Hot Best Seller

Naked PDF, ePub eBook

4.6 out of 5
30 review

Naked

Availability: Ready to download

File Name: Naked .pdf

How it works:

1. Register a free 1 month Trial Account.

2. Download as many books as you like (Personal use)

3. Cancel the membership at any time if not satisfied.


Naked PDF, ePub eBook Welcome to the hilarious, strange, elegiac, outrageous world of David Sedaris. In Naked, Sedaris turns the mania for memoir on its proverbial ear, mining the exceedingly rich terrain of his life, his family, and his unique worldview—a sensibility at once take-no-prisoners sharp and deeply charitable. A tart-tongued mother does dead-on imitations of her young son's nervous Welcome to the hilarious, strange, elegiac, outrageous world of David Sedaris. In Naked, Sedaris turns the mania for memoir on its proverbial ear, mining the exceedingly rich terrain of his life, his family, and his unique worldview—a sensibility at once take-no-prisoners sharp and deeply charitable. A tart-tongued mother does dead-on imitations of her young son's nervous tics, to the great amusement of his teachers; a stint of Kerouackian wandering is undertaken (of course!) with a quadriplegic companion; a family gathers for a wedding in the face of imminent death. Through it all is Sedaris's unmistakable voice, without doubt one of the freshest in American writing.

30 review for Naked

  1. 5 out of 5

    Joeji

    On the inside of this book, David Sedaris signed it and wrote, "Joe, I am so happy you're alive." He then proceeded to write in my girlfriend at the time's book, "You can do better."

  2. 4 out of 5

    Marty Reeder

    About a third of the way through David Sedaris's book, I wondered how I had not heard of this guy before. This guy was funny. No, not just funny, he was really funny. He didn't just make me laugh while reading his book, he made me cry I was laughing so hard. So why, why had I not heard of someone so side-splittingly funny? A couple chapters later, I understood why. A few more chapters after that and Naked went into a dive bomb. While there were some redeeming moments near the end, he never fully About a third of the way through David Sedaris's book, I wondered how I had not heard of this guy before. This guy was funny. No, not just funny, he was really funny. He didn't just make me laugh while reading his book, he made me cry I was laughing so hard. So why, why had I not heard of someone so side-splittingly funny? A couple chapters later, I understood why. A few more chapters after that and Naked went into a dive bomb. While there were some redeeming moments near the end, he never fully recovered and I returned the book from whence it came with a sigh, thinking of what could have been. So what went wrong? Let me tell you first what went right. The moments where David was a kid and shared stories about his experiences growing up; those were the priceless moments, those were the hilarious, tear-inducing scenes that were impossible not to enjoy. His description of his sarcastic mom, his crazy grandma, his golf-obsessed dad with mutilated friends were priceless. They were characters you could like and laugh at, at the same time. Then comes stories from Sedaris's college days and afterwards, and you begin to think, "You know, I don't really like this guy." And it is hard to laugh with a guy that you end up not liking. This is a guy who is an unapologetic drug abuser, uses obscenities with graphic language and descriptions, takes advantage of people, looks down on others. Some of these he tempers with a measly sentence at the end of a chapter showing that he has since learned better, but you don't believe it. It doesn't feel sincere, especially in the way he has written it. There are aspects of his childhood self that linger and allow you a view of the Sedaris that you miss, but alas, they are only glimpses. It was with great effort that I finished Naked, and it was with a bitter taste in my mouth. If I could chance to read more from Sedaris's childhood, I might venture back into those waters, but until then I will avoid him and think of what might have been.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Naked, David Sedaris Naked, published in 1997, is a collection of essays by American humorist David Sedaris. The book details Sedaris’ life, from his unusual upbringing in the suburbs of Raleigh, North Carolina, to his booze-and-drug-ridden college years, to his Kerouacian wandering as a young adult. The book became a best-seller and was acclaimed for its wit, dark humor and irreverent tackling of tragic events, including the death of Sedaris’ mother. Prior to publication, several of the essays Naked, David Sedaris Naked, published in 1997, is a collection of essays by American humorist David Sedaris. The book details Sedaris’ life, from his unusual upbringing in the suburbs of Raleigh, North Carolina, to his booze-and-drug-ridden college years, to his Kerouacian wandering as a young adult. The book became a best-seller and was acclaimed for its wit, dark humor and irreverent tackling of tragic events, including the death of Sedaris’ mother. Prior to publication, several of the essays were read by the author on the Public Radio International program This American Life. Contents: Chipped Beef; A Plague of Tics; Get Your Ya-Ya's Out!; Next of Kin; Cyclops; The Women's Open; True Detective; Dix Hill; I Like Guys; The Drama Bug; Dinah, the Christmas Whore; Planet of the Apes; The Incomplete Quad; C.O.G.; Something for Everyone; Ashes; Naked. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز چهارم ماه آوریل سال 2014 میلادی عنوان: مادر بزرگت را از اینجا ببر؛ نویسنده: دیوید سداریس؛ مترجم: پیمان خاکسار؛ تهران، زاوش، 1392، در 150 ص، چاپ دیگر: تهران، نشر چشمه، 1393؛ در 150 ص؛ شابک:9786002292858؛ چاپ پنجم 1395؛ موضوع: داستانهای کوتاه از نویسندگان امریکایی - سده 20 م داستانهای کوتاه: «طاعون تیک»، «گوشت کنسروی»، «مادربزرگت رو از این‌جا ببر!»، «غول یک‌چشم»، «یک کارآگاه واقعی»، «دیکس هیل»، «حشره ی درام»، «دینا»، «سیاره ی میمون‌ها»، «چهارضلعی ناقص» و «شب مردگان زنده». کتاب با ترجمه پیمان خاکسار در 152 صفحه از سوی نشر «زاوش» منتشر شده طاعون تیک: داستان پسربچه ای ست که ذهنش لحظه ای او را آرام نمیگذارد، کلیدی برای خاموش کردنش در دسترس او نیست. فرامینی همچون لیس زدن کلید چراغهای کلاس درس، فشاردادن دماغ به در یخچال و کاپوت ماشین، کوبیدن پاشنه ی کفش به پیشانی و ... از متن: لذت جایی در این فرایند نداشت، باید این کارها را میکردم، چون هیچ چیز بدتر از اضطراب ناشی از انجام ندادنشان وجود نداشت. پایان نقل گوشت کنسروی: استفاده مناسب از عنصر غافلگیری مادربزرگت را از اینجا ببر: نخست توصیف زندگی مادربزرگ پدری راوی در آپارتمانی بسیار کوچک است؛ که اصلا شبیه آپارتمان نیست، و به قول راوی: زندگی سگشان به کودکی پدرش شرف داشته است. خانواده ی پدری راوی از مهاجران یونانی هستند، و مادربزرگ هیچ تغییری نکرده است و بعد از این همه سال، انگلیسی را هنوز خوب حرف نمیزند، و بعد از گذشت یازده سال از ازدواج پسرش؛ هنوز به عروسش میگوید: «اون دختره». او را مخاطب قرار نمیدهد و البته که سایه ی همدیگر را با تیر میزنند...؛ خوشبختانه مادربزرگ یونانی در شهری دیگر ساکن است اما به واسطه ی تصادف و شکستگی لگن، مادربزرگ به خانه آنها میآید و ... و غول یک چشم: پدری که وظیفه خویش میداند که همواره بچه هایش را از خطر بترساند... و یک کارآگاه واقعی: مادر و خواهر راوی و سریال های تلویزیونی و البته تنها سریال های پلیسی جنایی... و دیکس هیل: راوی در کلاس هفتم است برای کار مجانی و عام المنفعه به تیمارستان دیکس هیل میرود... و حشره درام: در پی حضور یک بازیگر جهت الهام بخشی به دانش آموزان در کلاس نهم، راوی و دوستش به موضوع نمایش و بازیگری علاقمند میشوند و... و دینا: پدر عقیده دارد که هیچ چیز به اندازه کار بعد از مدرسه شخصیت آدم را نمیسازد و پول توجیبی را قطع میکند و راوی و خواهرش به کار در کافه تریاها مشغول میشوند... و سیاره میمون ها: ماجراهای اتواستاپ زدن های راوی... و چهارضلعی ناقص: راوی و هم اتاقی معلولش در دانشگاه و باز هم اتواستاپ... از متن: پدرم همیشه میگفت: «دانشگاه بهترین چیزیه که ممکنه تو زندگیت اتفاق بیفته». راست میگفت، چون آنجا بود که مواد و الکل و سیگار را کشف کردم... و شب مردگان زنده: راوی از شبی میگوید که جلوی در ویلای تابستانی اش ایستاده، و موشی را در آب خفه میکند، مینی بوسی میایستد و راننده از او آدرسی میپرسد. راوی میخواهد به او کمک کند اما همه چیز شبیه فیلمهای ژانر وحشت است... ا. شربیانی

  4. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    My full review, as well as my other thoughts on reading, can be found on my blog. Sardonic and droll, the abridged audio of David Sedaris’s Naked offers a series of scattered autobiographical pieces. As in most of his work, the author is ironic and self-deprecating as he alternates between recounting childhood memories and recollecting his travels as an adult. Because the audio is abridged, though, all the mediocre pieces that typically embellish a Sedaris collection have been removed. Naked offe My full review, as well as my other thoughts on reading, can be found on my blog. Sardonic and droll, the abridged audio of David Sedaris’s Naked offers a series of scattered autobiographical pieces. As in most of his work, the author is ironic and self-deprecating as he alternates between recounting childhood memories and recollecting his travels as an adult. Because the audio is abridged, though, all the mediocre pieces that typically embellish a Sedaris collection have been removed. Naked offers the perfect introduction to the author’s work for that reason, but those who dislike his brand of humor won’t find themselves changed.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kelly (and the Book Boar)

    Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ Here’s a dramatic reenactment of me in the car going to hell Wal-Mart with the husband while simultaneously trying to describe my feelings about David Sedaris . . . . Ever since I finally got brave enough to attempt audiobooks several months ago, I’ve methodically been revisiting Sedaris’ work. If you haven’t experienced his stuff before, I’m telling you audio is the way to go and Naked is David Sedaris at his best. From being a littl Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ Here’s a dramatic reenactment of me in the car going to hell Wal-Mart with the husband while simultaneously trying to describe my feelings about David Sedaris . . . . Ever since I finally got brave enough to attempt audiobooks several months ago, I’ve methodically been revisiting Sedaris’ work. If you haven’t experienced his stuff before, I’m telling you audio is the way to go and Naked is David Sedaris at his best. From being a little kid with O.C.D. in a time where such behavior was dismissed as “quirky,” to a young man living at a nudist colony, to his mother’s cancer diagnosis - Naked will have you laughing until you cry and crying until you laugh. An added bonus is his sister Amy lends her voice to some of the selections as well. Talk about my fantasy audible ménage à trois. The only thing better than the Sedaris siblings? Their mother. Several years ago I used to wish I could be her when I grew up. Now I’m thinking my wish came true which I think is awesome, but probably terrifies my family.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    David Sedaris is an adorable little sassmouth. His idiosyncratic brand of humor possesses many fine, laudable traits; it is by turns indecently irreverent, snotty, crude, painfully neurotic, silly, self-deprecating, and even downright morbid. Unfortunately, this collection of autobiographical essays just wasn’t as consistently funny and entertaining as his other books. The first half was genuinely hilarious, and reading it frequently led to uncontrollable giggling and explosions of loud, rambunc David Sedaris is an adorable little sassmouth. His idiosyncratic brand of humor possesses many fine, laudable traits; it is by turns indecently irreverent, snotty, crude, painfully neurotic, silly, self-deprecating, and even downright morbid. Unfortunately, this collection of autobiographical essays just wasn’t as consistently funny and entertaining as his other books. The first half was genuinely hilarious, and reading it frequently led to uncontrollable giggling and explosions of loud, rambunctious laughter. The second part, however, had so many strained, awkward jokes that I spent most of the time cringing with embarrassment on their behalf; the poor things were trying way too hard. If you want top-shelf Sedaris, I’d recommend starting with either Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim or perhaps Me Talk Pretty One Day, both of which provide much stronger examples of his distinctively snarky, sardonic wit. I’ll leave you with this excerpt, which duly notes the intrinsic futility of attempting to read a book on a crowded cross-country bus, surrounded by aggressively opinionated hillbillies with no real conception of boundaries or personal space: “Books offered no relief. Failing to act even as a shield, their presence attracted everything from mild curiosity to open hostility. ‘You think you’re going to learn something from a book?’ said the man sitting next to me. ‘Let me tell you a little something, bookworm, you’ll learn more on this goddamned bus than you would in a whole…’ He paused, attempting to recall the name given to such a place. ‘You’ll learn more here than in a whole pyramid full of books. You could fill a racetrack with every piece of shit ever written, but you’ll learn more right here.’ Having never seen a racetrack full of books, I thought it premature to contradict him.”

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    I'm being told that this is funny... but so far all I want to do is gather David Sedaris into my arms and rock him back and forth and tell him everything is okay. Okay, finished. Is it really supposed to be funny? I found myself pretty saddened by most of the stories. He's got a great writing style and I definitely felt pulled into each of the stories, but I think I felt more empathetic than anything. Especially in "C.O.G": I didn't want to quit my job. Quitting involved a certain degree of respo I'm being told that this is funny... but so far all I want to do is gather David Sedaris into my arms and rock him back and forth and tell him everything is okay. Okay, finished. Is it really supposed to be funny? I found myself pretty saddened by most of the stories. He's got a great writing style and I definitely felt pulled into each of the stories, but I think I felt more empathetic than anything. Especially in "C.O.G": I didn't want to quit my job. Quitting involved a certain degree of responsibility I didn't want to assume. Rather, I hoped that Jon might remove that burden and dismiss me as soon as possible. I had felt contempt for him, even occasional hatred, and now I was fighting the urge to feel sorry for him. He must have known it, and clearing his throat he proceeded to cut me off at the pass. "Let me tell you a little something," he said finally. "I don't appreciate being used. I'm not talking here about all the free coffee and rides I've given you. I mean used in here." He meant to point at his heart but, swerving to pass another car, wound up gesturing toward his lap instead. "You're a user, kid. You used my tools and my patience and now you want me to pat you on the head and tell you what a good little boy you are. But you know what? You're not a good boy. You're not even a good girl." More, I thought. More, more There's definitely similar themes in each story. He has low self esteem, he sees himself as weak and effeminate and hardly useful. He has strong ties to his family, although he isn't exactly sure why. Sure, they are told with a whimsical air, but I couldn't help but pick up on the self hatred and run with it. Maybe it's where I feel in my own life, but at the end of each story I reflected on his assessments and had to stop myself from breaking down. In 'Naked' someone asks him the question 'What if everybody in the world were allowed one wish, but in order to get it, it meant they'd bave to crawl around on their hands and knees for the rest of their life?' His observation: If I could have the face and body of my dreams, what good would it do me if I had to walk around like an animal? Mabe if I were to wish for happiness, I wouldn't mind crawling -- but what kind of a person would I be if I were naturally happy? I've seen people like that on inspirational television shows and they scare me. Why did I have to think about this in the first place? I enjoyed his stories and I will most likely read more but I'll have to up my anti-depressant dosage first.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    Naked David arrived first, but it was Holiday David who made the NPR splash. Those of us in the front row received the full facial and were covered David the Elf's funk. I've still got Sedaris stank all over me and I'm loving it! While Holiday took a step back from unadulterated intimacy, Naked (and Barrel Fever) begins the unveiling of David Sedaris' inner, most personal life. It has all the markings of an early work, feeling like a skeletal version of Me Talk Pretty... or Dress Your Family..., Naked David arrived first, but it was Holiday David who made the NPR splash. Those of us in the front row received the full facial and were covered David the Elf's funk. I've still got Sedaris stank all over me and I'm loving it! While Holiday took a step back from unadulterated intimacy, Naked (and Barrel Fever) begins the unveiling of David Sedaris' inner, most personal life. It has all the markings of an early work, feeling like a skeletal version of Me Talk Pretty... or Dress Your Family..., a funny skeletal version mind you, but incomplete and fragmentary nonetheless. Sedaris does not delve so deeply, mining the depths of his own existence to locate the funny bone, as he does in later works. His comedic flair has not yet fully caught fire. Even so, Naked presents some of the author's important first steps. Some are funny. Some are endearing. Some are tentative. Some are not pretty. All can be enjoyed by fans for what they are, a good beginning. If I could, I would rate this 3.5 stars, because the story-to-story quality ranges from 3 to 4. I'm feeling generous, so I've clicked the "4 stars" option. If you're a newcomer, you might want to start with Dress Your Family... though.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jessaka

    Put On Some Clothes Sedais My word! Get in this house right now David and put on your clothes, and if you say anything else that is foul mouthed out there on the streets or even in my house, I will wash your moth out with soap. And I can tell you right now, you won’t like it. Don’t we have enough vulgarity in our society today with everyone thinking it is okay to no longer be political correct? You think it is funny? Red Skelton once said that he saw so reason to use vulgar language in order to b Put On Some Clothes Sedais My word! Get in this house right now David and put on your clothes, and if you say anything else that is foul mouthed out there on the streets or even in my house, I will wash your moth out with soap. And I can tell you right now, you won’t like it. Don’t we have enough vulgarity in our society today with everyone thinking it is okay to no longer be political correct? You think it is funny? Red Skelton once said that he saw so reason to use vulgar language in order to be funny. He is right that there is no use for it, but it isn’t funny. Never was. And who have you been hanging out with in order to be able to make fun of foul mouthed, low life people? It isn’t funny to joke about them either. They ain’t funny. And furthermore, what kind of business would allow your mouth in the room, some seeding cocktail lounge in the dangerous section of a city? I dind’t raise you like this. I know you comedians like to let down your hair sometimes when you aren’t on camera. Geesh, I had to even turn off Trevor Noah for his nasty hand gestures, but then latter one she quit them. I know because I tuned in one day, and he wasn’t doing them anymore. Someone must have told him that the hand gestures were not funny, so I watch him now. And if you want to be famous like Trevor Noah, be on a late night talk show, you had better clean up your mouth. Yes, put on some cothes. They go a long way to covering up flaws. ¬

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sh3lly (GrumpyBookGrrrl.com)

    This is my second David Sedaris book and both were the audio versions. I really liked Calypso, which is his most recent. I wish this was longer! It was the unabridged version, which was only 3 CDs! *cries* David's sister, Amy Sedaris, does several of the female voices. This author has a way of making tragedy and sad events humorous. Stories here include his earlier school years with OCD and his parents and teachers blowing it off. Thankfully, mental disorders are treated much better these days. B This is my second David Sedaris book and both were the audio versions. I really liked Calypso, which is his most recent. I wish this was longer! It was the unabridged version, which was only 3 CDs! *cries* David's sister, Amy Sedaris, does several of the female voices. This author has a way of making tragedy and sad events humorous. Stories here include his earlier school years with OCD and his parents and teachers blowing it off. Thankfully, mental disorders are treated much better these days. But he would lick light switches, count the steps walking home, and make high-pitched voices. His actions were viewed back then as being quirky and something he would outgrow. The grossest thing by far in this was the part where (view spoiler)[someone was wiping poop on the family's towels! WTH lol Was it him? It is never specifically stated, I don't think? (hide spoiler)] There is also a story where he goes to camp and discovers he is gay. He also spends some time at a nudist colony. I enjoyed this! I definitely recommend the audio versions. He reads his stories so damn well.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dana

    Quality writing as I have come to expect from David Sedaris. Love his wit and dark humour. Can't wait to read another. I have started the habit of reading snippets of David Sedaris books in between book slumps and it has really helped! Great boredom breaker. Buy, Borrow or Bin Verdict: Buy Check out more of my reviews here

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    Maybe part of my problem with the book is that I first read the back cover, which told me two things that I didn't find to be true: 1. This book is side-splittingly hilarious 2. It turns the "mania for memoir on its proverbial ear." Sure, maybe it's not fair to judge the book based on my preconceptions, but there's some merit to this I think. First, my sides are completely unsplit. I laughed a few times, found some things whimsical, and did find a few lines to be very funny. But a lot of the jokes f Maybe part of my problem with the book is that I first read the back cover, which told me two things that I didn't find to be true: 1. This book is side-splittingly hilarious 2. It turns the "mania for memoir on its proverbial ear." Sure, maybe it's not fair to judge the book based on my preconceptions, but there's some merit to this I think. First, my sides are completely unsplit. I laughed a few times, found some things whimsical, and did find a few lines to be very funny. But a lot of the jokes fell flat to me and sounded like watered-down Rick Reilly goofiness, and I don't get into Rick Reilly so much. It's pretty obvious even without the hype that one of the book's main goals is to make the reader laugh, but I guess I found the humor limited. There's a lot of one-note humor (maybe a little too smirky sometimes?), and, more importantly, there's a lot of retreating behind witty wordplay or Tonight Show one-liners during moments of great tension. Sometimes the humor undermined the interesting action of the essays/stories, rather than allowing the author to explore some issues more deeply and/or to offer some more insight. Second, I don't see how this turns anything on its ear. I mean, the actual details of the plot are different from some memoir, but it covers some pretty well-traveled ground (homosexual awakening at summer camp, dealing with mom's cancer, etc.). And that's fine too. But I felt like a) there's an unfulfilled promise (which probably isn't Sedaris' fault, but still) and b) he could have wrung more out of the material than he did. All that said, I liked the book. 3 stars isn't a bad rating, I think. It's just that there's not a lot of stuff here I think I'm going to remember for very long. I read it, I enjoyed it, and now it's done.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Calista

    This was a good chuckle. The beginning with his neuroses was not all that funny, but then once he starts talking about his family - cracks me up. David took a trip to Greece with some good material. But the best part of the story is the nudist colony he goes too. I lost my mind laughing. That tickled me. I do enjoy reading David and I need to read more of his books. He is such a joy to see how he sees the world. The world through his eyes is so interesting and he never seems to run out of materia This was a good chuckle. The beginning with his neuroses was not all that funny, but then once he starts talking about his family - cracks me up. David took a trip to Greece with some good material. But the best part of the story is the nudist colony he goes too. I lost my mind laughing. That tickled me. I do enjoy reading David and I need to read more of his books. He is such a joy to see how he sees the world. The world through his eyes is so interesting and he never seems to run out of material.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    Let's start off with the cover. Magnificence. In hardback the shorts are adjustable, and if you pull them up over the title you will see an x-ray of legs. I assume, since Mr. Sedaris is so willing to sacrifice himself at the altar of humor, that those thin white bones are his own. Genius. Visiting a nudist trailer park in the name of research, really, the man is so selfless. Licking light switches, wiping his face on towels soiled with excrement...and it doesn't stop there. Why this is funny I ca Let's start off with the cover. Magnificence. In hardback the shorts are adjustable, and if you pull them up over the title you will see an x-ray of legs. I assume, since Mr. Sedaris is so willing to sacrifice himself at the altar of humor, that those thin white bones are his own. Genius. Visiting a nudist trailer park in the name of research, really, the man is so selfless. Licking light switches, wiping his face on towels soiled with excrement...and it doesn't stop there. Why this is funny I can't explain. But it is. The wrongness is just so right. One story in the collection stands out to me because it has more than self-deprecating humor. It is the story that chronicles his sister's wedding and his mother's slow decline into death. I suspect many readers of Sedaris are bigger fans of his mother than he is, and I cannot deny that I am a part of that crowd. The drinks, the caustic retorts, the ability to laugh at your child who can't walk into a room without caressing lampshades, the humane hospitality of welcoming a whore into your living room with Christmas cheer- the woman was the sinner's saint. Although some might argue with me, I can and will now provide proof that the woman didn't do so bad. Behold-- Exhibit A: The writer, David Sedaris Exhibit B: The feisty whirlwind of talent, Amy Sedaris. Yes, I am biased. Because of the late Ms. Sedaris, I can now with full confidence tell my children when they complain, "Just think of the material I'm giving you for your memoirs!"

  15. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    I can't get enough of this guy; his books are what I would imagine crack would be like, had I ever tried crack. Which I haven't. Seriously -- I just sit and read and laugh, read and laugh. He's just so damned candid about things. For example, the story of how he was sent to Greece for Greek-American summer camp as a teenager: "If my sister was anxious about our trip, she certainly didn't show it. Prying my fingers off her wrist, she crossed the room and introduced herself to a girl who stood picki I can't get enough of this guy; his books are what I would imagine crack would be like, had I ever tried crack. Which I haven't. Seriously -- I just sit and read and laugh, read and laugh. He's just so damned candid about things. For example, the story of how he was sent to Greece for Greek-American summer camp as a teenager: "If my sister was anxious about our trip, she certainly didn't show it. Prying my fingers off her wrist, she crossed the room and introduced herself to a girl who stood picking salvageable butts out of the standing ashtray. This was a tough-looking Queens native named Stefani Heartattackus or Testicockules. I recall only that her last name had granted her a lifelong supply of resentment. ... "Camp lasted a month, during which time I never once had a bowel movement. I was used to having a semiprivate bathroom and could not bring myself to occupy one of the men's room stalls, fearful that someone might recognize my shoes or, even worse, not see my shoes at all and walk in on me. Sitting down three times a day for a heavy Greek meal became an exercise akin to packing a musket." (87-88)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I started reading this book at a particularly pathetic stage in my life. I'd just left grad school and was sharing a room in my parents' house with one of my sisters. I had a 1.5 hour commute each way to work and even though I had to go to bed at like 9 p.m. to have the energy to face the next day, Monica (said sister) always thought I was up too late. One night, she started yelling at me because for several consecutive nights I'd stayed up late reading, giggling out loud in my bed. Luckily, whe I started reading this book at a particularly pathetic stage in my life. I'd just left grad school and was sharing a room in my parents' house with one of my sisters. I had a 1.5 hour commute each way to work and even though I had to go to bed at like 9 p.m. to have the energy to face the next day, Monica (said sister) always thought I was up too late. One night, she started yelling at me because for several consecutive nights I'd stayed up late reading, giggling out loud in my bed. Luckily, when I was finished and she read the book, she was a little more understanding.

  17. 5 out of 5

    britt_brooke

    “I was a smart-ass, born and raised. This had been my curse and would continue to be so.” I first read this in print 10 years ago or so. This was freaking delightful on audio! Sedaris narrates and his sister Amy pops in for the female speaking parts. Together, they are absolutely hilarious. I think I could listen to him tell personal stories all day long. I can't wait to continue rereading all of his books in this format.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rae

    Ya know, I bet people get tired of hearing me rave about David Sedaris and his works. But I wouldn't rave if I didn't feel like it was absolutely deserved. 'Naked' is what I'd like to label as a perfect "intro to David Sedaris" read. When I finally put my plan of strapping my boyfriend to a chair, taping his eyelids open and forcing him to read one of his books into action, this will be that book. Witty, sardonic and darkly hilarious, 'Naked' is to David Sedaris as 'IT' is to Stephen King.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    Sometimes I finish a book that feels good despite some of the uncomfortable things I found among the pages. Naked is the opposite, for despite the humor and insight I wanted to rub many of the passages out of my memory. I can't, and I cannot recommend the book. It was an exercise of wading through too much waste for too little worth. David Sedaris has a voice that is real, blemished and unapologetic. Whether 100% or 10% of the book is factual is not important; it's how he tells the stories that m Sometimes I finish a book that feels good despite some of the uncomfortable things I found among the pages. Naked is the opposite, for despite the humor and insight I wanted to rub many of the passages out of my memory. I can't, and I cannot recommend the book. It was an exercise of wading through too much waste for too little worth. David Sedaris has a voice that is real, blemished and unapologetic. Whether 100% or 10% of the book is factual is not important; it's how he tells the stories that make them unique. Unless you don't mind swearing, sexual content, meanness and filth, on which the book relies too much, avoid reading it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    John

    If I read The Da Vinci Code for all those people who prefaced their enjoyment of the book with "I don't read much," I finally read my first Sedaris book for all my smartass indie literary-type friends who stared aghast at me every time for the last five years I said I'd never read him. "You mean you've read Eggers, but not Sedaris? I'll bet you like the Stones better than the Beatles too, dont you?" "You think your family's bad, wait'll you read about his!" "No, I don't like him because he's cool, If I read The Da Vinci Code for all those people who prefaced their enjoyment of the book with "I don't read much," I finally read my first Sedaris book for all my smartass indie literary-type friends who stared aghast at me every time for the last five years I said I'd never read him. "You mean you've read Eggers, but not Sedaris? I'll bet you like the Stones better than the Beatles too, dont you?" "You think your family's bad, wait'll you read about his!" "No, I don't like him because he's cool, I like him because he's funny. But he's cool, too." Understandably, I went in a little leery. The first essay, Chipped Beef, did precious little to alleviate my skepticism - I guess it was a clever introduction to his family and his relationship to it, but it came off to me as a bit too snide and abstract, a deadly combination that Eggers is prone to as well. A Plague of Tics hooked me though, and the next 9 essays were all gut-busters, alternating between hilarious bombast and genuine empathy for his decrepit grandma, cocktail-swilling mother, multitudinous sisters, not-with-it father, and inept teachers. True Detective might have been my favorite of that set, leading the reader on a clue-sniffing hunting for the brazen perpetrator who repeated wiped his or her ass with the hand towels in the family bathroom. The longer essays that make up the second part of the book are where Sedaris really flexes his chops, though. Planet of the Apes and C.O.G. are Tangled Up in Blue-like accounts of his adventures in hitchhiking and public transportation across our fair land, while The Incomplete Quad throws a series of cripples into his road of self-discovery. I read Something for Everyone in a public place, and a handful of people stopped me to ask what I was reading that could make me embarrass myself laughing so much. Ashes is the closest Sedaris comes to outright sincerity, but he manages to inject even an account of his mother's cancerous exit with quite a few chortles and guffaws. And he closes the volume with Naked, a pleasant denouement chronicling his one trip to a nudist colony with one of the funniest moments of the book, when he arrives to a bunch of naked old men watching the weather and blaming him for bringing a cold front. There is surely more of Sedaris to come in this boy's life. I would venture to say, without trying to explain, that he writes like I want to.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

    I enjoyed this book more in the beginning than I did toward the end. At first it was entertaining to read about all of Sedaris's mishaps and "woe is me" type of moments, but that theme got too repetitive (for me) and eventually I just wasn't impressed anymore. It seemed like he was looking for sympathy while trying to put a humorous spin on pretty humbling and shitty moments in his life. There were parts that were truly funny, but I think it would have worked out better if every story (almost) h I enjoyed this book more in the beginning than I did toward the end. At first it was entertaining to read about all of Sedaris's mishaps and "woe is me" type of moments, but that theme got too repetitive (for me) and eventually I just wasn't impressed anymore. It seemed like he was looking for sympathy while trying to put a humorous spin on pretty humbling and shitty moments in his life. There were parts that were truly funny, but I think it would have worked out better if every story (almost) hadn't had an underlying "poor me" type of theme to it. The title 'Naked' is pretty honest. He wrote about a lot of different experiences in his life, and didn't seem to attempt to gloss them over or bend the truth in order to make himself look better. It seemed he went out of his way to portray himself as a self-preserving, self-centered type of person who has constantly been dealt a bad hand (and doesn't handle most situations well, crazy as some of them are). I give him credit for his honesty, but at the same time, this book didn't help me to like Sedaris as a person. His writing style has an easy flow, but the subject matter of this book came across to me as semi-depressing.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    This wonderfully amusing book took me by surprise. Each chapter is a short memoir of David Sedaris' childhood, filled with some unusual adventures, from hitch hiking with a paraplegic to having servants wax your change. Sedaris writes in a very humorous tone, basically turning some of his misfortunes into the readers entertainment. Come to think of it, it really wasn't the stories that made the book enjoyable. It was how Sedaris wrote them. A very unique, consistent style throughout the book, lo This wonderfully amusing book took me by surprise. Each chapter is a short memoir of David Sedaris' childhood, filled with some unusual adventures, from hitch hiking with a paraplegic to having servants wax your change. Sedaris writes in a very humorous tone, basically turning some of his misfortunes into the readers entertainment. Come to think of it, it really wasn't the stories that made the book enjoyable. It was how Sedaris wrote them. A very unique, consistent style throughout the book, loaded with wit and humor. Although Sedaris has a way with sarcasm and making fun of his family, there are also messages to be had underneath each of the short essays. He doesn't make them glaringly obvious or the major focus for the book, but one can tell that they are there on purpose. He reveals much to the reader in the literal interpretations of the essays in the book, but also in the subtext. Which is why I understand the title of the book and what it stands for.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    Naked is my first exposure to the humor of David Sedaris, and not only did I enjoy it, I will definitely read more by him. The comedic memoir is a collection of short stories from his childhood through his adulthood, including his experiences with OCD, the death of his mother, and coming out. I can't say that I can relate to his tales, but I experienced many laugh out loud moments. One of the more hilarious chapters chronicles the time he spent in a nudist colony. Underneath all of the silliness Naked is my first exposure to the humor of David Sedaris, and not only did I enjoy it, I will definitely read more by him. The comedic memoir is a collection of short stories from his childhood through his adulthood, including his experiences with OCD, the death of his mother, and coming out. I can't say that I can relate to his tales, but I experienced many laugh out loud moments. One of the more hilarious chapters chronicles the time he spent in a nudist colony. Underneath all of the silliness, it was hard to miss the dark and sad emotions that were also there. Due to the "bathroom humor," I wouldn't recommend this fun read to those who are easily offended. Anyone who enjoys Augustin Burroughs would probably also like Sedaris and vice versa.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Spider the Doof Warrior

    I don't know how to feel about this book. Parts of it are funny, parts of it are deeply sad but he's insisting that it's funny. Like when he talks about having OCD. I feel so bad for him. It makes me think people in the past sucked. The poor kid has a disorder and needs help, but his father's slammed on the brakes and made him hurt himself and his mother made fun of him for this. A lot of the humour is kind of cruel in this book. The best story was probably about David dealing with his mother dy I don't know how to feel about this book. Parts of it are funny, parts of it are deeply sad but he's insisting that it's funny. Like when he talks about having OCD. I feel so bad for him. It makes me think people in the past sucked. The poor kid has a disorder and needs help, but his father's slammed on the brakes and made him hurt himself and his mother made fun of him for this. A lot of the humour is kind of cruel in this book. The best story was probably about David dealing with his mother dying. It was very poignant and they were trying to keep being themselves in a situation that is so abnormal. But in most of these stories David and his family comes off as insensitive jerks. Longer rant later.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bookshop

    This is a highly unusual autobiography of David Sedaris, who, according to the New York Magazine, is a "Playwright, author, radio star, and retired elf". I wasn't sure what he is actually. I came across his name when his book (also in my already-bought-please-read-it-quickly list) Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim made it into the various reading lists of newspapers and magazines. I thought he was quite interesting and I started to take note of his name. The book is a collection of essays o This is a highly unusual autobiography of David Sedaris, who, according to the New York Magazine, is a "Playwright, author, radio star, and retired elf". I wasn't sure what he is actually. I came across his name when his book (also in my already-bought-please-read-it-quickly list) Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim made it into the various reading lists of newspapers and magazines. I thought he was quite interesting and I started to take note of his name. The book is a collection of essays outlining his experiences growing up in a dysfunctional Greek and Jewish family, his problems (he suffers from severe tics and he is a homosexual), his drug-induced days in colleges, and generally, his observation of human nature. It's nothing like the typical biography with details and pictures of parents, grandparents, and relatives of three generations and boastful accomplishments lined up neatly in a timeline. It is a simple story of an ordinary but talented man. He is described as a humor writer and this book is supposed to fall under the genre of comedy. However, let it be warned that the language is not all that simple. His style can be quite mouthful (in a good way) and takes time to get used to. Sentences can be quite complex but still honest and to the point. Having said all that, the book is undoubtedly funny. I caught myself chuckling aloud a few times after getting used to his style. His specality is cleverly turning sad, or even cruel, events into great satires. Read it. It's really different.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Miranda Reads

    I have a feeling that this guy will never run out of material Review to come Audiobook Comments Read by David Sedaris and his sister (Amy Sedaris). It's always fun when the author reads their own book. Makes it feel so much more real. Blog | Instagram | Twitter

  27. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Sometimes I forget that David Sedaris isn't funny in the way you might think. But he's pathetically, sadly, humanly funny and that makes him better than you might think.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jesse Keenan

    I had the opportunity to personally thank David Sedaris for this book but I don't think I was able to fully articulate what it meant to me at the time. This was in no small part due to the fact that I was standing before a personal hero of mine. Also I was drunk. I will attempt to write what I wish I could have expressed that night. Naked played a significant role in one the fonder memories of my adult life. It was during Fiesta in Santa Barbara (Old Spanish Days), which if you live in SB and are I had the opportunity to personally thank David Sedaris for this book but I don't think I was able to fully articulate what it meant to me at the time. This was in no small part due to the fact that I was standing before a personal hero of mine. Also I was drunk. I will attempt to write what I wish I could have expressed that night. Naked played a significant role in one the fonder memories of my adult life. It was during Fiesta in Santa Barbara (Old Spanish Days), which if you live in SB and are not a total dick you generally have a terrible time. But my best pal Sar and I decided to brave the a-holes littering the streets with confetti eggs and shot glass necklaces to enjoy a mid-day margarita at El Paseo. On our way to the drinks we decided to stop by our neighborhood Barnes and Noble to peruse the books and take a break from all the revelry going on outside (revelers are not big readers). I saw Naked on the best-seller list, liked the cover, picked it up off the shelf, read the first few pages and began laughing out loud. With our purchases in hand (Naked being one of them) we made our way to El Paseo. The margaritas were flowing like wine and I wanted to share the hilarity of the book with Sara -- so I began reading aloud. But I was quickly overcome with laughter, so Sara took over until she too needed a break and we continued to take turns until we had make it through the first two or three stories. It was a good day. When we were trying to come up with the perfect first-date for our initial screenplay, we both thought of that day and wrote it into the script (including an excerpt from Naked). Of course we switched the platonic to romantic (and as such we didn't make out afterwards like our characters did). But thank you David (and Sara) for the wonderful day.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kristine

    Like all of Sedaris' books, this one has some MAJOR, masterful escapades, made all the better because they are true... Two favorite scenes: Sedaris' mom and sister watch crime shows all summer and then... a mystery arises in their own household- who is wiping their butt on the towels? The BROWN towels, so the offense isn't recognized until one gets a face full. Who is it? "I don't know, but I know he had corn yesterday," is one quote that sticks in my mind. I think Naked is also the book that ope Like all of Sedaris' books, this one has some MAJOR, masterful escapades, made all the better because they are true... Two favorite scenes: Sedaris' mom and sister watch crime shows all summer and then... a mystery arises in their own household- who is wiping their butt on the towels? The BROWN towels, so the offense isn't recognized until one gets a face full. Who is it? "I don't know, but I know he had corn yesterday," is one quote that sticks in my mind. I think Naked is also the book that opens with Sedaris' description of his childhood OCD- his walk home from school took several hours because he had to ritualistically touch various objects on the way home from school- mailboxes, garden gnomes, his own doorbell, etc. Sedaris is such an incredible story teller.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Calzean

    The book might be 20 years old but the stories are still very funny. Sedaris and his family should be bottled and protected as national treasures as his insights into small America are brilliant. And all of the people he meets can vote too.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.