Hot Best Seller

The Elves of Cintra PDF, ePub eBook

4.6 out of 5
30 review

The Elves of Cintra

Availability: Ready to download

File Name: The Elves of Cintra .pdf

How it works:

1. Register a free 1 month Trial Account.

2. Download as many books as you like (Personal use)

3. Cancel the membership at any time if not satisfied.


The Elves of Cintra PDF, ePub eBook With his groundbreaking New York Times bestseller The Sword of Shannara and its acclaimed sequels, Terry Brooks brought a new audience to epic fantasy. Then he gave the genre a darkly compelling contemporary twist in his trilogy of the Word and the Void. Last year, in Armageddon’s Children, Brooks undertook the stunning chronicle that united two unique worlds. Now that sto With his groundbreaking New York Times bestseller The Sword of Shannara and its acclaimed sequels, Terry Brooks brought a new audience to epic fantasy. Then he gave the genre a darkly compelling contemporary twist in his trilogy of the Word and the Void. Last year, in Armageddon’s Children, Brooks undertook the stunning chronicle that united two unique worlds. Now that story of clashing forces of darkness and light, of Shannara’s beginnings and the human race’s possible end, marches forward into an unforgettable second volume full of mystery, magic, and momentous events. Across the ruined landscape that is America–hopelessly poisoned, plague-ridden, burned, and besieged by demon armies bent on exterminating all mortal life–two pilgrims have been summoned to serve the embattled cause of good. Logan Tom has journeyed to desolate Seattle to protect a ragged band of street urchins and the being known as “the gypsy morph,” who is both mortal and magical, and destined to save mankind unless he is destroyed. Likewise, Angel Perez has her own quest, one that will take her from the wreckage of Los Angeles to a distant, secret place untouched by the horrors of the nationwide blight–a place where the race of Elves has dwelled since before man existed. But close behind these lone Knights of the Word swarm the ravening forces of the Void. As the menacing thunder of war drums heralds the arrival of the demons and their brutal minions in Seattle, the young survivors who call themselves the Ghosts are forced to brave the dangerous world of gangs, mutants, and worse to escape the invasion. And Logan Tom must infiltrate a refugee compound to rescue Hawk, the leader of the street urchins, who has yet to learn the truth about who and what he is. Meanwhile, Angel Perez has joined an equally urgent mission: to find the Ellcrys, a fabled talisman crucial to protecting the Elven realm against an influx of unspeakable evil from the dread dimension known as the Forbidding. But Angel and her Elf allies must beware–for a demon spy, with a monstrous creature at its command, walks among them. As the legions of darkness draw the noose tighter, and the time of confrontation draws near, those chosen to defend the soul of the world must draw their battle lines and prepare to fight with, and for, their lives. If they fail, humanity falls. From the Hardcover edition.

30 review for The Elves of Cintra

  1. 4 out of 5

    Squire

    #5/29 in my Epic Shannara Quest. The second book in Brooks' Genesis of Shannara series is full of exciting, escapist fun; but some of the characters introduced in the book seem perfunctory and it reads like about 100 pages were cut from the story (the second half seems rushed). Still, it is an engrossing continuation of the story begun in Armageddon's Children, full of strange wonders and mystery with some surprisingly hefty life and death issues, that left me wanting to read the concluding volu #5/29 in my Epic Shannara Quest. The second book in Brooks' Genesis of Shannara series is full of exciting, escapist fun; but some of the characters introduced in the book seem perfunctory and it reads like about 100 pages were cut from the story (the second half seems rushed). Still, it is an engrossing continuation of the story begun in Armageddon's Children, full of strange wonders and mystery with some surprisingly hefty life and death issues, that left me wanting to read the concluding volume. I like the second chapter of a trilogy to be darker than the first, but that didn't turn out to be the case. I also miss the cliff-hanger ending of the first book. The post-apocalyptic world Brooks has fashioned remains the fascinating focal point of the series.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    The Elves of Cintra is the second book in the Genesis of Shannara series by Terry Brooks. I've been a Brooks fan since I first read Sword of Shannara back in Junior High School. While I haven't absolutely loved all of his books, I've really enjoyed most of them. Over time, he's had two series that take place more or less in "our world." The first was the Landover series which was generally more light-hearted fun with some tongue-in-cheek elements (not as farcical as say the Xanth series, but als The Elves of Cintra is the second book in the Genesis of Shannara series by Terry Brooks. I've been a Brooks fan since I first read Sword of Shannara back in Junior High School. While I haven't absolutely loved all of his books, I've really enjoyed most of them. Over time, he's had two series that take place more or less in "our world." The first was the Landover series which was generally more light-hearted fun with some tongue-in-cheek elements (not as farcical as say the Xanth series, but also not your sweeping epic fantasy, although some of the Landover books have some moderately engaging depth to them). His other venture into our "modern world" started with his Word and Void stories. The idea being that there are two basic forces in the world…the Word, which reigns over the good elements and the Void which reigns over the bad. Starting in the late 90s, he put out a trilogy following some encounters between the Word and the Void in modern day America. In the series he set forth some intriguing elements such as Knights of the Word (who are servants of the Word and strive to maintain goodness and order under the direction of the Word), the Demons and Once-Men (servants of the Void who try to subvert the world of Man and bring us into darkness and destruction) and the Feeders (invisible forms that prey on negativity and thrive on chaos, anger and other disagreeable emotions and actions of humanity). The Genesis of Shannara series picks up years after the Word and Void series and the world is in an essentially post-apocalyptic state. The government has collapsed…in fact, any real sense of civilization is all but gone. Most of humanity is huddling together for their survival either hiding in more remote areas and hoping to be left alone, or fortifying themselves in "compounds" created inside large structures such as sports arenas. Meanwhile, a variety of Demons and Feeders are subverting the land and creating an army of "Once-Men" to help seek out and exterminate mankind. Not a very pretty picture. The first book in the series (Armageddon's Children) primarily followed Logan Tom, a Knight of the Word, on a quest to travel across the country and find a "creature of faerie" masquerading in human form as a teenage boy. The first book ended with a rather climactic cliffhanger that raised uncertainty about much of the successful progress made in the first book. This second novel continued the story of Logan Tom but also, as the title suggests, brings in a new race of faerie creatures…the Elves. Apparently, the Elves have been essentially hiding out and living their lives for centuries, ignoring (and largely despising) Man. For those who have read some of the other Shannara books, you'll recognize some of the family and city names as well as the idea of Elcrys and the Chosen. For those unfamiliar, the Elcrys is a magical tree cared for by the Elves. This special tree has a very special function where it creates a sort of shield/barrier, called the Forbidding, behind which an immense population of extremely evil and ancient faerie creatures are trapped. Basically if the Elcrys/Forbidding fail, then our world will be overrun. With the fall of mankind, the Elcrys needs to be protected and so a quest is set out for a Chosen (one of those who cares for the Elcrys) to find a particular talisman and move the Elcrys and the Elves to safety. Meanwhile, Logan Tom escapes from the cliffhanger ending at the end of book 1 and begins a trek southward with the ragtag family of the Gypsy Morph Hawk (the faerie creature he went to save)…to try and reunite with Hawk and lead the kids to safety. In the style very well-known to Brooks readers, we get to follow multiple groups of characters on a variety of quests. Another Knight of the Word comes in to help the Elves. We're also given some close attention to a couple of Demons hunting the Knights, the Elves and the Gypsy Morph. So there are always at least two primary groups each on their own adventure and at times we are given some attention to the smaller groups as they slowly converge on their individual plans and get closer to one another. This book had a lot of intricate moments of suspense and intrigue where we are made to question the motives and trustworthiness of some of the individuals. This is another hallmark of Brooks's work that I enjoy…the fact that his heroes are never perfect, often quite flawed, and they also usually tend to be faced with such odds that it truly is questionable whether or not they will succeed. There is some foreshadowing in the book that definitely suggests some or many of the key characters will NOT survive through the entire series but will end up sacrificing themselves for the good of the others. Because of this, it added the tension to each suspenseful moment or action sequence because it was always very possible that one of the key characters could be killed off as part of this sacrifice. Thus the suspense felt more real…rather than the suspense often felt where you feel on edge but you know in the back of your mind that the hero will prevail because, well, he's the hero and that's the way it works. Overall, I really enjoyed this book and I'm having fun with this series both as a continuation of the Word and Void series and as a bridge to the world of magic and fantasy in the main Shannara series. I really like the ideas presented in the Word/Void series and the way they continue to develop here. It provides interesting theories and ideas related to the nature of morality, good/evil, and the overall psychology and mindset of Mankind. As this is the second book in a series, you need to be sure to at least read the previous book before starting this one (I'd suggest the Word/Void series as well, though it's not vital). Like book 1, this book ends with plenty of things unraveling. That said, the cliffhanger in book 1 was far more dramatic than the ending of book 2. In book 2 there is actually a lot more resolution and a greater sense of hope…although there is still plenty of despair hanging over the various groups since many of their key members hang on the verge of death. I definitely have a certain bias towards Brooks's work…as I said, I generally like almost everything I've read by him so I really feel like my own personal reading styles and tastes are very closely fitted to his writing style and stories. Still, I feel like I can recommend this series to a somewhat wider variety of readers, especially considering the recent influx of "urban fantasy" books. I'm not a reader of urban fantasy per se, so I don't know how well this relates to that genre, but I can say that this has a feel of post-apocalyptic dystopia blended with elements of epic fantasy. Which, as far as I'm concerned, is a very fun melding and one I definitely recommend. And with that, I now need to go read the final book in the series. **** 4 out of 5 stars

  3. 4 out of 5

    David Fox

    Elves & Demons & Faeries & Goblins & Ghosts, Oh My Prior to reading "Armageddon's Children" a few year's back I had neither read anything by Terry Brooks nor for that fact, had I ever heard about him. Also, for the most part, except for reading books like "The Road" or "The Stand" , I've had little experience with post apocalyptic, fantasy based literature. To my sincerest delight I do believe I've discovered a genre that I know will provide me with hours of blissful contentment. Elves & Demons & Faeries & Goblins & Ghosts, Oh My Prior to reading "Armageddon's Children" a few year's back I had neither read anything by Terry Brooks nor for that fact, had I ever heard about him. Also, for the most part, except for reading books like "The Road" or "The Stand" , I've had little experience with post apocalyptic, fantasy based literature. To my sincerest delight I do believe I've discovered a genre that I know will provide me with hours of blissful contentment. That is of course, if the body of literature holds up to the standards created by Mr. Brooks. Let's face it - this stuff is pure escapist fun. There are real good guys/gals who embody all of those positive attributes we assign to our heroes. Sure, his protagonists doubt themselves, feel conflicted & worry endlessly whether or not they can find their inner mettle to tackle the gargantuan challenges confronting them. But (and you already know the answer) they do. They battle terrible one & two dimensional antagonists that are literally, the scum of the earth. Little if any nuance applies here. They are evil & mean & nasty & deserve to be snuffed out. Brooks then places these characters in a world that is falling apart - poisoned, diseased, on its last legs - our planet sways to & fro like a punch drunk boxer trying to stay off of the canvas. And within this decimated landscape, populated by these larger than life characters, Brooks sets a plot in place that gives your fingers blisters from turning the pages so quickly. Finds a comfortable spot, pour yourself a beverage, then sit back & dive in to a world, the likes of which, you've seen before.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Stine

    I have no self-controlled so I immediately read this after Armageddon's Children.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Barry Mulvany

    So this was a much better paced book. The last book ended on a cliffhanger which I intensely dislike. This wasn't too bad here in that all the books are written but I still really do not like that book device. Anyway this book starts as you would imagine at this point and it resolves itself fairly quickly. It was a little Deus ex Machina but if you know Brooks it actually wasn't too surprising as it's been done before many times. There was surprisingly little time spent with Hawk in this book, m So this was a much better paced book. The last book ended on a cliffhanger which I intensely dislike. This wasn't too bad here in that all the books are written but I still really do not like that book device. Anyway this book starts as you would imagine at this point and it resolves itself fairly quickly. It was a little Deus ex Machina but if you know Brooks it actually wasn't too surprising as it's been done before many times. There was surprisingly little time spent with Hawk in this book, mainly him coming to terms with who he is based on what he learned at the end of the last one. The bulk of the time was with the Elves and the remaining Ghosts with Logan Tom. The Elves section was good and I was pleased to see that they actually did have interaction with our world as it seemed very weird that they didn't. This part was pretty typical quest based narrative but I have to say I enjoyed it. For a trope that is apparently everywhere in the fantasy genre you don't see much of it anymore. The Ghosts with Logan Tom was more of a journey section and I thought it was well done in that it showed how people were getting by in this post apocalypse and was actually pretty good for some character growth, the only part in the Elf section that I felt was missing. Like the last book, don't enter this book looking for something ground breaking but if you enjoy some old fashioned quest based stories this is pretty good. Looking forward to the conclusion.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    For a middle book, The Elves of Cintra surprised me. Most middle books in a trilogy, particularly those in fantasy and especially those with a simple concept in play, tend to be horrifically shallow. They lack its own story as most of its energies are focused towards building to an ultimate climax, but often doesn't reach said event at all. And it leaves its reader walking away frustrated and feeling as if they haven't gained much from the story at all. This book certainly had its fair share of a For a middle book, The Elves of Cintra surprised me. Most middle books in a trilogy, particularly those in fantasy and especially those with a simple concept in play, tend to be horrifically shallow. They lack its own story as most of its energies are focused towards building to an ultimate climax, but often doesn't reach said event at all. And it leaves its reader walking away frustrated and feeling as if they haven't gained much from the story at all. This book certainly had its fair share of all things that makes middle books the least enjoyable of a trilogy set. However, I didn't find myself annoyed after finishing it. Instead, I felt fairly gratified. Terry Brooks managed to maintain a good balance of closing holes while also opening others, but not to a point that the reader grew impatient with the writer. The pacing of the book wasn't rushed nor did it stretch itself too thin; it was very evenly spaced to not only gratify the readers by closing holes, but also kept them in some suspense by opening others. By now, the story feels much less crowded as it did in the first, even though the number of characters in it is more or less unchanged. I guess the fact that by now, the reader is better able to differentiate between them and given that there's less need to establish characters gives the story that much less of a crowded feeling. Also, the story is reasonably advanced now that all character development can now feed into the story itself as opposed to the story having to force feed the character introduction. Now with that said, while I thoroughly enjoyed the twist and turns provided by the book, particularly some of the surprises, it is still a rather simple fantasy book. It is straightforward, cleanly written and far from complicated or confusing. Nor does it provide much depth. It's not a bad thing, but it doesn't leave a reader with any real or lasting impression after completing the book. I also didn't really like how the focal point character Hawk barely made any appearance in this story and how anticlimactic his turned out to be; especially given the strength of his story and the cliffhanger after book one. it made me think the whole tale lost focus, as if it got side-tracked by a side story rather than building the real one. Although perhaps that was by design. The book is called The Elves of Cintra. It says in the title itself that it is about the side story and how it will affect the main plot rather than really playing with the main plot itself. And perhaps that is what made this book less of a 'middle book' and more of an actual book in its own right. And ultimately a good, uncomplicated read that didn't leave me with any sort of negative feeling after I finished it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Crowinator

    Posted to my Livejournal in March 2008, saved here for posterity: This series bridges his Word and the Void series and his Shannara series, and in a pretty clever way, too. In this one, Hawk, who is a street kid trying to survive in a (pre? post?) apocalyptic Seattle, turns out to be the Gypsy Morph, a magical being who is supposed to lead his chosen people to a safe haven where they can wait out the war happening between humans and demons. (Ya got that?) He has Logan, a world-weary Knight of the Posted to my Livejournal in March 2008, saved here for posterity: This series bridges his Word and the Void series and his Shannara series, and in a pretty clever way, too. In this one, Hawk, who is a street kid trying to survive in a (pre? post?) apocalyptic Seattle, turns out to be the Gypsy Morph, a magical being who is supposed to lead his chosen people to a safe haven where they can wait out the war happening between humans and demons. (Ya got that?) He has Logan, a world-weary Knight of the Word to help him and Hawk's street family to safety. Meanwhile (you knew there was a meanwhile, right?), the elves are starting to notice that the world around them is going to hell, because the Ellcrys has told young elf Kirisin that she needs to be moved to safety. For that, they need the blue elfstones, which are essential to find the Loden Stone that can move the Ellcrys. And they have Angel Perez, another Knight of the Word. And there are demons on all their trails. Okay, that's all plot, and overly simplified, at that. I think that this series takes place before the Shannara books and chronicles the beginning of the cataclysmic war that remakes the Earth that they mention in The Sword of Shannara. (I might be wrong though, so if anyone knows, clue me in.) This book moves fast, very fast, and has a great deal of action: lots of fights, near death experiences, chase scenes, and betrayals. Characterization is also fast but strong, so that all of the major players are distinctive, if not totally original in terms of fantasy conventions. Also, I love it when disparate plot lines come together in a big, grandiose plan, and that's what this is promising. I'm looking forward to the third book. (Sadly, I attempted to reread The Sword of Shannara, a book I'd loved as a child, and all I can say is, it does not wear well with time. I could not slog through the pages of wordy scenic descriptions and the long-winded character expositions, and the "here's an elf!", "here's a dwarf!", "here's magic sword!", element, though I know that back in 1977, this stuff was not a cliche. Mostly, though, it was the poor writing: the story I loved was still there, but buried under tortured prose. I guess you can't always go back to your childhood, huh?)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Krista Ivy

    Angel Perez heads out to find the elves, so that she may help them to fulfill their quest to find the Elfstones which lead to the Lodenstone. Magic has been lost to the elves, but with the right motivation; they will get it back. Also, Angel continues to fight the female demon that has hounded her since the last compound that she saved. Logan has found the family of children that belong to Hawk, the gypsy morph, that he has been sent to help. Hawk must come into his powers in order to lead his f Angel Perez heads out to find the elves, so that she may help them to fulfill their quest to find the Elfstones which lead to the Lodenstone. Magic has been lost to the elves, but with the right motivation; they will get it back. Also, Angel continues to fight the female demon that has hounded her since the last compound that she saved. Logan has found the family of children that belong to Hawk, the gypsy morph, that he has been sent to help. Hawk must come into his powers in order to lead his family and thousands of children to a safe place. The members of Hawk's family must show their own strengths (Fixit and Bear are amazing) and deal with the death of one of their own. The demon that has hidden amongst the elves reveals themselves after Angel fights with the animal demon that has been hounding (hehhee) her. Good reveal, might have seen it coming, but maybe that's because there are only so many elven characters that we got to know. It obviously wasn't going to be a random one. He would also have to hide in plain sight and get the young heroes to do as he wanted them to (smells like Barty Crouch Jr. when you put it that way). The action is pretty constant. There are more background reveals. I love slowly learning about Hawk's family. There are also some nice character developments. All in all, a great read that rolls along and sits well in the middle of its particular trilogy.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    After what my wife was saying was a fairly bad review of "Armageddon's Children", I can safely say that Terry Brooks more than made up for the slow start with the second of the trilogy, "Elves of Cintra". This is probably one of the best examples of a solid "2nd" in a trilogy, when so many trilogies tend to tank in the middle. The merging storylines, action, and mix of fantasy/post-apocalyptic fiction were done artfully. Sure, there were predictable events and interactions, but Brooks kept the wr After what my wife was saying was a fairly bad review of "Armageddon's Children", I can safely say that Terry Brooks more than made up for the slow start with the second of the trilogy, "Elves of Cintra". This is probably one of the best examples of a solid "2nd" in a trilogy, when so many trilogies tend to tank in the middle. The merging storylines, action, and mix of fantasy/post-apocalyptic fiction were done artfully. Sure, there were predictable events and interactions, but Brooks kept the writing interesting enough to make even the most obvious turns remain exciting to read. I have to admit that I found myself going back to my tried and true Brooks' reading style of checking after a storyline break to see how many chapters it would be until the characters returned as the focus of the story. However, this would happen at EVERY point-of-view change (my own dang fault for indulging the chapter browsing). It really is something though, to have someone reading in anticipation of the point-of-view shifting back, only to become so invested in the current point-of-view that any other shifts are met with the same intense anticipation.* *Sorry if that last statement is confusing - my mind is drawing a blank for now with more understandable rewrites.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bethany C

    I was a little hesitant to read The Genesis books because I love the world of Shannara but I'm not really into post-apocalyptic lit. And I did enjoy the parts that were centered around the elves and their 'quest' a little more, at least for the first half of the book. But Brooks is such a great author that he had me emotionally invested in all the characters, including and especially the 'Ghosts.' I was a little lost initially because it had been so long since I read the first of the Genesis boo I was a little hesitant to read The Genesis books because I love the world of Shannara but I'm not really into post-apocalyptic lit. And I did enjoy the parts that were centered around the elves and their 'quest' a little more, at least for the first half of the book. But Brooks is such a great author that he had me emotionally invested in all the characters, including and especially the 'Ghosts.' I was a little lost initially because it had been so long since I read the first of the Genesis books, but The Elves of Cintra not only developed in a way so that that didn't really matter, it also made me want to get to the next book a lot sooner.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sam Jones

    Can't wait until the next and last installment of this trilogy. Not the biggest fan of Terry Brooks writing style but his characterisation and plot more than make up for it. If you enjoy a good adventure try this trilogy on for size.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    I really wished I had reviewed this series by book instead of lumping it under one book claiming how much I love it. I know I do, but I can't remember why!? Heading into another Terry Brooks book (say that 10x fast) and wanted to refresh why I love him. Oh, well. Note to self: always review books!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Steve See

    Even better than the first! I think the second book is better than the first. Maybe the third will be the best of all? On to boom three!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Boyd

    A great continuation of the first book. Smooth read and excellent plot, you never go wrong with a Terry Brooks book. Very recommended

  15. 5 out of 5

    Paul Weiss

    The breathtaking second instalment in "The Genesis of Shannara" trilogy, In a horrifying blend of post-apocalyptic terror and new age urban fantasy, The Elves of Cintra continues the story of a world ravaged by nuclear war, plague, pestilence, famine, mindless zombie-like creatures, demons and terrifying creatures born out of devastating mutations. Deaths have numbered in the billions and humanity teeters on the very brink of extinction. Most of those few humans who have survived have reverted t The breathtaking second instalment in "The Genesis of Shannara" trilogy, In a horrifying blend of post-apocalyptic terror and new age urban fantasy, The Elves of Cintra continues the story of a world ravaged by nuclear war, plague, pestilence, famine, mindless zombie-like creatures, demons and terrifying creatures born out of devastating mutations. Deaths have numbered in the billions and humanity teeters on the very brink of extinction. Most of those few humans who have survived have reverted to a dark age in which they remain walled up in fortified compounds brutally scavenging from one another and scratching out a mean subsistence life in much the same fashion as tribes would have done during the earliest periods of mankind's existence. Long, long ago, the Elves conquered the demon hordes wandering Earth and sealed them away in a bleak existence called "the Forbidding". But current events on the earth - the wars, the nuclear radiation, the burgeoning evil that mankind is both experiencing and causing - are weakening the walls between Earth and the Forbidding. As evil's grip on the earth tightens, its defence has been reduced to the last two remaining Knights of the Word - Angel Perez and Logan Tom - two warriors carefully chosen by the Word for their indomitable spirit who have been given a magical staff and special powers to be used in the fight against demons and "The Void". In The Elves of Cintra, Brooks has woven an impossibly compelling magical spell, tightly drawing together the widely disparate story threads begun in Armageddon's Children. Hawk, one of the Seattle street child gangs who call themselves "The Ghosts" magically re-appears at the side of the King of the Silver River after his near execution. He learns of his role as the Gypsy Morph whose destiny is to lead thousands of the remaining children of humankind to a nebulous and as yet undefined promised land. Knight of the Word Angel Perez teams up with the young elf Kirisin to help him, his warrior sister and their blue Elfstones in an all-important search for the Loden Elfstone. This stone is as critical to the survival of the Elven nation as the Gypsy Morph is to the humans. Although far from certain of their ultimate destination and fate, Logan Tom continues to lead the remainder of The Ghosts in their flight from a devastated Seattle. The blood-thirsty, driven demons and other minions of The Void remain pledged to the annihilation of every living thing on earth and plague the children, the Knights of the Word and the Elves with their foul attacks at every turn. Armageddon's Children and The Elves of Cintra tell a powerful epic tale. Far more than a simple story of the unending and timeless conflict between good and evil, they spin a positively magnetic saga of love, commitment, honour, dedication, trust and so much more. For example, the tale of orphaned children attempting to raise themselves in a bleak, nuclear-blasted world without reference to parental guidance, while astonishingly reminiscent of Golding's Lord of the Flies, is fresh, exciting, heart-wrenching and most definitely not derivative in any way. The excruciating cataloguing of our human weaknesses and failings - selfishness, greed, despair, racism, lust and covetousness, to name only a few - serve as a bleak reminder of the problems which might ultimately be the foundation for humanity's eventual demise. Brooks' descriptions of a troubled world are graphic and breathtaking. His character building is deep, complex and utterly convincing. If I can find even a single criticism, it is that the story ends on an excruciating cliff-hanger. To be sure, it constitutes a natural end of the book and a sensible break point but I'm still going to be holding my breath until I can find a copy of The Gypsy Morph. What a fabulous story, Mr Brooks. I continue to be one of your biggest fans! Paul Weiss

  16. 4 out of 5

    Micheal

    Keep moving, keep healing,keep believing! Very captivating, Brooks is the Stephen King of science fiction. The mental movie that he has helped me create as my journey with the children as they are being led toward salvation has captured and fascinated every part of my imagination. Character development is very well done, talents are discovered just in time to prevent catastrophic injuries from happening. Comradeship, integrity, and a fierce desire to overcome the demons and mutants has kept me re Keep moving, keep healing,keep believing! Very captivating, Brooks is the Stephen King of science fiction. The mental movie that he has helped me create as my journey with the children as they are being led toward salvation has captured and fascinated every part of my imagination. Character development is very well done, talents are discovered just in time to prevent catastrophic injuries from happening. Comradeship, integrity, and a fierce desire to overcome the demons and mutants has kept me reading this series non-stop since first discovering Armegeddons Children!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Marcin

    Second part to the continuation and transfer from regular/mundane reality that got disturbed in W&V series, through the post-apocalyptic devastation of human civilisation with a glimmer of hope for new future given in GoS (this trilogy), to the magic-infused faerie-inhabited universe avid fantasy readers associate with the "more" Shannara placed books of this great cycle... With Hawk magically swept from the board filled with pawns and knights of both Word and Void Logan Tom takes onto himse Second part to the continuation and transfer from regular/mundane reality that got disturbed in W&V series, through the post-apocalyptic devastation of human civilisation with a glimmer of hope for new future given in GoS (this trilogy), to the magic-infused faerie-inhabited universe avid fantasy readers associate with the "more" Shannara placed books of this great cycle... With Hawk magically swept from the board filled with pawns and knights of both Word and Void Logan Tom takes onto himself the burden to shepherd the Ghosts out of danger looming in Seattle to mayhaps find the Gypsy Morph placed elsewhere. Their arduous journey is lengthy and far from uneventful, with both highs and lows aplenty (from magic, through plague and mutations to megatron-style insectoid bots). During this time we are given quite a few flashbacks to how the children family came to be, who are its members and where do they come from. These pitures that Brooks interjects between the group's voyage POIs allow the readers to comprehend more the kids that stayed outside the compounds instead of the relative safety of enclosed human companionships. But more importantly than that, this book focuses greatly on the story of the creatures from the title, on the elves of Cintra. With Kirisin searching for the Elfstones and, thus, the unique ancient magic of his kin, Angel fulfills her role of the protector and defender Knight of the Word... Their journey is even more eventful and illuminating, far more adventurous and unravelling, and more magically infused than W&V, AC and this book's humans' trek. We are offered new characters, more magic and eye-opening twists of the intricate patterns of fate-woven threads of mortals' lives - some patterns thus received are not that dissimilar from other Brooks' books (but heck, that's why we like'm, ain't it?), a few look fairly obvious for any avid epic fantasy readers albeit with this unique settings' adjustments, a couple give the readers a chance to wonder "is this a trap or an aid?" or "is (s)he a friend or foe?" or "is it this simple or does it go any deeper?"... It's a great companion to the books so far and a farily neat transition to the more fantastic fantasy settings' oriented main Shannara cycle options from Brooks' arsenal. It goes without saying that again you need to be accustomed to the whole W&V cataclysm and rebirth idea, to have read the AC (GoS#1), and to only passably know a thing or two of the Shannara cycle times. It is a good read, fairly decent even though it feels like it should have been combined with AC in a single book... It's actually very good taking into consideration what Brooks tries to accomplish here - to get the reader from the industrialised human civilisation of our times through its global holocaust effects and ever-fighting remnants always bent on destroying or alienating themselves, as if the collapse and civilisation itself were mere fidgments of imagination or fairy tales gone a bit too nightmarish, to a heroic time of might and magic with lavishly green foliages everywhere brimming with life and populated with faerie, elves and other kinds of creatures and secrets long-forgotten. This is not an easy task, but Brooks manages to erect this unique bridge from W&V to Shannara. The only pitfalls of this book upon reaching the last page? Why the heck are there still so many, even more than in GoS#1, plot threads yet without a more substantial conclusion or how are we to finally reach the more classic fantasy realm by the end of the Gypsy Morph (GoS#3)... Brooks simply leaves the reader with even a few more questions left unanswered or not explained than before opening the first page, forcing her/him to delve straight into the last book of this trilogy subseries.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Patrick D'Orazio

    As is the case with so many titles that are the middle stretch in a trilogy, this book suffers from being highly anticipated with a sense of trepidation at the fact that even before reading it you already have a good sense of the outcome, at least in broad general terms. An author who writes knowing, essentially in advance, that they are producing a trilogy must accept that certain plot points cannot be resolved by the end of book two though some others must be drawn further out. With that said, As is the case with so many titles that are the middle stretch in a trilogy, this book suffers from being highly anticipated with a sense of trepidation at the fact that even before reading it you already have a good sense of the outcome, at least in broad general terms. An author who writes knowing, essentially in advance, that they are producing a trilogy must accept that certain plot points cannot be resolved by the end of book two though some others must be drawn further out. With that said, I am not diminishing this book at all. Terry Brooks does a solid job in carrying the story that bridges the gap between his trilogy about the Word and the Void and the huge sweeping epic which is the Shannara realm. We get to see the story started with Armageddon's Children carried forward, with a great deal more involvement from the elves. As a reader of this entire mythology, the links start to take shape with this book--how we get from the world in which we human beings live in to the world that is the basis for the many Shannara stories that Brooks has told us over the past thirty years. But alas, it is the middle book. Sometimes the middle story is the best but usually it just does not have the same magic as the beginning or the end. I still hesitate in trying to imagine the breadth that the final book will have to have to really meld the two different universes together. As I mentioned in my review of the first book, the questions that come to mind have to do with those creatures that have not shown their faces yet...in partcular dwarves, trolls, druids...etc. Now I am sure that it will all be sorted out (and perhaps Terry has in mind yet another trilogy that will slide in between the first Shannara books and this set to give us even further detail) but I hope that the last book is not crammed to the rafters with a lot of unsubtle "glue" to bind it all together. Another way of putting that would be this: he completes the story of Hawk, Kirisin, Angel, Logan, and all the others, and then spends thirty pages spilling out the next one hundred years...how the dwarves boil up from the earth, how new magic was formed, etc. in such a way that it is just crammed in there. I have faith that Terry Brooks will avoid something like that, but you never know. The trilogy still has, in my mind, a lot of promise, but I also have high expectations for the third book and hope that it will do justice to the idea of bringing these two different worlds together as one. Until I have the chance to read that book in another year I honestly cannot judge this series effectively. As it stands, as a single novel, this book is solid. It moves the story along, keeps you interested in the characters, and you can start to see how everything is going to start coming together in the end. I liked the book, despite the "middle" book issues that I already mentioned. It has certainly whetted my apetite for the final chapter in this trilogy.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    Took me a while to finish the book, mainly because I lost it by moving twice in a year, but overall good interesting book. If you like the Shannara series this is a good addition. Has a unique setting for the fantasy world. Curious how the trilogy will end

  20. 5 out of 5

    Emma Yoloswag

    This is going to be a weird review, because I think this book was actually better than the first one, but still I rated it lower? Hang on, it's going to make at least a little bit sense. I think the main reason is the writing style. My experience with Terry Brooks's writing is that when you start reading, he writes in such a way that even reading about things that have no relevance to the plot is pleasant, and this goes on for at least a whole book. But at one point, you grow tired, and then ever This is going to be a weird review, because I think this book was actually better than the first one, but still I rated it lower? Hang on, it's going to make at least a little bit sense. I think the main reason is the writing style. My experience with Terry Brooks's writing is that when you start reading, he writes in such a way that even reading about things that have no relevance to the plot is pleasant, and this goes on for at least a whole book. But at one point, you grow tired, and then everything turns so that even reading about crucial events are so boring you can't wait until you get to put the book down. This happened with me when I was reading the last book of The Word & The Void, and again during this book. I don't think that's a coincidence. So, yeah. I got tired of the writing while I was in the middle of the book. I think that's a great deal of the reason why this got a lower rating. Because let's be honest, I think if I wasn't tired, I would have liked this better. There was a lot of stuff going on with the elves, which I liked much more than the children and Logan (Hawk is one of the least interesting characters ever, you can't change my mind). Again, the book seems to be a mix of at least three genres. I'm also convinced that the chapters about Logan and the children should have been moved to the first book, while that book's elf chapters should have been moved to this book, and everything would flow better. Don't yell at me, you know I'm right.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lisa B.

    Review is based on the novel, read before the new TV Series which started in January, 2016. *The Book was terrific ... just like the TV series. Hmm, I've never been able to say that before. Shannara Chronicles. Did you like ... The Lord of the Rings? Druids? 3-D demon creatures? Fast paced action, adventure, and three unlikely, but destiny chosen young adults? Love, magic and more ... OK ... you missed a great series! Shannara Chronicles are based on the literary novel by Terry Brooks, The Elves Review is based on the novel, read before the new TV Series which started in January, 2016. *The Book was terrific ... just like the TV series. Hmm, I've never been able to say that before. Shannara Chronicles. Did you like ... The Lord of the Rings? Druids? 3-D demon creatures? Fast paced action, adventure, and three unlikely, but destiny chosen young adults? Love, magic and more ... OK ... you missed a great series! Shannara Chronicles are based on the literary novel by Terry Brooks, The Elves of Cintra (Genesis of Shannara #2 released in 2007). TV Season 1, premiered Jan 5, 2016 on MTV • 10 Episodes (1&2 are together). IT WAS ENTIRELY RAD! Sorry. You DID MISS IT, DIDN'T YOU! It wasn't publicized very well. People my age don't normally watch MTV. For starters, you missed a beautiful storyline, solid characters, amazing sets, original wardrobe and the gorgeous wild forests and hills of New Zealand. You can still see it all!http://www.mtv.com/shows/shannara Terry Brooks', Shannara Chronicles, in orderhttps://www.goodreads.com/series/4357... I hope you enjoy this beautiful story as much as I did. Hurry & read Terry Brooks' novel, The Elves of Cintra (Genesis of Shannara #2 released in 2007) or watch Season 1 wherever you can. Come on Season 2 ... Season 1, episode 10, is a cliff hanger for Season 2! WHO, TOOK OFF THEIR MASK, TO REVEAL THEMSELVES to Eretria! CRUD! It's critical!"

  22. 4 out of 5

    Cody Westberry

    For some recap, this book is the sequel to the hit novel "Armageddon's Children." Following its story, it continues the adventures of Hawk, Logan Tom, and Angel Perez in their struggle to free humanity from the demon menace. This time, Hawk sets out to reunite with the Ghosts and lead them to a safe place. Logan Tom has met up with Hawk and is leading the ghosts on a similar mission to reunite with him. Angel Perez, however, is attempting to rescue the elves from a demon which threatens their sa For some recap, this book is the sequel to the hit novel "Armageddon's Children." Following its story, it continues the adventures of Hawk, Logan Tom, and Angel Perez in their struggle to free humanity from the demon menace. This time, Hawk sets out to reunite with the Ghosts and lead them to a safe place. Logan Tom has met up with Hawk and is leading the ghosts on a similar mission to reunite with him. Angel Perez, however, is attempting to rescue the elves from a demon which threatens their safety. The elves do not initially believe her, but a young boy named Kirisin decides to help her on her quest. Once again Terry Brooks has shown that he is capable of creating an environment of tension and excitement in his fantasy world. Specifically the character Kirisin stands out as a unique and able protagonist in this book with his ability to stand up to adversity when his peers do not believe in his quest. He handles himself well while still being a relatable and likable character. Brooks also shows that he knows his way around a twist when something happens to a specific character I will not name, but whom Kirisin is very upset to have this happen to. Over all, I'd give this one a 9 out of 10, for its improvement on the first novel.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Kuo

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I was absolutely angry that Terry Brooks ended Armageddon's Children where it did, so I immediately hopped onto the second and read about halfway before the book was yanked away and I was told to go to sleep. There's considerably less excitement and action than in the first book, but as this is the middle, it's understandable. We continue off with our Elves, our Knights of the Word plus one, and our Ghosts. Of Findo Gask, there's a few mentions, but the demons primarily featured here are Deloreen I was absolutely angry that Terry Brooks ended Armageddon's Children where it did, so I immediately hopped onto the second and read about halfway before the book was yanked away and I was told to go to sleep. There's considerably less excitement and action than in the first book, but as this is the middle, it's understandable. We continue off with our Elves, our Knights of the Word plus one, and our Ghosts. Of Findo Gask, there's a few mentions, but the demons primarily featured here are Deloreen, who completed her transformation but "tragically" loses her head, and one who has infiltrated the Elves' society. Not a lot happens, and the only major event is that the Elfstones and the Loden are found at last. My question, however, is about the rogue Knight. How is it possible that he is able to use the power of the Word? He is, after all, lost faith in the Word, choosing to go against it but not really going over to the dark side. John Ross turned away as well, and his magic was automatically shut off. I just find it confusing that someone who turns away from the embodiment of the Word (that of a shepherd) can still use the Word's power.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dark-Draco

    The second novel in this trilogy is as excellent as the first. In this post-apocalyptic America, the focus shifts to the Elves who have hidden themselves away on the deep forests, appalled at what the humans have done with the world, but unwilling to get involved. When young Kirisinis told by the magical Ellcrys that the city is in danger, he thinks it important enough to confront the King. But there are dark influences at work and the only way that he can do as the tree asks, is to go against The second novel in this trilogy is as excellent as the first. In this post-apocalyptic America, the focus shifts to the Elves who have hidden themselves away on the deep forests, appalled at what the humans have done with the world, but unwilling to get involved. When young Kirisinis told by the magical Ellcrys that the city is in danger, he thinks it important enough to confront the King. But there are dark influences at work and the only way that he can do as the tree asks, is to go against everything he has been taught to belive in - and pays the price for doing so. But he has some help in his quest to find the missing Elfstones, racing against time as the demon armies march closer to their stronghold. Again, another brilliantly written, fast-paced novel, with just the right mix of horror and fantasy. As a fan of the whole Shannara saga, it is great to see hints and whispers of events that will become the myths of the later characters. I read this just as quickly as the first, devouring over a couple of days while on holiday.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Shadean Shadean

    This book was great, definitely an awesome read as far as im concerned.. You get pleasantly surprised when 'enter the elves' who we ignorant humans thought didnt exist anymore but in stories and movies when they've actually co-existed alongside us for centuries.. Its a nice blend of mythical with modern day the only problem is you read the book to fast and have to sit around and wai for the last book of this trilogy to grace the shelves of book stores whic i swhat im doing.. But if there was ever This book was great, definitely an awesome read as far as im concerned.. You get pleasantly surprised when 'enter the elves' who we ignorant humans thought didnt exist anymore but in stories and movies when they've actually co-existed alongside us for centuries.. Its a nice blend of mythical with modern day the only problem is you read the book to fast and have to sit around and wai for the last book of this trilogy to grace the shelves of book stores whic i swhat im doing.. But if there was ever a series id recommend to read it would be the Genesis of Shannara Trilogy. But you may want to familiarise yourself first with the Word/Void Trilogy: ** Knight of the Word ** Running with the Demon ** Angel Fire East Also The High Druid of Shannara Trilogy is another one to read as its about the finding the weapon that the knights of the word use in the above books: ** Jarka Ruu's ** Tanequil ** Straken :)

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jim C

    This is the second book of a trilogy. The first one must be read to understand this novel. This book is the continuation of the modern world which is in ruins and how it becomes the setting of the author's Shannara books. I thought this book was better than the first book in the trilogy. Maybe because there was no setup and the action starts right away. I also thought this novel had more fantasy elements with elves, demons, magic, and a journey to rediscover something. I thought the author did a This is the second book of a trilogy. The first one must be read to understand this novel. This book is the continuation of the modern world which is in ruins and how it becomes the setting of the author's Shannara books. I thought this book was better than the first book in the trilogy. Maybe because there was no setup and the action starts right away. I also thought this novel had more fantasy elements with elves, demons, magic, and a journey to rediscover something. I thought the author did a great job with the setting and I could get a feel for the world as it evolves. Also, I had more of a connection with the characters than the first novel of this series. If you have read the first book, do yourself a favor and read this one.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    I don't have too much to say about this book. Like most of Terry Brook's books, I enjoyed it. Knowing what I do now about writing and such, I think a lot people may accuse him of telling or being too much of an interrupting author. It didn't really hinder my enjoyment of it. Although, in the Shannara books, I have noticed that a lot of the time, he uses the same character type for various roles. The names and backgrounds change, but the personalities are the same. With the Knight of the Word and I don't have too much to say about this book. Like most of Terry Brook's books, I enjoyed it. Knowing what I do now about writing and such, I think a lot people may accuse him of telling or being too much of an interrupting author. It didn't really hinder my enjoyment of it. Although, in the Shannara books, I have noticed that a lot of the time, he uses the same character type for various roles. The names and backgrounds change, but the personalities are the same. With the Knight of the Word and this series, that doesn't seem to happen as often. I'm having a really hard time separating Logan from Dresden in my mind. It has to be because they both carry staffs. There are similarities, but there are huge differences too. Anyway, good read.

  28. 5 out of 5

    David

    Brooks continues his reputation as a modern master of Epic Fantasy with his vivid and dynamic, sensory writing style. While he has been writing the Shannara saga for nearly 40 years now, this trilogy breathes new life into it. Some readers feel that his later books have become self derivative and stale, however, this trilogy brilliantly blends Epic Fantasy, post-apocalyptic science fiction, and Urban Fantasy to create a whole new unique genre. The only Shannara readers who may not enjoy this are Brooks continues his reputation as a modern master of Epic Fantasy with his vivid and dynamic, sensory writing style. While he has been writing the Shannara saga for nearly 40 years now, this trilogy breathes new life into it. Some readers feel that his later books have become self derivative and stale, however, this trilogy brilliantly blends Epic Fantasy, post-apocalyptic science fiction, and Urban Fantasy to create a whole new unique genre. The only Shannara readers who may not enjoy this are fantasy puritans who may not like the introduction of other concepts. He beautifully blends the fantastic with the real world with vivid characters.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Terry Barber

    I didn't think this book would be able to live up to the first book in the series, Armageddon's Children, because of the middle book slump curse... I was so very wrong. I enjoyed this one so much more than the first one. I loved the way this one went into the backstories of the characters so we could see where they came from. This book also deals very heavily with life and death matters. It was super easy to get into, and the action just kept coming. I am about to start my journey through this p I didn't think this book would be able to live up to the first book in the series, Armageddon's Children, because of the middle book slump curse... I was so very wrong. I enjoyed this one so much more than the first one. I loved the way this one went into the backstories of the characters so we could see where they came from. This book also deals very heavily with life and death matters. It was super easy to get into, and the action just kept coming. I am about to start my journey through this post apocalyptic world with "The Gypsy Morph," the third and final entry into The Genesis of Shanarra. See you when I get done!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Norman Howe

    Armageddon's Children did not warn me that the "Word and Void" series would segue into "Shannara","" so I was loathe to continue reading the "Genesis of Shannara" books. I"m glad I did. Not so happy about being left with a cliffhanger ending"," but at least the concluding volume has been published. Hope it keeps up the pace.If this sounds like a "Grinch" review"," it's because when I read "Sword of Shannara" it felt like "Tolkein Lite." A rereading of that book didn't change my opinion. Perhaps Armageddon's Children did not warn me that the "Word and Void" series would segue into "Shannara","" so I was loathe to continue reading the "Genesis of Shannara" books. I"m glad I did. Not so happy about being left with a cliffhanger ending"," but at least the concluding volume has been published. Hope it keeps up the pace.If this sounds like a "Grinch" review"," it's because when I read "Sword of Shannara" it felt like "Tolkein Lite." A rereading of that book didn't change my opinion. Perhaps the other books are better.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.