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Mrs. Dalloway's Party: A Short Story Sequence PDF, ePub eBook "Mrs. Dalloway said she would buy the gloves herself. Big Ben was striking as she stepped out into the street. It was eleven o'clock and the unused hour was fresh as if issued to children on a beach." -from "Mrs. Dalloway in Bond Street" The landmark modern novel Mrs. Dalloway creates a portrait of a single day in the life of Clarissa Dalloway as she orchestrates the last-mi "Mrs. Dalloway said she would buy the gloves herself. Big Ben was striking as she stepped out into the street. It was eleven o'clock and the unused hour was fresh as if issued to children on a beach." -from "Mrs. Dalloway in Bond Street" The landmark modern novel Mrs. Dalloway creates a portrait of a single day in the life of Clarissa Dalloway as she orchestrates the last-minute details of a grand party. But before Virginia Woolf wrote this masterwork, she explored in a series of fascinating stories a similar revelry in the mental and physical excitement of a party. Wonderfully captivating, the seven stories in Mrs. Dalloway's Party create a dynamic and delightful portrait of what Woolf called "party consciousness." As parallel expressions of the themes of Mrs. Dalloway, these stories provide a valuable window into Woolf's writing mind and a further testament to her extraordinary genius.

30 review for Mrs. Dalloway's Party: A Short Story Sequence

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kenny

    "Mrs. Dalloway said she would buy the gloves herself. Big Ben was striking as she stepped out into the street. It was eleven o'clock and the unused hour was fresh as if issued to children on a beach." Virginia Woolf ~~ Mrs. Dalloway in Bond Street These seven short stories continue or extend Virginia Woolf's ideas about Mrs. Dalloway's party in Woolf's landmark 1925 novel Mrs. Dalloway. The stories in Mrs. Dalloway’s Party create a dynamic and delightful portrait of what Woolf called “party consci "Mrs. Dalloway said she would buy the gloves herself. Big Ben was striking as she stepped out into the street. It was eleven o'clock and the unused hour was fresh as if issued to children on a beach." Virginia Woolf ~~ Mrs. Dalloway in Bond Street These seven short stories continue or extend Virginia Woolf's ideas about Mrs. Dalloway's party in Woolf's landmark 1925 novel Mrs. Dalloway. The stories in Mrs. Dalloway’s Party create a dynamic and delightful portrait of what Woolf called “party consciousness.” Woolf has such tremendous insight into human nature and her character's inner psyches. These stories amaze me in their depth and the complexity of her characters' emotions. This is a wonderful companion piece to Mrs. Dalloway and should be read after Mrs. Dalloway to provide an even fuller portrait of the Dalloway's party.

  2. 4 out of 5

    P-eggy

    Shallow. I've never been able to see what was so great about Virginia Woolf and Vita Sackville-West, the premiere female authors of the Bloomsbury Set. Two women from the upper class who wrote books about upper class women who did nothing at all except have minor angsts or affairs which they wrote about with excellent powers of description but no introspection at all. The men were different, there were some very great writers amongst them - Lytton Strachey and the wonderful E.M. Forster, for exam Shallow. I've never been able to see what was so great about Virginia Woolf and Vita Sackville-West, the premiere female authors of the Bloomsbury Set. Two women from the upper class who wrote books about upper class women who did nothing at all except have minor angsts or affairs which they wrote about with excellent powers of description but no introspection at all. The men were different, there were some very great writers amongst them - Lytton Strachey and the wonderful E.M. Forster, for example. Really, the Bloomsbury set were famous for their casual sexual mores, their artistic inclination, their atheism and general opposition to the traditions of the times, all attitudes afforded to them by their aristocratic status and great wealth. Their time came and went, and I can't think of a good reason to revisit it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    I absolutely adored these short stories. I enjoyed delving into these people's minds while they are supposedly enjoying Mrs. Dalloway's party. Their thoughts say so much about the human condition and existence. How we are our own worst enemies. And her writing... I am so in love with Virginia Woolf. Let me be, let me be... P.S. We all have been to this party. Yesterday, today and tomorrow.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Inkspill

    I’m getting ready to read Virginia Woolf’s Mrs Dalloway bought me to this collection of 7 short after I discovered these would lead Woolf to write this novel. The first short Mrs Dalloway in Bond Street starts with: Mrs Dalloway said she would buy the gloves herself. When I read this – delicious!!! In this story Clarissa Dalloway visits a store to buy a pair of gloves for her party. The remaining six stories are all told from a different guest’s point of view at the party, where briefly there ar I’m getting ready to read Virginia Woolf’s Mrs Dalloway bought me to this collection of 7 short after I discovered these would lead Woolf to write this novel. The first short Mrs Dalloway in Bond Street starts with: Mrs Dalloway said she would buy the gloves herself. When I read this – delicious!!! In this story Clarissa Dalloway visits a store to buy a pair of gloves for her party. The remaining six stories are all told from a different guest’s point of view at the party, where briefly there are glimpses of the Dalloways, their home and lifestyle. I also liked how the first two stories give a contrast of Clarissa and Richard, in the second story, The Man Who loved His kind, though Richard has only a bit part his stuffiness becomes evident to Clarissa’s, who is less sure of herself. That unsureness and awkwardness runs through all the different stories as social prejudices and differences are touched upon. It’s funny how reading books can become an unintended treasure hunt. In learning Woolf wrote a short story I would discover these seven, how close they resemble the novel I will soon find out.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Duncan

    Mrs. Dalloway’s Party is a series of thematically linked stories, that can be read as vignettes or as one long party. It the first, “Mrs. Dalloway in Bond Street,” Mrs. Dalloway sallies forth to buy the gloves herself. At age 52, she runs smack into her own mortality on the way to the glove shop. Alarmed, she realizes for the first time that the shop girl is a good twenty years older than the last time Mrs. Dalloway bothered to really look at her, to consider her as a fellow human rather than a Mrs. Dalloway’s Party is a series of thematically linked stories, that can be read as vignettes or as one long party. It the first, “Mrs. Dalloway in Bond Street,” Mrs. Dalloway sallies forth to buy the gloves herself. At age 52, she runs smack into her own mortality on the way to the glove shop. Alarmed, she realizes for the first time that the shop girl is a good twenty years older than the last time Mrs. Dalloway bothered to really look at her, to consider her as a fellow human rather than as a mere servant worthy of no special consideration. Immediately, Mrs. Dalloway turns away from such dreary considerations to more important concerns: Will the wrong people come to her party while the right people stay away? Will dowdy women with no fashion sense attend? The answer is a resounding yes, yes, yes. The following stories revolve around the “wrong” people, who accept Mrs. Dalloway’s invitation as almost an afterthought , and the dowdy women, who do not conform to fashion’s dictates. Unabashed, the formidable Mrs. Dalloway plays matchmaker for these individuals. Even though she senses the true nature of each and makes what should be brilliant pairings, her efforts backfire. Each party attendee secretly feels inferior to the others. Their irrational sense of inferiority stems from such mundane things as their clothing, their small houses, their lack of servants, or their unconventional parents. In reality, each is a fascinating individual of integrity and depth. However, their fear of rejection, of being snubbed in public, is so great that they resort to a defensiveness that renders them insufferable bores. After comparing their secret selves to the false impressions that they have of each other, they each commit the sin of feeling superior. In consequence, they refrain from genuine, revealing discourse. They form quick, superficial opinions of each other and are reduced to insincerity. In exposing the true nature of each character, Woolf explores estheticism in conflict with humanitarianism, the working poor in conflict with the “well fed, overdressed,” and the corruption of the city in conflict with the purity of Nature. We also witness an “educated” man trivializing the literary aspirations of a woman in the eternal conflict of male and female. At Mrs. Dalloway’s party, we witness the irrationality of human exchange “filled with pain and pleasure.” Each person in attendance is an island, “excluded from humanity.” As clichéd as it is, each individual is utterly alone in the crowd. Each is “the secluded being, who sits in darkness,” aching to be known, but so afraid of being rebuffed that they offer nothing of their true selves to each other.

  6. 5 out of 5

    TheSkepticalReader

    Difficult to rate this collection seeing as how it was something intentionally omitted from the original novel. Not one I’d recommend to someone new to Woolf, that’s for sure.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lara

    I found two positive things to say about this book. First, as a self-confessed lover of 'all things gramatical', Virginia Woolf's long complex sentences are beautifully constructed. These can run for half a page, with side-tracks and twists, yet when you look back at them, they are absoltely correct. This, for me, is the joy of Woolf. But, this series of short stories is utterley devoid of joy. Don't be fooled by the publisher's assessment that the book has the whole range of emotions associated I found two positive things to say about this book. First, as a self-confessed lover of 'all things gramatical', Virginia Woolf's long complex sentences are beautifully constructed. These can run for half a page, with side-tracks and twists, yet when you look back at them, they are absoltely correct. This, for me, is the joy of Woolf. But, this series of short stories is utterley devoid of joy. Don't be fooled by the publisher's assessment that the book has the whole range of emotions associated with a party. My second positive to take away from this book is the incredibly insight Woolf offers into the mind of a woman who suffered from artistic repression, and depression. Her characters have generally negative experiences, as the result of the way they (mistakenly?) view the intentions of others around them. It is so true, we create our won misery through misunderstanding and assuming the worst. However, the stories - particularly the second to last (The New Dress) - were such a faithful picture of how a paranoid person can create their own miserable experience, whether or not their assumptions are correct. For me, this was just too sad a reminder of behaviour in people I know.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    Seven stories, a further look into the high society life that makes Mrs. Dalloway's party. Ms Woolf had a fascination with parties and I have a fascination with her fascination. "For a party makes things either much more real or much less real." My favorite story being the longest- written, entirely about one outdated dress.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Andy Zell

    Mrs. Dalloway’s Party by Virginia Woolf is a collection of stories that serve as a good companion to her classic novel Mrs. Dalloway. From the introduction to the book we learn that the stories were written at the same time as or just after the writing of the novel, the latter of which was especially unusual for Woolf. She usually moved on to something different when she completed a novel. But she was interested in what she called in her writing diary “party consciousness,” that something about Mrs. Dalloway’s Party by Virginia Woolf is a collection of stories that serve as a good companion to her classic novel Mrs. Dalloway. From the introduction to the book we learn that the stories were written at the same time as or just after the writing of the novel, the latter of which was especially unusual for Woolf. She usually moved on to something different when she completed a novel. But she was interested in what she called in her writing diary “party consciousness,” that something about the gathering together of so many people under one roof that was both more artificial and more real than everyday life. In the course of seven stories we encounter a guest whose speech would fill a book and others who stand on the fringes hardly able to utter a syllable. There are misunderstandings and miscommunications as social opposites are introduced to one another. One woman worries the entire night about having worn the wrong dress that is not the current fashion. She had thought to wear something unique, but instead ruminated on the decision the entire party. Another man thought that he was so above the other party goers and their frivolity that he could barely deign to converse with anyone, and when he did it was with only the utmost condescension. I thoroughly enjoyed this slim book, but I have to say that it works best as a companion to the novel.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kendra Danielle

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. My God, was this boring. Imagine reading about someone's very normal life for the course of what seems to be 24 hours. It was very bland, and while there were some parts that would spark (Peter Walsh & Mrs. Calloway seeing each other years later after Mrs. Calloway chose Richard over him) my interest didn't continue beyond that. Of course, this was an assigned reading for my junior year college English class. Otherwise I don't think I would have ever read it. I like to give certain books a s My God, was this boring. Imagine reading about someone's very normal life for the course of what seems to be 24 hours. It was very bland, and while there were some parts that would spark (Peter Walsh & Mrs. Calloway seeing each other years later after Mrs. Calloway chose Richard over him) my interest didn't continue beyond that. Of course, this was an assigned reading for my junior year college English class. Otherwise I don't think I would have ever read it. I like to give certain books a second chance, but everything I've read by Virginia Woolf has been rather bland. As a reader I feel like my mind needs to wonder with excitement - if not excitement than at least wonderment because of ema certain type of eloquence that the writer displays.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Bernadette Robinson

    This is our July Library Reading Group read and I can't wait to see what the rest of the group think. A very short book of 57 pages, comprising of 7 short stories or as it calls them in the introduction chapters. The only way that you could call them chapters is that they are all set in the lead up to the Party but aren't related to one another in any other way. Why? I have to ask myself are we in anyway interested in them as I found them rather dull and of very little substance. I found my mind This is our July Library Reading Group read and I can't wait to see what the rest of the group think. A very short book of 57 pages, comprising of 7 short stories or as it calls them in the introduction chapters. The only way that you could call them chapters is that they are all set in the lead up to the Party but aren't related to one another in any other way. Why? I have to ask myself are we in anyway interested in them as I found them rather dull and of very little substance. I found my mind wandering and they didn't keep me engaged at all. I gave the book a 4/10 and that was for the writing style rather than the content.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alison Gates

    I liked Woolf's perspective of writing each chapter about the feelings a guest has at a party, and I thought it interesting that many of these feelings still apply! However, I am not terribly fond of the writing style.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    I do love Virginia Woolf, and this is like a little added extra to Mrs Dalloway. Featuring characters already familiar from the main book, these are short stories focussing upon the thoughts and experiences of 7 individuals either going to or at Clarissa's party. Another short book!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Marie S.

    Read in one sitting. It's not bad, it's just nothing I'll remember by tomorrow morning. The stories are so short that I couldn't care for anyone.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Scott Martin Productions

    I have never been a huge Virginia Woolf fan. I'm easily made impatient by the rambling, the fake effusiveness and the introspection and self obsession and internal dialogue that seems to plague so many of her characters. I lose concentration and lose interest, even when it comes to a work as brief as Mrs Dalloway's Party. Is it just me, or is it also difficult for others to hang onto a context amidst all the written rambling? Take, for example, page 50. A sentence begins "She had married Hubert.. I have never been a huge Virginia Woolf fan. I'm easily made impatient by the rambling, the fake effusiveness and the introspection and self obsession and internal dialogue that seems to plague so many of her characters. I lose concentration and lose interest, even when it comes to a work as brief as Mrs Dalloway's Party. Is it just me, or is it also difficult for others to hang onto a context amidst all the written rambling? Take, for example, page 50. A sentence begins "She had married Hubert.." on line 2, and that same sentence only concludes 23 lines later. 23 lines! I have no doubt that this is quality writing and that it is something that I would benefit from persevering with... however, life is too short and is already far too confusing so I'm not about to justify such indulgence any time soon. However, this is precisely the type of writing that works brilliantly when read aloud, preferably by a professional - for example on a Radio 4 play. I listen to such introspective ramblings with far more understanding and tolerance and somehow the stories stay with me. It's as if I need the voice to interpret and express the complex phrases. So, to assist those of us with less than perfect concentration, in my opinion, Virginia Woolf should always be read aloud! More on my blog at https://wordpress.com/view/scottmarti... Or my website at www.scottmartinproductions.com.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jazmín

    Insightful, witty and esthetic, yet non-essential to its companion novel, Mrs Dalloway, Mrs Dalloway's party remains a testament to Virginia Woolf's beautiful prose and characterization. She proves herself to be better than her contemporary, more celebrated rival, James Joyce. "Aunque era tímida y casi incapaz de pronunciar palabra cuando de improviso le presentaban a alguien, en esencia humilde, abrigaba una profunda admiración por los demás. Ser como ellos sería maravilloso, pero estaba condena Insightful, witty and esthetic, yet non-essential to its companion novel, Mrs Dalloway, Mrs Dalloway's party remains a testament to Virginia Woolf's beautiful prose and characterization. She proves herself to be better than her contemporary, more celebrated rival, James Joyce. "Aunque era tímida y casi incapaz de pronunciar palabra cuando de improviso le presentaban a alguien, en esencia humilde, abrigaba una profunda admiración por los demás. Ser como ellos sería maravilloso, pero estaba condenada a ser ella misma y solo podía, con su entusiasmo silencioso, sentada en el jardín, aplaudir a la sociedad humana de la que estaba excluida."

  17. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

    Despite several interruptions even in the midst of a couple of these stories. I still enjoyed it. I am not much of a party goer. But I can relate to some of the inner thoughts of these elders at the party and i the shop. I at 50 am feeling my age and I think it helps to enjoy this collection of tales.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    A great (easy, enjoyable, brief) introduction to the work of Virginia Woolf, and one of the few short story collections (that I am aware of) that actually tie together, and revolve around a central theme (i.e., Mrs. Dalloway’s Party). 🙂

  19. 5 out of 5

    Pierre

    Excellent prose, terrible stories. Extraordinarily boring- I see no interest in these characters whatsoever.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    It's been so long since I've "read," officially, for GoodReads that I had to do another! "Mrs. Dalloway's Party" is a collection of short stories (and what was a draft of Chapter One of "Mrs. Dalloway") which Virginia Woolf wrote during and after her most well-known novel. It was bound up and published posthumously, featuring an intro by Woolf historian Stella McNichol. In the intro, McNichol touched upon Woolf's fascination with parties, perhaps akin to today's "5 minute dating" events. It was a It's been so long since I've "read," officially, for GoodReads that I had to do another! "Mrs. Dalloway's Party" is a collection of short stories (and what was a draft of Chapter One of "Mrs. Dalloway") which Virginia Woolf wrote during and after her most well-known novel. It was bound up and published posthumously, featuring an intro by Woolf historian Stella McNichol. In the intro, McNichol touched upon Woolf's fascination with parties, perhaps akin to today's "5 minute dating" events. It was a chance to get people out of their usual doldrums and to have them interact in unusual ways (it seems in fact that this might be the only way for most men and women to talk socially.) Woolf's fascination with parties reminds me of my writerly fascination with the airport. :P It's a way to see people out of their usual milieu, and that's often when peoples' emotions- their fears and excitements- are closest to the surface. People at parties often seem uncomfortable. :P Their self-absorption keeps them from accepting other people- for example with Prickett Ellis in "The Man Who Loved His Kind" and Mrs. Vallance in "Ancestors." Unfortunately doubt also keeps people apart- like in "Together and Apart" where, despite discovering a similar profound love for Canterbury, both Mr. Serle and Miss Anning are afraid to take the relationship further. Woolf's biggest fault, to my mind, is that although she gives amazing detail to the inner thoughts of these different personalities, she has no sense of distinct voice. They all sound rambly and well-schooled in the same vocabulary. Though to be fair, the rambly part is a testament to the "stream-of-consciousness," that each of these stories is supposed to convey the realistic ramblings of the human thought process second by second (juxtaposed by occasional interruptions from the physical world.) I will always admire and respect Virginia Woolf for her truthfulness in how people think.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    As short story collections go, "Mrs. Dalloway's party" is a miracle. By that I mean that,in general, rating a book of short stories can be quite tricky. Usually they are the proverbial "mixed-bag" of stories you like and dislike in turn, and feel obliged to give a lower rating because you can't reconcile the two disproportionate halves. With "Mrs. Dalloway's Party" this was not my experience. The curation of this volume is near perfect; every single story in it belongs right where it is. Each in As short story collections go, "Mrs. Dalloway's party" is a miracle. By that I mean that,in general, rating a book of short stories can be quite tricky. Usually they are the proverbial "mixed-bag" of stories you like and dislike in turn, and feel obliged to give a lower rating because you can't reconcile the two disproportionate halves. With "Mrs. Dalloway's Party" this was not my experience. The curation of this volume is near perfect; every single story in it belongs right where it is. Each in it's way explores what Virginia Woolf terms "The Party Consciousness", or the psychology of the party. To quote the Introduction by Stella McNichol: "It is the psychology of the party, the subtleties of the human being's reactions and anxieties under the conditions and limits imposed on him by the social occasion that are closely scrutinized by Virginia Woolf in 'Mrs. Dalloway's Party.' The artificiality of the occasion brings the reality to the fore or gives access to it." Just prior to reading "Mrs. Dalloway's Party" I read the novel "Mrs. Dalloway" and this volume, I think, adds some interesting insights into it's conception. The first story, "Mrs. Dalloway in Bond Street" begins: "Mrs. Dalloway said she would buy the gloves herself." Sound familiar? I found myself mentally comparing and contrasting this story with the opening scenes of "Mrs. Dalloway". This short story well illustrates the changes and nuances added in the process of writing, and gives us a fuller appreciation of the genius of "Mrs. Dalloway" as a finished novel. The final six stories bring us into the consciousness of various guests at the party. While clearly these stories were better left out of "Mrs. Dalloway" as a novel, they are a wonderful addendum in fleshing out what went on in the minds of characters that were given but a brief mention during the final scenes of "Mrs. Dalloway." Highly, highly recommended. Four and a half stars.

  22. 5 out of 5

    K

    Bonus material to read slowly for readers who Love Mrs. Dalloway.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kadidja May

    I've never read anything by Woolf before, but I must say that I enjoy her writing style. I can almost hear my old English teacher say how "fine" this writing is, how beautiful those little moments of recognition at the end of most of these short stories are when the characters finally understand something. And I guess I agree with his imaginary comments. Woolf's narrative technique isn't something you would call conventional though. Her stories pretty much consist of pure streams of consciousness I've never read anything by Woolf before, but I must say that I enjoy her writing style. I can almost hear my old English teacher say how "fine" this writing is, how beautiful those little moments of recognition at the end of most of these short stories are when the characters finally understand something. And I guess I agree with his imaginary comments. Woolf's narrative technique isn't something you would call conventional though. Her stories pretty much consist of pure streams of consciousness reflecting the process of thinking as accurately as possible. One moment Miss Anning is thinking about a holiday in Canterbury, the next about the moon and then about the guy sitting next to her. And the awkwardness of the characters is just great! "The New Dress", "The Introduction" and "Together and Apart" are probably my favourites. I really like how the characters' insecurity is depicted and how realistic they are. After all, aren't we all awkward sometimes, or completely paranoid about our looks once in a while? Be honest. Yeah, I thought so. Overall, I really enjoyed the stories, although there's a tendency of confusing the reader with so many mental leaps. One has to get used to the style, and a reread of some paragraphs wouldn't be such a bad idea either. Very fine writing indeed.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ali

    Mrs Dalloway’s Party is a short story sequence which was written in the same period as Virginia Woolf’s classic novel Mrs Dalloway. The opening story Mrs Dalloway in Bond Street was originally intended as the first chapter of that novel. Each of these stories illustrates beautifully Virginia Woolf’s fascination with parties and the raft of emotions and difficulties such occasions may bring. In these stories Woolf shines a light on the society in which she had grown up – in her portrayal of the g Mrs Dalloway’s Party is a short story sequence which was written in the same period as Virginia Woolf’s classic novel Mrs Dalloway. The opening story Mrs Dalloway in Bond Street was originally intended as the first chapter of that novel. Each of these stories illustrates beautifully Virginia Woolf’s fascination with parties and the raft of emotions and difficulties such occasions may bring. In these stories Woolf shines a light on the society in which she had grown up – in her portrayal of the guests that attend Mrs Dalloway’s party Woolf presents us with the stories and voices of that society. In these stories Mrs Dalloway’s guests often appear isolated from the rest of the guests, middle aged, and upper middle class women anxious about their appearance, the antecedents of other guests, or their own reception by others at the party. Clarissa Dalloway, the indomitable hostess does her best to draw them out, introducing them to each other. Yet each of them has their own worries and concerns, so those who Clarissa tries to pair off – seem incapable of taking advantage of the chance she gives them. Full review: https://heavenali.wordpress.com/2016/...

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bettie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A 'scrollopy' hand-glass held out to middle-aged, middle-classed, angst-ridden females who have crashed heavily and head-first into the harsh reality of that which goes by the title Human Condition. Brilliant stuff. Mrs Dalloway's Party: Together and Apart by Virginia Woolf Read by Emma Fielding Abridged and produced by Lucy Collingwood blurb - Fascinated and preoccupied by the idea of this social event,Virginia Woolf wrote this story sequence around the same time as writing the novel Mrs Dalloway A 'scrollopy' hand-glass held out to middle-aged, middle-classed, angst-ridden females who have crashed heavily and head-first into the harsh reality of that which goes by the title Human Condition. Brilliant stuff. Mrs Dalloway's Party: Together and Apart by Virginia Woolf Read by Emma Fielding Abridged and produced by Lucy Collingwood blurb - Fascinated and preoccupied by the idea of this social event,Virginia Woolf wrote this story sequence around the same time as writing the novel Mrs Dalloway. In each of these three stories written in Woolf's distinctive style, the listener is offered glimpses into each character's inner most thoughts and emotions. Woolf depicts the intriguing social world of Mrs Dalloway's party in microscopic detail. In 'Together and Apart', two people are introduced at Mrs Dalloway's party and begin a rather awkward conversation where each of their internal thoughts about the other is revealed. Until they hit upon a subject close to both of their hearts.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Patricia

    Some of the stories offer a perspective on the different paths the novel could have taken. The novel is probably sleeker without Mrs. Dalloway wondering whether to buy Cranford for Milly, but I love how she reflects on the episode of the cow in flannel and laments the humor and self-respect(!) that kind of writing embodied. It's fascinating to follow the alternate routes novel might have taken. But the value of the stories go beyond that. Like her essays and novels, these stories capture "moment Some of the stories offer a perspective on the different paths the novel could have taken. The novel is probably sleeker without Mrs. Dalloway wondering whether to buy Cranford for Milly, but I love how she reflects on the episode of the cow in flannel and laments the humor and self-respect(!) that kind of writing embodied. It's fascinating to follow the alternate routes novel might have taken. But the value of the stories go beyond that. Like her essays and novels, these stories capture "moments of being," vividly experienced slices of time, flashes of light that illuminate a personality. The stories, mostly about conversations between people at party often wonderfully juxtapose the sharply observed surface of a conversation with depths of their interior life, as if Woolf is unraveling infinite riches compacted into a moment.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Zara

    This is wonderful if you loved Mrs. Dalloway, like discovering a really good fan fiction about one of your favourite moments in a loved book, except it's written by the same author as the book. What a privilege to read the draft of the opening sequence in Mrs Dalloway, where instead of flowers, she goes to buy a pair of gloves. It feels like a peek inside Virginia Woolf's mind, watching the cogs turning. Each short story is profound and fascinating, making me wish it was a longer book. After rea This is wonderful if you loved Mrs. Dalloway, like discovering a really good fan fiction about one of your favourite moments in a loved book, except it's written by the same author as the book. What a privilege to read the draft of the opening sequence in Mrs Dalloway, where instead of flowers, she goes to buy a pair of gloves. It feels like a peek inside Virginia Woolf's mind, watching the cogs turning. Each short story is profound and fascinating, making me wish it was a longer book. After reading this I wanted to read Mrs Dalloway again, because I could now flesh out the party scene more fully with the characters that inhabited it. I recommend this to anyone who enjoys Woolf's work, and especially who enjoyed Mrs Dalloway.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Fascinated and preoccupied by the idea of this social event,Virginia Woolf wrote this story sequence around the same time as writing the novel Mrs Dalloway. In each of these three stories written in Woolf's distinctive style, the listener is offered glimpses into each character's inner most thoughts and emotions. Woolf depicts the intriguing social world of Mrs Dalloway's party in microscopic detail. This story, 'Mrs Dalloway in Bond Street', follows Mrs Dalloway as she runs errands and prepares Fascinated and preoccupied by the idea of this social event,Virginia Woolf wrote this story sequence around the same time as writing the novel Mrs Dalloway. In each of these three stories written in Woolf's distinctive style, the listener is offered glimpses into each character's inner most thoughts and emotions. Woolf depicts the intriguing social world of Mrs Dalloway's party in microscopic detail. This story, 'Mrs Dalloway in Bond Street', follows Mrs Dalloway as she runs errands and prepares for the party she's hosting. http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b007vzr2

  29. 4 out of 5

    James

    Spot on! "Fibres of her were floated capriciously this way and that, like tentacles of a sea anemone, how thrilled, now snubbed, and her brain, miles away, cool and distant,up on the air, received messages which it would sum up in time so that, when people talked about Roderick Serle (and he was a bit of a figure) she would say unhesitatingly: 'I like him,' or 'I don't like him,' and her opinion would be made up for ever. An odd thought; a solemn thought; throwing a green light on what human fel Spot on! "Fibres of her were floated capriciously this way and that, like tentacles of a sea anemone, how thrilled, now snubbed, and her brain, miles away, cool and distant,up on the air, received messages which it would sum up in time so that, when people talked about Roderick Serle (and he was a bit of a figure) she would say unhesitatingly: 'I like him,' or 'I don't like him,' and her opinion would be made up for ever. An odd thought; a solemn thought; throwing a green light on what human fellowship consisted of." Last weekend, I was at this party.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nate D

    Extended bonus tracks -- a remix / alt version of the opening, plus six party-sequence expansions, broadening the internal landscapes of social obligation and uncertainty in exquisitely rendered single-viewpoints. I actually thought more could have been done with the party itself in Mrs. Dalloway, seeing as such a gathering is a fantastic venue for Woolf's wandering subjective camera techniques, and she evidently agreed.

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