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Infernal

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Infernal PDF, ePub eBook The ninth Repairman Jack novel begins with a tragedy that throws Jack together with his brother Tom, a judge from Philadelphia. They've never been close and Jack, the career criminal, soon finds that he adheres to a higher ethical standard than his brother the judge. Determined to get to know his brother better, Tom convinces Jack to go on a wild treasure hunt together. Ar The ninth Repairman Jack novel begins with a tragedy that throws Jack together with his brother Tom, a judge from Philadelphia. They've never been close and Jack, the career criminal, soon finds that he adheres to a higher ethical standard than his brother the judge. Determined to get to know his brother better, Tom convinces Jack to go on a wild treasure hunt together. Armed only with a map pointing the way to a desolate wreck off the coast of Bermuda, the brothers come across something much stranger, and much more dangerous than mere treasure.

30 review for Infernal

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    Ooookay, this book just goes to prove that just because you like a series and you like the earlier books in a series you can't count on liking all the books in a series. The 3 is a gift...I can't give 2.5 so I rounded up. Let's be up front. I like the Repairman Jack series. I've been on a roll reading one after another... Then I got to Infernal. This one bored me stiff, in some ways it all but crashed and burned. Don't get me wrong the story is here. It adds a little more to our knowledge abou Ooookay, this book just goes to prove that just because you like a series and you like the earlier books in a series you can't count on liking all the books in a series. The 3 is a gift...I can't give 2.5 so I rounded up. Let's be up front. I like the Repairman Jack series. I've been on a roll reading one after another... Then I got to Infernal. This one bored me stiff, in some ways it all but crashed and burned. Don't get me wrong the story is here. It adds a little more to our knowledge about Jack and ties up some "sort of" loose ends. But it does so so slowly and disjointedly. Mr. Wilson tends to spool his stories out. They bounce from one point of view to another and slowly grow. This just grew too slowly. By the time we got to the meat of the story (which we'd all figured out long, long, long before Mr. Wilson saw fit to intro it to the actual book I was slightly comatose and pretty much ready for him to just wind things up. Opening with a shot at an emotional trauma...leading us into a maze of family problems for Jack with Gia and Vicky there on the edges ready to be dragged into danger by their relationship with Jack (again) we wander along. Jack is supposed to be doing one thing (view spoiler)[ hunting terrorists (hide spoiler)] but gets drawn into another with all sorts of revelations that I suppose are supposed to make us go..."wow!". But they don't. We drop backwards in time now and then about 500 years to set up the paranormal part of the story but the book winds out top almost 250 pages before we actually Jack involved in that part of the book. I finished it and have the details I'm supposed to about Jack...but oh my goodness I hope the next book is back to the standard of the others. Recommended for fans of the Repairman Jack series who need the details within...you can probably skim quite a bit and still get the story.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    4 Stars Infernal, Repairman Jack #9 is another fantastic installment of one of my favorite on going series. F. Paul Wilson has created a special series led by a main character in Jack that always walks the line between good and bad. The Repairman Jack series has developed into one of my favorite series out there and I can never seem to get enough. Wilson does an amazing job at making each book work as a standalone while at the same time never neglecting the overall story arc. We the reader now n 4 Stars Infernal, Repairman Jack #9 is another fantastic installment of one of my favorite on going series. F. Paul Wilson has created a special series led by a main character in Jack that always walks the line between good and bad. The Repairman Jack series has developed into one of my favorite series out there and I can never seem to get enough. Wilson does an amazing job at making each book work as a standalone while at the same time never neglecting the overall story arc. We the reader now not only know that each book and story will have a deeper connection, we expect it. Jack is one of my favorite heroes/anti-hero. The blending of a blistering fast paced action thriller with a tiny, albeit meaningful supernatural twist, this series is my cup of tea. In this story Jack is reunited with his father once again. He also spends most this book with his older brother Tom. As far as the overall story goes this was a pretty light one. Of course seriously bad things could befall our hero and his loved ones if Jack doesn't save the day. This series as a whole is guilty pleasure of mine often making me give it even higher marks. I love the writing, the characters, the action, and the tiny bit of supernatural.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Joann Erlein

    Infernal- Could not put it down I just finished Infernal and I enjoyed it so much I was sorry it didn't have more chapters. I have ordered the next in series and I am excited about starting it. Repairman Jack has became one of my top of the list favourite reads.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jadewik

    After a devastating event at the airport, Jack needs his brother's help to claim a body. The brotherly reunion doesn't go well as Jack gets suckered into going on an overseas trip to Bermuda where he learns his judicial brother has gotten himself into more than a lot of trouble. Trying to find a solution to his predicament, Tom encourages Jack to help look for buried treasure which leads them to the discovery of a rather unusual artifact that opens up a Pandora's Box of trouble. I did After a devastating event at the airport, Jack needs his brother's help to claim a body. The brotherly reunion doesn't go well as Jack gets suckered into going on an overseas trip to Bermuda where he learns his judicial brother has gotten himself into more than a lot of trouble. Trying to find a solution to his predicament, Tom encourages Jack to help look for buried treasure which leads them to the discovery of a rather unusual artifact that opens up a Pandora's Box of trouble. I did blow through this book because it's Repairman Jack! ... and I enjoy F. Paul Wilson's writing style and the supernatural elements. But, I didn't like this particular book with respect to the rest of the series. It was too predictable. And I really was annoyed with Jack's brother Tom. Grrrr! Usually these books have a couple different plot lines that converge, but the sub-plot in this book was more divergent and I had to ask myself "why was this even in here?"... the answer to which I filled in with "maybe it sets things up for the following book?" While I didn't really care for the book, there were a few things I did enjoy-- the nod to a couple of the previous books "The Haunted Air" and "Crisscross" and "Gateways". So... if you haven't read other books in this series you might not know what's going on if you just jump into this book. I would almost say you could skip it, except for a few main things that happened-- Jack retrieves a particular book we read about in "Crisscross" and we learn about seven artifacts that will potentially have future roles in the Repairman Jack books. So, while this wasn't up to par with the rest of the series, I believe that it had some events which will contribute to the saga in other Repairman Jack novels.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Teller

    This was a less than perfect Repairman Jack novel, primarily because jack was more reactive than proactive and also because the ending of the novel was pretty much telegraphed way too early by the author. There was a whole lot of character development though, and some connection to previous events in the more recent novels that worked better than has been attempted in the earlier novels. Imperfect, but still a reasonably good read. I'm sill waiting for some earth shattering This was a less than perfect Repairman Jack novel, primarily because jack was more reactive than proactive and also because the ending of the novel was pretty much telegraphed way too early by the author. There was a whole lot of character development though, and some connection to previous events in the more recent novels that worked better than has been attempted in the earlier novels. Imperfect, but still a reasonably good read. I'm sill waiting for some earth shattering concepts to appear, but so far Wilson writes like a Tv series writer, dropping 1 or 2 plot points for the future into the bank each book hoping to lead you onward and that the final closure story will begin to give the sort of bang moment of revelation rather than wander away into mediocrity or go someplace that is impossible to reach with the pieces given. I'm also getting a bit annoyed with a pregnancy that stretches over, what, 3 Novels to date? 4? With the novels having been published one a year, the pregnant girlfriend plot (and the time passing between novels) is turning into comic-book time pacing. We shall see... I have one more novel of the series on my shelf (I picked up the first 10 in the series all at once) and if it doesn't get more interesting or develop more detail that will be the last one I read. Its a pity that I'm getting frustrated, the characters have such potential to be interesting.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Thomas

    Boy, this series just keeps on rolling along, maintaining consistently high writing, excellent supernatural/mystery plot, and great characters. Jack's brother Tom is the central supporting character this time around and the interaction between the two is very interesting. Each of these Repairman Jack novels seems to be split between 1) a "fix-it" job which is much like a private eye/crime novel plot and 2) an going supernatural plot that moves slowly along as we learn more and more ab Boy, this series just keeps on rolling along, maintaining consistently high writing, excellent supernatural/mystery plot, and great characters. Jack's brother Tom is the central supporting character this time around and the interaction between the two is very interesting. Each of these Repairman Jack novels seems to be split between 1) a "fix-it" job which is much like a private eye/crime novel plot and 2) an going supernatural plot that moves slowly along as we learn more and more about what is happening in the background. This time around, the supernatural part takes on a bigger role with the "infernal" and its effect on the story. An intriguing premise that really brings out the character traits of those it impacts. Sorry if that sounds like a vague description of this novel, but I don't want to spoil anything. Highly recommended, as all of the RJ books, but definitely read them in order.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    I read the first Repairman Jack novel, The Tomb, years ago. It felt like I read it when I was about sixteen, but it was only published in 1998, so I must have been closer to 25. I remember liking it a fair bit. That was before the events of 9/11, which I think contributed to a substantial change in tone in this book, Infernal. It's amazing, the level of Gary Stu (masculinization of the concept of a Mary Sue, for those who aren't familiar) feeling I got from the protagonist in this book -- not in overt I read the first Repairman Jack novel, The Tomb, years ago. It felt like I read it when I was about sixteen, but it was only published in 1998, so I must have been closer to 25. I remember liking it a fair bit. That was before the events of 9/11, which I think contributed to a substantial change in tone in this book, Infernal. It's amazing, the level of Gary Stu (masculinization of the concept of a Mary Sue, for those who aren't familiar) feeling I got from the protagonist in this book -- not in overt, blatant ways so much as in little hints and general feel, including some reflection of his supposed awesomeness in the character of his girlfriend, who inspired stupidly obsessive love at first sight in other characters, didn't look pregnant at six months, and so on. I could have handled that, though. It could still be a solid three-star novel ("liked it" on the Goodreads scale) if that was the biggest problem. The story just was not as compelling as I'd hoped, though, and the ultimate supernatural danger at the eventual center of the plot was dull and off-putting as a seemingly pointless anti-MacGuffin that (literally) just hovered obnoxiously in the pages and afflicted people with a cheese-ass growing mark. The author made some effort to explain the improbable coincidences and absurdities by applying some ex post facto "this is too much to be a coincidence, there must be some secret conspiracy" suggestion at the end, but it was both too much and too little to just accept that ham-handed apology for the plot. Then, of course, there's the weird post-9/11 salting with steaming piles of War-On-Tourism cheerleading crapped all over the story, plus some attendant racism that almost (but not quite) tried to apologize for itself. Seeing the main character seem interested in keeping his (literal) partner in crime from visiting injustice on the innocent just because they're "Arabs" (often using much less polite terms) was encouraging for a moment, until the token protestations that they had to be sure turned into "Well, no biggie, kill 'em all and let God sort 'em out!" motivation and behavior that really did nothing to truly justify the actions until long after it was too late to fix things if it turned out they were wrong. Yeah, the Goodreads rating went right down the shitter, there. I still read to the end, because by the time the final nail got pounded into this coffin it was close enough to the end that it's worth just being able to say I finished it when talking about how bad it was. The ending was not well-handled, even aside from the failings I described above, and ultimately Tom (the real hero of the story in some ways, and the only character who grew as a person) was just a caricature who had a caricature-quality moment of redemption. The innocent young girl was kind of a caricature, too, for that matter. I suspect the main reason this book has such good reviews on average is the simple fact that, for the most part, anyone reading this book has read eight of them before it, which means these are people who have already proven they love this author's work. Usually, people who hate an author's work drop out much earlier in an unloved series, leaving only the true fans to give ever-higher average reviews, as fewer and fewer of the readers are of the sort who'd give books in the series less than five stars every time. This book certainly wasn't worth more than three even if you don't have the same specific distaste for the author's bigotry-by-proxy. I like a good anti-terrorism yarn, if well-handled; people who kill innocent bystanders (e.g. terrorists) piss me right off. The anti-terrorism parts of this novel were not that, though. They were just rank bullshit. Yeah, fuck this book. I now wonder whether The Tomb wasn't very good after all. I suspect the series just got more threadbare as it went on, and the author turned into some kind of neocon or neolib after 9/11, though. In any case, I won't seek out any of the books between the two I've read, or any following books, at this point.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Michael T Bradley

    I really wonder what reading these books must be like if you've already read Nightworld, which did come out before all the RJ books. Like, are all the events that happen in here & that seem so momentous at the time just brushed over in a paragraph or two of backstory? In any case, after the tragedy at the beginning of this book, Jack is feeling pretty down, and because of the opening events (I feel silly trying to talk around them since they occur so early on, but I'd rather err on the side I really wonder what reading these books must be like if you've already read Nightworld, which did come out before all the RJ books. Like, are all the events that happen in here & that seem so momentous at the time just brushed over in a paragraph or two of backstory? In any case, after the tragedy at the beginning of this book, Jack is feeling pretty down, and because of the opening events (I feel silly trying to talk around them since they occur so early on, but I'd rather err on the side of not spoiling) gets to "pal around" with his brother, who's kind of a schmuck. I felt like a good 30% of this book was purely motivated by Gia acting out of character b/c certain events needed to happen, and without her pushing Jack into doing said events, he would've just said "no." But her reasoning for falling on the side she does is flimsy as all hell, and kind of ruined my suspension of disbelief. That being said, the book was still a quick and enjoyable read, like the majority of the RJ series. We get the introduction of these Infernal devices, which kind of made me think of the Horcruxes in the Harry Potter universe (which, honestly, pretty much ruined the series for me, so here's hoping the Jack novels don't follow the same path). It's weird to think we've still got awhile before Gia's damn due date, what with how compressed the RJ timeline is. Anyway, on to the next one ...

  9. 5 out of 5

    John

    I gave this four stars purely based on it being part of a series that is still four stars. However I wonder if there was some long suffering editor out there who still has nightmares about calling up Mr Wilson saying "err I don't mean to be rude mate, but do you mind shutting a few terrible gaping plot holes." And then having those plot holes half-assedly filled by flimsy afterthought codicils that just don't cut it. It's naff to believe that Jack who is eternally thinking 5 steps ahead, just to I gave this four stars purely based on it being part of a series that is still four stars. However I wonder if there was some long suffering editor out there who still has nightmares about calling up Mr Wilson saying "err I don't mean to be rude mate, but do you mind shutting a few terrible gaping plot holes." And then having those plot holes half-assedly filled by flimsy afterthought codicils that just don't cut it. It's naff to believe that Jack who is eternally thinking 5 steps ahead, just to exist, is somehow struck brain-dead for hours at a time, just when in reality, his brain should be in high gear. It's still a good book, and the plot is fine, but the contrivances to get from A to B will kill you.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Foster

    Every installment gets better than the last. Sadly, this time Jack loses his father very early on in the story. He is then forced into situations where he has to determine what he should do on his own, or as something his late father would have approved of him doing. Helping his brother among those choices. The trouble is only beginning for Jack now. The otherworldly parts of the book are again present (yay! I love this series for that) and Jack has to choose to take the fate of somet Every installment gets better than the last. Sadly, this time Jack loses his father very early on in the story. He is then forced into situations where he has to determine what he should do on his own, or as something his late father would have approved of him doing. Helping his brother among those choices. The trouble is only beginning for Jack now. The otherworldly parts of the book are again present (yay! I love this series for that) and Jack has to choose to take the fate of something upon himself, something that may very well end his existence. The story flows along very nicely, I'd have read it in just a few days, but I'd been distracted this past week. As I tell everyone, if you are into this kind of writing, give it a try. Thanks

  11. 5 out of 5

    Trever

    So far, all the Repairman Jack books are good, and worth reading, and this is no exception. That said, this one wasn't among my favorites as it seemed too wandery and scattered. There's a family reunion, Bermuda scuba adventures straight out of "The Deep", middle-eastern terrorists with their own storyline, and the most loathsome brother one could imagine. While I enjoyed it cover to cover, I did find myself getting frustrated with the zigzagging from plotline to plotline. Also, it's grim... lik So far, all the Repairman Jack books are good, and worth reading, and this is no exception. That said, this one wasn't among my favorites as it seemed too wandery and scattered. There's a family reunion, Bermuda scuba adventures straight out of "The Deep", middle-eastern terrorists with their own storyline, and the most loathsome brother one could imagine. While I enjoyed it cover to cover, I did find myself getting frustrated with the zigzagging from plotline to plotline. Also, it's grim... like, way grim, so be sure you're in the mood for a lot of bleak teeth-on-edge stuff before diving in.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Beth Gibson

    I really liked this book. Interesting characters, fast moving plot. I generally don't like books with a supernatural element in it, but it was handled more like an ancient curse with a modern remedy, which made the story interesting. No wasted pages, and though the ending was somewhat predictable, how it comes about is not. I would read others from this writer, I do like the writing style. The back story would have probably been a bit clearer if you read them in order, but this stands alone pret I really liked this book. Interesting characters, fast moving plot. I generally don't like books with a supernatural element in it, but it was handled more like an ancient curse with a modern remedy, which made the story interesting. No wasted pages, and though the ending was somewhat predictable, how it comes about is not. I would read others from this writer, I do like the writing style. The back story would have probably been a bit clearer if you read them in order, but this stands alone pretty well.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    Repairman Jack has long been a favorite character. The books in this long series are thrillers with a good dose of magic realism to spice things up. Repairman Jack - not an appliance repairman, mind you! - is a fixer. Jack fixes seemingly impossible situations with cunning and, if necessary, violence.

  14. 4 out of 5

    David

    The hidden history continues to reveal itself :)

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lavender

    More bad news for Jack. This one is definitely a nail biter. The bad things happening to Jack lately just keep getting worse.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

    "Blessed be the man who invented tempered steel." Ha! Thanks FPW.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brett Grossmann

    Good but not great. Jack coming out of the drug effects so fast was annoying. He was out. He would stay out. Having him wake up was lame and just there as s plot device

  18. 4 out of 5

    Arlingtontexican

    We met everyone in the family, had a books worth of adventure with each one.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Spurnlad

    Another top read in the Repairman Jack series.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Maddy

    RATING: 3.0 PROTAGONIST: Repairman Jack SETTING: New York City; Bermuda SERIES: #9 of 9 We’ve probably all experienced times when we’ve had conflict with a family member. Sometimes, that can go so far as complete estrangement. Jack and his father, Tom, had been at odds for a long time; however, in the past year, they went through some heavy stuff together and have reconciled. Now Tom is coming to New York from Miami to visit his son. There’s a palpable feeling of love a RATING: 3.0 PROTAGONIST: Repairman Jack SETTING: New York City; Bermuda SERIES: #9 of 9 We’ve probably all experienced times when we’ve had conflict with a family member. Sometimes, that can go so far as complete estrangement. Jack and his father, Tom, had been at odds for a long time; however, in the past year, they went through some heavy stuff together and have reconciled. Now Tom is coming to New York from Miami to visit his son. There’s a palpable feeling of love and caring when they meet at the airport. Jack leaves his father at the baggage claim while he goes to pick up the car; it’s then that a deadly massacre occurs, with 2 gunman killing everyone at the baggage carousel for Flight 715. To ensure that there are no survivors, the assassins have used cyanide-filled hollow point bullets, so that what would ordinarily be a bullet wound becomes a fatal injury. The targets for the massacre appear to have been a large contingent of Hasidic Jews that were on the flight. And thus Jack’s reunion with his father is over before it really begins. Given the fact that Jack (aka "Repairman Jack") no longer operates under his real name, he calls on his brother, Tom, to come to New York to claim their father’s remains. Tom is a judge in Philadelphia; he and Jack have not been close for many years. Almost from the moment they meet, things don't go well. As it turns out, Tom is a selfish and unlikeable man; in addition, he's turned to some illegal activities. When he finds that he is being hunted by the law, he begs Jack to help him disappear. In order to do so, he needs to collect the funds from his secret bank account in Bermuda. What he doesn't tell Jack is that he also has a treasure map of a ship from centuries ago, and that he hopes to find an object known as the "Lilitongue of Gefreda". Jack absolutely does not want to help his brother and would much prefer to stay with his girlfriend, Gia, her daughter, Vicky, and await the birth of their first child. Feeling that he is the only one that can help Tom, he reluctantly agrees to the trip. When they arrive in Bermuda, Tom is unable to obtain his money and talks Jack into finding the Lilitongue, which they do. Having expected a vast cache of jewels, he is disappointed to find a strange object that looks like a skin-covered basketball. They bring it with them back to New York and only then discover its lethal properties. I know there is a cult-like following of the "Repairman Jack" books, of which this is the ninth. I fail to see what the appeal is. The writing is absolutely ordinary. The protagonist and other characters in the book didn't have any depth, and it was impossible to connect with them. The plot was very strange. I believed that the book would be about finding the terrorists who massacred the travelers on Flight 715. Instead, that turned into a very secondary part of the plot. The whole thread about the Lilitongue and its paranormal properties seemed silly to me at best. I didn't dislike the book, but I didn't find anything about it that really made it stand out in any way for me.

  21. 5 out of 5

    John Culuris

    This is the most disjointed entry in the Repairman Jack series so far, almost certainly because of the self-imposed restrictions set in place by the author himself. All of Jack’s solo adventures (not counting the prequels) take place between his debut in The Tomb and the conclusion of the Adversary Cycle, Nightworld--written in 1984 and 1992, respectively. Infernal came out in 2005, with six more volumes to follow. As usual, the story opens coldly realistic, as befitting an urban fix-it man and sometime avenger. It This is the most disjointed entry in the Repairman Jack series so far, almost certainly because of the self-imposed restrictions set in place by the author himself. All of Jack’s solo adventures (not counting the prequels) take place between his debut in The Tomb and the conclusion of the Adversary Cycle, Nightworld--written in 1984 and 1992, respectively. Infernal came out in 2005, with six more volumes to follow. As usual, the story opens coldly realistic, as befitting an urban fix-it man and sometime avenger. It’s not long before the mystic and otherworldly elements come into play. There are problems, story wise, with both aspects of Jack’s world. Almost immediately Jack’s father dies in a hail of terrorist bullets at New York’s La Guardia Airport. As Jack mourns he sets about finding those responsible. But the quest for vengeance is quickly set aside. The story turns out to be more about Jack’s brother, a sleazy Philadelphia judge whose past is about to land him permanently in jail. In using the supernatural as a means to escape his earthly woes, he promptly endangers Jack’s girlfriend and her daughter, the only two people left whom Jack loves. The terrorist getting away virtually unscathed is the byproduct of telling a larger overreaching story, and they’ll probably be dealt with in a forthcoming book. Therein lay the point. The story’s problems are only problems to the uninitiated. Jack knows exactly where to find a particular “séance” that leads him to an ancient book with possible solutions, and this come off as very convenient. It also stretches credibility that Jack has seen this book before and knows exactly where to find it. But only in this particular novel. Again, there is a bigger picture. This has all been established in previous novels. This is not the place to be dropped into Jack’s world. And I suspect this to be true of the rest of the novels going forward. So go back to the beginning. Repairman Jack is a fascinating character and Wilson is master storyteller. It’s still a trip worth taking. But in the proper order.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    I generally dig F. Paul Wilson's Repairman Jack series, as long as he doesn't turn Jack into too much of a mouthpiece for his libertarian political thoughts (a little is to be expected and fits the character's worldview, but too much...) or go on about Jack's lack of a social security number (he has one, he just hasn't used it in 20 years for anything and at best doesn't remember it). But I also get a little anxious for any novel in which Jack works with a member of his family after the subpar Hosts where Ja I generally dig F. Paul Wilson's Repairman Jack series, as long as he doesn't turn Jack into too much of a mouthpiece for his libertarian political thoughts (a little is to be expected and fits the character's worldview, but too much...) or go on about Jack's lack of a social security number (he has one, he just hasn't used it in 20 years for anything and at best doesn't remember it). But I also get a little anxious for any novel in which Jack works with a member of his family after the subpar Hosts where Jack was reunited with his long separated sister and seemed to be little better than a powerless witness, a role that doesn't suit him much. His team-up with his secretly semi-badass father in Gateways worked out much better, so seeing this book would deal with Jack working with the last of his estranged family, brother Tom the judge from Philly, at least this should be the last of them. How did it turn out? Better than Hosts but not as good as Gateways. The Adversary stuff was largely sidelined or implied, so there was no big chapter of exposition where Jack shows he still doesn't get the whole "Lady with the Dog" thing that keeps calling herself Jack's mother (It's Mother Nature, Jack! Duh!), and in point of fact, the Lady this time around was a teenager who appeared briefly to Tom and not Jack. Tom came across largely as a "Opposite of Jack": though they looked very similar, Tom was a crooked judge who worked the law to his own advantage and was largely self-centered whereas Jack avoids the law to do right and thinks of others. The ending was no real surprise as Wilson was building on it almost from Tom's first appearance, but it was an OK read for this series. Unless Jack has some long lost cousin to show up next...

  23. 4 out of 5

    David Agranoff

    I went into the 9th Repairman Jack book as blind as possible, I didn’t read the descriptions on the back and just jumped in. I gave Infernal less stars than I have other books in the series and that low ranking might be misleading. It is a very high bar that has been set. I flew through this book as fast as I did the other books in the RMJ series, I just didn’t think this novel was as good as the others. I still liked the story, still enjoyed myself. In fact I read 100 pages in a sitting more th I went into the 9th Repairman Jack book as blind as possible, I didn’t read the descriptions on the back and just jumped in. I gave Infernal less stars than I have other books in the series and that low ranking might be misleading. It is a very high bar that has been set. I flew through this book as fast as I did the other books in the RMJ series, I just didn’t think this novel was as good as the others. I still liked the story, still enjoyed myself. In fact I read 100 pages in a sitting more than once. Lots of important things happen in this novel that advance the unfolding plot. Wilson always weaves one or two Jack “fix-it” jobs together. That wasn’t possible in this story do to the events that happen in the first couple chapters. It was shocking and probably angered more than one reader. I know Wilson has said that he wanted use RMJ to write novels that move genres. This one to me is the biggest stretch, getting Jack into the plot of the novel is kinda like fitting a square beg into a round hole. Infernal you see is in part a quest for buried treasure novel. Repairman Jack is a lifetime jersey/New Yorker and so much of the story revolves around the region. Fitting Jack into this novel he had to join his brother on search for buried treasure in the Bermuda triangle. I wasn’t sure it would work. It does work, it works well infact. I enjoyed it, but it is probably my least favorite in the series. These novels are filled with strong characters many of whom I like, as great of a characters as Abe or Jack’s father were his brother is the opposite. I think Wilson did a great job of making us readers like Jack’s Sister and father so I am sure he had intended for us to dislike Jack’s brother and boy did I. I mean his brother is a serious jerk. Stephen King has always been the best at creating bullies and Jerks. Tom (Jack’s brother) is a very vile creature indeed. There is a lot to like in this book For a more detailed spoiler filled review search for it on my blog. www.davidagranoff.blogspot.com

  24. 5 out of 5

    David

    This is another fun one by F. Paul Wilson. What I love about this author is that he is simply himself when he writes his books. There are no tortured observations about humanity or deep metaphors or an attempt to impress us with his knowledge and analysis. Wilson usually sets out to tell a really good story in a fun way, and usually invents something that is completely out of left field. The book starts out with Repairman Jack's father coming for a visit. I was not impressed and even thought to This is another fun one by F. Paul Wilson. What I love about this author is that he is simply himself when he writes his books. There are no tortured observations about humanity or deep metaphors or an attempt to impress us with his knowledge and analysis. Wilson usually sets out to tell a really good story in a fun way, and usually invents something that is completely out of left field. The book starts out with Repairman Jack's father coming for a visit. I was not impressed and even thought to myself, "This is boring." Big mistake. The action gets going right away with a terrific scene that gives a good start to the book. Jack is soon in pursuit of Muslim terrorists. However, the plot takes another twist when Jack's brother Tom shows up, and veers off into a whole other plot that may or may not be related to the first one. At this point in the series, I have no idea where F. Paul Wilson is heading, but I don't really care because the books are so much fun. Reading a series gives you a chance to revisit old characters, and Wilson gives us that. Gia, Vicky and Abe show up once again. However, there is also an appearance from Charlie and Lyle -- the mediums from a few books back. Oh, and a woman with a dog. The previous book's events play into the plot as well. The book ties up nicely, although a bit predictably in regard to Jack's brother. But it doesn't really matter, because the reading experience is so pleasant. Also, we are set up for the next novel in the series -- I am glad I discovered this series a bit late because I don't have to wait months for F. Paul Wilson to write another book. Onward to "Harbingers".

  25. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    Spoilers within: I don't fancy the racist language, though I understand it's necessary to the attitudes of some of the characters, but I wish Jack had countered it in his inner monologue or something because he knows it's not just "Arabs" behind the evil at work in the book. Plus I think too many readers could be incited to further hatred after reading certain passages. I'm also unsure about some of the unbelievable plot points: namely, I'm not convinced that, even in the fantastic wo Spoilers within: I don't fancy the racist language, though I understand it's necessary to the attitudes of some of the characters, but I wish Jack had countered it in his inner monologue or something because he knows it's not just "Arabs" behind the evil at work in the book. Plus I think too many readers could be incited to further hatred after reading certain passages. I'm also unsure about some of the unbelievable plot points: namely, I'm not convinced that, even in the fantastic world which is enmeshed in our own reality, a scumbag can turn into anything other than a scumbag. I know Jack has to return for a few more books, and so nothing can happen to him per se; but I will buy into a weird organic object created by a wizard to transport its user to some unknown dimension before I will believe that a crooked lawyer who is also a terrible father, husband, son, and brother could make a complete change in 5 years let alone 5 minutes, and sacrifice himself to save a brother he barely knows -- even though he himself has nothing left to lose. That said, this was an awesome novel and an emotionally exhausting read. Gia and Vicky are, as they should be, becoming more inextricable from the novels' plots, and so when something happens to them I'm on edge till the end of the book. Plus, Jack and Gia have a pretty perfect love, and I'm in love with their story.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Wasn't my favorite and it had a rather convenient ending that sort of telegraphed itself several chapters ahead. That said it is Repairman Jack and it came through when I needed it most to break the lethargy I was in after bogging down in two other books. Lyle and Charlie make an encore which was nice and we discovered that Abe is big softie at heart after-all. The LaGuardia Airport attack is never fully resolved and it leaves you with the feeling that Jack has undeserving blood on hi Wasn't my favorite and it had a rather convenient ending that sort of telegraphed itself several chapters ahead. That said it is Repairman Jack and it came through when I needed it most to break the lethargy I was in after bogging down in two other books. Lyle and Charlie make an encore which was nice and we discovered that Abe is big softie at heart after-all. The LaGuardia Airport attack is never fully resolved and it leaves you with the feeling that Jack has undeserving blood on his hands after the less-than-righteous raid on the Islamic Center planned by Joey Castelano. Jack actually brings much of the pain of this volume upon his own head by always withholding vital connecting info from Tom while on the other hand he allows Tom to "play" him with the Dad Guilt-Trip Card. Jack is not in top form throughout this story (instead seemingly being led around by the nose) but the overall Otherness story arc is intact and I have three more volumes awaiting on the shelf.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Brian Maicke

    Not my favorite of the Jack books, but a solid enough offering. Tough to talk much about the plot with out spoilers as some major things happen almost immediately. The bulk of the book follows Jack and his long estranged brother who has some problems of his own. In trying to resolve some of these problems, they end up digging up a lost treasure that could have ties to the Otherness. Two things brought down the rating a bit for me. First, Jack's brother is an unmitigated ass Not my favorite of the Jack books, but a solid enough offering. Tough to talk much about the plot with out spoilers as some major things happen almost immediately. The bulk of the book follows Jack and his long estranged brother who has some problems of his own. In trying to resolve some of these problems, they end up digging up a lost treasure that could have ties to the Otherness. Two things brought down the rating a bit for me. First, Jack's brother is an unmitigated ass for nearly off the book. I can understand why Wilson chooses to go this route, but having him feature so prominently in the book makes for some unpleasant reading. Secondly, the ending was a bit clichéd and seen coming from a mile away. It is partially redeemed by some unresolved issues that I assume will lead in to the next book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Jack's dad is coming in to visit, when he gets killed at the airport. The people who take credit for the slaughter are Wrath of Allah. So Jack is hunting them down. Meanwhile Jack's brother Tom, a judge, is in legal trouble. Tom convinces Jack to go to Bahama with him by boat to clean out Tom's bank account so he can disappear. When they can't, they end up finding the buried treasure (no coincidences right?) that Tom had a treasure map for. The treasure is an Infernal device that Vick Jack's dad is coming in to visit, when he gets killed at the airport. The people who take credit for the slaughter are Wrath of Allah. So Jack is hunting them down. Meanwhile Jack's brother Tom, a judge, is in legal trouble. Tom convinces Jack to go to Bahama with him by boat to clean out Tom's bank account so he can disappear. When they can't, they end up finding the buried treasure (no coincidences right?) that Tom had a treasure map for. The treasure is an Infernal device that Vicky activates that will cause the person to escape their enemies by leaving the world behind. Where will Vicky go? Is there anyway to stop it? And can Jack find the people responsible for his Father's death? Find out by reading!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bryan457

    Jack spends time with his brother Tom, the brother from hell, and gets guilt tripped into helping him with a situation he is in. They end up in Bermuda diving for treasure in a sunken ship and end up bringing back an object that is definitely out of the ordinary. A suggestion, once you get to the point where they bring the object back to New York make sure you have enough time to finish the rest of the book, because you won,t want to put it down. I missed Jack doing tricky Jack spends time with his brother Tom, the brother from hell, and gets guilt tripped into helping him with a situation he is in. They end up in Bermuda diving for treasure in a sunken ship and end up bringing back an object that is definitely out of the ordinary. A suggestion, once you get to the point where they bring the object back to New York make sure you have enough time to finish the rest of the book, because you won,t want to put it down. I missed Jack doing tricky fixes on people. The pistachio reminiscence is good, but I had already read it in more detail in the book Jack: Secret Histories.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ensiform

    Repairman Jack’s father comes to visit, but is killed as soon as he touches the terminal. Jack’s brother, a corrupt judge now in trouble with the feds, comes down to identify the body. He ropes Jack into helping him look for a treasure sunk near Bermuda in the 16th century. They find the treasure, but it turns out to be an Infernal device that means doom for someone very close to Jack. Wilson delivers the usual taut action and subdued heroism from Jack, even if this 350-page entry feels much mor Repairman Jack’s father comes to visit, but is killed as soon as he touches the terminal. Jack’s brother, a corrupt judge now in trouble with the feds, comes down to identify the body. He ropes Jack into helping him look for a treasure sunk near Bermuda in the 16th century. They find the treasure, but it turns out to be an Infernal device that means doom for someone very close to Jack. Wilson delivers the usual taut action and subdued heroism from Jack, even if this 350-page entry feels much more akin to hanging fire than delivering the firepower Jack usually does. (All of these massive tomes have, in total, taken up only a few months, Repairman time.) And the end is a major out-of-nowhere cop-out. And yet…. Page-turning!

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