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Siege at Blue Mountain: Book Five in the Elfquest Graphic Novel Series PDF, ePub eBook

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30 review

Siege at Blue Mountain: Book Five in the Elfquest Graphic Novel Series

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Siege at Blue Mountain: Book Five in the Elfquest Graphic Novel Series PDF, ePub eBook The Wolfriders have settled into their new Holt in the Forbidden Grove. The tumult of the Quest is behind them, and new life has come to the tribe. All is peaceful until a Wolfrider child is kidnapped. The elves must once again confront Winnowill and her schemes -- but first they must get through the humans who worship the evil temptress!

30 review for Siege at Blue Mountain: Book Five in the Elfquest Graphic Novel Series

  1. 4 out of 5

    Michael Jandrok

    DISCLAIMER TIME: This is NOT the place you want to begin if you are new to the “Elfquest” universe. Go back and read the first run of the series. That sets up everything that happens going forward…..you have been warned. Now off with you. SHOO, or I’ll have a Preserver come over to your house and cocoon your favorite pet in wrapstuff……. Continuing forward with my “Elfquest” read-through now brings me to the first sequel to the initial 20-issue run of the series, “Siege at Blue Mountain.” This was DISCLAIMER TIME: This is NOT the place you want to begin if you are new to the “Elfquest” universe. Go back and read the first run of the series. That sets up everything that happens going forward…..you have been warned. Now off with you. SHOO, or I’ll have a Preserver come over to your house and cocoon your favorite pet in wrapstuff……. Continuing forward with my “Elfquest” read-through now brings me to the first sequel to the initial 20-issue run of the series, “Siege at Blue Mountain.” This was a 4-issue run that would serve notice that Cutter and his little band of Wolfriders would not be allowed to rest in their newly gained Holt for very long. A few seasons have passed, and the elves seem happy with the new arrangements, even making a strong alliance with the Preservers who originally populated the Forbidden Grove. But as fate would have it, the physically healed but still mentally scarred Winnowill would send out one of her Eight protectors in the form of Aroree to gather up a few of the Preservers for her own dastardly needs. Winnowill has gained total control of Blue Mountain with the passing of Lord Voll, and she has placed the elf population of the stronghold in a deep sleep, to better harness their magic powers and enrich her own strength. Aroree sees the offspring of Dewshine and Tyldak floating about and quickly kidnaps the child, taking him to Blue Mountain in hopes of buying her freedom from servitude to Winnowill. Meanwhile, Cutter hatches a plan to weaken Winnowill by turning her human worshippers against her. He leaves on a mission to contact Adar and Nonna, his human friends from the first Quest. He hopes that they can convince the humans in thrall to Winnowill to turn against her, but as you might guess, nothing turns out the way it should. Winnowill has figured out the plan, and has goaded the human clan to a warlike froth, providing them with metal weapons……..AND no more spoilers from me. Read the book, get in the game, it’s all the elvish melodrama you could ever hope for and more. Ok, hmmmmmm…..where exactly do I go with all of this? It’s fun to see all the characters in a new story, but uhhhhhhhhh…..I dunno….maybe a bit of the glimmer is starting to wear off for me. The things that I loved about the first series seem to be slightly off in “Siege at Blue Mountain.” Don’t misunderstand me, it’s still a very “human” story, and it’s important to remember that the Pini elves are really a reflection of the human condition in short but sturdy anime form. But that sense of belonging that drove the first Quest forward seems to be missing here to a certain degree. Everything about the series seems amped up to epic proportions. There is more violence and heartbreak in the first installment of the new tale than there was in the first 10 issues of the original story. It’s darker, yes…..edgier, yes….more complex, yes…..but somewhat less….ENGAGING. It’s the basic equivalent of the dreaded sophomore slump, the curse of the sequel, the second-album syndrome. The book wants to be bigger and glossier and shinier than its predecessor, but in doing so it has lost a bit of the humility and underdog scale of the first run. And hey, yanno…..kudos to the Pinis for reaching, even if they miss the mark a little bit. Doing a rehash of the original Quest was never in the offing, and it takes guts to meddle with the tried and true formula. I found it quite interesting that the foreword was written by one Len Wein, the comics writer who was best known for his work on “Swamp Thing” and the “X-Men.” And that is truly where “Elfquest” belongs, in the great canon of “outsider” literature. I’ve thought right from the beginning that the Pini elves really had a lot in common with the main themes from the “X-Men” universe. That feeling of being alone in a hostile world, of not fitting into polite society….oh, yeah….those are powerful ideas that speak to many of us who have often been bullied or labeled as “nerds” or “bookworms.” In a society where intellectualism is now seen as being synonymous with elitism, it’s something that a lot of us have had to endure at one point or another in our lives. It is an even more valid comparison given the fact that Rayek has taken his study of the eldritch elven magic to new heights, thus giving himself a set of superhero powers….flight...mind control...enhanced sight and strength. It’s almost like Rayek wants a tryout to the Xavier School or something…… I should also note that there are numerous pieces of portrait art in the back section of the book, along with a black & white short story that originally appeared in the first volume of the WARP Graphics Annual. “Courage, By Any Other Name” is a curious footnote, being the first “Elfquest” tale not directy produced by the Pinis, although they did supervise the work. It’s a quick jaunt back to the time of Bearclaw, and it adds a bit of the old flavor to the entire package. “Elfquest” remains an incredibly powerful title. The artwork is still strong, the panels still have that kinetic sense of motion that keeps things humming along, and overall the whole thing just looks pretty damn good. The Pinis had hit the big bongos by the time this collection was released, and their fame within the comics community was taking a toll on them personally. “Siege at Blue Mountain” was collected and released by Father Tree Press, which was a new division of WARP Graphics. I give Wendy and Richard Pini a ton of credit for keeping control of their creation. A lot of writers and artists would have been content to sell-out to one of the big publishers, but “Elfquest” still FEELS like an independent comic, albeit one with a monthly distribution that would dwarf most underground comics of the era. But I still can’t shake that feeling that it’s a bit...stale. It’s kind of like that piece of chicken that’s been in the fridge for a couple of days. It still tastes good, but you can tell that it’s right on the edge of going bad and giving you a mild case of the trots. The characters don’t all act in logical ways…..the plot seems to have a hole or two….and the entire enterprise feels like that big double-live album from your favorite rock band. You know all the songs, but it sounds a bit like the audience noise was piped in and the band might have been a bit drunk the night it was recorded. It’s got that big gatefold cover and all the cool pictures, it’s HUGE and glistening and all…….but it doesn’t have the excitement of that first album when nobody knew who those guys were. You were there at the start, a true believer……..but now that everyone knows about it….well, ok…..enough of that. It’s still “Elfquest.” It’s still head and shoulders above most of the comic dreck that was being released in the latter part of the ‘80s. That really should be enough. On to the next volume.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kendall

    Rereading this after so many years from it brings back all the excitement, all the wonder, all the love for it all over again.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jean

    This book was a bit shorter on story (four issues), but made up for it in part with a lovely portrait gallery and a collection of B&W art that reminded me of why I first started reading the series. A lot of things go wrong in this part of the story, reminding us of the consequences of lies and deceit. A worthy successor to the original comics, I want to read the next volume. It deserves 4.5 stars because it is shorter, but I rounded up because the story was compelling. Don't start with this v This book was a bit shorter on story (four issues), but made up for it in part with a lovely portrait gallery and a collection of B&W art that reminded me of why I first started reading the series. A lot of things go wrong in this part of the story, reminding us of the consequences of lies and deceit. A worthy successor to the original comics, I want to read the next volume. It deserves 4.5 stars because it is shorter, but I rounded up because the story was compelling. Don't start with this volume, but if you enjoy fantasy graphic novels, then do pick up the first volume.

  4. 4 out of 5

    David

    I wasn't as blown away by this as I was by the original quest, but it's still really good.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Feld

    And here's where the fit hits the shan, as various characters make selfish decisions that are going to affect everyone around them: Rayek wants to use the Gliders' magic to amp up the palace of the High Ones, while Aroree plans to buy her freedom from Winnowill, who's hatching plots of her own. I've reread this a few times, and it's clear that Aroree is supposed to set the plot in motion by doing something that devastates others, but that she doesn't see as wrong, buying her own freedom at someon And here's where the fit hits the shan, as various characters make selfish decisions that are going to affect everyone around them: Rayek wants to use the Gliders' magic to amp up the palace of the High Ones, while Aroree plans to buy her freedom from Winnowill, who's hatching plots of her own. I've reread this a few times, and it's clear that Aroree is supposed to set the plot in motion by doing something that devastates others, but that she doesn't see as wrong, buying her own freedom at someone else's expense. The fact that she doesn't understand her actions are bad is supposed to keep her sympathetic. But I just don't buy it--if she hates being one of the Chosen Eight so much, and wants sympathy for that, how can she think it's okay to condemn someone else to that life? (view spoiler)[Not to mention, if we're supposed to excuse her due to cultural relativism, she was raised to be an elite warrior, but what we've seen of her so far is her obeying Lord Voll in kidnapping Cutter's family, fleeing a battle the moment her leader is killed instead of trying to save her compatriots or continue fighting for her leader's quest, betraying the Gliders again because Winnowill is mean, betraying the Wolfriders by kidnapping a baby to take her place, almost murdering a fellow Glider to get her freedom (in which case, according to her logic, doesn't she need to kidnap someone ELSE to make up for THAT loss?), oh, and having lots of sex. (hide spoiler)] She's not conflicted, she's not misled, she's not from another culture, she's just a selfish coward. And I don't understand Skywise or anyone else justifying that or getting past that. I'm fine with the book having villains, I'm just irritated that characters I like and respect want to take them home and make them cocoa.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Conan Tigard

    Siege at Blue Mountain takes place shortly after the end of Quest's End. Once again, Wendy and Richard Pini do an admirable job of transporting the reader back to the world of the Elves. This time, the evil queen is back in the form of Winnowill. I enjoyed having Winnowill return, as she is a character that you love to hate. There is not one good thing about this malicious female elf, except for her looks. The only thing I was disappointed in was that this book was only four comics long, instead Siege at Blue Mountain takes place shortly after the end of Quest's End. Once again, Wendy and Richard Pini do an admirable job of transporting the reader back to the world of the Elves. This time, the evil queen is back in the form of Winnowill. I enjoyed having Winnowill return, as she is a character that you love to hate. There is not one good thing about this malicious female elf, except for her looks. The only thing I was disappointed in was that this book was only four comics long, instead of the usually five that the first three collection are and the six in the fourth collection. Still, Siege at Blue Mountain is worth reading if you really love these characters, as many do. I rated this book an 8½ out of 10.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jewels

    The subject of soul names and recognition is an interesting concept. I like the way that the Pinis show it both ways: when it is a mutual, loving relationship, but also when it is the worst possible thing that could happen. The joining of the tribes through these relationships and the offspring that connect them are fascinating to read about. The atrocity of using the elf's soul name against her shows the extent that Winnowill is willing to go to obtain and keep power. Another great adventure!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rhiannon Graye

    These are a series of graphic novels that I first read in my tweens and hold a special place in my childhood reading. I have since come back to them and re-read them several times, and for me, they continue to stand to the test of time. This series changed drastically in plot and voice after the eighth volume, and increasingly became more and more of the saccharine sweet fantasy fluff that I can't bear to read. The first eight volumes are literary treasures that I continue to cherish.

  9. 5 out of 5

    stormhawk

    Siege at Blue Mountain lacks the scope of the original quest, and takes the story in a darker direction. I don't remember as much of this story as I did the original, so it was almost like a completely new reading experience.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Larry

    Fun, but only half as good as the brilliant original series.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Boyd

    Fantastic blend of fantasy and comics. Incredible characters and story line. Highly recommended

  12. 5 out of 5

    Triny

    Loved it!! The author now made a full book in black and white with the whole story of the Wolfriders and she is a great writer!! O love her books and how she describes the story.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lafcadio

    The memories are all too fresh -- too humiliating for the proud stargazer to recount. Instead, he breathes a name...

  14. 5 out of 5

    Maja - BibliophiliaDK ✨

    Still going strong, still loving it!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    A personal favorite.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Winnowill is such a bitch, in the Shannen Doherty tradition. I bet she doesn't even have a soul name.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sophie

    Winnowill is the evil seductress to end all evil seductresses. Who knew that gills were so hot?

  18. 5 out of 5

    Gus

    Good to read with oatmeal. Read it only with oatmeal.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    reprints/collects the first half of the 8-issue miniseries Siege at Blue Mountan. re-read 12/15/2010

  20. 4 out of 5

    Qilune

    All of Wendy and Richard Pini's ElfQuest books are amazingly good. ALL OF THEM.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Larissa

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kennon

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bethany Jozwiak-butler

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bats

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  26. 5 out of 5

    Maggie

  27. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  28. 5 out of 5

    Shirley Zastrow kilpatrick

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mikael Rydfalk

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lolly's Library

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