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Killing Kennedy Bill O'Reilly Audio CD:Bill O'Reilly Killing Kennedy Audiobook: Killing Kennedy Audiobook: Killing Kennedy AudioCD [[Audiobook CD - Audiobook, CD, Unabridged by Bill O'Reilly] PDF, ePub eBook In January 1961, as the Cold War escalates, John F. Kennedy struggles to contain the growth of Communism while he learns the hardships, solitude, and temptations of what it means to be president of the United States. Along the way he acquires a number of formidable enemies, among them Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev, Cuban dictator Fidel Castro, and Alan Dulles, director o In January 1961, as the Cold War escalates, John F. Kennedy struggles to contain the growth of Communism while he learns the hardships, solitude, and temptations of what it means to be president of the United States. Along the way he acquires a number of formidable enemies, among them Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev, Cuban dictator Fidel Castro, and Alan Dulles, director of the Central Intelligence Agency. In addition, powerful elements of organized crime have begun to talk about targeting the president and his brother, Attorney General Robert Kennedy. In the midst of a 1963 campaign trip to Texas, Kennedy is gunned down by an erratic young drifter named Lee Harvey Oswald. The former Marine Corps sharpshooter escapes the scene, only to be caught and shot dead while in police custody. The events leading up to the most notorious crime of the twentieth century are almost as shocking as the assassination itself. Killing Kennedy chronicles both the heroism and deceit of Camelot, bringing history to life in ways that will profoundly move the reader. This may well be the most talked about book of the year.

30 review for Killing Kennedy Bill O'Reilly Audio CD:Bill O'Reilly Killing Kennedy Audiobook: Killing Kennedy Audiobook: Killing Kennedy AudioCD [[Audiobook CD - Audiobook, CD, Unabridged by Bill O'Reilly]

  1. 4 out of 5

    Gary Schantz

    I see that many people have rated this book as high (or higher than the Lincoln book) but my viewpoint is that there is nothing new here...NOTHING. One hundred pages in, there is a total of 2 pages on the assassin and the rest on Kennedy's lifestyle. Who cares? So what that Kennedy was the Elvis of presidents? So what the he cheated on his wife? This is new? I enjoyed the book on Lincoln as I felt that it moved quickly with a new insight to how and why Lincoln was assassinated. Yet the Kennedy boo I see that many people have rated this book as high (or higher than the Lincoln book) but my viewpoint is that there is nothing new here...NOTHING. One hundred pages in, there is a total of 2 pages on the assassin and the rest on Kennedy's lifestyle. Who cares? So what that Kennedy was the Elvis of presidents? So what the he cheated on his wife? This is new? I enjoyed the book on Lincoln as I felt that it moved quickly with a new insight to how and why Lincoln was assassinated. Yet the Kennedy book is basically written by a Catholic who pretends that Kennedy was very uncatholic. Please...Catholic priests in recent years have been revealed to have done MUCH worse than Kennedy when it came to sexual behavior. Hiding behind the "who would dare cheat on Jackie?" idea is just beyond the gossiping about the Kardashians. However, sequels have a tendency to be let downs. There are only four main characters in the real-life Kennedy assassination story...JFK, Oswald, Ruby, and LBJ. After that, its just the usual gossip about Marilyn Monroe, Jackie, Bobby, Hoover, the Mafia, Castro, etc. Nothing new here. In my original review (written after the 1st 100 pages, I found the book to be one long gossip column that Ann Coulter couldn have written). However after finishing the book, my view has chnaged somehwhat in that O'Rielly never got to the heart of the subject. He basically leaves the reader hanging by throwing out names he doesnt bother to investigate any further such Goerge de Morhrenshildt (who according to the book has some CIA connections plus a connection to Jackie Kennedy along with Lee Harvey Oswald). He admits that he attempts to interview this man who upon being accosted by O'Reilly shoots himself in the head rather than partake in an any investigative reporting. Therefore, O'Reilly leaves a gaping hole in what that was all about by summing it up as "we'll never the the nature of the realtionship". Also he goes on to mention how Jack Ruby had no business being near Oswald at the time he was being removed from the Dallas County Jail...but doesnt bother to follow on why he was there at all. This event lead to Oswald's murder. This book actually adds to conspiracy theories because O'Rielly offers nothing of substance to explain why Oswald shot the president beyond the fact the he wanted to be famous. However, in the history of assassinations...almost everyone of them was the result of the hunter tracking down the hunted...MLK, RFK, Lincoln, Wallace, McKinley, etc. Only JFK walks into the path of a man who wants to kill someone. Ths book clearly states that Oswald had no real interest in killing Kennedy beynd becoming famous. He was either the luckiest guy in the world to have his victim presented right in the middle of his scope....or someone one knew Kennedy was going to be there and made sure Oswald was there too. And of course the Oswald killing only adds to the suspicisions that Ruby the owner of a strip club has now decided here is the big momonet for him to become famous by killing the man who killed the president. And this was another case of one man stalking another. For me to believe that Oswald just happened to land a job which would place him in a perfect position 30 days prior to Kennedy's arrival in Dallas...not to mention his arrival mere yards from him sounds like he was the luckiest assassin in history or it was a set-up After all, like the Oklahoma City Bombimg, there were 2 men involved in that terrorist attack and by legal definition that makes it a conspiracy. I don't think it's a stretch to think the Oswald had a few cohorts....forget Castro, the Mafia, the Cia, and other presidential enemies...Kennedy's assassination is completely glossed over in this book as if to say one man who failed at many things, who was disturbed, who was lost and lonely was able to put a plan together (all by himself without a mere whisper of it to anyone) to kill the president as he drove right by his job site. In the end all Oswald had to was wait for his victim to come to him. I find it hard to believe the secret service was that dumb.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    "Ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country."I remember......... like so many Americans who were of age during the time of the Kennedy assassination exactly where I was, what I was doing and what was happening all around me.I remember........ the announcement in school, the early dismissal, tears, shock, disbelief and then silence.......so much silence.John Fitzgerald Kennedy, sadly, had less than three years left to live when he took office in 1961 at the you "Ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country."I remember......... like so many Americans who were of age during the time of the Kennedy assassination exactly where I was, what I was doing and what was happening all around me.I remember........ the announcement in school, the early dismissal, tears, shock, disbelief and then silence.......so much silence.John Fitzgerald Kennedy, sadly, had less than three years left to live when he took office in 1961 at the young age of 43. O'Reilly's account of Kennedy's life covers the PT 109 incident, the failed Bay of Pigs invasion and the 13 long scary days of the Cuban missile crisis......and it was indeed a scary time. KILLING KENNEDY also touches on the war in Vietnam, MLK's dream for racial equality, and his and JFK's numerous indiscretions. (the latter is not descriptive as in Follett's Edge of Eternity)The actual data on the murder of the well-loved President Kennedy divulged nothing new that I can ascertain other than perhaps tidbits of dialogue that occurred inside the vehicle after the fatal shots.If you enjoy reading about presidential history though and the personal life of JFK, his wins and losses, his troubled health; and Jackie, her popularity with the public and her mythical American Camelot, this work of non-fiction is a fast, easy way to get the overall picture. For me, it turned out to be another learning experience, in some respects, and definitely a remembrance of a horrific time in American history. (O'Reilly's recommended newsreels were definitely worth the time)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Patty Abrams

    Written in a juvenile fashion, this book gave me nothing new. In fact, I knew more than the book was presenting. It begins with JFK's inauguration and goes until the assassination, and that section doesn't include anything about any of the conspiracy theories. Disappointed, because Killing Lincoln was so good.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Robert Morrow

    Killing Kennedy? It was Lyndon Johnson, Texas oil executives & their friends in U.S. military intelligence who did it. Is it worth your $20 and, more importantly, your precious time to read this book? No, because the author feels that he can just ignore 49 years of very fine research into the JFK assassination pretend this massive amount of quality research just does not exist. The Warren Report farce has not just been machine gun riddled, shot up like Swiss Cheese. It has been put into a blen Killing Kennedy? It was Lyndon Johnson, Texas oil executives & their friends in U.S. military intelligence who did it. Is it worth your $20 and, more importantly, your precious time to read this book? No, because the author feels that he can just ignore 49 years of very fine research into the JFK assassination pretend this massive amount of quality research just does not exist. The Warren Report farce has not just been machine gun riddled, shot up like Swiss Cheese. It has been put into a blender and sliced up into a fine puree, distilled & possibly approaching pure methane at the molecular level. Who killed John Kennedy? It was It was Lyndon Johnson, Texas oil executives (allied with LBJ) & their friends in U.S. military intelligence who did it for a variety of reasons both personal & ideological. LBJ, Hoover, Allen Dulles, H.L. Hunt, Clint Murchison Sr, D. H. Byrd, Nelson Rockefeller and George Herbert Walker Bush are all very likely inner circle plotters to murder John Kennedy. You can add to that Gen. Curtis LeMay and most especially Gen. Edward Lansdale who was identified at Dealey Plaza by 2 of his peers: Col. Fletcher Prouty and Gen. Victor Krulak. Lansdale ran Operation Mongoose for the Kennedys and later said it was one of the most frustrating experiences he ever had. U.S. military intelligence used anti-Castro Cubans and their affiliated CIA operatives to murder JFK. Anger and rage over Cuba policy was a very big reason for the JFK assassination. As was the fact that the Kennedys were within days of the political execution and personal destruction of VP Lyndon Johnson who they despised & who had blackmailed his way onto the 1960 Democratic ticket (see Evelyn Lincoln, Hy Raskin, Clark Clifford & Pierre Salinger for that). What this book proves is that it is still not socially or politically acceptable to tell the truth about the JFK assassination 49 years after that assassination of democracy in America. The reason for that is the truth discredits US political leadership of both major parties for the past 49 years. The reputations of Lyndon Johnson, Gerald Ford, George Herbert Walker Bush, Richard Nixon would all be fatally tarnished by frank and honest discussion of what happened in Dallas on 11/22/63 and who helped to cover it (Ford, Nixon) and why. JFK assassination truth discredits the leadership at the highest levels of the Democratic & Republican party, the government, the CIA controlled media, the FBI, the CIA, the US military, every single newspaper in America and their editorial boards and every history and political science department of every major university. JFK assassination truth also discredits the NYT, Wash Post, WSJ, USA Today, LIFE, ABC News, CBS, NBC and CNN. JFK assassination truth also discredits the heavily CIA-influenced Council on Foreign Relations and many of the political and historical commentators you see on TV and in the marquee spots in newspapers. On June 30, 2009, President Obama had a private dinner with 9 top presidential historians: Michael Beschloss (CFR), H. W. Brands, Douglas Brinkley (CFR), Robert Caro, Robert Dallek, Doris Kearns Goodwin, David Kennedy, Kenneth Mack, and Garry Wills. As with Bill O'Reilly, I have never heard any of these reputable scholars say anything credible about the JFK assassination. In the case of Doris, it might be because she used to hop in bed with Lyndon Johnson who once asked to marry her. I don't know what Lady Bird would have done. Throw rice at the wedding of LBJ and Doris? Read Sally Quinn's blockbuster article on Doris in the Wash Post (8/24/75) entitled "A Tale of Hearts and Minds." Ditto Larry Sabato, Chuck Todd of NBC & Michael Barone - those men all feed disinformation on the JFK assassination. It is all about the power of tyranny to make black seem white, white seem black, up seem down and down seem up. O'Reilly's treatment of US intelligence agent Oswald is truly pathetic. Oswald was a fake defector to Russia and when he came back he assumed a phony persona of a pro-Castro Marxist as he worked for intelligence operatives & rightwingers such as David Atlee Phillips and the ultra-rightist Guy Bannister in New Orleans. In order to understand how and why O'Reilly puts out such junk - still covering for the murderers of John Kennedy - one has to understand the story of the Emperor's New Clothes. That is the one where the young kid points out the Emperor is butt naked while all the finest townspeople (doctors, lawyers, businessmen, FOX News personalities) are busy praising the Emperor's phantom clothes. O'Reilly works for Roger Ailes at FOX. Roger Ailes is very close friends with George Herbert Walker Bush, who I think is one of the inner circle perps in the JFK assassination. GHW Bush is one record as saying he can't remember where he was on the day of the JFK assassination - somewhere down he Texas he thinks. That is absurb; it's like Rudy Guiliani saying he can't remember where he was on 9/11. GHW Bush was staying in the old Dallas Sheraton Hotel - we know that for a fact. GHW Bush is also very close to the anti-Castro Cuban radicals and he even pardoned one of their top anti-Castro terrorists Orlando Bosch. Actually Bush commuted his sentence, a de facto pardon and he let Bosch out of jail. So O'Reilly may very well be one person removed from a murderer of JFK. I think so. The political and social pressure for O'Reilly is to remain stupid about the JFK assassination. If JFK truth were told you would not have had GWB as president for 2 terms, not have GWB and Jeb as governors of Texas & Florida respectively, not have Jeb on the presidential stage in 2016, not have his son George P. Bush trying to launch a career in Texas politics. The other book to read in order to understand why Bill O'Reilly and the rest of the media treat the JFK assassination such a patently dishonest, absurd fashion is "Obedience to Authority" by Stanley Milgram. That is the man who did experiments getting subjects to electrically shock victims because authority figures told them to do so. That is key to understanding the JFK assassination and why the cover up endures 49 years later. http://www.amazon.com/Obedience-Autho... Historians & journalists, including the play acting dumb Bill O'Reilly - at the risks of some hoots from a discredited establishment - need to start assimilating into their books and narratives the very fine body of research that now exists on the JFK assassination from authors and researchers such as Phillip Nelson, Walt Brown, Ed Tatro, Joachim Joesten, Craig Zirbel, Noel Twyman, Doug Horne, David Lifton, Joan Mellon, Harry Livingstone, Barr McClellan, Madeleine Duncan Brown, Billie Sol Estes, James Tague, Connie Kritzberg, Thomas Buchanan, Anthony Summers, Vincent Salandria, Martin Schotz, Michael Morrisey, John Newman, Jerry Policoff, Gaeton Fonzi, Dick Russell, Russ Baker, Bruce Campbell Adamson, Wim Dankbaar, Rodney Stich, Judyth Vary Baker, Mark Lane, James Douglass, Casey Quinlan, Fletcher Prouty, Jim Garrison, Larry Hancock, Fabian Escalante, Robert Groden, Charles Crenshaw, Oliver Stone, Ed Haslam, Harry Yardum, Robert Gaylon Ross, Jim Marrs, George Michael Evica, Gary Shaw, Craig Ciccone, James Fetzer, Vince Palamara, William Turner, Penn Jones, William Turner, and John Judge. Jim DiEugenio needs to be read on JFK's very dovish foreign policy and the possible role of Allen Dulles in helping to orchestrate the JFK assassination. You can read legendary JFK researcher Bruce Campbell Adamson, Russ Baker, Wim Dankbaar and Paul Kangas on the likely role of CIA George Herbert Walker Bush in the JFK assassination. "Years later, when he was running for President, George [Herbert Walker Bush] would claim that he never made the call. Documents were then produced that refreshed his memory. He also claimed that he did not remember where he was the day John F. Kennedy was killed- "somewhere in Texas," he said. George Bush is possibly the only person on the planet who did not recall his whereabouts that day ..." [Kitty Kelley, "The Family: The Real Story of the Bush Dynasty," pp. 212-213] As for Oswald being U.S. intelligence - a critical point that is completely missed by O'Reilly/Dugard, read: 1) "Oswald and the CIA" book by John Newman 2) "Spy Saga: Lee Harvey Oswald and US Intelligence" book by Philip Melanson 3) "History Will Not Absolve Us" by Martin Schotz (Chapter 5 "Oswald and U.S. Intelligence" by Christopher Sharrett) 4) "Me and Lee" book by Judyth Vary Baker (Oswald's mistress in New Orleans, summer 1963) 5) "A Certain Arrogance: U.S. Intelligence's Manipulation of Religious Groups and Individuals in Two World Wars and the Cold War - and the Sacrificing of Lee Harvey Oswald" book by George Michael Evica 6) "Accessories After the Fact" by Sylvia Meagher, Chapter 19 "Oswald and the State Department'" 7) "Coup D'Etat in America: The CIA and the Assassination of John F. Kennedy" by Alan Weberman & Michael Canfield, Chapter 3 "Was Oswald a CIA Agent?" 8) "Oswald in New Orleans: Case for Conspiracy with the CIA" by Harold Weisberg 9) Chapter 9 "Fingerprints of Intelligence" in "Reasonable Doubt" by Henry Hurt 10) Chapter 14 "Oswald and the CIA" in "Oswald: Assassin or Fall Guy" by Joachim Joesten 11) Google “Lee Harvey Oswald’s reading habits summer 1963” by Judyth Vary Baker Well, by this time, you may have noticed that I haven't talked much about Bill O'Reilly's book. That is because O'Reilly writes a book of 325 pages and he does not talk much about "Killing Kennedy:" how or why it happened. Someone needs to.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Tomes

    My experience this book is so intertwined with my experience of 11/22/63 that I can't mention one without the other. I'm cross-posting this review to King's book. I recently was given Bill O'Reilly's Killing Kennedy: The End of Camelot as a birthday gift. I probably would not have bought it although I like his television news show because, being a lawyer, I read enough nonfiction and like to escape to fiction to relax. But it was eminently readable and certainly took me back to that dark day in N My experience this book is so intertwined with my experience of 11/22/63 that I can't mention one without the other. I'm cross-posting this review to King's book. I recently was given Bill O'Reilly's Killing Kennedy: The End of Camelot as a birthday gift. I probably would not have bought it although I like his television news show because, being a lawyer, I read enough nonfiction and like to escape to fiction to relax. But it was eminently readable and certainly took me back to that dark day in November 1963. And yes, I still remember where I was when we got the word of the assassination (an art class at the University of Cincinnati, where I was enrolled in the Advertising Design Program). When an author can make history as readable and entertaining as a good novel, it has to be a good thing, and I would give the book five out of five stars. But reading it made me go back and finish Stephen King’s 11/22/63, which is a novel about a man that goes back in time to assassinate Lee Harvey Oswald to prevent President Kennedy’s assassination. I had started reading the book many months ago, but had given up, though not because it wasn’t good. It was the book that I had in my bedroom that I would read as part of my getting ready to sleep routine. It was very readable, but it was so long (more than 800 pages) that in the 20 minutes or so that I had to read before falling asleep, I felt that I wasn’t making any progress. So without any conscious decision, I just stopped reading it, intending to come back to it at some point. O’Reilly’s book energized me to pick King’s book back up, and I finished more than 500 pages in two days. The thing that has always amazed me about King’s writing is his sense of place and time. I thought that his Salem’s Lot was the best contemporary vampire novel because he made the characters so every day and believable. I also particularly liked his Christine, The Green Mile, Needful Things, and Shawshank Redemption. I have not read any of his fantasy, such as the Dark Tower series, because I am not into fantasy other than Poul Anderson’s Three Hearts and Three Lions and Robert A. Heinlein’s Glory Road. But am I glad that I went back to 11/22/63, and I mean went back to because the author takes you back to that time. The novel is a science fiction book, a thriller, a romance, and a little bit of a horror story all rolled into a seamless whole. As an aspiring novelist myself, I certainly wish that I could write like he does, especially at setting the scene and developing the characters by their actions and what they say rather than by too much internal dialog. An easy five of five stars.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    I read Killing Patton: The Strange Death of World War II's Most Audacious General and thought it a good and thought provoking book. Could I, I would give this book maybe a half star less, but that could be subjective. Mr. O'Reilly tells us that there's nothing new here as he opens...he's right. So let me say this, if you were born too late to actually remember the events recounted in this book it will be far more valuable than it will to those of us who remember them. There are events in history I read Killing Patton: The Strange Death of World War II's Most Audacious General and thought it a good and thought provoking book. Could I, I would give this book maybe a half star less, but that could be subjective. Mr. O'Reilly tells us that there's nothing new here as he opens...he's right. So let me say this, if you were born too late to actually remember the events recounted in this book it will be far more valuable than it will to those of us who remember them. There are events in history that burn themselves into the brain and forever after you will remember where you were when you learned of them. For my parents it was Perl Harbor. For the current generation it's 9/11. For "us" it's the assassination of John F. Kennedy. I was on the stairs of my school when someone rushed up to me and told me the president had been killed. Mr. O'Reilly and Mr. Dugard lead us through the events of the three years of JFK's administration, some of the background and life of Lee Harvey Oswald, Jack Ruby and others whose lives intersect with these events. There are of course large numbers of conspiracy theories surrounding the president's death. Mr. O'Reilly gives a bare nod to these but on the whole they are simply discounted and the story we get is the one history has recorded. There may be a few times when some of Mr. O'Reilly's bias peaks through...but not often. So, if your knowledge of these events is skimpy then read this one. It's a good complete account concerning the facts of the events.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ned

    As he demonstrates on FOX News, Mr O'Reilly has trouble separating historical fact from hearsay, history from his own prejudices. I read his previous book, Killing Lincoln, a year or so ago and while it did not contain much in the way of new information as it claimed, the book was actually well written and held my interest. Killing Kennedy did neither. In the introduction, Mr O'Reilly claims he will "cut through the fog and bring you the facts". Facts, to Mr O'Reilly are whatever he chooses to b As he demonstrates on FOX News, Mr O'Reilly has trouble separating historical fact from hearsay, history from his own prejudices. I read his previous book, Killing Lincoln, a year or so ago and while it did not contain much in the way of new information as it claimed, the book was actually well written and held my interest. Killing Kennedy did neither. In the introduction, Mr O'Reilly claims he will "cut through the fog and bring you the facts". Facts, to Mr O'Reilly are whatever he chooses to believe, and the rest of the book is a fog machine. He has an annoying repetitive quirk of continually attempting to tantalize us with "little did they know, but this would be JFK's last birthday" "little did they know but JFK only had 9 months to live" "little did they know, but this would be the last tie JFK ever bought" . He doesn't ever stop! He ends each chapter with this cheap device that just doesn't work. You want to toss the book out the window. Perhaps most annoying of all is Mr O'Reilly is obsessed with JFK's sex life. This is totally irrelevant to "Killing Kennedy" unless Mr O'Reilly is trying to claim that good old JFK screwed himself to death! I thought Mr O'Reilly was a blowhard commentator but a good writer. I was only half right.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alissa Patrick

    The man is a bonafide douchecanoe but he can write compelling accounts of world events. This was really fascinating.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Paula Kalin

    Fascinating fact-based account of JFK's White House years highlighting the controversies leading up to his assassination. Picked up a few interesting details of the behind the scene lives of JFK and MLK, Jr.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    This book was fascinating in a weird tabloid sort of way. I was only 4 when JFK was elected, but at a young age I was happy to know that a Catholic like me was president of the United States. I knew that it was controversial that Kennedy was a Catholic; but I doubt that word was in my vocab at the time. This is how I have always pictured JFK: He even had children like me: Although people would probably hate him today because he was such a rich guy (wink wink), no one cared back then: As I grew old This book was fascinating in a weird tabloid sort of way. I was only 4 when JFK was elected, but at a young age I was happy to know that a Catholic like me was president of the United States. I knew that it was controversial that Kennedy was a Catholic; but I doubt that word was in my vocab at the time. This is how I have always pictured JFK: He even had children like me: Although people would probably hate him today because he was such a rich guy (wink wink), no one cared back then: As I grew older and took the required classes in American History, I learned about the Bay of Pigs and other bad times for JFK. I didn't think much about it, or the many JFK links to women other than his wife. Then I listened to this audiobook, and I thought this guy is almost as bad as Tiger Woods. What an idiot! And Jackie knew, but put up with it! What an idiot! All of the people surrounding JFK knew of his addiction to women, but they protected him, which is why there are so few photos like this one: This book does not go into the nitty gritty details of JFK's affairs, just the generalities along with some of the names. The book covers far more important topics, but this was one of the most shocking. As O'Reilly recounts the important events occurring in the United States and around the world, I was drawn into the story. This book may give you a better understanding of the events of the day. At this point I would like to comment on O'Reilly's vagueness concerning his sources, especially concerning what people were actually thinking. How O'Reilly knew details about what Jackie told her personal doctor is beyond me. I am sure he got the big facts right, but not so sure about some of the other stuff. Take it for what it was worth. As this book is supposed to deal with the death of JFK and what lead to it, and whether or not Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone or with others, O'Reilly sets the scene with information that shows many people would have liked JFK out of the picture. Nikita Khrushchev, organized crime, Cuba, FBI director J. Edgar Hoover, VP LBJ, AG Bobby Kennedy, and Oswald all play interesting roles in this story that show a possibility for conspiracy. **SPOILER ALERT** SPOILER BELOW: Then as the assignation nears: And happens: Jackie retrieving part of her husband: Was Oswald that smart? His plan worked perfectly: Then Oswald is quickly murdered by Ruby: O'Reilly briefly discusses the Warren Commission and says they were right, there was no conspiracy. Wait...the set up, the assassination, the assassin silenced, and now you are telling us to go home because there is nothing to see? I really don't know about the conspiracy, but the more I know about men and big government, the less I trust them. So I will leave it there.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    A very easy read written in a style of short vignettes that follow the various lives that converge in the killing of President Kennedy. The book includes a few interesting insights, altho not many. It is an embellished essay about this epic tragedy. If one wants a simple, easy to read, summary of what happened, this is a fair candidate. Were O'Reilly's name not on the cover, this would likely be lost in the dusty shelves and lists of nice books of little or no import in the world of literacy and A very easy read written in a style of short vignettes that follow the various lives that converge in the killing of President Kennedy. The book includes a few interesting insights, altho not many. It is an embellished essay about this epic tragedy. If one wants a simple, easy to read, summary of what happened, this is a fair candidate. Were O'Reilly's name not on the cover, this would likely be lost in the dusty shelves and lists of nice books of little or no import in the world of literacy and the voluminous undistinguished mountain of writings about Kennedy. However, because it is getting pitched to a huge and mostly adoring audience of millions night after night? Well, it is a "best seller" for that reason and none others. Not a recommended book for anyone really wanting to know specifics, details, and in-depth investigation of the assassination. Nice cover though. btw, some self-proclaimed officianados have determined that O'Reilly's write fails to come to correct conclusions. Frankly, while I'm disinclined to think it does not, I'm not sufficiently intriqued to have read enough to have an informed position about the Warren Commission's conclusion. For now, I believe those conclusions, having read and watched "enough." So until there is a clarion call proclaiming a new "truth" that might vindicate the conspiracy theorists' ideas, I think they are well-meaning, wannabe CSIers. For now, I think this summarizes the true story, simply and succinctly. btw, the manner in which the authors portray the Kennedys is sickening-sweet, dreamy-eyed and almost childish. Guess they had to work to get the book's content to play into the book's title that included the vision of Camelot. Not! Never was, and they do a mass disservice to anyone wanting to really know, imo. In the end, the only thing that links O'Reilly and this story is his contention that he "heard" one of the ancillary characters blowing his head off, as O'Reilly was "hot on the trail of truth." Yea, right. O'Reilly. Mr. No-Spin Spinster!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Angie

    Great non-fiction (that felt like a novel) about JFK and his assassination. There might not be a lot of "new" material, but it was a great refresher. Actually I did learn several things I didn't know and made me want to learn even more. My parents were teens/young adults when he was killed and could tell me exactly where they were when they heard the news. Highly recommend to anyone wanting an entertaining/short version on the details of the JFK murder.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tom Smith

    O'Reilly's "Killing Kennedy" is a major disappointment for anyone seeking new theories or information on the assassination. This book largely follows the inept findings of the Warren Commission despite O'Reilly claiming that he would "offer different scenarios for the reader to come to their own conclusions". In the end, however the reader is left with the same cliches and speculation that we have all known for years, ultimately right back to the original investigation. I have a problem with an O'Reilly's "Killing Kennedy" is a major disappointment for anyone seeking new theories or information on the assassination. This book largely follows the inept findings of the Warren Commission despite O'Reilly claiming that he would "offer different scenarios for the reader to come to their own conclusions". In the end, however the reader is left with the same cliches and speculation that we have all known for years, ultimately right back to the original investigation. I have a problem with an author who is writing a so called "non fiction" account of history who portrays characters as if he were present with the participants at that time in history. How is it, Mr. O'Reilly that you knew what Lee Harvey Oswald was thinking when he was allegedly plotting to kill the president? There is very little evidence revealed by the author other than his own views and opinions. This is a constant theme throughout the book which lends it to more "fairly tales" than supported evidence. Those seeking a more scholarly investigation of this case need to put this book back on the shelf. There are much better choices out there.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Larry Bassett

    Listening to this book in the audible format was a very emotional experience for me. I was a teenager when Kennedy was assassinated in the 1960s were a very significant decade for me. Listening to the story of Camelot was also very emotional for me because I am in the midst of what may be the end of my father's life. My father is just recently in a nursing home as he approaches is 96 birthday following a fall that resulted in some serious head injuries. My emotions from that experience our gushi Listening to this book in the audible format was a very emotional experience for me. I was a teenager when Kennedy was assassinated in the 1960s were a very significant decade for me. Listening to the story of Camelot was also very emotional for me because I am in the midst of what may be the end of my father's life. My father is just recently in a nursing home as he approaches is 96 birthday following a fall that resulted in some serious head injuries. My emotions from that experience our gushing out in tears as I listen to the end of the life of JFK. There is a good deal of personal information about the life of the Kennedys in this book. There are many conspiracy theories about this time. And I think they are reasonably well handled in the book, being mentioned without being given significant credibility.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

    I was 10 years old when JFK was killed. This book, which I listened to as opposed to reading it (read by Bill O'Reilly) was very helpful to me. It allowed me to know the whole story as an adult, in order, written as a story but factual (as far as we have the facts today). The "facts" have been available for years, but to have it all at once and delivered well gave me a better understanding of world affairs, the Kennedys and other politicians as flawed people; an ego driven villain in Oswald and I was 10 years old when JFK was killed. This book, which I listened to as opposed to reading it (read by Bill O'Reilly) was very helpful to me. It allowed me to know the whole story as an adult, in order, written as a story but factual (as far as we have the facts today). The "facts" have been available for years, but to have it all at once and delivered well gave me a better understanding of world affairs, the Kennedys and other politicians as flawed people; an ego driven villain in Oswald and the complexities of threats to our safety and the stress put upon a leader such as our president during tough times. Seems to me JFK's heart was into the role as leader and obstacles and challenges were many and serious . No matter what one thinks of the Kennedys, even my 10 y/o sensibilities knew it was wrong beyond wrong to kill him and this book helped me to put it into proper adult perspective once and for all. I liked it better than Killing Lincoln only because Lincoln's story had so many details about war battles that made little sense to me most of the time; I don't follow war strategy, etc. But as my favorite president, I was glad to read about him and his last days.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sandy Sopko

    The ascension, administration, and assassination of President Kennedy is truly a riveting topic, but this text is poorly written and, furthermore, written to such a low reading level that the grammatical errors and simplistic style are entirely distracting -- perhaps that is based on the audience to which O'Reilly wishes to appeal. For example, "kids" should be "children" for heaven sake, unless you're writing to an elementary reading level, and the verb tense should be consistent and should NOT The ascension, administration, and assassination of President Kennedy is truly a riveting topic, but this text is poorly written and, furthermore, written to such a low reading level that the grammatical errors and simplistic style are entirely distracting -- perhaps that is based on the audience to which O'Reilly wishes to appeal. For example, "kids" should be "children" for heaven sake, unless you're writing to an elementary reading level, and the verb tense should be consistent and should NOT be present tense. Also, where are the annotated footnotes for readers to delve into more information from the primary sources historians rely upon to provide objective information? Without these sources, it appears the authors have imagined or invented the motivations and emotions they attribute to the people involved in years leading up to the assassination. The book comes off as highly subjective, Republican, ultraconservative, gossipy, rolling about in the gutter of propaganda and innuendo, the worst fluff. Polish it up, tighten it up, class it up. I shouldn't have expected anything better, though. Glad I didn't buy it. Sorry I'm compelled to read it for my book club.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    Very disappointing, exploitative book. Nothing new or enlightening on the murder of a sitting President. Robert Caro's book offers more on the assassination of President Kennedy then did O'Reilly. When all is said and done, Killing Kennedy was all about making a fast buck for O'Reilly. Skip it...you're missing nothing at all.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Joni

    I give this book two stars because it was certainly entertaining. However, it will never get a Pulitzer Prize for history. Good historians lay the facts before their readers, and allow the readers to come to their own conclusions based on facts. That doesn't happen with this book. Bill just can't help inserting his own spin into the story. I loved how he tried to pin the Vietnam War on Kennedy rather than Eisenhower. I also was amused at his supposed inside knowledge of how people were thinking. I give this book two stars because it was certainly entertaining. However, it will never get a Pulitzer Prize for history. Good historians lay the facts before their readers, and allow the readers to come to their own conclusions based on facts. That doesn't happen with this book. Bill just can't help inserting his own spin into the story. I loved how he tried to pin the Vietnam War on Kennedy rather than Eisenhower. I also was amused at his supposed inside knowledge of how people were thinking. My favorite was when he stated that Oswald beat his wife, but she was okay with that because she preferred being beaten to being ignored. Right. Thought no woman. Ever. He also stated that Oswald admired Kennedy, but he shot him because his wife broke up with him. Really? How do you know that Bill? That makes no sense at all. This book does have some interesting pictures and maps, though, and it's a good reminder that bad history is still being pumped out.

  19. 4 out of 5

    BAM The Bibliomaniac

    I think the tour of the White House by the First Lady to be shown on television should be reenacted. That's a great idea! What a tragic time in our country's history. My heart broke for Jackie. What is amazing is that even though the author strayed from blaming Kennedy's death on any one conspiracy theory, his life still swarmed with conspiracies, so it's not a stretch to think.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sherri

    A sad and controversial time in American history. However, it's politics. Intrigue, back room deals, power trips, women and affairs, the list goes on. What was reinforced was what a sex addict JFK was, his physical ailments, and the set up for political dynasty of their family. Then you look at all the major world and military trials he had to deal with. Not a lot of juicy conspiracy theories.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    WOW!!!! This was a good book, had trouble putting it down!!!! Of I am sure that everyone thinks read one book about President Kennedy you have read them all. I did not feel that that was the case for me with this book. I learned a lot about Kennedy and the beautiful Jackie. Of course in history class we learned about Kennedy and the day his life was taken, but we didn't learn so much about Oswald. This book had great insight into him and the way he thought all those years ago. My LOVE for Kennedy WOW!!!! This was a good book, had trouble putting it down!!!! Of I am sure that everyone thinks read one book about President Kennedy you have read them all. I did not feel that that was the case for me with this book. I learned a lot about Kennedy and the beautiful Jackie. Of course in history class we learned about Kennedy and the day his life was taken, but we didn't learn so much about Oswald. This book had great insight into him and the way he thought all those years ago. My LOVE for Kennedy stems from seeing the famous quote from his inaugural address on the wall of the history room for my four high school years. . . "Ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country." I was also very lucky to go see his grave and Jackie's when I was a senior in high school. Seeing his grave and the Eternal flame was what made me realize that history is being made every day even if we aren't ready for it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Shelby

    5 Stars First off this book is really good. I did a lot more than what I already knew before. I have never read any Bill O'Reilly books before. K was not sure what to except. I loved everything about this book. I guess it is because it is a history book and I like to learn from these kind of books. I loved the writing and all the information that Bill O'Reilly gives through out the story from the beginning to the end. I would definitely read this book again. I would recommend this book to anyone 5 Stars First off this book is really good. I did a lot more than what I already knew before. I have never read any Bill O'Reilly books before. K was not sure what to except. I loved everything about this book. I guess it is because it is a history book and I like to learn from these kind of books. I loved the writing and all the information that Bill O'Reilly gives through out the story from the beginning to the end. I would definitely read this book again. I would recommend this book to anyone that likes to read any history books or just wants to learn more about JFK.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Terri

    There is something about major disasters that elevates them in the minds of most people. We understand them on a grand scale as national or world tragedies, but we seldom think of the countless personal heartbreaks they entail. I was a child during the campaign of 1960, but I vaguely recall hearing adults in my small, Protestant hometown worry over what would happen if a Catholic were elected President. I do not recall ever hearing about the Bay of Pigs or the Cuban Missile Crisis on the news. I There is something about major disasters that elevates them in the minds of most people. We understand them on a grand scale as national or world tragedies, but we seldom think of the countless personal heartbreaks they entail. I was a child during the campaign of 1960, but I vaguely recall hearing adults in my small, Protestant hometown worry over what would happen if a Catholic were elected President. I do not recall ever hearing about the Bay of Pigs or the Cuban Missile Crisis on the news. It was a time when children were protected from some of the more harsh aspects of life (would that it were still so!). But, like most Americans I will never forget exactly where I was and what I was doing when I heard President Kennedy had been shot. I remember watching the funeral procession and seeing John, Jr. saluting his father's casket. Yes, these are real memories, not just recollections of news footage I've viewed as an adult. They made lasting impressions on me, but they grew from my own loss and shock, not from empathy for those involved. Perhaps it's surprising that I never read any of the numerous Kennedy biographies that followed his death or any of the lurid debunking biographies that sought to reveal the dirt under the shining surface of Camelot. Perhaps I wanted to retain a bit of that simpler time when everyone, even the President of the United States, could have a private life beyond the public persona. I am no ostrich with my head in the sand... I was aware of the stories of Kennedy's many indiscretions and affairs but had no desire to wallow in the details. Therefore, I was reluctant to pick up Killing Kennedy even though I enjoyed O'Reilly's Killing Lincoln. When both my sisters finished and recommended the book, I decided to try it, and I am so glad I did. Others have complained that there is little or nothing new here, and that may well be true, but for those like me who have avoided the subject, the story is presented in a highly readable narrative that neither wallows in Kennedy's infidelity and failures nor puts him on a pedestal. Rather, O'Reilly and Dugard present a young man who was groomed for a life very different from the one Fate had in store, a bright idealist who grew through misfortune, doubt and pain to become a leader of great promise. Simultaneously, they share glimpses and insights into other key players in the tragedy, including Lee Harvey Oswald, Jackie Kennedy, Robert Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson, and many more. The personal stories and details make the assassination more than a historical event, more than an American nightmare, but a personal tragedy for all those involved.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Shavon

    The story reads like a movie. The way O'Reilly switches back and forth from the glorious Kennedy to the pathetic Oswald with objectivity makes Killing Kennedy seem like as accurate an account as we who were not born at the time can hope to have - devoid of the hero-worship spin put on Kennedy by other so-called reporters who come off as little more than fans rather than as historians. In this book, Kennedy was at once flawed and impressive - in other words, he was human. And the troubled Oswald The story reads like a movie. The way O'Reilly switches back and forth from the glorious Kennedy to the pathetic Oswald with objectivity makes Killing Kennedy seem like as accurate an account as we who were not born at the time can hope to have - devoid of the hero-worship spin put on Kennedy by other so-called reporters who come off as little more than fans rather than as historians. In this book, Kennedy was at once flawed and impressive - in other words, he was human. And the troubled Oswald is not unlike these troubled adults who shoot children in Connecticut schools nowadays. If only we learned something from him and others since him... I was already familiar with the facts surrounding Kennedy's horrendous murder, but I must say that I FELT it for the first time reading this book. I have no idea how Mrs. Kennedy ever slept another night in her life after experiencing what she experienced that day in Dallas with the love of her life. One point of criticism - the first person, present tense was sometimes awkward since this was not an autobiography, but overall very good read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Karen Malena

    This book was a slice of history for me! I've always loved all things "Kennedy" but this was like a trip to places I've never been and events I never saw before. What a great book, so much knowledge by Mr. O'Reilly. I recommend it to history buffs or general JFK fans!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Neil Mudde

    Having read most of what has been written about the assasination, including the complete Warren Report, this makes for an interesting read, very much a.la 'readers digest' format.

  27. 5 out of 5

    W. Whalin

    A Fascinating Snapshot at A Significant Period of History I’ve been hearing about the O’Reilly “Killing” books for years but never read or heard one of these books until KILLING KENNEDY. I listened to the audio book cover to cover and enjoyed it. The authors weave a fascinating story filled with historical facts about the last years of John Fitzgerald Kennedy (predominately) but also other people in the story like Jackie Kennedy or Lee Harvey Oswald or numerous others. The detailed research and st A Fascinating Snapshot at A Significant Period of History I’ve been hearing about the O’Reilly “Killing” books for years but never read or heard one of these books until KILLING KENNEDY. I listened to the audio book cover to cover and enjoyed it. The authors weave a fascinating story filled with historical facts about the last years of John Fitzgerald Kennedy (predominately) but also other people in the story like Jackie Kennedy or Lee Harvey Oswald or numerous others. The detailed research and storytelling is fascinating and keeps listeners attention throughout the book. I learned a great deal and found the experience enjoyable. I highly recommend KILLING KENNEDY and will be looking to listen to other books in this series.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    I enjoyed this Kennedy retrospective; it captured the frenzy that accompanied 11/22/63 and the days that followed with dignity and grace. The legacy of the Kennedy Assasination will live on long after most of us are dead, so, it's a bit ironic that people debate one simple fact. Kennedy was shot. The man's head was blown apart by an assasin's bullet and the intrigue of whether it was one person or a conspiracy is moot. Really? Does it matter? In any event, reading this book really convinced me t I enjoyed this Kennedy retrospective; it captured the frenzy that accompanied 11/22/63 and the days that followed with dignity and grace. The legacy of the Kennedy Assasination will live on long after most of us are dead, so, it's a bit ironic that people debate one simple fact. Kennedy was shot. The man's head was blown apart by an assasin's bullet and the intrigue of whether it was one person or a conspiracy is moot. Really? Does it matter? In any event, reading this book really convinced me that this one little, unimportant, invisible, nonentity of a man killed our president all by himself. No one would have picked this little nothing person to even be on their baseball team, let alone to assinate a president! What strikes me is how the book portrays the mood of the country and more importantly, the impact the event had on the remainder of the 1960's. It was SEE experience for those of us old enough to remember it, two statements echoed in the nation that day: "Kennedy's been shot" and "The President is dead." The rest of the three days were a blur as they were for Jackie and the Kennedy family. We mourned with them. Kennedy will always have his detractors, his name is too infamous. The book brought back those days to me as though I was watching that TV all over again. Those awful images through my tears and my heavy heart. I was so young – it was the first American tagedy that I was able to feel so personally. And, amazingly, can still feel. Only one aspect of the book confuses me – how could a man in such pain and in a back brace have such a rampant sex life?

  29. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Cognard

    "In short, there's simply not a more congenial spot For happily ever after in than here in Camelot" Like everything else, I did things backwards here as well. Probably one of the few boys who fell in love the musical Camelot, before diving into the many books and movies, and then even as a republican accepting JFK as a noble knight. As I said I'm a republican so you'd think I'd be excited to read a book by O'Reilly, ripping apart Kennedy. But really I wasn't. The reason I became a republican was I "In short, there's simply not a more congenial spot For happily ever after in than here in Camelot" Like everything else, I did things backwards here as well. Probably one of the few boys who fell in love the musical Camelot, before diving into the many books and movies, and then even as a republican accepting JFK as a noble knight. As I said I'm a republican so you'd think I'd be excited to read a book by O'Reilly, ripping apart Kennedy. But really I wasn't. The reason I became a republican was I hated the liberal press that surrounded me when I grew up. I didn't hate them for being liberal they're entitled, I just wanted news, unbiased news. So at first when FOX and Rush and all the republican media started arriving, I was relieved, and accepted them for a while. Then I got sick of being spoon fed stuff that I wanted to believe regardless if it was true. So now I'm still republican but strongly feel we need a third party for news people. Anyway back to the review. I was pretty sure I was not going to like, especially when it started with all those corny things about the similarities between Lincoln and Kenedy. I was really expecting O'Reilly to completely rip Kenedy apart he didn't, Instead he served up parts about Kennedy's life. Picking up with some I was quite familiar with and some I was not. "Take Courage, now there's a sport" The real start of the book to me was when he covers Kenedy night on PTO boat where he saved his crew. This was one of the areas I knew very little about and I found the telling of it quite interesting even if Bill could not resist lobbing a couple of blames on the Harvard Grad and his inexperience in his position. "Fidelity is only for your mate" Another area was not as familiar with was some of JFK's hookups. He mentions few but really only goes only goes into great detail about Marylyn. In fact O'reilly goes out of his way to really paint Kenedy as a very close family man with some outside stress relief. As a fanatical conspiracy theorist, for a while, I have since gave them all up. There was no real light shed on the killing Kenedy part. In fact there seemed to be more missing facts than included. And some of the facts of his run, I always thought a shoe store owner led cops to him, are very different in this book. As well, I do not think he mentions the film taken that day. I still to this day marvel that only one person was filming at the time. I mean 8mm film was pretty common in 60's. Anyway felt the story was somewhat light and quick when to got to this part and shed no new light. No that there could be much new light to shed. As I said I have given up on all theories and think Oswald was just a crazy person with desire to kill JFK. There are still couple are still deep down in me buried waiting for a reason to jump back out. This book did not provide that reason. The one conspiracy that has never left me was the question about Jack Ruby. It is the one conspiracy theory I cannot let go. I still strongly feel that govermen thought it was better for Oswald to be dead, then to sound like some crazy loser wanna be communist, and have to explain how a crazy loser wanna be communist, with no help was able to kill the president. With him dead so quickly it takes having to answer that a million times away. That part was even less covered. still I found the writing style interesting and the implied thoughts of the main charcater's although unprovable, believable in many parts to make the read enjoyable.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    This is my second read of this book. This book is absolutely amazing. I've listened to and read other accounts of this event, but I was only seven (7) years old in second grade when this happened. I've never heard a better work and heard something more passionate and more accurate. I really have a lot of respect for Bill O'Reilly. He did a masterful job of writing and narrating this. I can't believe how so much information was gathered to make this book come together. It was a marriage of appear This is my second read of this book. This book is absolutely amazing. I've listened to and read other accounts of this event, but I was only seven (7) years old in second grade when this happened. I've never heard a better work and heard something more passionate and more accurate. I really have a lot of respect for Bill O'Reilly. He did a masterful job of writing and narrating this. I can't believe how so much information was gathered to make this book come together. It was a marriage of appearance in a lot of ways, but I feel that they actually came to love each other. She put put with a lot that I could not have done. I have such new respect for Jacque. What a difficult marriage they had, and she had to put up with his sexual rendezvous. But you knew they loved each other and their children. To have lost three children which I didn't know and have the strength to see them through their last moments. They sent us home from school early that day and my Mom was walking to meet me with tears flowing from her eyes and she tried to explain to me what happened, even though they told us at school. I was seven years old when Kennedy died, but I'm learning so much about his personal life, his family, his work, his habits and stuff that I've never heard. What an awesome regal woman Jacque is. She put up with an unusual husband that not all of us could have handled. Her smoking eventually killed her, after marrying Aristotle Onassis, she became Jacque O. Caroline and her brother John Kennedy Jr. haven't had an easy life either. John was killed in an Airplane accident. Caroline lives a fairly private life, married and had three children.

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