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The Resurrectionists PDF, ePub eBook Having won his emancipation after fighting on the side of the colonies during the American Revolution, Salem Hawley is a free man. Only a handful of years after the end of British rule, Hawley finds himself drawn into a new war unlike anything he has ever seen. New York City is on the cusp of a new revolution as the science of medicine advances, but procuring bodies for stu Having won his emancipation after fighting on the side of the colonies during the American Revolution, Salem Hawley is a free man. Only a handful of years after the end of British rule, Hawley finds himself drawn into a new war unlike anything he has ever seen.

 New York City is on the cusp of a new revolution as the science of medicine advances, but procuring bodies for study is still illegal. Bands of resurrectionists are stealing corpses from New York cemeteries, and women of the night are disappearing from the streets, only to meet grisly ends elsewhere. After a friend’s family is robbed from their graves, Hawley is compelled to fight back against the wave of exhumations plaguing the Black cemetery. Little does he know, the theft of bodies is key to far darker arts being performed by the resurrectionists. If successful, the work of these occultists could spell the end of the fledgling American Experiment… and the world itself.

 The Resurrectionists, the first book in the Salem Hawley series, is a novella of historical cosmic horror from the author of Broken Shells and Mass Hysteria.


30 review for The Resurrectionists

  1. 4 out of 5

    Char

    Short and fast paced, THE RESURRECTIONISISTS delivers! Salem Hawley is a free black man ever since helping the Colonies fight against the British. Now he is helping Americans battle against creatures of the cosmos. Doctors are trading in flesh, not only to further their science but to triumph in their nefarious efforts to bring forth these aforementioned creatures. Do any of Salem's actions make his make life as a black man at that time any easier? No, no they do not. Will he be able Short and fast paced, THE RESURRECTIONISISTS delivers! Salem Hawley is a free black man ever since helping the Colonies fight against the British. Now he is helping Americans battle against creatures of the cosmos. Doctors are trading in flesh, not only to further their science but to triumph in their nefarious efforts to bring forth these aforementioned creatures. Do any of Salem's actions make his make life as a black man at that time any easier? No, no they do not. Will he be able to help his fellow citizens fight an enemy most have never seen? If he does, will he survive the fight? You'll have to read this to find out! There's a lot going on here for such a short novel. Clashing personalities, clashing cultures, a city in fear, cosmic frights and real life ones as well. Somehow, the personality of Hawley stands out as a shining example of good and hope, while most of the doctors come off as exactly the opposite. It amazed me how well these characters were drawn, considering how much page time they each were given. I definitely recommend this book. I had previously sworn off books that are part of an unfinished series, however, I couldn't help but give in to this one-just look at the cover and you'll know why. Recommended! (I can't wait for the next book!) *Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for the e-ARC of this book in exchange for my honest feedback. This is it.*

  2. 4 out of 5

    Hunter Shea

    This book was lovingly cooked up by Hicks with everything I love from the horror spice rack - a deliciously evil blend of Lovecraft, Martyrs, Frankenstein and Grand-Guignol madness. The concept is bonkers and the gore is unrelenting and off the wall. A hell of a way to kick off what will be a killer series.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bark

    The Resurrectionists has tentacles and that’s all you need to know! But I’ll tell you a little more. Set in 1788 and featuring a world where racial tensions run high, Salem Hawley is an emancipated black man doing his best to fight for what is right. He is decent and dedicated and it’s these traits that lead him down a dark and disturbing path and straight to a deviant group of Resurrectionists who are up to unimaginable things. They rob graves, they mutilate the bodies and, like the idiots they are, they read fr The Resurrectionists has tentacles and that’s all you need to know! But I’ll tell you a little more. Set in 1788 and featuring a world where racial tensions run high, Salem Hawley is an emancipated black man doing his best to fight for what is right. He is decent and dedicated and it’s these traits that lead him down a dark and disturbing path and straight to a deviant group of Resurrectionists who are up to unimaginable things. They rob graves, they mutilate the bodies and, like the idiots they are, they read from an old tome in an attempt to please the elder gods. Of course dead bodies simply aren’t enough you dummies! “Suffering is always the key.” That’s all I should say about that because I do not want to spoil this experience for you. This book is very well written and filled with some Barker-worthy disturbing imagery, a well-crafted protagonist and a few perfectly written evil, dumb-ass men who want to achieve power at any cost. I’d like to think those types are purely fictional but I have my doubts every time I turn on the news. Thankfully there are decent men like Salem Hawley to balance it all out. The pace is fast and the creatures are nasty and they will make you squirm. There be monsters! There be gore! There be brutality! There be come-uppance! It’s all terrible and I mean terrible in the best horror-filled way. I absolutely cannot wait to read the next installment of Salem Hawley’s adventures in monster hunting! I also love the fact that in the author notes Hicks mentions that he was inspired to write this series after reading Mary Roach’s book Stiff which featured all sorts of fascinating death facts and makes mention of real life Resurrectionists. If you haven’t read Stiff and have a morbid curiosity about this sort of thing you should put it on your read soon list along with this book, of course. 4 ½ Stars

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Gaarder

    Visit me at jenchaosreviews.com Goodreads Rating: 4.21/ My Rating: 4.00. Review: From the Amazon Breakthrough Award Finalist comes a new series. The Resurrectionists is the first in the Salem Hawley series combining mystery and horror in a time of struggle and race and gender inequality. A freed man of color finds that a friend’s wife and child’s graves are savaged by unruly physic or students of medicine and decides to take action. With the friend at his si Visit me at jenchaosreviews.com Goodreads Rating: 4.21/ My Rating: 4.00. Review: From the Amazon Breakthrough Award Finalist comes a new series. The Resurrectionists is the first in the Salem Hawley series combining mystery and horror in a time of struggle and race and gender inequality. A freed man of color finds that a friend’s wife and child’s graves are savaged by unruly physic or students of medicine and decides to take action. With the friend at his side, things take a turn for the worst. Tragedy strikes, and a man dies only to have his body taken as well. Angry, he sets forth to exact a plan to set balance to he world of justice for the people of color against the white people. This results, ultimately in riots. Meanwhile, a group of demented doctors have discovered in their travels, human suffering and death can open the doors to otherworldly beings called ”thinnies.” Kidnapping live people and grave robbing are not going to be the end all be all for them. Furthermore, they discover they need something more significant, better than they’ve done before. Salem Hawley is a hero in that he does not expect to face things of unnatural origin. Indeed he has faced the evils of men, but not the otherworldly creatures of the other dimension. The villains of the story are typical creeps that make the reader gasp in horror as they read about the atrocities that they will commit to the ordinary person. Terrible monsters tear through the fabric of reality, blood is shed, sacrifices are made, and a book is stolen. A devilish man strikes a monstrous deal with an innocent man, what is going to be the very conclusion to this whole thing? A series that starts with grave robbing and ends with bloodshed, the characters are fully realized and not dropped off into a felled reality. This is a book that harkens to the former days of horror and gore — the monster tales of old. Writing: Clear and weighty prose combined with thrilling crescendoes make this story very enjoyable and one that is worth hanging on to. This is from a well-practiced writer that knows the craft and is not afraid of pushing boundaries. Plot: A searing heat comes from the pages of the story as I read the story about men doing evil things form the glory of evil. The plot never wavered, never missed a beat. Characters came together well and put things in perspective as accurate as they would be at the period described in the book. What I Liked: The climax into a world of unknown horror that opened at the heart of the story and the suffering along with it, though did not amuse me, made me see just how awful people can be. I was able to see that people, even as far back as that, men and women want power, want evil to overcome humanity. It’s terrifying to behold. What I Didn’t Like: The monster attack lasted a long time. I thought that it could have been more condensed. I would have liked if there had been more dialogue also. This helps give the scenes more purpose. Overall Impression: The Resurrectionists ( Salem Hawley #1) By Michael Patrick Hicks is a spooky tale of grave robbery, evil, creatures of unknown origin tearing through the fabric of reality, and awful atrocities of man against man. This is a good story and well written one at that. With spine-tingling terror and historical references, this book will keep you at the edge of your seat. I rated this a 4.00.

  5. 4 out of 5

    destiny ♡⚔♡ [howling libraries]

    I'd been meaning to pick up some of Michael Patrick Hicks' work for quite some time after hearing friends rave about it, so I'm really pleased to have finally gotten the chance to do so with The Resurrectionists! I'm a big fan of subversive Lovecraftian horror, so I jumped at the chance to read this little novella featuring a recently freed slave as its hero, and I won't hesitate to tell you that Salem is so damn easy to root for. He's a genuinely likeable character and I definitely found myself on the edge of m I'd been meaning to pick up some of Michael Patrick Hicks' work for quite some time after hearing friends rave about it, so I'm really pleased to have finally gotten the chance to do so with The Resurrectionists! I'm a big fan of subversive Lovecraftian horror, so I jumped at the chance to read this little novella featuring a recently freed slave as its hero, and I won't hesitate to tell you that Salem is so damn easy to root for. He's a genuinely likeable character and I definitely found myself on the edge of my seat more than once, worried for his safety. The stakes are very high in The Resurrectionists, as our biggest threat isn't even the terrifying monsters seeping into our world so much as it is the ways that humans will destroy one another without a moment's remorse, whether their fuel be hate, racism, or simple cruel curiosity. Besides Salem and a few very minor side characters, don't go into this one expecting to find too many characters to love! Hicks' writing is lovely and quick to the chase, and there's a lot of oddity and depravity here that's really fantastically well-done, though sensitive stomachs might want to steel themselves before heading into the scenes in the surgical rooms as there's a lot of gore (which I enjoyed to no end). The only real complaint that I had, and the reason I couldn't quite mark this one higher than 4 stars, is that sometimes it felt like I was reading two separate storylines in the same novella, rather than two sides of the same story. That could totally just be me and the weird funk I've been in with my reads lately, but even the ending of this novella had me feeling like the plot had been buried a bit. While it wasn't a perfect read, I still had fun with it and would be interested in checking out more of Hicks' work in the future. Thank you so much to High Fever Books for providing me with this ARC in exchange for an honest review!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mindi

    I love cosmic horror and historical novels, and Hicks combines both to make the first book in the SALEM HAWLEY SERIES a novella that I could barely put down. I'm ready for book two now! I've always had a morbid interest in grave robbers or resurrectionists, and the stories about the real life duo of Burke and Hare have always been fascinating to me. Hicks uses men like the famous duo to procure bodies, but he also makes the anatomists in this tale exceptionally villainous. THE RESURRE I love cosmic horror and historical novels, and Hicks combines both to make the first book in the SALEM HAWLEY SERIES a novella that I could barely put down. I'm ready for book two now! I've always had a morbid interest in grave robbers or resurrectionists, and the stories about the real life duo of Burke and Hare have always been fascinating to me. Hicks uses men like the famous duo to procure bodies, but he also makes the anatomists in this tale exceptionally villainous. THE RESURRECTIONISTS takes place a few years after the American Revolution, and the protagonist Salem Hawley has won his status as a free man after fighting for the colonies. It's easy to like Hawley's character and to root for him as New York cemeteries for people of color are being overrun with grave robbers. Hawley cannot allow his friends and neighbors to endure the pain and torment of finding their loved ones stolen from their graves, and he decides to do whatever it takes to make the city aware of the crimes. Hicks uses a fictional grimoire based on the Necronomicon to ramp up the cosmic action. He actually based the main part of this novel on the New York Doctor's Riot of 1788. Somehow this part of history had completely escaped my knowledge, and I owe Hicks a debt of gratitude for mentioning it in the Acknowledgements. I now have a new factual rabbit hole to explore online. If you enjoy cosmic horror and historical novels you definitely need to pick this one up. I cannot wait to see where Hicks takes this series.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sadie Hartmann Mother Horror

    Wow! I'm going to give a full, detailed review for SCREAM Magazine but just so readers know where I stand on this one, Michael Patrick Hicks has imagined something *very* compelling. I read much of this book with a heavy heart and a healthy aversion to all the hate speech, violence (borderline torture porn) but there is so much to enjoy about this too. My hope is for Salem Hawley to get a lot more "scene time" and development because I like him! *clapping* More to come in SCREAM, Wow! I'm going to give a full, detailed review for SCREAM Magazine but just so readers know where I stand on this one, Michael Patrick Hicks has imagined something *very* compelling. I read much of this book with a heavy heart and a healthy aversion to all the hate speech, violence (borderline torture porn) but there is so much to enjoy about this too. My hope is for Salem Hawley to get a lot more "scene time" and development because I like him! *clapping* More to come in SCREAM, please watch for the review this summer. Recommended to fans of: Historical Horror Fiction, Cosmic/Lovecraftian Horror, Strong POC Protagonists, God-Awful, Evil Protagonists You Love to Hate and MORE!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Hepler

    With The Ressurectionists, Michael Patrick Hicks is firing on all cylinders and has laid the foundation for an electrifying cosmic horror series. Delivered in his signature smooth and captivating writing style, the addictive novella is as terrifying and action-packed as a slasher flick, but also saturated with literary merit at its core, exploring social issues like racism, classism, and the ramifications of medical experimentation. It was such a fun, provocative read. I can't wait to see what d With The Ressurectionists, Michael Patrick Hicks is firing on all cylinders and has laid the foundation for an electrifying cosmic horror series. Delivered in his signature smooth and captivating writing style, the addictive novella is as terrifying and action-packed as a slasher flick, but also saturated with literary merit at its core, exploring social issues like racism, classism, and the ramifications of medical experimentation. It was such a fun, provocative read. I can't wait to see what direction he steers the plot in the second book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    A very well written and dark Lovecraftian tale from Mr. Hicks. The plague doctors are looking to rip open the “thinnies” and bring forth the creatures that lurk behind the curtain. They just might do it, too. Another super solid effort from MPH and highly recommended. I received a complimentary copy of this title from Netgalley and have voluntary left this honest review.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Meenaz Lodhi

    The story of Salem Hawley and his quest of searching the disappearance of bodies from the cemetery.. takes him to unknown occult scenarios in this horror historical fiction. A perfect prequel novella! Unnerving! ... It truly is the perfect blend of gore, horror and action. An adrenaline-fueled, no punches pulled, onslaught of gruesome action! The very definition of a page turner.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tim Meyer

    A perfect blend of historical and cosmic horror. Hicks has definitely created something special here, simultaneously authentic and otherworldly. Great characterization, vivid descriptions, and a cast of villains that will make your skin crawl. The first Salem Hawley book could be the start of something big.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Toni | Dark Reads

    The Resurrectionists, the first book in the Salem Hawley series, is a novella of historical cosmic horror. Thanks to NetGalley, Michael Patrick Hicks and High Fever Books who provided an ARC of this book, in exchange for an honest review 'Full throttle gore, wonderfully written and not for the fainthearted!' Read the full review @ Dark Reads http://darkreads.blog/2019/06/04/the-...

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sjgomzi

    First of a new series. This cosmic horror/historical novel mashup delivers in every way. A great protagonist, scary villains. A frightening and oh so disturbing premise-this book entertained the hell out of me. Michael Patrick Hicks is one of my favorite writers, and if you enjoy this, I highly recommend checking out his other books as soon as possible. Trust me. You won’t be sorry!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    "The secrets to so many of life's mysteries could only be divined in the study of death." First, look at this damn cover. It's creepy and gorgeous, and I kind of want a poster of it. This definitely drew me in to The Resurrectionists. Although this book has such an interesting synopsis, I struggled to connect with the story. It's a short book with a lot of violence packed in, and eventually it started to feel gratuitous. At times, it felt misogynistic to me because the torture of some "The secrets to so many of life's mysteries could only be divined in the study of death." First, look at this damn cover. It's creepy and gorgeous, and I kind of want a poster of it. This definitely drew me in to The Resurrectionists. Although this book has such an interesting synopsis, I struggled to connect with the story. It's a short book with a lot of violence packed in, and eventually it started to feel gratuitous. At times, it felt misogynistic to me because the torture of some female characters was so dragged out and detailed, and I didn't feel the same way about the men who were being hurt. I know this is because the characters are major dicks, but it still bothered me. Sometimes I don't think about it that much, but I don't think I was in the mood for it at all when I read this. Based on the synopsis, I was expecting this book to be a little deeper. I thought we would get to know Salem more, but The Resurrectionists never really took that deep dive. As I mentioned earlier, I felt like the story was gratuitous at times, and I ended up feeling like the book was missing that bit of heart that led me to connect with the characters. Even though I had a difficult time with The Resurrectionists, it is not a bad book. I liked the creepiness of the book. Michael Patrick Hicks writes so well, and always has a creative story to tell. I think I just wasn't the right reader for this one.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    In this first novella in a planned series, Hicks weaves a brutally fast paced and wholly terrifying historical story set in the Colonial American city of New York. Bodies have been stolen from the freed black cemetery, as well as those less fortunate, being abducted and killed for nefarious purposes. A cabal of insidious doctors begin a ritual using an infamous ancient text to summon otherworldly powers...and bring forth destruction to mankind. Salem Hawley, an educated freed ex-slave aims to fi In this first novella in a planned series, Hicks weaves a brutally fast paced and wholly terrifying historical story set in the Colonial American city of New York. Bodies have been stolen from the freed black cemetery, as well as those less fortunate, being abducted and killed for nefarious purposes. A cabal of insidious doctors begin a ritual using an infamous ancient text to summon otherworldly powers...and bring forth destruction to mankind. Salem Hawley, an educated freed ex-slave aims to find out who's behind the body thievery and soon gets caught up in unimaginable nightmare. Look forward to the next installment and highly recommended for fans of cosmic horror!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    I would like to shake Michael Patrick Hicks's hand and buy him a drink. After reading The Ballad of Black Tom and leaving that novella severely disappointed, I wondered if any writers would be able to tackle Cosmic Horror and issues like racism with a more deft touch. And then I read the Resurrectionists, closed the book and said "WHERE THE FUCK WERE YOU ALL MY LIFE?!" The Resurrectionists as you can see, is the first in the Salem Hawley series, named after the titular character who I reckon looks like this: I would like to shake Michael Patrick Hicks's hand and buy him a drink. After reading The Ballad of Black Tom and leaving that novella severely disappointed, I wondered if any writers would be able to tackle Cosmic Horror and issues like racism with a more deft touch. And then I read the Resurrectionists, closed the book and said "WHERE THE FUCK WERE YOU ALL MY LIFE?!" The Resurrectionists as you can see, is the first in the Salem Hawley series, named after the titular character who I reckon looks like this: That's right. My image of Salem is Donald Glover. Fight me bitches! The story is actually split between viewpoints with both centred around the main story. Jonathon Hereford is a doctor working for a university in Manhattan. Him and his other dickhead academics are procuring cadavers for "medical study" through the employment of graverobbers, particularly the bodies of African Americans. Yeah this was an actual thing that happened in the States. Cunts. The thing is, Hereford and his fellow medical cronies are a pack of Eldritch Cultists who are looking to summon Cosmic Horror nasties from the other side of the reality. Just so happens they need bodies, particularly, live ones. Meanwhile Salem Hawley is a recently freed black man living in Manhattan, making a living as a tutor for young children. He lives in a shared housing building and spends his days writing angry letters to the local newspaper, protesting the graverobbing. One night he bites off more than he can chew when his friend Jeremiah is killed during an attempt to stop the graverobbing (they'd stolen Jeremiah's wife and daughter) and Jeremiah is killed. What follows is a snowball plot of bad shit involving riots in the streets, eldritch summonings, lots of blood and gore and the promise of a bigger story to come. The writing from Hicks is crisp, fluid and beautiful to read with a good dose of colourful language, solid clear sentences and simple but realistic dialogue. The setting and scenery is decently described enough to give me a sense of atmosphere and understanding of the world. There was never a moment where I was taken out of the experience by characters talking a load of bollocks or using phrases that seemed out of place. There's a hint of florid prose in the vein of Lovecraft in here, but Hicks never allows that to overtake his own style. The horror is slow building at first, but builds to a satisfying climax that will make any gorehound reach for the box of tissues. The characters themselves are a decent grab-bag of different personalities, goals, desires and morals. Dr. Hereford is a decently slimy, nasty piece of work whose given enough space in the story to truly show the depths of his depravity. Hicks actually made me hate him, so much that I wanted to see him suffer. Bayley came across a typical power-mad cultist with little regard for those around him, masquerading as a kindly doctor, but there was enough there for me to stay engaged with him as a character. But the true star of the series is the titular Salem Hawley. One of my biggest problems when reading The Ballad of Black Tom was that I felt no real connection to Tommy Tester. So much of Tester felt manufactured and stale and the moments where I was meant to empathize with him suffered from stiff shallow writing and hamfisted commentary. Salem Hawley meanwhile.... Hawley is atypical of Lovecraftian protagonists, not least of which because he's African American. While he's educated and well-read like others of his ilk, he's also not some milquetoast little pussy either. His history as a former soldier in the Civil War means that he's combat-ready, strategic, steadfast in the face of the horrors of the book and caring of the Black Community of Manhattan. Hicks takes the time early on to show us, not tell us, how good a man Hawley is. His opening scene is teaching a young boy to read. He offers emotional support to Jeremiah. And later on, when there is a moment for Hawley to become as bad as the villains, he refuses to cross that line. Hicks actually made me care for Hawley before the bad things send the shit-rocket skywards. The plot itself isn't anything that lights my pubes of fire, but its the setting and how Hicks frames it and how he writes it, that makes The Resurrectionists distinct from other Cosmic Horror stories. It's your standard "Cultists summon nasties from outside reality" style plot with some echoes of Lovecraft's "From Beyond" mixed in for good measure. Humans are such easy prey.... But the setting is what makes this unique. The setting is post Civil War Manhattan, at a time just after slaves have been emancipated but not given equal rights. So as a result, a lot of truly vile racism still exists and is part of the reason why the cultists are able to get away with graverobbing. Unlike Tommy Tester, who was just some rando picked off the street and had no real connection to the plot until it called for it, Salem Hawley is a former slave, whip scars and all, and his history and current predicament play into the plot. But its also HOW Hicks chooses to write about these matters/themes that makes the book engaging. In my review, I gave The Ballad of Black Tom a lot of flak for trying to be too hard to cram the racism angle into the story, especially in moments where it felt extremely hamfisted and stuck out like a donkey at a bukkake party. Hicks opts for a more subtle strategy of having the racism of post Civil War America be a recurring undercurrent, not by telling us, but by showing us. Both Hereford and Bayley are given some focus in the novella so as to get inside their heads and show us how little they think of African American people. John Hicks (a character in the story, not the author) is a vile little shit and the leader of the graverobbers and his actions truly demonstrate the behaviour of someone committed to such atrocities. Hawley's letters to the local newspaper at met in kind and show the kind of bullshit spin-doctoring people would say to accusations of racism. And when there comes that moment when Hawley does go off on an internal rage against the White Man, it feels earned because it happens in a true moment of despair and rage. And to Hawley's credit, he never descends to that level of levelling vitriol at everyone. When given a moment to strike back at white people, he falters because regardless of his own rage and resentment, he can never do what other cunts would to his people. He's a human being first. The Resurrectionists is a brilliant start to the Salem Hawley series and something I've been looking for in Cosmic Horror for a while; taking the same old tired shtick and twisting it in a new/creative way. The themes explored don't feel hamfisted or take precedent over the story, the characters are engaging and interesting, the plot is okay but well-written enough I could forgive its overall simplicity and the ending was decent while leaving the door open for a larger world. Gonna be keeping an eye on this one. All one thousand of them.... Onward my pet Shoggoth! Bring me Hicks's brain!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tracy Robinson

    Review to come for Sci Fi and Scary in June Here it is! “Few things in life, he had discovered, were as satisfying as holding a human heart in one’s own hand….” This is the second book I have read by Michael Patrick Hicks. Last year, his novella Broken Shells was one of my top books of 2018. I went into this with an expectation of lush, yet exacting detail, and a unique storyline. If you’ve ever read one of his pieces, whether a book or a book review, you know th Review to come for Sci Fi and Scary in June Here it is! “Few things in life, he had discovered, were as satisfying as holding a human heart in one’s own hand….” This is the second book I have read by Michael Patrick Hicks. Last year, his novella Broken Shells was one of my top books of 2018. I went into this with an expectation of lush, yet exacting detail, and a unique storyline. If you’ve ever read one of his pieces, whether a book or a book review, you know that this guy can WRITE. I was not disappointed. Coupled with this author’s aptitude as a wordsmith is a fastidious attention to detail in regards to the historical time period covered in this novella. I hadn’t previously read about the the Doctor’s Riot of 1788, and when I completed The Resurrectionists, I immediately did some very minor research of my own. I was pleasantly surprised that Hicks’ depiction of the the events leading up to and at the heart of the riot felt reliable and engaging. Historical fiction, particularly historical horror, can be a hit or miss for me and this checked all the boxes. My only criticism of this novella is that I feel like it needed MORE. More background and information regarding Salem Hawley, the Resurrectionists, and a few other characters. I do realize that this is an intended series and I am only on book 1. I really think that this story might work better as a lengthier novel. I’ve seen other readers state the exact opposite (which is completely fine), but I was left with the feeling that I had only seen the surface of things. This, then, caused me to be a little less invested in some of the BEST action scenes. Regardless of the above, I am most definitely looking forward to the completion of this series. Hicks’ propensity to nail the reader with some of the most startling and gruesome scenes in horror fiction is one of my favorite parts about his work. More importantly it is pertinent to the plot and isn’t gratuitous. There is a reason, a call of sorts, for these scenes to exist. I put the book down a few times in the most extreme scenes and flipped those pages at a dash in others. My horror heart was happy. Truly excited to see where this series leads me. Thanks to the author for sending me this book for review consideration

  18. 4 out of 5

    Martin

    Now that was a dark and gruesome read. So begins this compelling series by the great Michael Patrick Hicks who has given us the bloody BROKEN SHELLS last year. Set after the American Revolution, this cosmic horror tale finds a freed black man on a quest to make wrong things right for a friend in need. What follows is quite delicious in the sense that the reader has no way of knowing exactly where this is all going. Sharp writing, in-your-face violence, this Lovecraftian-style novella will make y Now that was a dark and gruesome read. So begins this compelling series by the great Michael Patrick Hicks who has given us the bloody BROKEN SHELLS last year. Set after the American Revolution, this cosmic horror tale finds a freed black man on a quest to make wrong things right for a friend in need. What follows is quite delicious in the sense that the reader has no way of knowing exactly where this is all going. Sharp writing, in-your-face violence, this Lovecraftian-style novella will make you turn the pages very quickly and make you hope the second installment materializes really soon. ARC given by the publishers and NetGalley.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Red Lace Reviews

    Salem Hawley may be a free man after the American Revolution, but his troubles are plenty. A good friend seeks his help, turning Salem's attention to the graves being emptied and the deceased experimented upon and studied by medical students and physicians. It goes ignored, yet Salem is determined to do something, anything. If only he knew about the rituals being performed, the Old Ones being worshiped, right under his nose. If only he knew that New York City is on the cusp of ruin. ( Salem Hawley may be a free man after the American Revolution, but his troubles are plenty. A good friend seeks his help, turning Salem's attention to the graves being emptied and the deceased experimented upon and studied by medical students and physicians. It goes ignored, yet Salem is determined to do something, anything. If only he knew about the rituals being performed, the Old Ones being worshiped, right under his nose. If only he knew that New York City is on the cusp of ruin. (WARNING: This review contains minor spoilers.) I received this book in exchange for an honest review. I thank High Fever Books for giving me the opportunity. I'm going to get right to the point: I had a BLAST (the capitals should further reiterate my point) reading this book. I feel like my reading pace, as of recent days, has been akin to trudging through knee-high mud. It's been painfully slow, frustrating, and I was in danger of expiring before making real progress. Then I happened upon this jewel of a novella; I was reminded that reading doesn't have to be a much-dreaded chore. I was so completely immersed from the start - it didn't hesitate to plunge right into the nauseating particulars of body snatching and desecration of the dead. Scenes were graphic and often extreme, in the sense that it married sexual arousal and violence. It wasn't pretty, but it was seriously addictive. The fact that a lot of attention fell upon the villains and their own ambitions also interested me on a deeper level. They were despicable, yes, but no matter how terrible their work, my curiosity wanted them to succeed. That's the thing about this sub-genre: I so desperately want the monsters to cause havoc. All hail the tentacles! Salem Hawley was the likeable sort, and I feel I was properly introduced to his character despite the short length. His experiences honed in on the persecution the black community had to endure - unlicensed exhumations going ignored by society - and so I felt invested in his struggles to make change. To be frank, the ill-treatment was heartbreaking, packing that extra punch due to the realness it represented. I applaud the level of emotion that was found in the writing and conveyed through Salem's own anger. In that way, he was a genuine person, and I can't wait to read more of him; to see his development and how he overcomes the bane of the knowledge he acquired. The portrayal of the 1788 Doctors' Riot of New York City was tremendously compelling with its blending of historic events and aspects of a more cosmic nature. In all honesty, I can take or leave historical fiction. It's not something I actively seek out, but if I find myself reading it, I can appreciate the author igniting an interest that motivates me to research the topic. Did you know that Richard Bayley and John Hicks were real people? Obviously their depiction here is not accurate, but one hell of a spin was put into their story. I think I like this version better. In conclusion: I'm so thrilled that The Resurrectionists is the beginning of a series, as I got the distinct impression Salem's journey was far from over. This novella captivated me from the get-go, introducing me to an array of characters that were fascinating in their own right. The last chapters held a special kind of mayhem, and I was in my element throughout. Notable Quote: "This war for independence," Bayley began, "and the sins that have built this foundling nation have a toll. Always, there is a toll. So, so much blood was loosed upon the earth. Between your wars and your slavers' whips, this infantile nation breeds blood and begets violence. It was ignorant to think such a thing could go unnoticed. We laid out a buffet, and Old Ones ate and ate, and we left them starved for more. They are here, and they are demanding." © Red Lace 2019 Wordpress ~ Twitter

  20. 5 out of 5

    Audra (ouija.doodle.reads)

    A novella with a historical backdrop and a swirl of cosmic horror is just too interesting to pass up! This quick read is the first in a series that will follow Salem Hawley, a free black man living just after the American Revolution. What I loved about this narrative is how it was interested in telling a broader story about racism during this time period, how it mixed in those real-life tensions and injustices with a compelling, dark supernatural story. Basing some of the events in th A novella with a historical backdrop and a swirl of cosmic horror is just too interesting to pass up! This quick read is the first in a series that will follow Salem Hawley, a free black man living just after the American Revolution. What I loved about this narrative is how it was interested in telling a broader story about racism during this time period, how it mixed in those real-life tensions and injustices with a compelling, dark supernatural story. Basing some of the events in the book on real historical happenings (body snatching and Burke and Hare–style murdering to teach students about anatomy and the Doctor’s Riot of 1788) gives this little book a meaty backdrop and makes the supernatural elements feel very vivid. The ending action felt abrupt and rushed to me, not at all carrying the weight, tension, and excellent pacing of the rest of the story. As there is more to come from this story—which is clearly set up at the end of this novella—perhaps a more satisfying conclusion will come with the rest of the books in the series. My thanks to the author for sending the Night Worms this one to read and review.

  21. 4 out of 5

    The Behrg

    The Resurrectionists is an ambitious project, but then again a historical cosmic horror novel has no chance existing without that ambition. Fortunately, Michael Patrick Hicks has the chops and delivers a story that is as frightening as it is unique. There's a lot to discover and hone in on in this novella, from the rampant racism of the time period to the deviant plans of the "plague doctors" to our lead character, Salem Hawley, who commands your attention with every scene. Then there's the viol The Resurrectionists is an ambitious project, but then again a historical cosmic horror novel has no chance existing without that ambition. Fortunately, Michael Patrick Hicks has the chops and delivers a story that is as frightening as it is unique. There's a lot to discover and hone in on in this novella, from the rampant racism of the time period to the deviant plans of the "plague doctors" to our lead character, Salem Hawley, who commands your attention with every scene. Then there's the violence, and for horror fans, this will have you grinning from ear to ear. There are no heroes in this story, but rather flawed and broken characters, and even our protagonist walks past lines many authors wouldn't cross. I did feel I could have used a little more depth to some of the "villains" as the motivation for their plans didn't pull me all the way across the aisle onto their side, but other than that this is a spectacular start to what will surely be a successful and dreadful series. (The best kind). Hicks consistently challenges himself rather than writing the same novel over and over, and it's been great to watch his growth from extreme horror to dystopian political fiction to sci-fi horror and now this. Incredibly researched while balancing story, characters, and the darker elements you might expect with Hicks' writing, this is a book you don't want to miss.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Joanna Smith

    Wow, disturbing stuff! Hicks bases his story on the New York Doctors’ Riot of 1788 and even included some characters from the actual event with some unpleasant embellishments. This horror novella is extremely graphic so be aware of that if you want to read it. It was ok but I didn’t love it as it’s not really my thing.

  23. 5 out of 5

    FanFiAddict

    Rating: ★★★★ Synopsis Having won his emancipation after fighting on the side of the colonies during the American Revolution, Salem Hawley is a free man. Only a handful of years after the end of British rule, Hawley finds himself drawn into a new war unlike anything he has ever seen. New York City is on the cusp of a new revolution as the science of medicine advances, but procuring bodies for study is still illegal. Bands of resurrectionists are stealing corpses f Rating: ★★★★ Synopsis Having won his emancipation after fighting on the side of the colonies during the American Revolution, Salem Hawley is a free man. Only a handful of years after the end of British rule, Hawley finds himself drawn into a new war unlike anything he has ever seen. New York City is on the cusp of a new revolution as the science of medicine advances, but procuring bodies for study is still illegal. Bands of resurrectionists are stealing corpses from New York cemeteries, and women of the night are disappearing from the streets, only to meet grisly ends elsewhere. After a friend’s family is robbed from their graves, Hawley is compelled to fight back against the wave of exhumations plaguing the Black cemetery. Little does he know, the theft of bodies is key to far darker arts being performed by the resurrectionists. If successful, the work of these occultists could spell the end of the fledgling American Experiment… and the world itself. The Resurrectionists, the first book in the Salem Hawley series, is a novella of historical cosmic horror from the author of Broken Shells and Mass Hysteria Review Thanks to the author for an advanced reading copy of The Resurrectionists (The Salem Hawley Series, Book 1) in exchange for an honest review. Receiving this eARC did not influence my thoughts or opinions on the novella. THAT KEALAN PATRICK BURKE COVER, THOUGH Not since Victor LaValle’s The Ballad of Black Tom have I been so intrigued by a Lovecraftian inspired novella, though the shock and awe presented in Hick’s work is truly captivating. The character of Salem Hawley is one you can truly stand behind as he fights for the betterment of his fellow Black Man, though to say he simply falls into a greater conspiracy is putting it lightly. Something otherworldly has awakened and it’ll take more than pikes and shovels to force it back from whence it came. The only downside I can be a little nitpicky over is that I felt like it ended abruptly. Even knowing that it is apart of something greater, I felt too wound up for it to be over. Having said that, I do like how Hick’s builds up for the coming sequels and the author notes give us a glimpse into his inspiration. All in all, a very enjoyable read for fans of Hick’s work and for those who enjoy Lovecraftian/Cosmic horror.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Alex findingmontauk1

    Do not be fooled by the size of this one! What appears as a short novella is packed FULL of cosmic horror, violent racism, gory medical advances and experimentation, and has a touch of history, as well! This book is full of grave robbers and body exhumations, too! One of the things I love most about this story is that the monsters encroaching on our existence aren't necessarily the biggest threat. The biggest threat to our lives is PEOPLE. People can be downright terrible. And the vil Do not be fooled by the size of this one! What appears as a short novella is packed FULL of cosmic horror, violent racism, gory medical advances and experimentation, and has a touch of history, as well! This book is full of grave robbers and body exhumations, too! One of the things I love most about this story is that the monsters encroaching on our existence aren't necessarily the biggest threat. The biggest threat to our lives is PEOPLE. People can be downright terrible. And the villains in this story are DOWNRIGHT TERRIBLE people. They are full of hate and thirsty for power. I was also drawn to our protagonist, Salem Hawley, seeing him as the hero with integrity and discipline that we all need and could be. I am so pumped that this is the first book in a series because Salem is great! 4 stars to this one!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lou

    There will be contained within this book: beak-masked surgeons, grave robbers, evisceration, plague cultists, black magic, monsters, the mystical, otherworldly Old Ones, believing “Suffering is always the key,” and experimentation, with the days of old and prejudices of old. Opens with scene of horror with the strange, a beaked mask man removing a heart, that may have you hooked in the tale. “A slender man draped in a thick, waxed overcoat stood over her, his hands gloved in shin There will be contained within this book: beak-masked surgeons, grave robbers, evisceration, plague cultists, black magic, monsters, the mystical, otherworldly Old Ones, believing “Suffering is always the key,” and experimentation, with the days of old and prejudices of old. Opens with scene of horror with the strange, a beaked mask man removing a heart, that may have you hooked in the tale. “A slender man draped in a thick, waxed overcoat stood over her, his hands gloved in shiny black leather to match the coat. His face was hidden behind a large-beaked mask.” Storytelling reminiscent of the likes of author Robert McCammon. Find yourself transported to terrible times and minds with immersive storytelling in the cosmic horror realm. Reader left eagerly awaiting the continuation of this interlude into heart of darkness. Review also @

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Jones

    Historical fiction meets Lovecraft in this quick, engrossing novella of cosmic horror. Using the Doctor's Riots of 1788 as a backdrop, our hero Salem Hawley must fight against a band of sadistic, blood-thirsty cultists guided by The Necronomicon and bent on unleashing the wrath of Eldritch gods on post-Colonial New York. References to Lovecraftian monsters abound along with solid nods to "At The Mountains Of Madness," possibly "The Horror at Red Hook," and definitely "The Shadow Over Innsmouth" Historical fiction meets Lovecraft in this quick, engrossing novella of cosmic horror. Using the Doctor's Riots of 1788 as a backdrop, our hero Salem Hawley must fight against a band of sadistic, blood-thirsty cultists guided by The Necronomicon and bent on unleashing the wrath of Eldritch gods on post-Colonial New York. References to Lovecraftian monsters abound along with solid nods to "At The Mountains Of Madness," possibly "The Horror at Red Hook," and definitely "The Shadow Over Innsmouth" looking ahead to Book 2. The story mixes history, action, and gore nicely and, while more graphic than most Lovecraft stories, I think would appeal to fans of historical and weird fiction.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Oliver Clarke

    A thoroughly entertaining mix of history, politics and good old-fashioned Lovecraftian cosmic horror. ‘The Resurrectionists’ is a great, slightly pulpy read. It’s incredibly gory and wildly violent, but also rich in atmosphere and historical detail. Hawley is a good protagonist, determined, principled and relatable; but it’s the thoroughly evil villains that steal the show. Lots of fun and I’m looking forward to the next book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Chuck Buda

    This is the opening salvo in a series that gives the readers everything they want. A gritty, grisly historical fiction with poetic prose and plenty of heart and guts. A mesmerizing, cosmic horror tale channeling elements of Lovecraft and Chambers with a dash of Poe. I can't wait for the next chapter! DO NOT MISS THIS SERIES!

  29. 4 out of 5

    A.E.

    This story is set in the early part of the 20th century in New York and involves graverobbers who get up to no good and desecrate graves for bodies for medical experiments, but also target the downtrodden, shall we say, for their live experiments, which go into explicit and gruesome detail. Not for the faint of heart indeed. Our protagonist, Salem, is a free person of colour who tries to stop one of these grave desecrations when it targets someone he knows, but it ends in a vicious an This story is set in the early part of the 20th century in New York and involves graverobbers who get up to no good and desecrate graves for bodies for medical experiments, but also target the downtrodden, shall we say, for their live experiments, which go into explicit and gruesome detail. Not for the faint of heart indeed. Our protagonist, Salem, is a free person of colour who tries to stop one of these grave desecrations when it targets someone he knows, but it ends in a vicious and bloody encounter. Exploring the point of view of one of the villainous characters was an interesting choice, and one I felt allowed the reader to experience all of the gory details up close. The plot built to a dynamic crescendo of events that kept escalating; in the interest of avoiding spoilers, I will stop there, but suffice it to say, Salem's journey was a compelling and nerve-wracking experience to read through. Of additional note, the author's Afterword provides a fascinating glimpse into the history that inspired his work, and for those interested, there will be a sequel, it appears. I also wanted to call attention to the stunning cover art by Kealan Patrick Burke, a talented author and graphic artist in his own right. Overall, I felt this very well-written book was an incredibly compelling read, and in spite of making me squirm at quite a few spots with the body horror, I enjoyed it and found it to be a gripping page-turner.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Josh reading

    Having read Michael Patrick Hicks novella Broken Shells, last year, I knew I was in for quite a ride. The Resurrectionists tells the tale of Salem Hawley, an African American veteran of the Revolutionary War, who faces a horrific plot by a group of Manhattan grave robbing scientists who just happen to also be cultists. I really loved the cosmic horror elements of this story, the Lovecraftian terrors are truly frightening. Add to that Hicks ability to write unbelievably horrific scenes that make Having read Michael Patrick Hicks novella Broken Shells, last year, I knew I was in for quite a ride. The Resurrectionists tells the tale of Salem Hawley, an African American veteran of the Revolutionary War, who faces a horrific plot by a group of Manhattan grave robbing scientists who just happen to also be cultists. I really loved the cosmic horror elements of this story, the Lovecraftian terrors are truly frightening. Add to that Hicks ability to write unbelievably horrific scenes that make you feel as if you are right there in the thick of it and you’ve got yourself a nail biter of a novella that reads unbelievably quick. I can’t wait for the next volume in the Salem Hawley Series, definitely a great choice for a very rapid read!

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