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The Belgariad Boxed Set: Pawn of Prophecy / Queen of Sorcery / Magician's Gambit / Castle of Wizardry / Enchanters' End Game PDF, ePub eBook

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The Belgariad Boxed Set: Pawn of Prophecy / Queen of Sorcery / Magician's Gambit / Castle of Wizardry / Enchanters' End Game

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The Belgariad Boxed Set: Pawn of Prophecy / Queen of Sorcery / Magician's Gambit / Castle of Wizardry / Enchanters' End Game PDF, ePub eBook It all begins with the theft of the Orb that for so long protected the West from an evil god. As long as the Orb was at Riva, the prophecy went, its people would be safe from this corrupting power. Garion, a simple farm boy, is familiar with the legend of the Orb, but skeptical in matters of magic. Until, through a twist of fate, he learns not only that the story of the Or It all begins with the theft of the Orb that for so long protected the West from an evil god. As long as the Orb was at Riva, the prophecy went, its people would be safe from this corrupting power. Garion, a simple farm boy, is familiar with the legend of the Orb, but skeptical in matters of magic. Until, through a twist of fate, he learns not only that the story of the Orb is true, but that he must set out on a quest of unparalleled magic and danger to help recover it. For Garion is a child of destiny, and fate itself is leading him far from his home, sweeping him irrevocably toward a distant tower-and a cataclysmic confrontation with a master of the darkest magic. The quest may be nearing its end, but the danger continues. After discovering a shocking secret about himself he never could have imagined-all in pursuit of the legendary Orb-Garion and his fellow adventurers must escape a crumbling enemy fortress and flee across a vast desert filled with ruthless soldiers whose only aim is to destroy them. But even when the quest is complete, Garion's destiny is far from fulfilled. For the evil God Torak is about to awaken and seek dominion. Somehow, Garion has to face the God, to kill or be killed. On the outcome of this dread duel rests the future of the world. But how can one man destroy an immortal God?

30 review for The Belgariad Boxed Set: Pawn of Prophecy / Queen of Sorcery / Magician's Gambit / Castle of Wizardry / Enchanters' End Game

  1. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    I'm a closet sci-fi/fantasy/adventure fan. I make no apologies for that. And I'll make no apologies for loving this series of books. I've read this series at least a dozen times and it never fails to entertain. This series is deceptive. Because the five books are quick reads, it can be easy to dismiss them as light reading in the genre. They're not. Mark Twain once apologize for writing a long letter because he didn't have time to write a short one. David Eddings (and his noncredited co-author wi I'm a closet sci-fi/fantasy/adventure fan. I make no apologies for that. And I'll make no apologies for loving this series of books. I've read this series at least a dozen times and it never fails to entertain. This series is deceptive. Because the five books are quick reads, it can be easy to dismiss them as light reading in the genre. They're not. Mark Twain once apologize for writing a long letter because he didn't have time to write a short one. David Eddings (and his noncredited co-author wife, Leigh) took the time to write a enjoyable, smart, funny and engaging adventure series. It IS of the "farm boy led by prophecy" subgenre that has fallen out of favor in the era of gritty fantasy with flawed main characters, but Eddings sets up a tale with competing prophecies. I particularly enjoyed how he differentiates between sorcery and magic and the mechanics of how sorcery works in this world. Serious adventure fans will find enough in here to enjoy and to justify the time spent reading; casual fans just looking for a good read will enjoy it for the fast, fun ride it takes them on.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jason Miller

    The Belgariad series and its sequel, the Mallorean series (also 5 books) are some of the best fantasy novels you will ever read. Unlike most fantasy books, it is relatively easy to quickly figure out the world in which they take place. The characters are absolutely fantastic - some of the best characters in any fantasy book I've ever read. I think Silk is my favorite. So read all 10 of these books. They are great!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Emil Söderman

    Okay, what to say about Eddings? Let me start by saying that while LOTR was the first fantasy I read (back in the early 90's, when there was a sense that there wasn't a fantasy genré yet, at least not in the small time where I lived, there was just SF and then there was LOTR) Eddings was the one that made me a fantasy fan. There's a lot of (for good reasons!) dismissing of Eddings, yes, it's a simple narrative, yes, the characters are stereotypes, yes, it's sometimes pretty blatantly racist, he re Okay, what to say about Eddings? Let me start by saying that while LOTR was the first fantasy I read (back in the early 90's, when there was a sense that there wasn't a fantasy genré yet, at least not in the small time where I lived, there was just SF and then there was LOTR) Eddings was the one that made me a fantasy fan. There's a lot of (for good reasons!) dismissing of Eddings, yes, it's a simple narrative, yes, the characters are stereotypes, yes, it's sometimes pretty blatantly racist, he repeats the same story about seven times in different series, and yes, he did it all purely to make money. On the other hand, for the right age-group it's wonderful. I just introduced my half-brother (he's about 12) to Eddings and he loves it. There's a kind of magic there, and for all the charges (justified!) of being unoriginal, Eddings (RIP) mainly uses clichés because they work. The thing I'd compare it to would be the Star Wars original trilogy: (and like Lucas, Eddings has read Campbell) If you have a kid the right age, or if you ARE a kid the right age, or if you just feel like some mindless fun with good guys, bad guys, some teenage angst and a happy ending, this is a good book to read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sparhawk

    This is the series that really got me hooked into the fantasy genre. The pace at which the story moves along is one of the best... introducing you to the innocent, somewhat naive farmboy Garion, who quickly grows on you as everything that has been kept secret from him is slowly revealed, forcing him to come to grip with his destiny. The variety of characters and their unique personalities are great, and the often funny banter between the characters makes this a guaranteed enjoyable read!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Truly great story. When I read LOTR, I was left with images of all of these grim people with little in the way of comic relief.......to which you might respond "Sauron's got the world practically in his grasp, what's the humor in that?" I just think that I'd rather sit down and have a drink with Belgarath, Silk, Barak and company rather than Gandalf and Frodo. Having said that, LOTR is the far superior work, but I don't think that Eddings had that sort of goal with his series. Just a lot of fun t Truly great story. When I read LOTR, I was left with images of all of these grim people with little in the way of comic relief.......to which you might respond "Sauron's got the world practically in his grasp, what's the humor in that?" I just think that I'd rather sit down and have a drink with Belgarath, Silk, Barak and company rather than Gandalf and Frodo. Having said that, LOTR is the far superior work, but I don't think that Eddings had that sort of goal with his series. Just a lot of fun to read, full of stereotypes, archetypes, but sometimes you want to eat Beef Wellington and sometimes you want a hamburger pizza.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Leon

    The Belgariad is the best series of books I have ever read. The books take you into a well defined world, each country very different from the next, and envelops the reader in such a riveting story-line that he would want to never put the book down. The series is full of magic (sorcery), action, and believeble characters. Well worth the read

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jan-Maat

    Started by reading the third book of the series when I was about fifteen and spread out from there. The series is very easy reading. The humorous banter of the characters has a mildly addictive quality. The books have better moments, certainly I remember that in principle there were better moments although for the life of me I can't recall any now my memory of reading these is like that of eating sliced packet bread smeared with margarine and shipham's paste, but you could probably read them whi Started by reading the third book of the series when I was about fifteen and spread out from there. The series is very easy reading. The humorous banter of the characters has a mildly addictive quality. The books have better moments, certainly I remember that in principle there were better moments although for the life of me I can't recall any now my memory of reading these is like that of eating sliced packet bread smeared with margarine and shipham's paste, but you could probably read them while drunk and suffer no appreciable loss of enjoyment or understanding of the plot. They are fine for what they are and I could recommend them to somebody who was young, or maybe learning English as a foreign language, but otherwise life is short, tempus fugit and all that.Dispensible.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Doug

    Yes, you are reading that correctly - this is a fantasy series of five books. Actually, ten, for there is a sequel series of five called The Mallorean, although it isn't quite as good. As would would expect in a series of such length, there are many characters and storylines, but not so many that you get lost in them. The five books of the Belgariad are wonderfully creative; Eddings creates a fantasy world that is fun to become part of.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Maurinejt

    This was my introduction to high fantasy. My gateway drug, I suppose. I have loved these books since they were loaned to me in high school, and I used to reread them at least once a year. When times were bad, I could still follow along with Garion, sigh over Silk (one of my original literary crushes), enjoy the interplay and intrigue, and the DIALOGUE!!! I had never read a book like that. I still haven't. My opinion on the series may have changed somewhat on my latest reread but David Eddings st This was my introduction to high fantasy. My gateway drug, I suppose. I have loved these books since they were loaned to me in high school, and I used to reread them at least once a year. When times were bad, I could still follow along with Garion, sigh over Silk (one of my original literary crushes), enjoy the interplay and intrigue, and the DIALOGUE!!! I had never read a book like that. I still haven't. My opinion on the series may have changed somewhat on my latest reread but David Eddings still writes the best dialogue on the planet. If this series was written today, it would have been YA, and some details would have changed--not for the better. The main character Garion ranges from 14 to about 16 through the course of the novels. It was written at a time when the age of the protagonist did not immediately categorize a work, so Eddings was able to deal with adult material that his young hero didn't necessarily pick up on but mature readers would, yet told plainly and cleanly. There is some light commentary on social and domestic issues, and the violence is somewhat restrained and justified. It has been years since the last time I picked it up. But I was in the need of chicken soup style comfort, so I was moved to spend time with Garion and co. again. The flaws that bothered me were much more abundant and pronounced in the Mallorean than here in the Belgariad, but they were still there. David Eddings has an almost unlimited magical system, where these sorcerers live forever and can do anything. With such lack of constraints, it is understandable that you run into plot holes from time to time. There are small scenes that are hard to justify, a "why didn't they just--?" sort of question that occurs to the reader. A sort of an explanation is presented to cover most of it, but it's a stretch to make it do for all. However, there is a simple, straightforward charm about the Belgariad, both the characters and the quest are fun and engaging, and I have always loved roaming his world--where the idea of national identity is raised to new heights.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

    Probably my favorite series. I got hooked on this in early, early high school and it's still the story I compare similar books to when I try to decide if they're good or not. Unfortunately, near as I can tell, everything else David Eddings wrote sucked so the jury's still out on who my favorite author is. I like this series because it's really easy to read. The characters have qualities that make them engaging and their relationships with one another are well defined and detailed. Eddings' dialog Probably my favorite series. I got hooked on this in early, early high school and it's still the story I compare similar books to when I try to decide if they're good or not. Unfortunately, near as I can tell, everything else David Eddings wrote sucked so the jury's still out on who my favorite author is. I like this series because it's really easy to read. The characters have qualities that make them engaging and their relationships with one another are well defined and detailed. Eddings' dialog flows naturally, like a casual conversation would, including little things that written dialog usually lacks; inside jokes, references not everyone in the scene is meant to catch, private innuendos... even the speaker getting sidetracked. The way his characters talk to one another feels very organic, and that makes it easy to read. Too many fantasy settings these days are getting too deeply rooted in the "darker and grittier" setting (ala, anything by George RR Martin), but that's not true here. This is good, clean and light. Excellent for bedtime reading, which is pretty much all I do. This is an old, tried and true fantasy model that he's used here. Hero on a quest for a magic thingamagig, aided by a wizard, thwarted by a villain, rewarded with a heroine. Yeah, that sums up just about every high fantasy story ever told. He uses it as a framework and not a crutch, but that won't keep some of us from being able to see where the story is about to go. His big reveals tend to be a bit predictable, but still fun. And that brings me to the point: fun. Eddings has been accused of belting out this story in thirteen volumes just to make a buck, but truthfully he actually only barely broke even writing them. Moreover, he was working what he called a "real job" while he wrote them, and is quoted saying "nobody writes to get rich". But he had fun with this series, and because of that I did too. Start with Pawn of Prophecy and read it. It's the shortest book and introduces all the important elements of the series. Worst case scenario, it's too light for you. All you've lost is a week you could have spent gambling on the quality of something else.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    So this is REALLY schlocky fantasy, and even at like 15 I knew it was schlocky, and yet kept reading, and kept waiting until next year when the next novel would come out. Now, I had no idea at the time that after a hardcover comes out, its usually another YEAR before the soft cover is published. Its actually funny, the South Park with Cartman waiting on the Wii -- the wait for the 5th book was INTERMINABLE !!!! This MIGHT be why I was able to break the spell that Robert Jordan threw on so many fo So this is REALLY schlocky fantasy, and even at like 15 I knew it was schlocky, and yet kept reading, and kept waiting until next year when the next novel would come out. Now, I had no idea at the time that after a hardcover comes out, its usually another YEAR before the soft cover is published. Its actually funny, the South Park with Cartman waiting on the Wii -- the wait for the 5th book was INTERMINABLE !!!! This MIGHT be why I was able to break the spell that Robert Jordan threw on so many folks in the late 90s into the double aughts --- David Eddings had already done it to me 10 years prior. I guess he saved me from Harry Potter. I feel dirty -- these books are SO predictable that even *I* was able to guess what was happening YEARS before the events happened on paper. And yet... I can remember pretty much when every one arrived in its little Science Fiction Book Club box, and I would get a bag of Doritos, a 3 Liter of Pepsi, and just go into lockdown mode for the evening. I guess its just a good memory of my dad coming to check on me at like 2 or 3 AM, and he'd get me refills of ice, and just cut me a little slack about chores and everything on those days. Then, and I wont use vulgarity, but he started writing a SECOND set of 5 novels WHICH WERE EXACTLY THE SAME!!!!!!!!!! O. M. G. So much anger having to wait another 5 years. GRRR!!!!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jade Kerrion

    In the Belgariad, David Eddings leverages archetypes to the hilt--the orphaned child of destiny, the old and wise advisor, the protective mother-of-all--and weaves them into a beautiful detailed world, populated by people in nations who seem determined to live up to every stereotype about their race. What might have otherwise come across as dull and repetitive characterization instead turns into an insider joke of which the reader is a part. When a character rolls their eyes and says, "Alorns!", In the Belgariad, David Eddings leverages archetypes to the hilt--the orphaned child of destiny, the old and wise advisor, the protective mother-of-all--and weaves them into a beautiful detailed world, populated by people in nations who seem determined to live up to every stereotype about their race. What might have otherwise come across as dull and repetitive characterization instead turns into an insider joke of which the reader is a part. When a character rolls their eyes and says, "Alorns!", the reader is laughing right along, nodding in fervent agreement. The plot itself is familiar and has been used by others in one variation or another--the orphaned child rises to claim his destiny as savior of the world, and oh, by the way, find the precious blue gem before the enemy does. (Eddings has a fixation for precious and pretty blue gems--read the Elenium/Tamuli for more blue gem obsession). That said, the story-telling is crisp, the plot brisk, and his descriptions draw you into the story, painting a picture that allows the reader to see each scene as it unfolds. I have spent many happy hours immersed in the world of the Belgariad. My hardcover novels are looking a little tattered from repeated use. Thank you, Eddings, for a truly outstanding high fantasy series.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mary-Beth

    These books are entertaining, up to a point. Even as a teenager, when I was most into these novels, however, I started skimming at the end of the series, wanting to know what was going to happen, but wanting to skip Eddings' verbosity and plot twists that were created for their own sake. This is the weaker of the two major series he writes. This is probably because Garion is the kind of hero who is too good for his own good and therefore fairly boring. One usually looks to the slightly crusty Bel These books are entertaining, up to a point. Even as a teenager, when I was most into these novels, however, I started skimming at the end of the series, wanting to know what was going to happen, but wanting to skip Eddings' verbosity and plot twists that were created for their own sake. This is the weaker of the two major series he writes. This is probably because Garion is the kind of hero who is too good for his own good and therefore fairly boring. One usually looks to the slightly crusty Belgarath or perhaps to the morally questionable Kheldar for entertainment. The women are handled in a fairly disgusting manner. There's a theme of women using their charms to get what they want and then sniping at the male characters like harpies. Then again, half the time the women are only sniping to get the men to take a bath so I guess that doesn't reflect too kindly on either sex. If you're just looking for entertainment and a lot of it, this series goes on forever, so you shouldn't be disappointed.

  14. 5 out of 5

    EmmaLee Pryor

    So finished the whole series, these five and the next five and they were fine, but not really compelling to read. I just would have a hard time recommending these books to anyone because they aren't that spectacular. Also someone commented on my review of the first book that the various gods/peoples are not that difficult for even the most juvenile of minds. However the way the gods are portrayed is not god-like at all. They are, except Aldur, kind of irritating. Also, after having read Eddings So finished the whole series, these five and the next five and they were fine, but not really compelling to read. I just would have a hard time recommending these books to anyone because they aren't that spectacular. Also someone commented on my review of the first book that the various gods/peoples are not that difficult for even the most juvenile of minds. However the way the gods are portrayed is not god-like at all. They are, except Aldur, kind of irritating. Also, after having read Eddings other series, (the jewel one, with diamond, rubies and sapphire) he has some serious issues with his heroes being attracted to childlike, waif-like young girls that never age.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Wendi

    I read these books starting in Jr High, I think, and read them all multiple times. I love the author and the world he created. His characters are alive and well in my imagination. Though Eddings world is not nearly as developed as Tolkien's, if you liked The Lord of the Rings, you'll like these too.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michael Rullo

    The Belgariad by David Eddings consists of five books; Pawn of Prophecy, Queen of Sorcery, Magician’s Gambit, Castle of Wizardry, and Enchanters’ End Game. This is just one five book series out of two that make up the base of work Eddings put together for his created universe. The second five-book series is called The Malloreon. I’ll be reading and reviewing that as well in the future. Then there are some supplementary texts. There are two prequels based on two central characters entitled Belgar The Belgariad by David Eddings consists of five books; Pawn of Prophecy, Queen of Sorcery, Magician’s Gambit, Castle of Wizardry, and Enchanters’ End Game. This is just one five book series out of two that make up the base of work Eddings put together for his created universe. The second five-book series is called The Malloreon. I’ll be reading and reviewing that as well in the future. Then there are some supplementary texts. There are two prequels based on two central characters entitled Belgarath the Sorcerer, and Polgara the Sorceress. Then there is also a book entitled The Rivan Codex which is a kind of behind the scenes book to how Eddings and his wife put the whole thing together. I just wanted to let you know that if you picked up Pawn of Prophecy and thought it sounded interesting, here’s what you’re getting yourself into. There is a lot of content to read - which can be good or bad, depending on how you look at it. Let me explain. I made the choice after finishing the first book that I was going to wait until I finished the whole first series to write a review. The reason why was because 1) I went through the book so quickly, and 2) I didn’t feel like I had read enough to write a review on. The first book didn’t have a sense of completeness to it. Rather than each book being a solid and complete story in and of itself, I realized that this series was more like one story being told over the course of five books. I don’t really care for that, but I wasn’t going to quit reading the series because of it. A lot of series do that, so if I refused to read every series that does, I’d be left with even less potential reading material. It’s just a pet peeve of mine that I feel like each book in a series should be able to stand on its own as well as be part of the whole, and this series didn’t hold up to that standard. Then I ran into a snag. I was getting the audiobook versions of the books on loan from my library’s e-library service. I went through books 1-3 super fast. Then, when it came time to read book 4, I had to wait 127 days for it to be available. That really put a damper on things. Also, in the downtime, I started two other series. One of which is another completed series, but the other one only has the first book published. This is all on top of the fact that my memory already sucks. So, I may not get into specifics with this review. For that, I apologize. I will do my best though to give you a general overview with my spoiler-free review and hope it suffices. However, I will probably end up doing a review for each book in the Malloreon to try and avoid something similar to this from happening again. Now that I’m really getting into my review of The Belgariad, let me just say that had I read this when I was a kid - I would have absolutely loved it. I told my wife that after reading the first book. The problem with that is simply that these books are not children’s books. There are themes and scenes that are more adult oriented that let me know for certain that these are absolutely not children’s books, yet I felt like the quality of writing was what I would expect from a children’s book. That would not have stopped me from reading these books as a kid, but it would mean that as a kid I would not have been the intended audience. I felt this was an important distinction to make. As soon as I began reading this series, and lasting all the way through it, all I could think as a writer was that this is a perfect example of what we’re always being told NOT to do. Everything was a trope. Everything felt cliche. Everything was entirely predictable. It got annoying quick. That’s not to say that I didn’t enjoy the series though. I allowed myself to enjoy it, in spite of all that. Like I said, I realized that if I read this as a kid, before I had come to expect certain things from writing, I would have absolutely loved it. So, I tried to let myself love it now. The story is interesting and had me hooked, regardless of how “tropey” it was. The characters are diverse and relatable - some are even lovable. The setting spanned over a large continent that was interesting and different. The plot was pretty standard, good vs evil, light vs dark. Everything was preordained - except for how it would end because that could go one of two ways. There are plenty of subplots going on as well, but they’re all rather obvious as well. The group that was assembled was pretty typical with each character representing something similar to what you’d expect from a class in DnD. They are part of the party because “the prophecy” says they must be, and of course their purpose is revealed through key moments where only they could get the group out of their current situation. It’s all just SO cliche. But, it was a fun ride. Even though each book didn’t stand apart on its own very well, the series as a whole did wrap up the story nicely, all the while setting up the continuation of events that are sure to follow in The Malloreon. I think that if you’ve read a lot of stories/series similar to this one (meaning, very cliche and very tropey), then you may be too jaded to let yourself enjoy this one. I haven’t read a lot of them, so I was able to let myself enjoy this series despite all its faults. I just had to remember that tropes became tropes because they work. That’s why they’re so prevalent. We are just challenged as writers today to come up with new ways to use the tropes so that they seem fresh and interesting. At the time, I’m sure this was fresh and interesting. It just seems so overused and cliche now because so many other people copied him and authors like him. One of my other major complaints about this series was how I felt like it could have been done in fewer books. I think with more editing, a lot of useless stuff could have been cut, other things could have been moved around, and it could probably have been honed down into a trilogy. After doing a little research though, I found out that this was largely due to Eddings’ publishers. They were very clear and rigid in what they wanted Eddings to do because it was what they thought would sell the best. They wanted x amount of volumes, with roughly x amount of words, in about x amount of time. Another peeve of mine was the title of the last book in the series (because there are no enchanters in the books) but come to find out that was due to the publishers too. The title Eddings wanted to use was a lot better in my opinion, but they felt it was too many words to look good on the cover. I think that these things were errors on the publishers part, but the series seems to have been rather successful and has quite the fan following even still, so maybe they were right. The last thing I wish to point out is the lack of character progression. The supporting characters don’t change, and it could be argued that they don’t need to. They are who they are, and that’s who they needed to be due to the prophecy, so if they changed they would no longer be who the prophecy needed. Fine. My main issue is with the protagonist. Garion really doesn’t change through the whole series. Honestly, if he’s still the same in The Malloreon, I’m going to be really hard pressed to get through it. The kid is numb. You would think that after the shit he’s been through, he might have smartened up a bit. I would at least expect him to have a hardened exterior - at least a little bit! Something. I just wish there would have been something. I have a hard time believing that the events Garion has gone through wouldn’t have changed him more than they did. I guess that I will kind of understand if the real shift in his character comes out in The Malloreon, but I think we should have at least started to see it in these books. No matter how I try and defend it in my head to play devil’s advocate, I just can’t come up with anything good. I think this is a huge fault in the series. It doesn’t make it unreadable, but I just wish it was done better. All in all, I rate this series with 4 stars. I acknowledge that this series has its faults, but I still found it enjoyable to read on the whole, and I think you might too. If you’re too jaded by other stories similarly as tropey, you may not be able to let yourself enjoy this one, but I think you should try. Even though I got annoyed by certain things, and stayed annoyed by them throughout the series because they kept occurring, I wouldn’t say that these books were hard for me to get through. Quite the contrary: I flew through them. So I say give ‘em a read and let me know what you think. Cheers!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Adrienne

    The Belgariad by David Eddings is one of those epic sword-and-sorcery fantasies. It was a good story, with lots of interesting characters, a detailed world and a unique sorcery system. I quite enjoyed it. One thing I didn’t enjoy about it though, was that it was in many ways very very similar to Lord of the Rings. I realize that LOTR is a seminal fantasy work, and it’s hard to be completely unique and still have a similar storyline, but there were quite a few times that I thought - as I was read The Belgariad by David Eddings is one of those epic sword-and-sorcery fantasies. It was a good story, with lots of interesting characters, a detailed world and a unique sorcery system. I quite enjoyed it. One thing I didn’t enjoy about it though, was that it was in many ways very very similar to Lord of the Rings. I realize that LOTR is a seminal fantasy work, and it’s hard to be completely unique and still have a similar storyline, but there were quite a few times that I thought - as I was reading the book - “Oh, look, it’s just like LOTR.“ The gods created the world and man to entertain. Each god adopted a race of people, except for Aldur, who kept to himself and took on a few men to be his disciples. He taught them sorcery, and they lived for many years. Aldur also made the orb, a thing of great power, that he used to make things more beautiful. But Torak, Aldur’s brother, was jealous of the orb, and he stole it and used it for evil. A large contingent of men from many races made war on Torak and his race, and they were able to wrest the orb from Torak, which they took away and placed in the throne room in the palace of the Isle of Winds. The Rivan people of the Isle of Winds were tasked with keeping the orb safe from Torak. And Torak went to sleep, even though he was in great pain from the orb. And time passed. (See how this feels like Lord of the Rings?) Faldur’s Farm, in the midst of Sendaria is a normal farm. It is also the only home Garion has ever known. Garion’s Aunt Pol is the chief cook, but she may be more than she seems. When rumor reaches the farm that the orb has been stolen, Aunt Pol and Mister Wolf, the old storyteller, take Garion on a journey that changes his life. I don’t want to give anything away, because it was a good story. Garion is likeable and I really liked Aunt Pol. There are many other characters as well, a quest, several large duels, chases, escapes, true love, miracles…(yes, really) In fact, The Belgariad would make a fantastic movie. I hope they make one, but be sure and read the book before any such film comes out, because it’s a good one!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    I've been told by countless people that this book is horrible because it's predictable - but, isn't some predictability a good thing in a book? I'm sure not everyone will agree with me, but I don't like to be completely surprised by a book. Not all surprises are good, after all. Anyway, with that being said, I first read this book when I was 8 years old. I skipped the prologue, and went straight into reading the book with very low expectations...I am a creature of habit, and my mother had request I've been told by countless people that this book is horrible because it's predictable - but, isn't some predictability a good thing in a book? I'm sure not everyone will agree with me, but I don't like to be completely surprised by a book. Not all surprises are good, after all. Anyway, with that being said, I first read this book when I was 8 years old. I skipped the prologue, and went straight into reading the book with very low expectations...I am a creature of habit, and my mother had requested I read this book. I was originally unhappy about not being able to reread old favorites. I have read this book over 40 times since then, and I have never been disappointed. This is what I would classify as a "safe" read. This book is very safe. First of all, at 8 years old I found there to not be anything I didn't understand, even vocabulary (though I will admit I had a good vocabulary for an 8-year-old). There is no child-inappropriate content whatsoever. And yet, even as an adult I find that I still greatly enjoy this series. It's a book for the whole family, and it's a fun and creative world to get lost in. As mentioned above, I rather enjoy the predictability. I can read through the book knowing that I don't have to worry about being unsettled by a bad surprise, (view spoiler)[none of your favorite characters ever die, no one time travels or undoes anything that makes the whole book pointless, and best at all this feeling of being safe carries throughout the entire series! (hide spoiler)] If you enjoy reading about fictional worlds, prophecies don't bother you, and you're looking for a family oriented book that can spark a vivid imagination, you should at least consider giving this one a try. I can't promise that you'll like it - I don't pretend to know the minds of others - but I can at least say that I enjoyed it, and I hope you will too.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Edward

    The Belgariad is a series of five books that are the first of 12 that follow the same characters. Edding's most powerful feature is his characters. It is the intimate relationship that the reader cannot help but develop with his characters that will make reading these books seem like all too short of an experience. The characters that Eddings creates in the collection that includes the Belgariad, the Mallorean, Belgarath the Sorcerer and Polgara the Sorceress are what truly makes them my all tim The Belgariad is a series of five books that are the first of 12 that follow the same characters. Edding's most powerful feature is his characters. It is the intimate relationship that the reader cannot help but develop with his characters that will make reading these books seem like all too short of an experience. The characters that Eddings creates in the collection that includes the Belgariad, the Mallorean, Belgarath the Sorcerer and Polgara the Sorceress are what truly makes them my all time favorite fantasy novels. I gladly return to them over and over, with each time being a reuniting of old friends. My mother introduced me to these books and, like her, I have reread them many times and will continue to do so for the rest of my life.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Justin K. Rivers

    Warm and entertaining, with likable characters, Eddings' series is fun but light. It's classic quest-based high fantasy, but there's an odd current of racism involved, more than the usual "orcs are bad" sort of thing. In the world of the Belgariad, the various humans are divided into several different countries, each with their own overriding and somewhat arch characteristics. The bad guys are the dark-skinned Murgos, and they're basically all bad. Be on the lookout for Romans, Jews, Egyptians, Warm and entertaining, with likable characters, Eddings' series is fun but light. It's classic quest-based high fantasy, but there's an odd current of racism involved, more than the usual "orcs are bad" sort of thing. In the world of the Belgariad, the various humans are divided into several different countries, each with their own overriding and somewhat arch characteristics. The bad guys are the dark-skinned Murgos, and they're basically all bad. Be on the lookout for Romans, Jews, Egyptians, and Scandinavians to all make stereotype appearances. Despite these drawbacks, the books benefit from some decent world-building on the part of David Eddings, and from the complex and charismatic wizard Belgarath, who is really the glue that holds it all together.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    A young adult series that stands the test of re-reading as an adult. I suspect that I first read the series in the early 90s, it wasn't new at the time, and I was in my early twenties. It still grabbed me, and I find that it has an enduring appeal, from the naivete of the main character to the oddly subdued but supremely powerful elder figures, with a quick plot, nice dialogue, and well structured action sequences. In talking to random people over the years, I have been periodically surprised by A young adult series that stands the test of re-reading as an adult. I suspect that I first read the series in the early 90s, it wasn't new at the time, and I was in my early twenties. It still grabbed me, and I find that it has an enduring appeal, from the naivete of the main character to the oddly subdued but supremely powerful elder figures, with a quick plot, nice dialogue, and well structured action sequences. In talking to random people over the years, I have been periodically surprised by who is a fan of David Eddings, which only makes me think more of his work, to attract hard core fantasy geeks like myself, as well (in particular) a moderately humorless human resources manager that I spent a memorable hour or two discussing the series with. Always recommended.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ivan

    If I read this book in my pre-teen or early teen years I would loved it to death.I would probably tell people to forget Lord of the rings and read Eddings, but as adult I found it charming but not really great. Interactions between where characters where always fun and I had grin on my face most of the time while reading this book but I can't give it higher score because there simple are lot better heroic fantasy and young adult books.Still one of the best books if you are trying to push child in If I read this book in my pre-teen or early teen years I would loved it to death.I would probably tell people to forget Lord of the rings and read Eddings, but as adult I found it charming but not really great. Interactions between where characters where always fun and I had grin on my face most of the time while reading this book but I can't give it higher score because there simple are lot better heroic fantasy and young adult books.Still one of the best books if you are trying to push child into fantasy genre.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Frank

    David Eddings' finest work. Tough to break the books down individually...so I'm cheating and writing about the 5 book series as a whole. All the characters are fresh...wizards, princesses, mystic swords...This series just rocks.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Carriesanguine

    I'm currently reading this too. One of my favorite series from my teenage years.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Katie .

    Do you know how hard these are to get at the library?! They're never in!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Doug

    Best fantasy books on the planet. My kids will read these over and over!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Leon

    I recall enjoying this in high school.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    My favorite series by far - I'm just about ready to re-read it!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alba M. Sanchez

    Fantasy is pure awesomeness.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Callie

    I really liked these books when I was younger, but I seem to have grown out of them. The story is amusing, but nothing spectacular.

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