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The Science of Breaking Bad PDF, ePub eBook

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The Science of Breaking Bad

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The Science of Breaking Bad PDF, ePub eBook

35 review for The Science of Breaking Bad

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sumit RK

    Breaking Bad is one of television's greatest series. With a darkly gripping storyline, strong characters, excellent direction and some brilliant storytelling, it will remain one of the greatest TV shows ever made. If you have watched Breaking Bad, a lot of the key points in the show revolved around Walter White’s genius-level knowledge of chemistry; from making meth to explosives to acids for destruction. But how much of Walt's science is actually scientific? The Science of Breaking Bad attempts Breaking Bad is one of television's greatest series. With a darkly gripping storyline, strong characters, excellent direction and some brilliant storytelling, it will remain one of the greatest TV shows ever made. If you have watched Breaking Bad, a lot of the key points in the show revolved around Walter White’s genius-level knowledge of chemistry; from making meth to explosives to acids for destruction. But how much of Walt's science is actually scientific? The Science of Breaking Bad attempts to explain all the science in Breaking Bad. Note: If you haven’t watched the show, there are some major spoilers ahead. Trumbore and Nelson (also Breaking Bad's science advisor) cover the show's portrayal of chemistry, biology, medical science, and physics. From the making of meth to Walt's DIY battery making, using hydrofluoric acid to dissolve bodies; from the thermite lockpick to making of Ricin. They move on to explosives, psychiatry, pediatrics, insecticides, cancer, poisons, and addiction. The fact-checking also extends into medical science, with the portrayal of Walt’s cancer, Jesse’s PTSD or Walter Jr's cerebral palsy. So what exactly is “The Science of Breaking Bad” all about? This book is NOT a step-by-step manual to cook Meth or make explosives. This book teaches neither of that but as a reader, you will learn the secrets behind some of the more harmless effects on the show and appreciate the mysteries and complexity of science. Almost every major feat of science in the show is tested and neatly categorized into fact and fiction. The goal of this book is to amplify the message that "Science can be Fun". There are some parts of the book that explain the entire chemical process behind a chemical reaction and the formulas and equations and many chemical reactions might be a little overwhelming to some. Though it makes the book thorough, it may turn off the more casual readers. The structure of the book could have been better rather than jumping to any episode randomly. All in all, an entertaining way to learn more about chemistry –and If you are a fan of the show, reading this book will remind you of some of your favorite scenes and plot moments. If you are a fan of the series, you will enjoy this one. 3.5/5 Many thanks to the publishers MIT Press, the authors Dave Trumbore, Donna J. Nelson, Marius Stan and Edelweiss for the ARC.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Brian Clegg

    At first sight I'm probably not the best person to review this book as I have never watched Breaking Bad (apart from repeatedly seeing bits of episode 2 when I played it more than 50 times while battery testing laptops) and have no desire to do so. However, I am very interested in how fiction portrays science and the claim this book makes is that Breaking Bad was uniquely impressive in the amount of real science it contained. The format of the book is more than a little odd. One of the contributo At first sight I'm probably not the best person to review this book as I have never watched Breaking Bad (apart from repeatedly seeing bits of episode 2 when I played it more than 50 times while battery testing laptops) and have no desire to do so. However, I am very interested in how fiction portrays science and the claim this book makes is that Breaking Bad was uniquely impressive in the amount of real science it contained. The format of the book is more than a little odd. One of the contributors, Donna Nelson, is a chemistry professor who responded to a call for a science consultant to the show. Each chapter starts with a section of reminiscence from Nelson about the joys and tribulations of the role. That's fine and often gives interesting insights, but for some reason it's printed in tiny text, significantly smaller than the rest of the book. I think the idea is to make it look like an email, but it just makes it hard to read. I remember chatting to a physicist who had just been science consultant on a science fiction movie and he was full of the production team's enthusiasm for science - but the movie was later slated for terrible science content. Nelson seems similarly beguiled by Hollywood and perhaps is a little too starstruck not to over compliment the production team for their dedication to science. We then get two versions of an explanation from science writer Dave Trumbore of the Breaking Bad science on a particular topic, often focussing on one or two episodes. The first version is a high-level summary, labelled '101' after the odd US way of denoting basic university courses, and the other is 'Advanced'. These are well written and can be quite interesting - for example in the discussion of explosives and of producing a DIY battery. Although Trumbore probably gives the Breaking Bad people more credit than they deserve for being accurate, he is careful to point out where the demands of good storytelling or filming were reasonably thought to outweigh the requirement for scientific accuracy. I did feel, though, that some sections - for example the ones dealing with medical conditions from psychology to oncology - were just there to fill things out and weren't really about the presentation of science in the show. Overall, despite the odd format, it's quite a good example of the 'science of...' genre. Though not as interesting as, say The Science of Middle Earth (which inevitably was a considerably harder task for the writer), it puts across quite a lot on that under-represented science chemistry - and though occasionally there was a little too much detail for this kind of book, it was generally well presented by Trumbore. There was too much obsession with the drug that was central to the storyline - the reverence the writers of the book had for the TV show occasionally verged on the sickly, and this particularly came across in the word count given over to the creation of the drug. Realistically, few others will try reading this just for the science content. It will be read by fans of the show - the kind of people who watch the DVD again with the commentary switched on (I don't know if Breaking Bad has this, but other shows with cult followings do) - and such readers will certainly enjoy picking over the fine details of what happened in particular episodes, even if some of the heavier science points perhaps don't interest them. A good effort.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Strawberry

    *I received an advance copy of this book from Edelweiss/The MIT Press in exchange for a fair and honest review* I am a fan of Breaking Bad, so naturally this title caught my eye and I had to request the advance copy of it. “The Science of Breaking Bad” is basically like an extended, printed edition of Mythbusters (the author, Dave Trumbore, refers to an episode of that show that focused specifically on some of the science of Breaking Bad numerous times). And Mr. Trumbore is very passionate about *I received an advance copy of this book from Edelweiss/The MIT Press in exchange for a fair and honest review* I am a fan of Breaking Bad, so naturally this title caught my eye and I had to request the advance copy of it. “The Science of Breaking Bad” is basically like an extended, printed edition of Mythbusters (the author, Dave Trumbore, refers to an episode of that show that focused specifically on some of the science of Breaking Bad numerous times). And Mr. Trumbore is very passionate about the subject! He tested the validity of pretty much every major feat of science in the show, from Hector Salamanca’s wheelchair bomb and the thermite lockpick, to body-dissolving acid and Hank’s exploding Schraderbräu beer bottles, alongside Dr. Donna Nelson, a chemistry professor who volunteered to be the on-set science consultant for Breaking Bad. Reading this book, one finds out what was accurately portrayed on screen and what was slightly manipulated to create more (literally) explosive results for the entertainment of the viewers. There are some parts of the book that might be a little overwhelming to some because of an abundance of formulas and equations to demonstrate how some of the chemical processes are achieved, but I don’t think that it detracts from the overall appeal to fans of the series. Mr. Trumbore even ventures into medical science, comparing on-screen PTSD, fugue states, panic attacks, and cerebral palsy, along with cancer and its treatment, to their real-life counterparts. Also sprinkled throughout the book are anecdotes provided by Dr. Nelson about her experience on the set and how amazed she was to see her input being played out on this massively popular TV show, which I particularly enjoyed. Another added bonus found throughout is science trivia taken from various episodes. Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed “The Science of Breaking Bad.” I would highly recommend it to any fan of the series, whether they’re a chemistry whiz or not. It is a fun companion to those who appreciate the more explosive moments of Breaking Bad — although, as the authors point out more than once, “none of the information in this book is intended to be used in an illicit, illegal, or ill-advised manner”!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Vasudev Gowda

    wow is really small word this book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dave402

  6. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Wheeler

  7. 4 out of 5

    Llama

  8. 4 out of 5

    Will Radford

  9. 5 out of 5

    Erin Boyington

  10. 4 out of 5

    Pt Books

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jermey

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mohammad

  13. 5 out of 5

    Casey

  14. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  16. 5 out of 5

    Livus

  17. 5 out of 5

    David

  18. 5 out of 5

    Hima Dulijan

  19. 5 out of 5

    Effyanti Mohd Shuib

  20. 4 out of 5

    Davoud Hoshiar

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bryson Nzigi

  22. 4 out of 5

    Preeti

  23. 4 out of 5

    William Firmanto

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rhiannon

  25. 5 out of 5

    Aryaman

  26. 5 out of 5

    Larka Fenrir

  27. 5 out of 5

    Omar Ehab

  28. 4 out of 5

    CaveatEmptor

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dave Hourn

  30. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  31. 4 out of 5

    Nabiela

  32. 4 out of 5

    Gerardo Salazar

  33. 5 out of 5

    winnie

  34. 5 out of 5

    Ace

  35. 4 out of 5

    Arya

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