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The Resurrectionists (Salem Hawley, #1) PDF, ePub eBook Having won his emancipation after fighting on the side of the colonies during the American Revolution, Salem Hawley is a free man. Only a handful of years after the end of British rule, Hawley finds himself drawn into a new war unlike anything he has ever seen. New York City is on the cusp of a new revolution as the science of medicine advances, but procuring bodies for stu Having won his emancipation after fighting on the side of the colonies during the American Revolution, Salem Hawley is a free man. Only a handful of years after the end of British rule, Hawley finds himself drawn into a new war unlike anything he has ever seen.

 New York City is on the cusp of a new revolution as the science of medicine advances, but procuring bodies for study is still illegal. Bands of resurrectionists are stealing corpses from New York cemeteries, and women of the night are disappearing from the streets, only to meet grisly ends elsewhere. After a friend’s family is robbed from their graves, Hawley is compelled to fight back against the wave of exhumations plaguing the Black cemetery. Little does he know, the theft of bodies is key to far darker arts being performed by the resurrectionists. If successful, the work of these occultists could spell the end of the fledgling American Experiment… and the world itself.

 The Resurrectionists, the first book in the Salem Hawley series, is a novella of historical cosmic horror from the author of Broken Shells and Mass Hysteria.


30 review for The Resurrectionists (Salem Hawley, #1)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Char

    Short and fast paced, THE RESURRECTIONISISTS delivers! Salem Hawley is a free black man ever since helping the Colonies fight against the British. Now he is helping Americans battle against creatures of the cosmos. Doctors are trading in flesh, not only to further their science but to triumph in their nefarious efforts to bring forth these aforementioned creatures. Do any of Salem's actions make his make life as a black man at that time any easier? No, no they do not. Will he be able to help his Short and fast paced, THE RESURRECTIONISISTS delivers! Salem Hawley is a free black man ever since helping the Colonies fight against the British. Now he is helping Americans battle against creatures of the cosmos. Doctors are trading in flesh, not only to further their science but to triumph in their nefarious efforts to bring forth these aforementioned creatures. Do any of Salem's actions make his make life as a black man at that time any easier? No, no they do not. Will he be able to help his fellow citizens fight an enemy most have never seen? If he does, will he survive the fight? You'll have to read this to find out! There's a lot going on here for such a short novel. Clashing personalities, clashing cultures, a city in fear, cosmic frights and real life ones as well. Somehow, the personality of Hawley stands out as a shining example of good and hope, while most of the doctors come off as exactly the opposite. It amazed me how well these characters were drawn, considering how much page time they each were given. I definitely recommend this book. I had previously sworn off books that are part of an unfinished series, however, I couldn't help but give in to this one-just look at the cover and you'll know why. Recommended! (I can't wait for the next book!) *Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for the e-ARC of this book in exchange for my honest feedback. This is it.*

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Gaarder

    Visit me at jenchaosreviews.com Goodreads Rating: 4.21/ My Rating: 4.00. Review: From the Amazon Breakthrough Award Finalist comes a new series. The Resurrectionists is the first in the Salem Hawley series combining mystery and horror in a time of struggle and race and gender inequality. A freed man of color finds that a friend’s wife and child’s graves are savaged by unruly physic or students of medicine and decides to take action. With the friend at his side, things take a turn for the worst. Trage Visit me at jenchaosreviews.com Goodreads Rating: 4.21/ My Rating: 4.00. Review: From the Amazon Breakthrough Award Finalist comes a new series. The Resurrectionists is the first in the Salem Hawley series combining mystery and horror in a time of struggle and race and gender inequality. A freed man of color finds that a friend’s wife and child’s graves are savaged by unruly physic or students of medicine and decides to take action. With the friend at his side, things take a turn for the worst. Tragedy strikes, and a man dies only to have his body taken as well. Angry, he sets forth to exact a plan to set balance to he world of justice for the people of color against the white people. This results, ultimately in riots. Meanwhile, a group of demented doctors have discovered in their travels, human suffering and death can open the doors to otherworldly beings called ”thinnies.” Kidnapping live people and grave robbing are not going to be the end all be all for them. Furthermore, they discover they need something more significant, better than they’ve done before. Salem Hawley is a hero in that he does not expect to face things of unnatural origin. Indeed he has faced the evils of men, but not the otherworldly creatures of the other dimension. The villains of the story are typical creeps that make the reader gasp in horror as they read about the atrocities that they will commit to the ordinary person. Terrible monsters tear through the fabric of reality, blood is shed, sacrifices are made, and a book is stolen. A devilish man strikes a monstrous deal with an innocent man, what is going to be the very conclusion to this whole thing? A series that starts with grave robbing and ends with bloodshed, the characters are fully realized and not dropped off into a felled reality. This is a book that harkens to the former days of horror and gore — the monster tales of old. Writing: Clear and weighty prose combined with thrilling crescendoes make this story very enjoyable and one that is worth hanging on to. This is from a well-practiced writer that knows the craft and is not afraid of pushing boundaries. Plot: A searing heat comes from the pages of the story as I read the story about men doing evil things form the glory of evil. The plot never wavered, never missed a beat. Characters came together well and put things in perspective as accurate as they would be at the period described in the book. What I Liked: The climax into a world of unknown horror that opened at the heart of the story and the suffering along with it, though did not amuse me, made me see just how awful people can be. I was able to see that people, even as far back as that, men and women want power, want evil to overcome humanity. It’s terrifying to behold. What I Didn’t Like: The monster attack lasted a long time. I thought that it could have been more condensed. I would have liked if there had been more dialogue also. This helps give the scenes more purpose. Overall Impression: The Resurrectionists ( Salem Hawley #1) By Michael Patrick Hicks is a spooky tale of grave robbery, evil, creatures of unknown origin tearing through the fabric of reality, and awful atrocities of man against man. This is a good story and well written one at that. With spine-tingling terror and historical references, this book will keep you at the edge of your seat. I rated this a 4.00.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Hunter Shea

    This book was lovingly cooked up by Hicks with everything I love from the horror spice rack - a deliciously evil blend of Lovecraft, Martyrs, Frankenstein and Grand-Guignol madness. The concept is bonkers and the gore is unrelenting and off the wall. A hell of a way to kick off what will be a killer series.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sadie Hartmann Mother Horror

    Wow! I'm going to give a full, detailed review for SCREAM Magazine but just so readers know where I stand on this one, Michael Patrick Hicks has imagined something *very* compelling. I read much of this book with a heavy heart and a healthy aversion to all the hate speech, violence (borderline torture porn) but there is so much to enjoy about this too. My hope is for Salem Hawley to get a lot more "scene time" and development because I like him! *clapping* More to come in SCREAM, please watch for t Wow! I'm going to give a full, detailed review for SCREAM Magazine but just so readers know where I stand on this one, Michael Patrick Hicks has imagined something *very* compelling. I read much of this book with a heavy heart and a healthy aversion to all the hate speech, violence (borderline torture porn) but there is so much to enjoy about this too. My hope is for Salem Hawley to get a lot more "scene time" and development because I like him! *clapping* More to come in SCREAM, please watch for the review this summer. Recommended to fans of: Historical Horror Fiction, Cosmic/Lovecraftian Horror, Strong POC Protagonists, God-Awful, Evil Protagonists You Love to Hate and MORE!

  5. 4 out of 5

    destiny ♡⚔♡ [howling libraries]

    I'd been meaning to pick up some of Michael Patrick Hicks' work for quite some time after hearing friends rave about it, so I'm really pleased to have finally gotten the chance to do so with The Resurrectionists! I'm a big fan of subversive Lovecraftian horror, so I jumped at the chance to read this little novella featuring a recently freed slave as its hero, and I won't hesitate to tell you that Salem is so damn easy to root for. He's a genuinely likeable character and I definitely found myself I'd been meaning to pick up some of Michael Patrick Hicks' work for quite some time after hearing friends rave about it, so I'm really pleased to have finally gotten the chance to do so with The Resurrectionists! I'm a big fan of subversive Lovecraftian horror, so I jumped at the chance to read this little novella featuring a recently freed slave as its hero, and I won't hesitate to tell you that Salem is so damn easy to root for. He's a genuinely likeable character and I definitely found myself on the edge of my seat more than once, worried for his safety. The stakes are very high in The Resurrectionists, as our biggest threat isn't even the terrifying monsters seeping into our world so much as it is the ways that humans will destroy one another without a moment's remorse, whether their fuel be hate, racism, or simple cruel curiosity. Besides Salem and a few very minor side characters, don't go into this one expecting to find too many characters to love! Hicks' writing is lovely and quick to the chase, and there's a lot of oddity and depravity here that's really fantastically well-done, though sensitive stomachs might want to steel themselves before heading into the scenes in the surgical rooms as there's a lot of gore (which I enjoyed to no end). The only real complaint that I had, and the reason I couldn't quite mark this one higher than 4 stars, is that sometimes it felt like I was reading two separate storylines in the same novella, rather than two sides of the same story. That could totally just be me and the weird funk I've been in with my reads lately, but even the ending of this novella had me feeling like the plot had been buried a bit. While it wasn't a perfect read, I still had fun with it and would be interested in checking out more of Hicks' work in the future. Thank you so much to High Fever Books for providing me with this ARC in exchange for an honest review!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Hepler

    With The Ressurectionists, Michael Patrick Hicks is firing on all cylinders and has laid the foundation for an electrifying cosmic horror series. Delivered in his signature smooth and captivating writing style, the addictive novella is as terrifying and action-packed as a slasher flick, but also saturated with literary merit at its core, exploring social issues like racism, classism, and the ramifications of medical experimentation. It was such a fun, provocative read. I can't wait to see what d With The Ressurectionists, Michael Patrick Hicks is firing on all cylinders and has laid the foundation for an electrifying cosmic horror series. Delivered in his signature smooth and captivating writing style, the addictive novella is as terrifying and action-packed as a slasher flick, but also saturated with literary merit at its core, exploring social issues like racism, classism, and the ramifications of medical experimentation. It was such a fun, provocative read. I can't wait to see what direction he steers the plot in the second book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mindi

    I love cosmic horror and historical novels, and Hicks combines both to make the first book in the SALEM HAWLEY SERIES a novella that I could barely put down. I'm ready for book two now! I've always had a morbid interest in grave robbers or resurrectionists, and the stories about the real life duo of Burke and Hare have always been fascinating to me. Hicks uses men like the famous duo to procure bodies, but he also makes the anatomists in this tale exceptionally villainous. THE RESURRECTIONISTS ta I love cosmic horror and historical novels, and Hicks combines both to make the first book in the SALEM HAWLEY SERIES a novella that I could barely put down. I'm ready for book two now! I've always had a morbid interest in grave robbers or resurrectionists, and the stories about the real life duo of Burke and Hare have always been fascinating to me. Hicks uses men like the famous duo to procure bodies, but he also makes the anatomists in this tale exceptionally villainous. THE RESURRECTIONISTS takes place a few years after the American Revolution, and the protagonist Salem Hawley has won his status as a free man after fighting for the colonies. It's easy to like Hawley's character and to root for him as New York cemeteries for people of color are being overrun with grave robbers. Hawley cannot allow his friends and neighbors to endure the pain and torment of finding their loved ones stolen from their graves, and he decides to do whatever it takes to make the city aware of the crimes. Hicks uses a fictional grimoire based on the Necronomicon to ramp up the cosmic action. He actually based the main part of this novel on the New York Doctor's Riot of 1788. Somehow this part of history had completely escaped my knowledge, and I owe Hicks a debt of gratitude for mentioning it in the Acknowledgements. I now have a new factual rabbit hole to explore online. If you enjoy cosmic horror and historical novels you definitely need to pick this one up. I cannot wait to see where Hicks takes this series.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    A very well written and dark Lovecraftian tale from Mr. Hicks. The plague doctors are looking to rip open the “thinnies” and bring forth the creatures that lurk behind the curtain. They just might do it, too. Another super solid effort from MPH and highly recommended. I received a complimentary copy of this title from Netgalley and have voluntary left this honest review.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tim Meyer

    A perfect blend of historical and cosmic horror. Hicks has definitely created something special here, simultaneously authentic and otherworldly. Great characterization, vivid descriptions, and a cast of villains that will make your skin crawl. The first Salem Hawley book could be the start of something big.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Meenaz Lodhi

    The story of Salem Hawley and his quest of searching the disappearance of bodies from the cemetery.. takes him to unknown occult scenarios in this horror historical fiction. A perfect prequel novella! Unnerving! ... It truly is the perfect blend of gore, horror and action. An adrenaline-fueled, no punches pulled, onslaught of gruesome action! The very definition of a page turner.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Toni | Dark Reads

    The Resurrectionists, the first book in the Salem Hawley series, is a novella of historical cosmic horror. Thanks to NetGalley, Michael Patrick Hicks and High Fever Books who provided an ARC of this book, in exchange for an honest review 'Full throttle gore, wonderfully written and not for the fainthearted!' Read the full review @ Dark Reads http://darkreads.blog/2019/06/04/the-...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sjgomzi

    First of a new series. This cosmic horror/historical novel mashup delivers in every way. A great protagonist, scary villains. A frightening and oh so disturbing premise-this book entertained the hell out of me. Michael Patrick Hicks is one of my favorite writers, and if you enjoy this, I highly recommend checking out his other books as soon as possible. Trust me. You won’t be sorry!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    "The secrets to so many of life's mysteries could only be divined in the study of death." First, look at this damn cover. It's creepy and gorgeous, and I kind of want a poster of it. This definitely drew me in to The Resurrectionists. Although this book has such an interesting synopsis, I struggled to connect with the story. It's a short book with a lot of violence packed in, and eventually it started to feel gratuitous. At times, it felt misogynistic to me because the torture of some female char "The secrets to so many of life's mysteries could only be divined in the study of death." First, look at this damn cover. It's creepy and gorgeous, and I kind of want a poster of it. This definitely drew me in to The Resurrectionists. Although this book has such an interesting synopsis, I struggled to connect with the story. It's a short book with a lot of violence packed in, and eventually it started to feel gratuitous. At times, it felt misogynistic to me because the torture of some female characters was so dragged out and detailed, and I didn't feel the same way about the men who were being hurt. I know this is because the characters are major dicks, but it still bothered me. Sometimes I don't think about it that much, but I don't think I was in the mood for it at all when I read this. Based on the synopsis, I was expecting this book to be a little deeper. I thought we would get to know Salem more, but The Resurrectionists never really took that deep dive. As I mentioned earlier, I felt like the story was gratuitous at times, and I ended up feeling like the book was missing that bit of heart that led me to connect with the characters. Even though I had a difficult time with The Resurrectionists, it is not a bad book. I liked the creepiness of the book. Michael Patrick Hicks writes so well, and always has a creative story to tell. I think I just wasn't the right reader for this one.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Martin

    Now that was a dark and gruesome read. So begins this compelling series by the great Michael Patrick Hicks who has given us the bloody BROKEN SHELLS last year. Set after the American Revolution, this cosmic horror tale finds a freed black man on a quest to make wrong things right for a friend in need. What follows is quite delicious in the sense that the reader has no way of knowing exactly where this is all going. Sharp writing, in-your-face violence, this Lovecraftian-style novella will make y Now that was a dark and gruesome read. So begins this compelling series by the great Michael Patrick Hicks who has given us the bloody BROKEN SHELLS last year. Set after the American Revolution, this cosmic horror tale finds a freed black man on a quest to make wrong things right for a friend in need. What follows is quite delicious in the sense that the reader has no way of knowing exactly where this is all going. Sharp writing, in-your-face violence, this Lovecraftian-style novella will make you turn the pages very quickly and make you hope the second installment materializes really soon. ARC given by the publishers and NetGalley.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tracy Robinson

    Review to come for Sci Fi and Scary in June Here it is! “Few things in life, he had discovered, were as satisfying as holding a human heart in one’s own hand….” This is the second book I have read by Michael Patrick Hicks. Last year, his novella Broken Shells was one of my top books of 2018. I went into this with an expectation of lush, yet exacting detail, and a unique storyline. If you’ve ever read one of his pieces, whether a book or a book review, you know that this guy can WRITE. I was not dis Review to come for Sci Fi and Scary in June Here it is! “Few things in life, he had discovered, were as satisfying as holding a human heart in one’s own hand….” This is the second book I have read by Michael Patrick Hicks. Last year, his novella Broken Shells was one of my top books of 2018. I went into this with an expectation of lush, yet exacting detail, and a unique storyline. If you’ve ever read one of his pieces, whether a book or a book review, you know that this guy can WRITE. I was not disappointed. Coupled with this author’s aptitude as a wordsmith is a fastidious attention to detail in regards to the historical time period covered in this novella. I hadn’t previously read about the the Doctor’s Riot of 1788, and when I completed The Resurrectionists, I immediately did some very minor research of my own. I was pleasantly surprised that Hicks’ depiction of the the events leading up to and at the heart of the riot felt reliable and engaging. Historical fiction, particularly historical horror, can be a hit or miss for me and this checked all the boxes. My only criticism of this novella is that I feel like it needed MORE. More background and information regarding Salem Hawley, the Resurrectionists, and a few other characters. I do realize that this is an intended series and I am only on book 1. I really think that this story might work better as a lengthier novel. I’ve seen other readers state the exact opposite (which is completely fine), but I was left with the feeling that I had only seen the surface of things. This, then, caused me to be a little less invested in some of the BEST action scenes. Regardless of the above, I am most definitely looking forward to the completion of this series. Hicks’ propensity to nail the reader with some of the most startling and gruesome scenes in horror fiction is one of my favorite parts about his work. More importantly it is pertinent to the plot and isn’t gratuitous. There is a reason, a call of sorts, for these scenes to exist. I put the book down a few times in the most extreme scenes and flipped those pages at a dash in others. My horror heart was happy. Truly excited to see where this series leads me. Thanks to the author for sending me this book for review consideration

  16. 4 out of 5

    Red Lace Reviews

    Salem Hawley may be a free man after the American Revolution, but his troubles are plenty. A good friend seeks his help, turning Salem's attention to the graves being emptied and the deceased experimented upon and studied by medical students and physicians. It goes ignored, yet Salem is determined to do something, anything. If only he knew about the rituals being performed, the Old Ones being worshiped, right under his nose. If only he knew that New York City is on the cusp of ruin. (WARNING: Thi Salem Hawley may be a free man after the American Revolution, but his troubles are plenty. A good friend seeks his help, turning Salem's attention to the graves being emptied and the deceased experimented upon and studied by medical students and physicians. It goes ignored, yet Salem is determined to do something, anything. If only he knew about the rituals being performed, the Old Ones being worshiped, right under his nose. If only he knew that New York City is on the cusp of ruin. (WARNING: This review contains minor spoilers.) I received this book in exchange for an honest review. I thank High Fever Books for giving me the opportunity. I'm going to get right to the point: I had a BLAST (the capitals should further reiterate my point) reading this book. I feel like my reading pace, as of recent days, has been akin to trudging through knee-high mud. It's been painfully slow, frustrating, and I was in danger of expiring before making real progress. Then I happened upon this jewel of a novella; I was reminded that reading doesn't have to be a much-dreaded chore. I was so completely immersed from the start - it didn't hesitate to plunge right into the nauseating particulars of body snatching and desecration of the dead. Scenes were graphic and often extreme, in the sense that it married sexual arousal and violence. It wasn't pretty, but it was seriously addictive. The fact that a lot of attention fell upon the villains and their own ambitions also interested me on a deeper level. They were despicable, yes, but no matter how terrible their work, my curiosity wanted them to succeed. That's the thing about this sub-genre: I so desperately want the monsters to cause havoc. All hail the tentacles! Salem Hawley was the likeable sort, and I feel I was properly introduced to his character despite the short length. His experiences honed in on the persecution the black community had to endure - unlicensed exhumations going ignored by society - and so I felt invested in his struggles to make change. To be frank, the ill-treatment was heartbreaking, packing that extra punch due to the realness it represented. I applaud the level of emotion that was found in the writing and conveyed through Salem's own anger. In that way, he was a genuine person, and I can't wait to read more of him; to see his development and how he overcomes the bane of the knowledge he acquired. The portrayal of the 1788 Doctors' Riot of New York City was tremendously compelling with its blending of historic events and aspects of a more cosmic nature. In all honesty, I can take or leave historical fiction. It's not something I actively seek out, but if I find myself reading it, I can appreciate the author igniting an interest that motivates me to research the topic. Did you know that Richard Bayley and John Hicks were real people? Obviously their depiction here is not accurate, but one hell of a spin was put into their story. I think I like this version better. In conclusion: I'm so thrilled that The Resurrectionists is the beginning of a series, as I got the distinct impression Salem's journey was far from over. This novella captivated me from the get-go, introducing me to an array of characters that were fascinating in their own right. The last chapters held a special kind of mayhem, and I was in my element throughout. Notable Quote: "This war for independence," Bayley began, "and the sins that have built this foundling nation have a toll. Always, there is a toll. So, so much blood was loosed upon the earth. Between your wars and your slavers' whips, this infantile nation breeds blood and begets violence. It was ignorant to think such a thing could go unnoticed. We laid out a buffet, and Old Ones ate and ate, and we left them starved for more. They are here, and they are demanding." © Red Lace 2019 Wordpress ~ Twitter

  17. 4 out of 5

    Audra (ouija.doodle.reads)

    A novella with a historical backdrop and a swirl of cosmic horror is just too interesting to pass up! This quick read is the first in a series that will follow Salem Hawley, a free black man living just after the American Revolution. What I loved about this narrative is how it was interested in telling a broader story about racism during this time period, how it mixed in those real-life tensions and injustices with a compelling, dark supernatural story. Basing some of the events in the book on re A novella with a historical backdrop and a swirl of cosmic horror is just too interesting to pass up! This quick read is the first in a series that will follow Salem Hawley, a free black man living just after the American Revolution. What I loved about this narrative is how it was interested in telling a broader story about racism during this time period, how it mixed in those real-life tensions and injustices with a compelling, dark supernatural story. Basing some of the events in the book on real historical happenings (body snatching and Burke and Hare–style murdering to teach students about anatomy and the Doctor’s Riot of 1788) gives this little book a meaty backdrop and makes the supernatural elements feel very vivid. The ending action felt abrupt and rushed to me, not at all carrying the weight, tension, and excellent pacing of the rest of the story. As there is more to come from this story—which is clearly set up at the end of this novella—perhaps a more satisfying conclusion will come with the rest of the books in the series. My thanks to the author for sending the Night Worms this one to read and review.

  18. 4 out of 5

    FanFiAddict

    Rating: ★★★★ Synopsis Having won his emancipation after fighting on the side of the colonies during the American Revolution, Salem Hawley is a free man. Only a handful of years after the end of British rule, Hawley finds himself drawn into a new war unlike anything he has ever seen. New York City is on the cusp of a new revolution as the science of medicine advances, but procuring bodies for study is still illegal. Bands of resurrectionists are stealing corpses from New York cemeteries, and women o Rating: ★★★★ Synopsis Having won his emancipation after fighting on the side of the colonies during the American Revolution, Salem Hawley is a free man. Only a handful of years after the end of British rule, Hawley finds himself drawn into a new war unlike anything he has ever seen. New York City is on the cusp of a new revolution as the science of medicine advances, but procuring bodies for study is still illegal. Bands of resurrectionists are stealing corpses from New York cemeteries, and women of the night are disappearing from the streets, only to meet grisly ends elsewhere. After a friend’s family is robbed from their graves, Hawley is compelled to fight back against the wave of exhumations plaguing the Black cemetery. Little does he know, the theft of bodies is key to far darker arts being performed by the resurrectionists. If successful, the work of these occultists could spell the end of the fledgling American Experiment… and the world itself. The Resurrectionists, the first book in the Salem Hawley series, is a novella of historical cosmic horror from the author of Broken Shells and Mass Hysteria Review Thanks to the author for an advanced reading copy of The Resurrectionists (The Salem Hawley Series, Book 1) in exchange for an honest review. Receiving this eARC did not influence my thoughts or opinions on the novella. THAT KEALAN PATRICK BURKE COVER, THOUGH Not since Victor LaValle’s The Ballad of Black Tom have I been so intrigued by a Lovecraftian inspired novella, though the shock and awe presented in Hick’s work is truly captivating. The character of Salem Hawley is one you can truly stand behind as he fights for the betterment of his fellow Black Man, though to say he simply falls into a greater conspiracy is putting it lightly. Something otherworldly has awakened and it’ll take more than pikes and shovels to force it back from whence it came. The only downside I can be a little nitpicky over is that I felt like it ended abruptly. Even knowing that it is apart of something greater, I felt too wound up for it to be over. Having said that, I do like how Hick’s builds up for the coming sequels and the author notes give us a glimpse into his inspiration. All in all, a very enjoyable read for fans of Hick’s work and for those who enjoy Lovecraftian/Cosmic horror.

  19. 4 out of 5

    A.E.

    This story is set in the early part of the 20th century in New York and involves graverobbers who get up to no good and desecrate graves for bodies for medical experiments, but also target the downtrodden, shall we say, for their live experiments, which go into explicit and gruesome detail. Not for the faint of heart indeed. Our protagonist, Salem, is a free person of colour who tries to stop one of these grave desecrations when it targets someone he knows, but it ends in a vicious and bloody enc This story is set in the early part of the 20th century in New York and involves graverobbers who get up to no good and desecrate graves for bodies for medical experiments, but also target the downtrodden, shall we say, for their live experiments, which go into explicit and gruesome detail. Not for the faint of heart indeed. Our protagonist, Salem, is a free person of colour who tries to stop one of these grave desecrations when it targets someone he knows, but it ends in a vicious and bloody encounter. Exploring the point of view of one of the villainous characters was an interesting choice, and one I felt allowed the reader to experience all of the gory details up close. The plot built to a dynamic crescendo of events that kept escalating; in the interest of avoiding spoilers, I will stop there, but suffice it to say, Salem's journey was a compelling and nerve-wracking experience to read through. Of additional note, the author's Afterword provides a fascinating glimpse into the history that inspired his work, and for those interested, there will be a sequel, it appears. I also wanted to call attention to the stunning cover art by Kealan Patrick Burke, a talented author and graphic artist in his own right. Overall, I felt this very well-written book was an incredibly compelling read, and in spite of making me squirm at quite a few spots with the body horror, I enjoyed it and found it to be a gripping page-turner.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ashley (bookishmommy)

    I'm the worst when it comes to reading a synopsis because I like to go into stories blind so naturally I had no idea what to expect from The Resurrectionists. I was intrigued based on the cover alone. The Resurrectionists is a tale of cosmic horror and the first book in the Salem Hawley series. It is a novella and clocks in at just over 120 pages. To be honest, I am just not a big fan of cosmic horror. If you are, I think you'll have a great time with this book.The writing was great, I just didn I'm the worst when it comes to reading a synopsis because I like to go into stories blind so naturally I had no idea what to expect from The Resurrectionists. I was intrigued based on the cover alone. The Resurrectionists is a tale of cosmic horror and the first book in the Salem Hawley series. It is a novella and clocks in at just over 120 pages. To be honest, I am just not a big fan of cosmic horror. If you are, I think you'll have a great time with this book.The writing was great, I just didnt really get immersed in the story the way I wish I would have.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Jones

    Historical fiction meets Lovecraft in this quick, engrossing novella of cosmic horror. Using the Doctor's Riots of 1788 as a backdrop, our hero Salem Hawley must fight against a band of sadistic, blood-thirsty cultists guided by The Necronomicon and bent on unleashing the wrath of Eldritch gods on post-Colonial New York. References to Lovecraftian monsters abound along with solid nods to "At The Mountains Of Madness," possibly "The Horror at Red Hook," and definitely "The Shadow Over Innsmouth" Historical fiction meets Lovecraft in this quick, engrossing novella of cosmic horror. Using the Doctor's Riots of 1788 as a backdrop, our hero Salem Hawley must fight against a band of sadistic, blood-thirsty cultists guided by The Necronomicon and bent on unleashing the wrath of Eldritch gods on post-Colonial New York. References to Lovecraftian monsters abound along with solid nods to "At The Mountains Of Madness," possibly "The Horror at Red Hook," and definitely "The Shadow Over Innsmouth" looking ahead to Book 2. The story mixes history, action, and gore nicely and, while more graphic than most Lovecraft stories, I think would appeal to fans of historical and weird fiction.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Somer Canon

    This book was heartbreaking, infuriating, and horrifying. Exactly what you want in a cosmic horror book. The characterization was very effective and the ending was fantastic, leaving me wanting more. Nicely done.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Chuck Buda

    This is the opening salvo in a series that gives the readers everything they want. A gritty, grisly historical fiction with poetic prose and plenty of heart and guts. A mesmerizing, cosmic horror tale channeling elements of Lovecraft and Chambers with a dash of Poe. I can't wait for the next chapter! DO NOT MISS THIS SERIES!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    The Resurrectionists is a novella that provides a nice introduction to the primary character Salem Hawley and provides information on a time period I am not familiar with. However this is a horror story and the author provides a good portion of gore and action that will satisfy any horror fan. I have not read a lot of historical horror but this story provides enough background so that I can follow what is happening without being confused. I enjoyed the character development while hoping to learn The Resurrectionists is a novella that provides a nice introduction to the primary character Salem Hawley and provides information on a time period I am not familiar with. However this is a horror story and the author provides a good portion of gore and action that will satisfy any horror fan. I have not read a lot of historical horror but this story provides enough background so that I can follow what is happening without being confused. I enjoyed the character development while hoping to learn more about Salem in future stories. The novella length can be frustrating because it can sometimes feel that you don’t get a fleshed out story but in this case I feel that it was written well. Overall this was a very enjoyable and well written story that I recommend to horror fans. I look forward to future installments.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Scott Kemper

    Review to come soon. But, if you’re a fan of Lovecraftian cosmic horror, historical horror, and The Ballad of Black Tom, keep this book on your radar.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cedar Hollow Horror Reviews

    Michael Patrick Hicks has outdone himself this time. He has concocted a potent, genre-bending cosmic horror tale that’s rich with historical implications. Hicks taps into so many history facets of the American Revolution and its aftermath––it truly is beautiful to behold. He really did his research and it shows through this first installment. He pays respect and honor to the characters and the time period. You even get to learn about the people of the American Revolution and the post-Revolutiona Michael Patrick Hicks has outdone himself this time. He has concocted a potent, genre-bending cosmic horror tale that’s rich with historical implications. Hicks taps into so many history facets of the American Revolution and its aftermath––it truly is beautiful to behold. He really did his research and it shows through this first installment. He pays respect and honor to the characters and the time period. You even get to learn about the people of the American Revolution and the post-Revolutionary War era. It’s this controversial time period and its intricate shortcomings that sets the stage for Michael Patrick Hicks’ The Resurrectionists. The story centers around Salem Hawley, a freed man and a Revolutionary War veteran. He finds himself in another war, one far worse than he’s ever seen. The advancement of medicine in New York City is on the brink of its own revolution, and something sinister is fueling it. Doctors have been digging up bodies for their experiments and studies. It’s illegal to procure bodies in that manner, but they do it anyway. Salem Hawley catches wind of what’s going on in the African American cemeteries and steps in to stop the grave robbers. Hawley is plunged into an otherworldly war. Salem Hawley is the type of character you want in your corner. You feel for him and you don’t want anything bad to happen to him. So, when he plunges into harms way, you root for him to prevail. Hawley is a very complex character with tons of depth. With that being said, I would like to talk about the tentacled monstrosities because they are also important to the story. Michael Patrick Hicks doesn’t over sell the creatures. He describes them using the less is more approach, leaving the reader with some room for imagination. He doesn’t tell us what they look like, he lets us see for ourselves, which is fascinating once you think about it. And it’s all through their actions and we see character growth as the story progresses. Hicks doesn’t reveal everything about his characters all at once. Michael Patrick Hicks also shows respect to POC and underrepresented characters, which makes the reading experience even better. The scenes, y’all. I can’t get over the scenes in The Resurrectionists. The scenes are bloody brilliant and viciously splendid. The testing and experiments are everything. The cutting of the cadavers was gut-wrenching. My stomach churned with every pass of the scalpel. Whilst reading The Resurrectionists, my body hurt just thinking about what those people were going through. Those doctors were getting a kick out of cutting up people’s bodies. It pissed me off and made me want to beat the mess out of those plague doctors. Turns out, those doctors were up to something far more sinister than anything imaginable. New York City will never be the same. I’m not that familiar with H.P. Lovecraft‘s work, but The Resurrectionists sure is a great cosmic horror novella. Michael Patrick Hicks does a great job setting the tone for the rest of the novella with that opening scene. And you can tell he meticulously researched the medicine and history in this novella. I can’t put into words how much I loved the monstrosities. I can’t get the plague-masked doctors out of my head. I also recommend reading the author’s notes at the end of the novella. It will give you some perspective on things. I look forward to the next installment in The Salem Hawley Series. I would like to take a moment to talk about the epic cover designed by Kealan Patrick Burke. The cover captures the mood and the story as a whole. It catches the potential reader’s eye and it looks dope. It helps when a cover artist reads the manuscript before designing the cover. Elderlemon Design is where it’s at. It would look great framed in my office or on my shelf. I’ll definitely be picking up a physical copy for my personal collection. I’ve read all of Michael Patrick Hicks horror books. He keeps getting better with every publication. MPH has really honed his craft. The sentences are rhythmic and his prose is lyrical. It’s cool seeing an author grow in his craft. Look for big things to come from MPH, he’s on the rise. All of his horror books are one-sitters. You will not want to stop reading. You’ll want to read this one on the john, at the supper table, in the break room, and in the bed. Overall, highest of recommendations!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Warner

    Michael Patrick Hicks is fast becoming one of the first authors I think of when the topic of unflinching horror fiction comes up. Hicks routinely comes up with some of the nastiest ideas and delights in pushing the reader right up into the gore so that we may fully appreciate the slick, sticky monstrosities he has created. The Resurrectionists takes place in post-Revolutionary War NYC during a time when grave robbing was common as doctors sought to understand human anatomy better. One sympathizes Michael Patrick Hicks is fast becoming one of the first authors I think of when the topic of unflinching horror fiction comes up. Hicks routinely comes up with some of the nastiest ideas and delights in pushing the reader right up into the gore so that we may fully appreciate the slick, sticky monstrosities he has created. The Resurrectionists takes place in post-Revolutionary War NYC during a time when grave robbing was common as doctors sought to understand human anatomy better. One sympathizes, as science often appeared insane in the early years of human understanding. However, the scientists and doctors at the center of The Resurrectionists are performing these dirty deeds less so that they may better understand humanity and more so that they can contact something that lurks beyond the veil of reality. After witnessing Lovecraftian creatures preying on the dead and dying on the fields of battle, these veteran doctors begin experiments on those raised from the grave, or those unfortunate and unloved that society will not miss. It’s cruel, unusual, and… has the potential to tear a hole between our world and the world of the Elder Gods. As the series title may suggest, there is a combating force to this reckless evil: Salem Hawley, freed slave and military veteran, who enters the story after the Resurrectionists victimize the African American community on several occasions and law enforcement cannot even pretend to care. If I have a complaint about The Resurrectionists, it’s that it leaves us too soon. Again, it’s the start of a series. But I wanted MORE. And NOW. Seriously, the whole book is good, but the finale takes it up a notch. It is a novella full of monster madness, cosmic horror, and human cruelty. On that last note: Hicks does not shy away from human evils, whether physical, verbal, or social in nature. The book is full of evil men doing violent things to those who deserve better. And as it’s the story of a freed slave following a violent mystery in early America, racism also comes into play (but let’s be honest, when has racism not been in play in American history?). So on occasion it is not a very fun book. But nor should it be, in my opinion. Glossing over the ugliness of the time would’ve hurt the story and done a disservice to its victims (fictional though many of them may be in this case). Of Hicks’s work that I’ve read, he routinely puts some angry political commentary right into the gory body of his work. I’ve no idea if this follows his writing across all his works, but my appreciation of Hicks as a writer is that he is both things: genre political commentator and horror fiend. And, personally, I think the two sides of his fictional interests work hand in hand to make a better, more compelling whole. The Resurrectionists is a historical horror tale with crazy gore, deep mythology, and complex characterization. Should appeal to old fans of Lovecraftian mythos and those just starting to get into that world of cosmic horror. Hicks is a take-no-prisoners horror author and The Resurrectionists is one of his most interesting works. I am very excited to read the continuing story of Salem Hawley in future books. *I received an early copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review*

  28. 5 out of 5

    Diamond

    Review copy provide courtesy of NetGalley Having won his emancipation after fighting on the side of the colonies during the American Revolution, Salem Hawley is a free man. Only a handful of years after the end of British rule, Hawley finds himself drawn into a new war unlike anything he has ever seen. The Resurrectionists is the first in what will be a series following Salem Hawley going up against grave robbers, occultist doctors, and cosmic horrors, and it certainly did a fantastic job of gett Review copy provide courtesy of NetGalley Having won his emancipation after fighting on the side of the colonies during the American Revolution, Salem Hawley is a free man. Only a handful of years after the end of British rule, Hawley finds himself drawn into a new war unlike anything he has ever seen. The Resurrectionists is the first in what will be a series following Salem Hawley going up against grave robbers, occultist doctors, and cosmic horrors, and it certainly did a fantastic job of getting me hooked and ready for the upcoming books! Once again Hicks brought me almost too far into his story, I could nearly smell the blood and feel the tentacles reaching for me from the void. There's a fine balance between being so descriptive you feel like you're within the story, and being so descriptive it takes you out of the story, but Hicks has found that perfect balance and walks it with aplomb. I do wish I had gotten a bit more insight into Salem himself and what makes him tick. What I do know is that he is a moral, loyal, and badass character, and that's enough for me to know I'll gladly read about him fighting baddies and monsters for as many books as Hicks writes about him. This is also a novella length story with a lot happening at a very fast pace, and I'm sure as the series continues there will be more character development--so I'm not mad about it (but actually pretty psyched!) I mean, a black protagonist in post Revolutionary War America battling human and inhuman monsters? What's not to love?? We do get a pretty good picture of the antagonists here, and while that might seem a bit backwards I felt it really drove home just how much Salem is up against. If Lovecraftian monsters aren't enough, there are absolutely vile humans as well--racist, human sacrificing, grave robbing humans, and you will loathe them entirely. On the subject of race, I really appreciated that race issues of the time (and who are we kidding, they haven't gone anywhere) are so centered within the story, but treated with sensitivity. The N-word does make appearances, but is used sparingly and pretty much exclusively by the villains, which may seem small to some (but certainly felt big to me). The Resurrectionists is a great story on it's own, but also serves as a stellar introduction to a series that makes this "series shy" reader excited for what's to come.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Drenning

    Thanks to Netgalley for an ebook copy in exchange for a review. I really enjoyed this book. I wish it had been longer. Looking forward to reading the next books. The book really made you understand just how awful humans can be. The monsters were scary, and Hawley was a character I enjoyed and felt so much for. Definitely recommend and will read the future books.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bojoura

    Unfortunately this was not my read, although I had a difficult time with The Resurrectionists, it is not a bad book. I liked the creepiness, but the overall concept was too provocative and too explicit for my taste. While story was developing I thought the character of Salem Hawley wasn't developing enough. I really liked him and wish there had been more of him. But maybe this needs to be saved for the future of the series. For me it was too much about a villain's arousal at dead bodies, I would h Unfortunately this was not my read, although I had a difficult time with The Resurrectionists, it is not a bad book. I liked the creepiness, but the overall concept was too provocative and too explicit for my taste. While story was developing I thought the character of Salem Hawley wasn't developing enough. I really liked him and wish there had been more of him. But maybe this needs to be saved for the future of the series. For me it was too much about a villain's arousal at dead bodies, I would have liked to know more about the villain's motivations. The writing tough was really good and if you are a big fan of cosmic horror you'll have a great time with this book.

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