Hot Best Seller

Stigmata: Escaping Texts PDF, ePub eBook

4.6 out of 5
30 review

Stigmata: Escaping Texts

Availability: Ready to download

File Name: Stigmata: Escaping Texts .pdf

How it works:

1. Register a free 1 month Trial Account.

2. Download as many books as you like (Personal use)

3. Cancel the membership at any time if not satisfied.


Stigmata: Escaping Texts PDF, ePub eBook Helene Cixous -- author, playwright and French feminist theorist -- is a key figure in twentieth-century literary theory. Stigmata brings together her most recent essays for the first time. Acclaimed for her intricate and challenging writing style, Cixous presents a collection of texts that get away -- escaping the reader, the writers, the book. Cixous's writing pursues aut Helene Cixous -- author, playwright and French feminist theorist -- is a key figure in twentieth-century literary theory. Stigmata brings together her most recent essays for the first time. Acclaimed for her intricate and challenging writing style, Cixous presents a collection of texts that get away -- escaping the reader, the writers, the book. Cixous's writing pursues authors such as Stendhal, Joyce, Derrida, and Rembrandt, da Vinci, Picasso -- works that share an elusive movement in spite of striking differences. Along the way these essays explore a broad range of poetico-philosophical questions that have become characteristic of Cixous' work: * love's labours lost and found * feminine hours * autobiographies of writing * the prehistory of the work of art Stigmata goes beyond theory, becoming an extraordinary writer's testimony to our lives and times.

30 review for Stigmata: Escaping Texts

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jonfaith

    Take the living instant with the closest and the most delicate words. Without words as witnesses the instant (will not have been) is not. I do not write to keep. I write to feel. I write to touch the body of the instant with the tips of words. One suspects that Cixous and Derrida do not pen their essays for the neutral, or accidental reader. There is a certain expected level of prior reading facility which is expected or required. Unfortunately, when said essays are collected, the prior reading f Take the living instant with the closest and the most delicate words. Without words as witnesses the instant (will not have been) is not. I do not write to keep. I write to feel. I write to touch the body of the instant with the tips of words. One suspects that Cixous and Derrida do not pen their essays for the neutral, or accidental reader. There is a certain expected level of prior reading facility which is expected or required. Unfortunately, when said essays are collected, the prior reading for such preparedness is cumulatively beyond the pale of most layman. Consider me one of the inept. Wait, Jon, are you talking about core requirements for anyone approaching these essays? Yes, yes I am. When I was child my younger sister couldn't pronounce the J sound and instead called me Non. I've been preoccupied ever since with the Void. Most of the early essays in the book were generally opaque, given that I wasn't well versed in the examined texts. The collection then pivoted to a more autobiographical bend. I do not write to keep. I write to feel. These works sift through childhood and family genealogy, fingering the filaments of ethnicity and ritual. Cixous shines in such artful movements: the gravity of the themes explored is warped (refracted) by the adroit play of language and homonym. Identity is forever splintered. What I kept away from, in keeping my name and my nose, was the temptation of disavowal.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kate Savage

    This is the most important book I have ever read. I read about her dog Fips on a plane leaving home, and wanted to shake the poor sap next to me and say LISTEN TO THIS DID YOU EVER HEAR SOMETHING THIS TRUE? That is the blessing of Cixous, but she comes with a burden. When you do share a line from her with a person you love, you have around a 1 in 10 chance that this person will feel the same way. A greater likelihood, as I've sadly found, is that you'll only make people feel confused and uncomfor This is the most important book I have ever read. I read about her dog Fips on a plane leaving home, and wanted to shake the poor sap next to me and say LISTEN TO THIS DID YOU EVER HEAR SOMETHING THIS TRUE? That is the blessing of Cixous, but she comes with a burden. When you do share a line from her with a person you love, you have around a 1 in 10 chance that this person will feel the same way. A greater likelihood, as I've sadly found, is that you'll only make people feel confused and uncomfortable. This is not a normal book. In Cixous' own words: "this book gives itself the freedom to escape from the laws of society. It does not fit the description. It does not answer the signals. It does not get a visa. "For the the policeforce reader it seems to be an anarchic thing, an untamed beast. It incites the reflex to arrest. But the freedom my book gives itself is not insane. It exercises the right to invention, to research. We only search for what no one has yet found, but which exists nonetheless. We search for one land, we find another."

  3. 4 out of 5

    Hadrian

    I can't speak for anything else in this collection, but "The Love of the Wolf" is a fearsome bit of criticism. Reads almost like a free-verse poem.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Carrie Lorig

    bloodmagic.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Konrad

    I admire Cixous & her style -- her practice of closing her eyes while writing, to muzz up the mark between outside & inside, to 'write at the pace of the present.' What better way to "wrest one's prey from forgetfulness" (194), than to speed on just as quickly. [Is her revision just as much a dash?] Lucidity may become a bit blurred at times, & the worst induces a vertigo familiar to much french lit. theory, but the general feeling reaches a cruising, pleasing littéraire buzz. & I admire Cixous & her style -- her practice of closing her eyes while writing, to muzz up the mark between outside & inside, to 'write at the pace of the present.' What better way to "wrest one's prey from forgetfulness" (194), than to speed on just as quickly. [Is her revision just as much a dash?] Lucidity may become a bit blurred at times, & the worst induces a vertigo familiar to much french lit. theory, but the general feeling reaches a cruising, pleasing littéraire buzz. & in such a style, avowing fault for the death of a dog never read so well.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Helen McClory

    So much stuff underlined and pondered. I love how Cixous assumes an intelligent reader (often wrongly in my case, but). Wandering and chancy and discoursive. Love.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    I find Cixous' writing to be utterly enchanting, surprising in its readableness and quite ferociously intelligent. Indeed, I find the ease with which I read her the most surprising thing of all; I ask myself, shouldn't theory be more 'difficult' than this? Perhaps it is the age I am. The last time I read theory with any kind of concentration was over 15 years ago at university. Then, I struggled. Then, the words seemed to swarm in front of my eyes, writhing and fluid, hard to pin down, opaque. Oc I find Cixous' writing to be utterly enchanting, surprising in its readableness and quite ferociously intelligent. Indeed, I find the ease with which I read her the most surprising thing of all; I ask myself, shouldn't theory be more 'difficult' than this? Perhaps it is the age I am. The last time I read theory with any kind of concentration was over 15 years ago at university. Then, I struggled. Then, the words seemed to swarm in front of my eyes, writhing and fluid, hard to pin down, opaque. Occasionally a shard of meaning would reveal itself, but it wouldn't be long before that shard was obscured once more, in words on words on painfully obfuscating words. So, me and theory do not have the best history. But Cixous' writing is, for the most part, very different: it is enjoyable, for a start, being as poetic as it is philosophical or academic. This is something of a revelation to me. Also, she lacks the (very male) tendency to beat one over the head with her arguments - her arguments are a slow and steady suggestion, implying much, revealing much, like light shone on a darkened corner. She never overdoes, she is lightness personified, and her heavy accents are always thoughtfully used, and sparingly. Plus she writes mind-boggling sentences like this: 'That's why I always liked Plutarch when I was little.' I can entirely see the child-Cixous bent in concentration over Plutarch. And thank God for it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Andy Cass

    Cixous is incredible. This is the first full work I've read by her, but now I'm eager to read more. The only essay I struggled to get through was "Mamae, Disse Ele". I usually read each essay once high and once sober, so if weed is your thing then I recommend that!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dani M

    "The poison is not hate it is weak love. We were poisoned. I poisoned him." p.259. <3

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    This is a collection of Cixous' shorter non-fiction works from a variety of sources translated into English. Therefore, it is a collection of her essays on different topics from the 1980s and 1990s with the common theme of most of these short works concerning writing in some capacity. Of all the French post-structuralists, Cixous has always been the most interested in the epistemological and philosophical aspects of writing itself. Her empahsis here starts off on her own marginal status as a Fre This is a collection of Cixous' shorter non-fiction works from a variety of sources translated into English. Therefore, it is a collection of her essays on different topics from the 1980s and 1990s with the common theme of most of these short works concerning writing in some capacity. Of all the French post-structuralists, Cixous has always been the most interested in the epistemological and philosophical aspects of writing itself. Her empahsis here starts off on her own marginal status as a French Jew in Algeria and then, in due turn, an Algerian in France. Branching out from her own experience, she examines other writers and artists who have also written out their lives as a mechanism for coping with marginalization and social or personal dischord. Via these texts, Cixous interrogates the very core of what it means to be "a writer" and also how writing in treated and read in various capacities. She is always personal moreso than academic though her mighty and encompassing knowledge of literature is clear in all of these essays. In all, while not considered an introduction, per se, to Cixous' work nor the best place to start on her most essential writing, this book is highly useful to anyone interested in Cixous or in contemporary writing in general. The concept of the "other" oft located in post-structural and feminist writing is nowhere better explored than in these essays and the general approach Cixous takes to her discernment of the writing process is unmatched.

  11. 5 out of 5

    The Book Addict (Bite-Sized Reviews)

    "i urge you: bite me. sign my death with your teeth." T H O U G H T S: a collection of cixous' shorter texts and essays, brilliantly and brashly written, wandering and conjuring, compelling you to read and reread and draw out a tapestry of meaning.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    844.914 C5829 2005

  13. 4 out of 5

    meg madison

    actually did not finish. heavy going for me.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tina.

    Would give it four-and-a-half, if I could.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jernihsiagian

    hhhmmm

  16. 5 out of 5

    christopher leibow

    This is a marvelous collection of some of Cixous essays. Read the essay on Rembrandt is worth the purchase of the book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Drangspume

    I'm in the process of reading this book, which, like its title, is polysemic. Multilingual etymologies permeate and pierce the spine, scarifying it with the intricacies of ornament.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rhan

    like...

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sabrina

    Intelligent and emotional integration of personal memory and critical literary theory. Derrida calls her the greatest writer in the French language.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tamara

    Beautiful and haunting poetry that I term womanly, not feminine.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Peter Wilkin

  22. 4 out of 5

    steffi

  23. 5 out of 5

    Julie

  24. 5 out of 5

    Vera Y.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Naomi

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jared

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sabela Ausland

  28. 4 out of 5

    L

  29. 4 out of 5

    Narya Feathers

  30. 4 out of 5

    Clairedaigle

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.