be a great deal of uneasiness at this, but the world has no idea what awaits them. At an exclusive and “who’s who” event at the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, Robert Langdon has been summoned by his former student to attend this announcement. It is here that Langdon meets Winston, his docent for the evening, who turns out to be one of Kirsch’s greatest creations and shows the new levels Artificial Intelligence is reaching. As the presentation begins, Kirsch lays out a strong argument against the need for religion to explore the world at its core. While computers are happy to say “cannot compute” when something has no firm answer, the brain turns to religion to fill the cracks and acts as a crutch to help the individual hobble through existence. It is this that Kirsch wants to dispel with his announcement. As the world watches, Kirsch is about to access his news, when an assassin’s bullet tears into him and kills the brilliant computer scientist. Rushing to his side, Langdon is accompanied by the museum’s director, Ambra Vidal. Both want to ensure the message of Kirsch’s presentation is revealed and the news not silenced by the bullet. Armed with Winston’s help, the two (point-five) of them rush to get out of the museum with Kirsch’s phone, where the final piece of the puzzle is locked away. Now, to crack into the 47-character password and reveal all. As Spanish authorities try to solve the murder, there are new issues, with Vidal having close ties to the Spanish monarchy and their ultra-Catholic views. As they flee, Langdon is determined to crack the code and let the world see what Kirsch wanted to reveal. Meanwhile, the assassin is still on the loose and two of the three religious leaders who know Kirsch’s valuable information have been murdered. All eyes turn to a Spanish schism in the Catholic Church and a group that has nothing to lose by annihilating all things that may turn the world away from religion. With time running out and the world waiting with bated breath, Robert Langdon may hold the key to removing the foundations of all things religious, creating a seismic void for vast amounts of the population. A brilliant piece that keeps the reader thinking throughout and learning in equal measure. There is little time for rest and Langdon fans will appreciate this jam-packed piece, even if it does get tangential at times. Dan Brown always packs a punch with his novels, seeking to push the envelop, but does so in such a way that the narrative does not usually seem far-fetched. Those who have never delved into a Robert Langdon story may not be as well-versed with his nuances, but there is little character development in the true sense. Brown tends to pull memories or events from the past to complement the present story, rather than build a character who draws on these elements the further the series evolves. Langdon’s academic past and sharp mind help to develop a strong and likeable character, though he is surely the kid in school you’d punch in the arm for being a know-it-all. Another of Brown’s formulaic additions to each novel in the series is the young and beautiful woman, done here with Ambra Vidal. Vidal is not the helpless woman who requires saving by Langdon as much as a vessel into which the protagonist can pour his knowledge (thereby educating the reader as well). Vidal’s story is vast and quite interesting, giving the reader much to use to help form their opinion of the woman. Her character thread is long and can be seen woven into many interesting subplots. The vast array of other characters enrich the story and provide interesting storylines to keep the narrative moving forward in an interesting fashion. With such a large collection of characters, it is sometimes hard to remember all the literary crumbs that are being dispersed, but Brown does well to create interesting subplots to keep the reader curious. The story’s premise is highly controversial and Brown seeks to fan the flames between religion and science. Long deemed poor bedfellows, Brown seeks to push the science versus religion debate to new levels by extrapolating the Darwinian issues over evolution and positing an argument about the beginning of human existence. This goes further than the Big Bang versus Genesis and Brown seeks to create a new and science-based argument to send the fragility of religion toppling over again. The open-minded reader will surely see all sides to the arguments made within the larger story and find a truth for themselves, but there is a strong push towards science and technology to better explain life and its origins. Does religion have any chance against this ocean of information, for it is trust versus fact that finds its way into this discussion? Brown does not parse words, but he also seeks to explore things from a perspective that the lay reader can likely understand. Yes, there are segments of the story that are jargon-filled, but it is done to teach and not speak above the head. Brown is also the king of the tangential storyline and inserts minutiae into the story to teach as well as entertain. That is plentiful here and the reader has much that can be taken away. Brilliantly placed throughout the story, Brown shows his dedication to research and sharing of knowledge. There are so many parts embedded into this wonderful writing that the reader may bask in the smooth flow of the words on the page, the great deal of factual information that serves to substantiate the plot, or even the dedicated dialogue that is not as jilted as some popular authors of the genre. Some may say that the core story and the eventually revelation of the secret Kirsch had to offer are anti-climactic, which is their right. It is, perhaps, only a means to an end, as Brown wants to open the Pandora’s Box and let both sides bump chests to discredit the strength of the other. Whatever the outcome of the debate in the reader’s mind, it would seem that some symbiosis and a joint approach might fuel a more civilized and yet still fruitful discussion. Kudos, Mr. Brown, for another wonderful story. I remained entertained and educated throughout, which serves the purpose in a piece of fiction. I enjoy the controversy as well and hope it will fuel many a discussion. Like/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at: http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/ A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...

  13. 4 out of 5

    James

    When Origin, the fifth in the Robert Langdon series by Dan Brown, was published last Fall, I couldn't wait to read it. Unfortunately, I had several ARCS, giveaways, and commitments that forced me to hold off until just this week to read it - nearly 5 months of misery. I cried when my fellow readers published reviews and I couldn't look at them. I kicked things when the book mocked me on the shelf. Yet I survived and made it my priority this week... in the end, it was a good read and I will alway When Origin, the fifth in the Robert Langdon series by Dan Brown, was published last Fall, I couldn't wait to read it. Unfortunately, I had several ARCS, giveaways, and commitments that forced me to hold off until just this week to read it - nearly 5 months of misery. I cried when my fellow readers published reviews and I couldn't look at them. I kicked things when the book mocked me on the shelf. Yet I survived and made it my priority this week... in the end, it was a good read and I will always enjoy Brown's style, plots and characters. I'm giving this one 3.5 out of 5 stars and will rate either a 3 or 4 on each of the book sites depending on their ratings meanings. The story is quite intriguing, as always. A man holds a press conference / big reveal event to account that he has found the answers we've all been searching for: (1) Where did we come from, and (2) Where are we going? It kicks off a series of events including his murder, the ire of many established world religions and the envy of historians and cultural icons. Langdon pairs up with the future Queen of Spain who runs the museum where the murder occurs, then they travel the country to discover all the answers. The scenery, setting, and backgrounds are marvelous. Brown is highly adept at giving readers exactly as much as they need to picture the story without coloring it in too much... a few blurry edges for personal imagination. The sheer intensity of the research he must have done in the worlds of science, religious, museums, Spain and art is admirable. The volume of characters, the who is good versus who is evil balance, the red herrings, the small and large steps during the chases... all of these facts and the enveloped tone completely make this a 5 star read from those perspectives. But then I started comparing it to his previous novels, to other works in this sub-genre and to his overall approach in telling the story. It fell short for me. There weren't enough side stories. The characters were flatter than usual. I would love to have seen a bigger story about the Spanish royalty's influence and history (other than Franco) in regard to science, evolution and romance. There were no scenes except a memory between the prince and his future consort, so I didn't root for them. Langdon almost felt like a secondary character in the book. And the various sects of religious and military groups involved in the story seemed too fluid and/or disorganized in terms of the bigger picture. It made the story less interesting as I couldn't really latch onto any specific character. Even Langdon had a minimal connection to the man who was murdered... despite being professor and student, we saw very little memories of a bond between them. Throw in a few conversations at a pub bonding over a theory, or an argument over the church, something to connect them for us in the present. That said, I do enjoy these types of novels and there was enough to keep my interest. It just wasn't a consistent page-turner throughout the whole book. I'll still read the next one. And I'll always be in awe of the author's intelligence, world knowledge and style.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mackey

    FIVE STARS and FIVE MORE!! Nothing is invented, for its written in nature first. Originality consists of returning to the Origin." -Antoni Gaudi Where did we come from? Where are we going? These are the two most basic, yet important questions mankind asks of itself. For thousands of years man has struggled with these questions and, in an attempt to fill the void where there is no definite absolute, has created stories and gods to explain the inexplicable. This book, which is one of the most thrill FIVE STARS and FIVE MORE!! Nothing is invented, for its written in nature first. Originality consists of returning to the Origin." -Antoni Gaudi Where did we come from? Where are we going? These are the two most basic, yet important questions mankind asks of itself. For thousands of years man has struggled with these questions and, in an attempt to fill the void where there is no definite absolute, has created stories and gods to explain the inexplicable. This book, which is one of the most thrilling books I've read in ages, looks at the science behind "the Origin" while taking Robert Langdon and us on a mind blowing trip around Spain! Dan Brown began writing Science Fiction before he started his Langdon series. Origin harkens back to those days when his books were filled with startling scientific data more than religious codes and dogma. While there still is the religious aspect in the book, the sheer volume of scientific data in Origin is staggering - especially if you are fact checking everything as I was doing. I suspect there will be those who find the science in this book too overwhelming and will not enjoy the book as a result. I, however, wanted MORE! Yes, there is a questioning of blind religious faith. Yes, Brown does once again shed light on extremists within the Catholic Church - as we should on all extremism. Yes, Brown does force the reader to look at fascism in a hard, cold light - AS WE ALL SHOULD!!! This book is one of the most timely, relevant fiction based on fact novels published in a long time. Already there are those who are saying it is "tripe." I daresay that they have not read the book OR it pointed a finger at them and they felt uncomfortable. This is not a "typical Dan Brown tromp." It is far better than that. The writing is impeccable, the characters fully developed and the research is thorough and well sussed. Moreover, it is a thriller that will keep you guessing until the end of the book which is exactly what thrillers should do. And that, my friends, does not even allow for the surprise twist at the end!! The answer to "where are we going" left me dumbfounded, speechless, flabbergasted!! Yes. YES. YES!!! OMGOSH!!! The entire book is worth reading just to get to that point!! I almost closed the books hen I read it! I was too emotionally overwhelmed - but - the ending is beautiful! This a MUST READ book!! Go. Now. Get this book!! I leave you with this riddle: Ampersand phone home

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sepani

    So after reading all Dan Brown’s books, I think I finally found the most interesting book among the five; which is ORIGIN This book also starts with the same structure like his previous novels which focuses about the religion and the past while this book speaks about the religion and the future. In here the author gives the answers to the most basic and important questions which are; Where did we come from? Where are we going? The second question made me astounded, but in a way I agree with that fa So after reading all Dan Brown’s books, I think I finally found the most interesting book among the five; which is ORIGIN This book also starts with the same structure like his previous novels which focuses about the religion and the past while this book speaks about the religion and the future. In here the author gives the answers to the most basic and important questions which are; Where did we come from? Where are we going? The second question made me astounded, but in a way I agree with that fact. While reading, I had to google for many places, and art works which I did for every novel he has written so far. It helped me to visualize the facts written in the novel and made it hardly to put it down. “Well, science and religion are not competitors, they’re two different languages trying to tell the same story. There’s room in this world for both.”

  16. 4 out of 5

    Justin Tate

    Dan Brown is the premiere source for edge-of-your-seat thrillers, and Origin doesn't disappoint. This time Robert Langdon finds himself somewhat out of water when a murder ploy involving a futurist atheist and varying religious figures takes a high-tech turn. As always, the secret sauce is Brown's ability to incorporate research into the high-stakes adventure. We get some of the classic art history type stuff, but also a lot of forward-thinking technology concepts that truly fascinate. On the po Dan Brown is the premiere source for edge-of-your-seat thrillers, and Origin doesn't disappoint. This time Robert Langdon finds himself somewhat out of water when a murder ploy involving a futurist atheist and varying religious figures takes a high-tech turn. As always, the secret sauce is Brown's ability to incorporate research into the high-stakes adventure. We get some of the classic art history type stuff, but also a lot of forward-thinking technology concepts that truly fascinate. On the positive side, Origin is an impossible-to-put-down thrill ride that masterfully handles mystery to the point that you're desperate to find out what happens. On the negative end, the reveals don't quite equal the substantial build-up, and there's at least one major mystery that's pretty obvious early on. Also--I don't know if it's for legal reasons or what--but Brown essentially cites some of his research sources through Langdon, and they are disappointing. Travel blogs and TED Talks come up, for example. I like it better when he plagiarizes and looks like a genius - ha! Overall, the great aspects of the book heavily outweigh a few imperfections. If you're a Dan Brown fan, no need to fear - he's still got it!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    It was morning. It was possible to tell this because the sun was in the sky and it was no longer dark out. Chestnut maned, voluptuous reference librarian Sara Fiore gradually felt herself awaken from a sleep which had lasted approximately seven hours. She turned on her side and allowed her brown eyes, one of which was slightly droopier than the other to linger lazily on the still sleeping form of her lithe and marvelously sexy husband Dan (who might be just a tad annoyed at being included in thi It was morning. It was possible to tell this because the sun was in the sky and it was no longer dark out. Chestnut maned, voluptuous reference librarian Sara Fiore gradually felt herself awaken from a sleep which had lasted approximately seven hours. She turned on her side and allowed her brown eyes, one of which was slightly droopier than the other to linger lazily on the still sleeping form of her lithe and marvelously sexy husband Dan (who might be just a tad annoyed at being included in this review but I won't tell if you won't). Oh how they had laughed delightedly the night before when she let her mind drift back in time to the days of her winsome youth when she had trained briefly as an actress and used all her old skills (thank heaven for those improv classes!) to perform for him the very best parts of Dan Brown's latest bestseller. How the relief had coursed through her like fine mulled wine, that she no longer drank being a recovering alcoholic of some years (who could forget that misspent night in Greece!), when she first learned that the best selling, barely literate, blithering moron was not in fact going to butcher her beloved William Shakespeare into easily digested but utterly tasteless morsels of pop culture twee as the self described "author" himself had implied when first teasing his new book. Such was her relief upon discovering that he would instead be dumbing down Darwin's theory of evolution to a degree where her rambunctious, beloved, but insanely stupid rescue dog, who was the result of a very questionable union between a beagle and a German Shepard, could understand it, that she actually awarded him a single star on Goodreads! And so the night had passed as she laughingly regaled her insanely attractive, yet ever so slightly mysterious in an amusingly innocent way husband with yet another mind numbingly dull exercise in how not to write a novel. They chortled with glee over the nonsensically scattered italics, two page chapters, and claustrophobia still being bumbling dimwit Robert Langdon's sole defining characteristic. They marveled at imbecilic Brown's ham handed attempts at yet another story pitting Monty Pythonesque religious zealots against devil may care, cheeky scientific geniuses who in no way whatsoever bear any kind of even passing resemblance to either Elon Musk or Richard Branson. But even they were left scratching their slightly graying heads uncomprehendingly over the author's asinine belief that a mentally impaired eggplant wouldn't be able to figure out that by titling his book "Origin" and constantly referring to "something that would change creation stories all around the world forever" the BIG REVEAL might possibly have something to do with our ORIGINS as a species. Okay I can't do this anymore. Maybe I should give this collection of papers inside two pieces of super stiff cardboard (I refuse to call it a novel or a book) another star because dear god does it take effort to write that badly. Religion is bad and if you're religious you're stupid. Science is good and it turns out virtual reality is the key to figuring out how we emerged from the primordial ooze even though using virtual reality to figure that out is kinda sorta the exact polar opposite of using actual science instead of you know a computer program that you can design to tell you whatever you want. But before the whole world can learn this amazing news there's a murder and some people are chasing Robert Langdon and another in a long line of much smarter than him women while they look for...I think it's a flash drive...or maybe a password...I honestly can't be arsed to remember. Then some more stuff happens and THE WORLD WILL NEVER BE THE SAME AGAIN. Except it will because after every single one of the earth shattering, universe shifting events in each of these books everything resets as though Jesus's kids weren't found, a plague rendering everyone infertile wasn't released, and whatever the hell happened in The Lost Symbol didn't happen. Oh and before I forget... SYMBOLOGY IS STILL NOT A THING DAN BROWN!!!!!!!!!!!!!! *It occurs to me that I really should share the inspiration for this review, a wonderful, wonderful and far funnier review/commentary on the "author" written in 2013 by Michael Deacon* http://www.telegraph.co.uk/books/auth...

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dana Al-Basha دانة الباشا

    [Oct 15, 2016] I can't wait for this! Months and months and months ago (last year), I was waiting for September to come, when the date was pushed to October and when October the 3rd came I forgot about the release date, which is today! I went for lunch and walked as usual to the nearest bookstore to find the display to Origin being set! I'm glad to announce that I am the first person to buy this book in Kuwait! How cool is that?! I can't wait to begin reading! This edition is the UK first edition. [Oct 15, 2016] I can't wait for this! Months and months and months ago (last year), I was waiting for September to come, when the date was pushed to October and when October the 3rd came I forgot about the release date, which is today! I went for lunch and walked as usual to the nearest bookstore to find the display to Origin being set! I'm glad to announce that I am the first person to buy this book in Kuwait! How cool is that?! I can't wait to begin reading! This edition is the UK first edition.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sr3yas

    In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. -------------------------- Genesis 1:1 Where did God come from? And if we decide this to be unanswerable, why not save a step and decide that the origin of the universe is an unanswerable question? --------------------------Carl Sagan Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going? ----------------------- Paul Gauguin Langdon's fifth outing to the world questions the origin of life and future of mankind, and promises exciting answe In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. -------------------------- Genesis 1:1 Where did God come from? And if we decide this to be unanswerable, why not save a step and decide that the origin of the universe is an unanswerable question? --------------------------Carl Sagan Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going? ----------------------- Paul Gauguin Langdon's fifth outing to the world questions the origin of life and future of mankind, and promises exciting answers to these questions that will shake the foundation of the world... Whether the impact of these shakes is a 1 or a 10 is for you to decide! Surprisingly, Mr Brown doesn't kill anyone off in the prologue, instead he opens the story with a rather interesting meeting between Edmond Kirsch, a billionaire/ inventor/ futurist/ celebrity and above all, a devote atheist, and three well respected religious leaders from three different faiths. Kirsch shares a presentation on a new finding with them and these three religious leaders go... You might expect that the story will take off right after this interesting prologue, but after prologue comes the preamble, or the setting of the stage (quite literally so). We, along with Robert Langdon are invited to attend a spectacular event hosted by Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, where Edmond Kirsch will unveil the discovery that will... Yea, we get it, It's going to be Earth-shattering and paradigm shifting stuff. So what is it? Aaaaaand that's how Dan Brown gets you. Now you'll have to read the whole book to know the "truth". We spent the first quarter of the book inside Guggenheim Museum, and a good part of that quarter acts as exhibition guide to the museum. My friend, I suggest you watch a video tour of the museum or else you will be switching back and forth between the Internet search and the novel for quite some time, like I did. We are introduced to Ambra Vidal, the director of Guggenheim Museum, and apparently this book's Bond girl (Or Langdon Girl! Does that sound right?) and Winston, an A.I. created by Edmond. Langdon calls him Siri on steroids and I call him distant cousin of Samantha from Her. You know, the one with Scarlet Johansen's sexy voice. The novel has its ups and downs, and it is probably the least challenging of all Langdon novels, mainly because of moderate level code breaking, easily guessable man-behind-the-curtain, a plot that goes from point A to point B to C without any hiccups, and little too mainstream central science plot. Yet, Origin redeems itself because of the charms of our ageing leading man, the selection of beautiful locations and epic architectures, and Brown's usual interesting info dumps. None of the action felt far-fetched, and the tweaks Brown did with the usual Langdon formulas were fun to read. And above all, it is entertaining. And as to the questions of our origin and future, I and Calvin have the same answer. ***** End of the review***** Beginning of rants (Major Spoilers Ahead) SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS I know I gave three stars, but I got so many issues with this one. Starting with *inhales* The code-breaking! Did you see that shit? Edmond literally handed over a checklist of clues for his password, and it feels so absurd. Even after that, the search for the password was not even clever, but a normal, logical search. I mean, Langdon and Ambra attained the password without any rigorous intellectual brainstorming. What happened to all the brainy stuff? And hyping the "discovery" was so overdone, considering the actual discovery. Copernicus of our age, Edmond? YOU DIDN'T EVEN INVENT THE THEORY. You took thermodynamics theory of the origin and ran a simulation in your supercomputer! Edmond invented the computer and the simulation, but all glory belongs to Jeremy England who proposed the theory. BTW, Jeremy England's theory is pretty cool (and real). You can read an article about his Thermodynamics theory of origin here ------>https://www.quantamagazine.org/a-new-... And back to ranting. The answer to where we are going? Dan Brown was hyping it even though he knew it's a really underwhelming concept because EVERYONE TALKS ABOUT IT. Humanity infusing itself with technology is not a revelation, but a simple fact I face every time when my nephews or nieces ask me to lend them my smartphone, instead of asking for chocolates. So, the revelation that we are going to evolve from Homo Sapiens to Homo machines or whatever was a resounding "duh" for me. And the whole destruction of religion was a sham too! The religious leaders were disturbed because THEY THOUGHT THE WORLD WAS GOING TO END. Nothing more. And as for the new Origin theory disrupting religions, anyone remembers Darwin's theory? Remember how it destroyed all religions? No? Me neither. Religion has a tendency to...uh... overlook and see what they need to see. And I could be wrong, but I don't think simulations are considered as proof. (Many computer models states that we have a ninth planet in the solar system, but it's not yet official because we haven't found one. Same logic?) And finally, the reveal involving (view spoiler)[Winston? (hide spoiler)] I called it even before I finished the first half. I felt it was a no-brainer because of the resourcefulness of the informer and the sheer quantity and quality of the leaks. It was obvious that only one person could do that. I suspected the identity of Regent too, and when Edmond's mortality was revealed, I was quite sure of that too. Parting thoughts: (view spoiler)[I think Winston knew the password. (hide spoiler)] Either that or he is a poor planner. Food for thought.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sumit RK

    At the outset, I must admit that I am a big fan of Dan Brown. I have read his every book and the Robert Langdon series is one of my favourites. But the latest offering has left me disappointed. His latest offering Origin is by far his weakest; a uninspired narrative, lacking creative depth and most importantly a formulaic Langdon thriller that just doesn’t feel like a Dan Brown original. Origin is the fifth Dan Brown book featuring Langdon. Brown’s story explores the two existential questions: W At the outset, I must admit that I am a big fan of Dan Brown. I have read his every book and the Robert Langdon series is one of my favourites. But the latest offering has left me disappointed. His latest offering Origin is by far his weakest; a uninspired narrative, lacking creative depth and most importantly a formulaic Langdon thriller that just doesn’t feel like a Dan Brown original. Origin is the fifth Dan Brown book featuring Langdon. Brown’s story explores the two existential questions: Where do we come from? Where are we headed? (With the usual theme of clash between Science & Religion.) If you have read more than a couple of books involving Robert Langdon, you already know how the story will move ahead: 1. A scientist (almost always Langdon’s friend) on the verge of major scientific breakthrough is killed by a mysterious assassin. 2. Robert Langdon somehow becomes a prime suspect and is hunted by the police. He is accompanied by a female companion (always) in decoding the codes and patterns in the race against time. 3. The entire mystery unfolds around one of the iconic world cities scattered with architectural landmarks (It could be Vatican, Florence, Madrid or Paris), heavily focussing on an artist and his works (In some it is Leonardo Da Vinci, Botticelli, Michelangelo etc) and now in Origin it is Antoni Gaudi. 4. A dark assassin brainwashed by a mysterious cult (Illuminati /Opus Dei/Templars) into thinking that he is fighting for a worthy cause after having been saved from the personal demons of his past. 5. A chase across the city, solving puzzles involving symbols, anagrams, icons, an encounter with assassin and the final reveal which will change the world forever. It feels like you are reading the same story over & over again.You could almost tell what is going to happen next, who could the antagonist and you can even guess the final reveal in the first half of the book itself, if you are paying attention. Even Inferno was a tad predictable but the clues always kept you on the edge. In Origin though, most of the clue finding is replaced by mindless chase sequences. Even the final reveal is underwhelming compared to previous books. Hopefully Dan Brown reboots the Robert Langdon series because the Robert Langdon series deserves better and even the fans deserve much better.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Origin (Robert Langdon, #5), Dan Brown Robert Langdon, Harvard professor of symbology and religious iconology, arrives at the ultramodern Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao to attend a major announcement—the unveiling of a discovery that “will change the face of science forever.” The evening’s host is Edmond Kirsch, a forty-year-old billionaire and futurist whose dazzling high-tech inventions and audacious predictions have made him a renowned global figure. Kirsch, who was one of Langdon’s first student Origin (Robert Langdon, #5), Dan Brown Robert Langdon, Harvard professor of symbology and religious iconology, arrives at the ultramodern Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao to attend a major announcement—the unveiling of a discovery that “will change the face of science forever.” The evening’s host is Edmond Kirsch, a forty-year-old billionaire and futurist whose dazzling high-tech inventions and audacious predictions have made him a renowned global figure. Kirsch, who was one of Langdon’s first students at Harvard two decades earlier, is about to reveal an astonishing breakthrough . . . one that will answer two of the fundamental questions of human existence. عنوانها: منشاء؛ سرچشمه؛ خاستگاه؛ پیدایش؛ نویسنده: دن براون؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز دوازدهم ماه فوریه سال 2018 میلادی عنوان: منشاء؛ نویسنده: دن براون؛ مترجم: محسن عقبایی؛ تهران، مجید، 1396؛ در 560 ص؛ شابک: 9789644531248؛ موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان امریکایی - سده 21 م عنوان: منشاء؛ نویسنده: دن براون؛ مترجم: مهدی لطیفی؛ تهران، منوچهری؛ 1397؛ در 522 ص؛ شابک: 9786005994391؛ عنوان: منشاء؛ نویسنده: دن براون؛ مترجم: سوگند رجبی نسب؛ ویراستار: مهدی افشار؛ تهران، انتشارات بهنام؛ 1397؛ در 631 ص؛ عنوان: منشاء؛ نویسنده: دن براون؛ مترجم: زینب محمدنژاد؛ ویراستار: سیدصاحب موسوی؛ تهران، انتشارات آناپنا؛ 1397؛ در 48 ص؛ عنوان: سرچشمه؛ نویسنده: دن براون؛ مترجم: علی مجتهدزاده؛ مشهد، انتشارات شمشاد؛ 1397؛ در 570 ص؛ شابک: 9786008392545 عنوان: پیدایش؛ نویسنده: دن براون؛ مترجم: مهرذاذ وثوقی؛ تهران، ققنوس؛ 1397؛ در 608 ص؛ شابک: 9786002784261؛ عنوان: خاستگاه؛ نویسنده: دن براون؛ مترجم: احمد جعفری؛ تبریز، فروزش؛ 1397؛ در 545 ص؛ شابک: 9789645477613؛ عنوان: خاستگاه؛ نویسنده: دن براون؛ مترجم: حسین شهرابی؛ تهران، تندیس؛ 1397؛ در 768 ص؛ شابک: 9786001823077؛ عنوان: خاستگاه؛ نویسنده: دن براون؛ مترجم: فریبا جعفری نمینی؛ تهران، نسل نو اندیش؛ 1397؛ در 590 ص؛ شابک: 9789642369003؛ پیدایش، یا «منشأء»، یا «خاستگاه»، یا «سرچشمه»، عنوانهای فارسی، رمانی از: « دن براون»، نویسنده آمریکایی است، که نخستین بار در ماه اکتبر سال 2017 میلادی منتشر شد. ژانر رمان همچنان مهیج است، و داستانی معمایی و علمی-تخیلی است. رمان ادامه ی ماجراجویی‌های «رابرت لنگدان»، استاد نشانه‌ شناسی مذاهب، و نمادشناسی، از دانشگاه «هاروارد» است، که اینبار، رخدادهای آن، در کشور اسپانیا رخ می‌دهند. رمان «پیدایش»، پنجمین کتاب از سری «رابرت لنگدان»، که با کتاب «فرشتگان و شیاطین»، آغاز، و سپس به ترتیب در کتاب‌های: «رمز داوینچی»، «نماد گمشده»، و «دوزخ»، دنبال شده‌ است. ا. شربیانی

  22. 5 out of 5

    Calista

    I read this as summer reading. It was fun and thought provoking for me. I do find the way Dan Brown tells the story to be so annoying. He draws certain things out to create tension, but in me it was not good. It made me want to set the book aside because it was so annoying. He will start telling part of the narrative we want to hear and then a character will go off on a tangent for a while before coming back to the story. Really? This is the 5th Robert Langdon book and I love the symbologist and I read this as summer reading. It was fun and thought provoking for me. I do find the way Dan Brown tells the story to be so annoying. He draws certain things out to create tension, but in me it was not good. It made me want to set the book aside because it was so annoying. He will start telling part of the narrative we want to hear and then a character will go off on a tangent for a while before coming back to the story. Really? This is the 5th Robert Langdon book and I love the symbologist and why doesn't the way Robert changes our world every show up in the next book. Dan keeps bringing religion up, but each book is supposed to alter religion and yet by the next book it doesn't seem to have made a dent. I do see one thing. In the Inferno a virus was released to keep the population down and in this story Ambra cannot have children. Is that from the virus of the previous book? Could be. We won't know. Such a huge deal is made out of faith in this book and the fact that once this new paradigm is out, people will lose faith. I don't think there is any kind of proof that can be offered to stop the majority of believers from believing. I did like the question Robert Langdon asks, "Who made the laws of physics for life to begin?" It's a great question. What I love is that Dan Brown only leaves questions about faith using his characters. Someone makes a point and Dan goes out of his way to then have a little question at the end of that statement. He wants to promote dialogue. I'm not saying the writing is the best here, but the ideas about computers, religion, where we come from and where we going are huge and I feel they are handled well. The race around Spain isn't as awe inspiring as other places, but I have seen enough pictures in my head that it is interesting. There are a few symbols in here, but not as much as normal. I was able to surmise several big plot points before they were revealed, which makes me feel smart and 'go me.' Even though the pacing drives me crazy, this book was everything I want. I was engaged, my mind was provoked and made me think about deep topics and the nature of humans and technology while also just being a totally fun read. I had a great time reading this. It was better than his previous 2 books I felt. This is the best book since the Da Vinci Code I think. There were good mysteries and I really like Winston. There was a great little chilling twist right at the end that once again turned everything on it's head. Dan is an expert at that. You think it's all played out and then there is one slight twist to shift the paradigm. There is an idea of Entropy in this story and the way it's described is amazing. I never thought of this as a law of the universe, but it fits so much of life. Entropy is an interesting study and that is what blew my mind - BAM - splat, all over the way. It's a great concept and a paradigm shift to move forward. I assume much of the science and math in the story from professors is real, it is all theoretical at this point. I will have to research when I am done with school. That's all I got. Glad I read this.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jerry Jose

    Well, I won’t lie. I had fun. Dan Brown novels are like Michael Bay movies; both were once cool and are now timeworn by overstaying the welcome. Well, if you are content with what to expect, they could still be easy entertainment. But this one surprised me, by being bad. I was more curious about whether everything in this book will remain in Spain or move to Catalonia by the time I finished it, than the promised big secret. ‘Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition’, right? For the fifth time in Well, I won’t lie. I had fun. Dan Brown novels are like Michael Bay movies; both were once cool and are now timeworn by overstaying the welcome. Well, if you are content with what to expect, they could still be easy entertainment. But this one surprised me, by being bad. I was more curious about whether everything in this book will remain in Spain or move to Catalonia by the time I finished it, than the promised big secret. ‘Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition’, right? For the fifth time in a row, existence of the world is threatened by a ‘secret’; unraveling of which, requires a complicated scheme of solving codes hidden in modern art and literature by nefarious cults over centuries. And again for the fifth time in a row, it is up to Harward symbologist Prof. Robert Langdon to solve this mystery alongside his brand new disposable female Boswell; while being chased by Police, though cooperation is a perfectly logical option. I was all in for this formula, but Brown decided to up the game by giving Langdon a personal Jarvis and his own version of conspiracy reddit. And if you, like me, are expecting some continuation or even mention of the Childhoods End scenario, Inferno had left us in, prepare to be disappointed; it gets zero mention. The transformative discovery at the end of the book, which is the primary incentive for reading, was doomed to be a presentation on thermodynamics and diffusion physics from the very start, despite the over dramatic built up of an Apple event. I was left all the more infuriated by Brown comparing his big secret with Copernicus’s heliocentrism, Darwin’s evolution and Einstein’s relativity, while all he did was to pretend like he just invented the genre of cyberpunk. I might have grown too old to completely enjoy this, but more importantly, I think Dan Brown has grown older. You know it’s too far fetching when Langdon has to deduce corporate logos such as Uber, to show his specialty of ‘romance in short notice.’ Dan Brown repeatedly asserts Langdon’s female companion as a woman of her own, and then proceeds to prove her otherwise. He was trying too hard to be cool, by hook or crook, from Asimov, Clarke, Blake to Star Wars and Fermi Paradox and Ted Talks and Neil deGrasse Tyson. And there were product placements, I don’t know whether that is a thing for books, but, CNN, Uber, Tesla, Apple and FedEx did seem to have their hand in sponsorship. Below is a cringy example “In reality, Edmond loved attention, and admitted to keeping his plane at Sabadell only to have an excuse to drive the winding roads to his home in his favorite sports car—a Tesla Model X P90D that Elon Musk had allegedly hand-delivered to him as a gift. Supposedly, Edmond had once challenged his jet pilots to a one-mile drag race on the runway—Gulfstream vs. Tesla—but his pilots had done the math and declined.” Usually data dumping and random facts in Dan Brown novels concatenate to some extent; here they weren’t really conclusive, even if one ignore the significance. Also most of the things that are explained as cutting edge technology like bone conducting headphones, dark web, advancements in AI were already too main stream to incite any awe; and he seemed to have saturated the conspiracy resources from the past as well. The current world is more liberal to be shattered by the prospectus of religion or death of it than Brown thinks. Despite everything, this book had me hooked. I finished it in a day. I was fascinated by the introduction to arts and architecture like Guggenheim Museum, Sagrada Familia and other works of Gaudí, expanding my bucket list. The book had its redeeming elements, the edginess that might have been appealing to your teenage self openly and your old self as guilty pleasure. Atheism and Christian imagery, Historic figures and mysterious cults, Langdon figuring out codes that no one else can and feeling embarrassed that it had taken him so long, Artemis Fowl-ish know-it-all-do-it-all technocrats, over dramatic introductions, pompous arts and academics, ultra-modern philosophy, extreme displays of royalty, loyalty and fanaticism, factoids and verbatims, matters in single digit minutes spanning over chapters in double digits, forgettable ladies etc. And above all, Robert Langdon surviving an assassin and a fall. There were many serious deviations from Dan Brown’s usual structure as well. Langon came out more as a gunter researching on Halliday than the eminent scholar of ancient history he is renowned for. Also whole episode happens in Spain, or what is now Spain, rather than the Universal or Eurasian premise of previous installments. Who knows, maybe he is counting on the Catalan referendum. Origin is the least entertaining work by Dan Brown in my opinion, at least among Robert Langdon series. Nevertheless, if you are up for a no brainier, fast paced, conspiracy filled read, this book has you covered. There is enough to make you feel like an armchair conspiracy theorist, though it may not be the best use of your time. Langdon watched the phone plummet down and splash into the dark waters of the Nervión River. As it disappeared beneath the surface, he felt a pang of loss, staring back after it as the boat raced on. Robert,” Ambra whispered, “just remember the wise words of Disney’s Princess Elsa. Langdon turned. “I’m sorry?” Ambra smiled softly. “Let it go.” I have decided to follow the wise words of Disney Princess Elsa and let it go, at least till the next book. :)

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tahera

    So I will just sift through the final chapters once again before I write anything....which really won't be a lot! :P ______________________________________________________ Right, so after a lot of soul searching, 2* is the max I can give for this book and I am being lenient. This has to be the most under whelming book I have read in the R.L. series so far! Very early on in the book, there are two instances where Robert Langdon feels that: 1) Tonight's audience was not exactly the 'home crowd' for a So I will just sift through the final chapters once again before I write anything....which really won't be a lot! :P ______________________________________________________ Right, so after a lot of soul searching, 2* is the max I can give for this book and I am being lenient. This has to be the most under whelming book I have read in the R.L. series so far! Very early on in the book, there are two instances where Robert Langdon feels that: 1) Tonight's audience was not exactly the 'home crowd' for a professor of religious symbology 2) I've entered a parallel universe I know what you mean Mr. Langdon. I felt lost while reading the book, I can only imagine what you must have gone through being in it -_- :P. The book basically covers two question: Where do we come from? Where are we going? Perfectly reasonable questions to ask but Mr. Dan Brown took such a bloody long time to get to the answers that I lost interest mid way and it stayed that way for the remainder of the book. When he finally did get around to the answers, I could have cared less because by that time I had come up with my own simpler answers to the said questions: Q Where do we come from? A Um our mothers' womb. Q Where are we going? A Eventually six feet under. It's so There I am finally done with this review!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ɗẳɳ 2.☊

    ★☆☆☆☆ When I finished this book in December, I posted a vague teaser and left it unrated. Now, it’s finally time to end the suspense—not that my rating or harsh words will be much of a surprise to those that know me. Which begs the question, why would I subject myself to a book I seemingly had little chance of enjoying? What’s that quote about setting aside childish things and whatnot? Wasn’t there a legitimate reason why I gave up on Dan Brown nearly a decade ago? Probably, but this was a Christm ★☆☆☆☆½ When I finished this book in December, I posted a vague teaser and left it unrated. Now, it’s finally time to end the suspense—not that my rating or harsh words will be much of a surprise to those that know me. Which begs the question, why would I subject myself to a book I seemingly had little chance of enjoying? What’s that quote about setting aside childish things and whatnot? Wasn’t there a legitimate reason why I gave up on Dan Brown nearly a decade ago? Probably, but this was a Christmas present from my niece the previous year—a typical popular fiction book a nonreader would choose for the reader in their family. And, what else could I do but say thank you? I mean, it’s pretty easy to be an asshole online to complete strangers, but a little harder when someone’s handing you a gift. So, as this year’s Christmas was swiftly approaching, I realized I’d be seeing my niece again and started to feel guilty about casually discarding her thoughtful gift. Well, that and the fear of a pop quiz is what led to me finally picking up the book. And, sadly, it was even worse than I had hoped. I’m not sure if things were always this dire, or if Brown’s plots have gotten progressively worse. Or, perhaps my tastes have simply evolved over the years, and/or I’ve become one of the holier-than-thou literature snobs. No, scratch that last thought. A quick browse through my shelves will prove that clearly isn’t the case. Which means it’s not me, Dan, it’s you. Okay, so the gist of the novel is that Robert Langdon’s friend and former student, Edmond Kirsch, a futurist and computer savant has miraculously solved the two most fundamentally important questions in the history of mankind. Where do we come from, and where are we going? This monumental discovery will finally prove, beyond a shadow of a doubt, how life began on planet Earth, as well as predict where human evolution is ultimately heading. A discovery that’s sure to rock the very foundation of all the world’s religions. A discovery so vitally important that no one can be trusted with its secret—oh, except for three high ranking religious officials he told a few days prior to releasing the news. A secret so shocking that it dies with Kirsch when he’s assassinated mere seconds from the big reveal on a live worldwide simulcast. Or does it . . . Not on Robert Langdon’s watch! He and Tits McGee—the latest in a string of stunningly beautiful, sharp as a tack, female sidekicks for our resident, crusty old symbologist to fawn over—cling to the hope they can somehow unlock the secret. And, with the help of an amazing AI program, named Winston, they aim to do just that. The only problem is that the people behind the assassination will stop at nothing to destroy the evidence and bury the secret forever. And, after the police put out an APB for Langdon and McGee, their quest becomes eminently more challenging. Thus begins The Amazing Race across Spain. A race against the clock to save science! But, don’t fret constant reader there’ll still be plenty of time to visit several famous tourist attractions, and discuss the utterly fascinating history of each locale. So, tune in for an endless orgy of art and architecture, with a side of murder and mayhem. It’s fun for the whole family! Oy vey. Where do I even begin to dissect this shit show? With a plot flimsier than a five-dollar tent, and its blatant product placement, and transparent villain. Seriously folks, if you can’t unravel this mystery, you might as well hang up your Inverness cape and deerstalker hat, tear up that honorary Nancy Drew detective badge, and return your secret decoder ring, unopened. There’s just no nuance or sophistication to a story with major plot points like Tits McGee conveniently remembering how the dead guy confessed to her, over drinks one night, to using a forty-eight character password, based on his favorite line of poetry, to unlock his computer. Which, of course, leads the idjits to scouring through the deadite’s massive personal library to find that one treasured work. And, considering the AI program was arguably the most fleshed out character of the story, I’d say that overall the characterizations were pretty flat. Amazingly, as another reviewer noted, after five novels in which to develop Robert Langdon, claustrophobia is still the defining characteristic of the bumbling dimwit. For a supposed genius with an eidetic memory, it’s remarkable how often key pieces of critical information slip through his mind, until the plot finally demands he reach that eureka moment and grasp the solution. It plays out the exact same in every story. Speaking of which, Brown has obviously never read Elmore Leonard’s 10 Rules of Writing because rule #9 clearly states, “Don’t go into great detail describing places and things.” And, that’s Brown’s entire shtick! All of his plots are designed around the stops on his guided tour through [insert historic locale]. Look to your right and note the astonishing blah, blah, blah, built in the late 1500s by what’s his name, and treasured for its marvelous yada, yada, yada. Final thoughts: What kind of bizarro, topsy-turvy world are we living in where the bestselling authors are some of the worst writers, while so many quality writers and deserving stories go entirely unnoticed? Who’s to blame? A publishing industry that values name recognition and the speed at which one can churn out a novel above all else, Oprah and her terrible Book Club selections, or are we simply put off by authors that use a thesaurus or challenge our mental acuity? Has our attention span waned to the point where stories that require more than a couple of pages to pique our curiosity are immediately discarded? Where chapters exceeding five freaking pages are far too taxing on our feeble wittle minds? How depressing.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Suanne Laqueur

    Well that was quintessential Dan Brown. A literary masterpiece? Of course not, and that's not why I read him. Origin isn't his best. Overwritten in some places, underwritten in others. Premise wasn't as tight as his others but still, fast-paced, exciting, interesting, a bit of armchair travel, a crash course in art/architecture every other chapter, decent food for thought and the added bonus of having Tom Hanks in your head. Not a bad way to spend 24 hours.

  27. 4 out of 5

    TS Chan

    Origin is not likely to win literary awards nor garner critical acclaim; for what it's worth though, it is darn entertaining. Ever since I've picked up The Da Vinci Code, I've been hooked on the Robert Langdon books. I admit that I have a weakness for the formula Dan Brown utilises for his thrillers, employing an intoxicating mix of history, art, poetry, symbols, codes, and famous landmarks or architecture. A rousing adventure through exotic and renowned locations that have me reaching for Googl Origin is not likely to win literary awards nor garner critical acclaim; for what it's worth though, it is darn entertaining. Ever since I've picked up The Da Vinci Code, I've been hooked on the Robert Langdon books. I admit that I have a weakness for the formula Dan Brown utilises for his thrillers, employing an intoxicating mix of history, art, poetry, symbols, codes, and famous landmarks or architecture. A rousing adventure through exotic and renowned locations that have me reaching for Google search ever so often. As usual, all the architecture and locations mentioned are real, and again it fuelled the wanderlust in me. This time with Spain as the backdrop, we have the bizarre and breath-taking Guggenheim Bilbao as the opening venue with a fair amount of exposition on some of its more notable modern art exhibits. Robert Langdon will then, of course, find himself heading from one famous location or landmark to another. The narrative becomes info-dumpy at these parts of the story; a little more than usual in this novel, which does make the pacing slower. It goes without saying that the author went through a lot of research to produce his Robert Langdon series and it shows. This is probably the most critical component of his books which makes them so enjoyable for me. One that overcomes the fact that his stories are repetitive and his prose ordinary. Nothing has changed as far as his plot structure and characterisation are concerned. It all starts with a murder, and somehow Robert will end up on the run, with a beautiful sidekick (be it a museum director or a scientist or some other expert of sorts), from some national guard or local police as well as an assassin with a tragic past. At the same time, he is also running against time to solve pertinent clues to unwind the mystery, etc. That said, there seemed to be less code-solving in this novel, which was a bit of a downer. The real history that underscored this narrative highlighted the dark times of Spain under the military dictator, Francisco Franco. With the current political crisis in the same country, I couldn't help feeling that some strange twist of fate is at work here that would have this novel being released around the same time. Origin will not win any points for originality. It is, however, a real page-turner. Despite not having the breakneck pace of some of its predecessors, I still find myself engrossed and captivated, unable to put the book down. What I found compelling is the underlying theme which resonated quite deeply with me. It is about creation and destiny, and the vast divide between religion and science in answering the universal questions of 'Where do we come from?' and 'Where are we going?' It deals with relevant current issues around rapid technological advancements, especially in artificial intelligence and wearable technology, and the propagation of sensational or fake news fuelling conspiracy theories through ungovernable internet media. If you are looking for non-cerebral page-turning entertainment, or if you are a Robert Langdon fan like me who can overlook certain flaws, I will recommend Origin. To conclude, I'd like to post a quote of relevance to the story, from one of the world's greatest and most renowned scientists, who had been very outspoken about his religious views: A knowledge of the existence of something we cannot penetrate, of the manifestations of the profoundest reason and the most radiant beauty - it is this knowledge and this emotion that constitute the truly religious attitude; in this sense, and in this alone, I am a deeply religious man. - Albert Einstein This review can also be found at Booknest

  28. 5 out of 5

    Macy_Novels at Night

    I adore Dan Brown. I did not adore this book much as his others. I was impatiently anticipating the release of Origin, with the expectation that I would be just as sucked in to this book, as I was the others. I might hastily recommend that Dan retire his Robert Langon series and begin anew with something else. I feel like the same story line is being used over and over again, with a exotic woman that has a sorted past. A man of Dan's intelligence must know that this idea is becoming redundant. T I adore Dan Brown. I did not adore this book much as his others. I was impatiently anticipating the release of Origin, with the expectation that I would be just as sucked in to this book, as I was the others. I might hastily recommend that Dan retire his Robert Langon series and begin anew with something else. I feel like the same story line is being used over and over again, with a exotic woman that has a sorted past. A man of Dan's intelligence must know that this idea is becoming redundant. The stories are becoming some what predictable. I was very excited when I heard the premise of the book surrounded "Where did we come from, and where are we going?" This is a questions that has, and still plagues people including myself daily. While I was not expecting any concrete answers from Dan Brown, my heart was hoping for a deep philosophical conclusion that left me in wonderment. It became apparent early on that this was not the conclusion that I was hoping for. Dan's conclusion, which I will not give away, I felt was surface compared to the depth of the other novels such as "Angels and Deamons" and the "Divinci Code." The novel itself was beautifully written, but I do not believe that it lived up to the expectations that a true Dan Brown fan looks forward to. Dan Brown is an amazing writer, and although the story was not what I was exactly expecting, he still left me amazed at his writing skills. As an aspiring writer, I look up to him immensely, and I will continue to wait for his upcoming novels with just as much anticipation.

  29. 5 out of 5

    RedemptionDenied

    Damn. I've broken a cardinal rule; by adding another book. I've read the first four Langdon' novels, which I enjoyed, and can't wait for this to be released.

  30. 4 out of 5

    L.A. Starks

    In comparing this book with Dan Brown's others, I'd give 4.5 stars if that was an option. Early on, there are too many passages that are pure travel guide. However, by the end, Brown is comfortably tackling the Big Topic: religion vs. technology. There are one or two of the usual Texas/Southern/Bible stereotypes, but in other passages Brown gives us valuable reminders of Spain's history and the darkness of Franco's governance. I'm not giving much away by saying Barcelona, and Gaudi's architecture, In comparing this book with Dan Brown's others, I'd give 4.5 stars if that was an option. Early on, there are too many passages that are pure travel guide. However, by the end, Brown is comfortably tackling the Big Topic: religion vs. technology. There are one or two of the usual Texas/Southern/Bible stereotypes, but in other passages Brown gives us valuable reminders of Spain's history and the darkness of Franco's governance. I'm not giving much away by saying Barcelona, and Gaudi's architecture, make a fantastic and enviable art-meets-technology setting. I was surprised not to see more about Catalan separatism and the Catalan language, which is neither French nor Spanish but an interesting gumbo of the two. High marks for research and AI, but honestly, I doubt most readers need the concept of the dark web explained. Also, the symbol for entropy in statistical mechanics/thermodynamic equations is not a starburst but the letter S. Read Origin all the way to the end and characters will show surprising depth. Nice plot twists.

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