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Ground Zero PDF, ePub eBook A Novel. A canny mix of sci-fi paranoia and criminal mayhem.

30 review for Ground Zero

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ensiform

    In this, the thirteenth and “pen-penultimate” Repairman Jack novel, Jack takes on the cause of Weezy, a childhood friend (a character introduced in one of Wilson’s teen Jack books for young adults) and an eccentric genius with a photographic memory, who has pieced together the brief hints about the true forces behind the 9/11 terrorists (the Adversary needed the towers to fall so one of their pillars of power could be planted). This disturbs the powers forking for the One, who move to silence he In this, the thirteenth and “pen-penultimate” Repairman Jack novel, Jack takes on the cause of Weezy, a childhood friend (a character introduced in one of Wilson’s teen Jack books for young adults) and an eccentric genius with a photographic memory, who has pieced together the brief hints about the true forces behind the 9/11 terrorists (the Adversary needed the towers to fall so one of their pillars of power could be planted). This disturbs the powers forking for the One, who move to silence her. Meanwhile, they also make plans to call up the “Fhinntmanchca,” an anti-matter monster who can destroy the Lady for them. With Weezy’s help, Jack manages to discern some of the One’s plans, though as usual he is more or less powerless against them, serving only to subdue or kill his minor earthly agents. This is a typically exciting entry in the series, though I did feel a bit lost when it came to plot minutiae. Since this is a quintessential roman fleuve, with almost zero explanatory material of past events and characters, a gap of three years between books means there will be some confusion. Wilson is a master of pacing and suspense, though, so even a weak Jack book, in which the “hero” or more or less buffeted around by inevitable forces he has no hope of combatting, is a fun read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    The Cats Mother

    This is the 13th of the Repairman Jack series, and unlike the early ones, which pretty much stood alone, you now really need to be following the series to keep up, because this is now all about the impending final battle with the adversary. I haven't read the non-Jack books in the cycle, or the early years books - I might come back to them later as various events are now referenced as his childhood friend Weezy is introduced. There are obviously bits I'm missing out on, which made some of the pl This is the 13th of the Repairman Jack series, and unlike the early ones, which pretty much stood alone, you now really need to be following the series to keep up, because this is now all about the impending final battle with the adversary. I haven't read the non-Jack books in the cycle, or the early years books - I might come back to them later as various events are now referenced as his childhood friend Weezy is introduced. There are obviously bits I'm missing out on, which made some of the plot lines and baddies a bit confusing at times. This is about a conspiracy to bring down the twin towers, because of something buried beneath which is important to the Order in its attempts to end the world. There was a lot of talking and plotting and not so much action, so it dragged a bit for me, but with only two books left I'll need to finish the series soon before I forget the details.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Zedsdead

    Be warned...Ground Zero isn't really a Repairman Jack novel, it's an Adversary Cycle book in Jack's clothes. Wilson uses Ground Zero to start gathering up all the scattered disparate plot threads of his many stories and draw them together in preparation for the big end-of-the-world finish (Nightworld, already published 1992ish.) Ground Zero is serviceable if you're following Wilson's great big overarching Secret History of the World chronicle, but it's sorely lacking in clever Repairman Jack reven Be warned...Ground Zero isn't really a Repairman Jack novel, it's an Adversary Cycle book in Jack's clothes. Wilson uses Ground Zero to start gathering up all the scattered disparate plot threads of his many stories and draw them together in preparation for the big end-of-the-world finish (Nightworld, already published 1992ish.) Ground Zero is serviceable if you're following Wilson's great big overarching Secret History of the World chronicle, but it's sorely lacking in clever Repairman Jack revengey goodness. It was written to tie up the series, and that fact shows.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    4 Stars Ground Zero, Repairman Jack #13 was to me a good story that sets up the obvious endgame in this amazing series and guilty pleasure of mine. F. Paul Wilson has created a special series led by a main character in Jack that always walks the line between good and bad. The Repairman Jack series has developed into one of my very favorite series out there and I can never seem to get enough. Wilson does an amazing job at making each book work as a standalone while at the same time never neglecti 4 Stars Ground Zero, Repairman Jack #13 was to me a good story that sets up the obvious endgame in this amazing series and guilty pleasure of mine. F. Paul Wilson has created a special series led by a main character in Jack that always walks the line between good and bad. The Repairman Jack series has developed into one of my very favorite series out there and I can never seem to get enough. Wilson does an amazing job at making each book work as a standalone while at the same time never neglecting the overall story arc. We the reader now not only know that each book and story will have a deeper connection, we expect it. Wilson goes out of his way to tell us the readers and fans that like the last book, this one and the next one will carry into one another, one long story arc. These books will have less of conclusions as they are the last steps leading to the final story. Jack is one of my favorite heroes/anti-hero of all time. The blending of a blistering fast paced action thriller with a tiny, albeit meaningful supernatural twist, this series is my cup of tea. The writing is superb. The novel's are true page turners. Ground Zero is a story that focuses on a new weapon and of the inevitable endgame. There are some great new characters but most are familiar. I absolutely love this series, Wilson's writing, and Repairman Jack. 13 books down and now, the end is in sight. I still cannot get enough of Jack and his story. Like the last several books, this one is one of the darker and scariest Repairman Jack novels of the series. Things have not gone well for our hero. So many bad things have happened. Too many people killed, some were family. The weight of the world rides on our invisible hero. This series as a whole is guilty pleasure of mine often making me give it even higher marks. I love the writing, the characters, the action, and the tiny bit of supernatural. I cannot wait until my wife finally listens to me and she also jumps in to the world of Repairman Jack. One of my all time favorite series..

  5. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Thomas

    We're fast approaching the end now...the end of the Repairman Jack series (at least the main line, not counting prequels, YA titles, etc.) But also the end of the world as we know it. There are two novels left after this one and it all promises to be a doozy of a ride. This is not a stand-alone novel. Not really. Early Repairman Jack novels could be read and enjoyed by themselves, and were much more mystery/detective stories with supernatural sorts of elements that usually left you scratching you We're fast approaching the end now...the end of the Repairman Jack series (at least the main line, not counting prequels, YA titles, etc.) But also the end of the world as we know it. There are two novels left after this one and it all promises to be a doozy of a ride. This is not a stand-alone novel. Not really. Early Repairman Jack novels could be read and enjoyed by themselves, and were much more mystery/detective stories with supernatural sorts of elements that usually left you scratching your head because there was obviously something huge going on in the background but we just didn't know what it was. We readers get to learn all about it along with Jack as we progress through the novels. But at this point in the 15 book series we are well into understanding what is really going on. And it's so complex and humongous that it doesn't fit into individual novels. We're talking about the whole "Secret History of the World" much of which is revealed in the Repairman Jack novels but also in the Adversary Cycle books. The author himself states this in the forward to this book. The novels do not tie up so neatly as earlier ones. There have been large story arcs before but he was able to bring them to a satisfactory conclusion each time. That is no longer the case. While each book still has a definite beginning, middle, and end, the overall story arc has so completely taken over that they are reading now like one longer work. That's perfectly fine for me because they are so awesome. I won't do a plot summary but will say that the "real" story behind 9/11 alluded to in the title and cover art is pretty amazing and completely aligns with the rest of the series. One of the great attractions for me with this series is the enduring relationship between Jack and his girlfriend Gia. It seems like so many times in modern storytelling, the main character's relationships are battered by events in the story and often end up in the dumpster. It's just so refreshing to see these two characters' love endure despite the forces against them. (Of course I'm not done with the series yet). Guess I'm just an ol' softy. Anyway, I'm on the edge of my seat wondering how the final two books will play out. I count this series among my all time favorites.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mike Kazmierczak

    GROUND ZERO breaks away from the pattern of the normal Repairman Jack novel. Wilson has already been working on tying up the series and bringing it to an end. Something that has been noticeable in the last few books due to their subplots that are both accelerating and not resolving completely. This time though Wilson takes it one step further and just builds on the mythos. The usual pattern for the Repairman Jack books is to have a primary plot that is related to the Adversary Cycle but at the s GROUND ZERO breaks away from the pattern of the normal Repairman Jack novel. Wilson has already been working on tying up the series and bringing it to an end. Something that has been noticeable in the last few books due to their subplots that are both accelerating and not resolving completely. This time though Wilson takes it one step further and just builds on the mythos. The usual pattern for the Repairman Jack books is to have a primary plot that is related to the Adversary Cycle but at the same time it is a separate plot that can be resolved. This time though the primary plot starts with the introduction of a character to help fight the Otherness and the plot doesn't move off from the One and the plans made by the Otherness the entire time. Weezy is Jack's friend from his childhood days. While I haven't ready the Secret Histories or the Young Jack stories yet, I would imagine that Weezy is a recurring character in those novels. Weezy is a conspiracy theorist of the extreme type; combined with her ability to remember everything she's read and seen, she sees connections that show the Order's plans. It is these connections that put Weezy's life is at risk when she links the Order to the 9-11 attacks. Fortunately Jack came back into her life shortly before things hit the fan for her and saves her life. Since she knows so many of the pieces but not the bigger picture, Jack lets her in on the secret history and even gives to her the Compendium. Jack hopes her ability to remember everything will make sense of the Compendium. The story continues with the development and culmination of one of the side plans of The One, something that has a huge impact on Jack and his team of helpers. Unfortunately I would have to say that if you are not current with your Repairman Jack reading, this is not the book to start. We're pretty much at the tail end of the series. GROUND ZERO is exactly the book that long-time readers will love because it moves so many things forward and is creating a bigger impact. New readers will be lost. Trust me, go back to THE TOMB and read all of the books in order. I would also recommend reading them back-to-back. Just binge read them all. You'll catch many of the nuances that I've missed over the years.

  7. 5 out of 5

    David Agranoff

    Ground Zero by F.Paul Wilson A repairman jack novel 355 pages Tor The scale and vast scope of Stephen King's Dark Tower series is well noted. While career spanning mythos are common in the fantasy novels (IE authors like George RR Martin/ Robert Jordan) it is not very common in horror fiction. King is known for horror fiction and many of his strictly horror fiction tales( the mist and Salem's Lot connect to the Dark Tower) but that series is also fantasy. F.Paul wilson has created a career spanning Ground Zero by F.Paul Wilson A repairman jack novel 355 pages Tor The scale and vast scope of Stephen King's Dark Tower series is well noted. While career spanning mythos are common in the fantasy novels (IE authors like George RR Martin/ Robert Jordan) it is not very common in horror fiction. King is known for horror fiction and many of his strictly horror fiction tales( the mist and Salem's Lot connect to the Dark Tower) but that series is also fantasy. F.Paul wilson has created a career spanning saga and mythos of horror fiction that spans almost twenty books. Several classics like “The Keep” and “NightWorld” are more than twenty years old but impressively he is still working on this one story. The common thread is a lovecraftian-ish end of the world cosmic horror tale that ended our world in the novel Nightworld. Since that book was published Wilson has returned to it's main character Repairman Jack in more than a dozen novels and expanded on the mythology. Within the framework of Repairmen Jack novels Wilson has explored many genres and themes. Even written a young adult novel about Jack as a teenager. It is a massive undertaking of genre fiction that in many ways is more impressive than the Dark Tower in it's scope. I admit that I have not read any of the other Repairmen Jack novels but have read a couple of the Adversary cycle which are apart of the same story. The Keep is in fact one of my all time favorite novels. I became interested in Ground Zero when I realized that Wilson was weaving the events of 9/11 and truth movement ideas into his end of the world mythology. It sounded fascinating, and it was. Wilson explains the back story enough that I was able to follow but I am sure the novel is easier to follow if you read the other 11 or 15 books that he has already written in the saga. The story is fast paced and well written with short page turning chapters that go back in forth between perfectly timed chapter breaks. The characters are rich and keep you involved in the intense story of monstrous conspiracy and paranoia. Thumbs up. Get hooked on Repairman Jack

  8. 5 out of 5

    Earl

    "Ground Zero" is the 13th book in F. Paul Wilson's Repairman Jack series, and as such is not a very good spot for someone to begin the series. For longtime readers, any Repairman Jack book is good, but it seemed like, at the end, nothing really happened. In this volume, Jack takes on the cause of a childhood friend who is trying to nudge 9/11 conspiracy theorists into looking deeper into who was behind the World Trade Center attack, and why. Of course, Jack discovers it was part of another of the "Ground Zero" is the 13th book in F. Paul Wilson's Repairman Jack series, and as such is not a very good spot for someone to begin the series. For longtime readers, any Repairman Jack book is good, but it seemed like, at the end, nothing really happened. In this volume, Jack takes on the cause of a childhood friend who is trying to nudge 9/11 conspiracy theorists into looking deeper into who was behind the World Trade Center attack, and why. Of course, Jack discovers it was part of another of the Adversary's plans, and tries to stop the endgame of this one, even though he arrives quite late to the party. Gunplay, supernatural hoodoo, and a few one-liners are the order of the day. There's nothing surprising in this story, but it's comforting to know that even a by the numbers Jack novel is still enjoyable. I could see the "truth" of this book rubbing those who were personally affected by 9/11 rubbing them the wrong way. I think that it was brave for Wilson to use it as a backdrop, but also almost necessary. With the mythology that he has set up, Wilson almost had to work 9/11 into his plotline. Thankfully, he waited quite a while to do so, instead of cranking this story out immediately after the attacks. This is fiction, and is meant to be an action/horror ride, not a serious analysis of terrorism. Also, the main plot of Wilson's "Secret History of the World" is not advanced much at all. All of the pieces are in pretty much the same spots as when the book started, with only a bit of time passing. With two books left in Jack's series, and then the revision of "Nightworld" left, this really seemed like Wilson was trying to fit one more novel into the series, instead of getting on with the story. That can be forgiven with a character like Jack, but this book would be completely skippable in the grand scheme of things. All in all, "Ground Zero" is not for those who haven't set foot in Wilson's world yet, and not necessary for those who have. However, I can't see any person who has read the previous 12 Repairman Jack books passing this up. If you've read them, keep reading. If you haven't, find "The Tomb" pronto, and start.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Hitandmiss

    Overall I've enjoyed Jack up until this point. I’ve had my qualms about libertarian philosophy being sneaked into the books (Jack not paying taxes and living free from society while enjoying all the advantages of this society) and I've looked past the the rampant intellectual dishonesty of "An armed society is a peaceful society" were we never have an honest counter to Abe’s ideology even a “how do we stop bad guys getting guns?” or “What about innocents killed by people shooting at bad guys?”. I Overall I've enjoyed Jack up until this point. I’ve had my qualms about libertarian philosophy being sneaked into the books (Jack not paying taxes and living free from society while enjoying all the advantages of this society) and I've looked past the the rampant intellectual dishonesty of "An armed society is a peaceful society" were we never have an honest counter to Abe’s ideology even a “how do we stop bad guys getting guns?” or “What about innocents killed by people shooting at bad guys?”. I looked past these faults as I enjoyed the action and don’t take books like this too seriously. However the shoe horning of 9/11 into the book (and the previous books) was a low blow. I realise a lot of books take historical events and use them for plots, however with this book I felt we didn’t need 9/11, the order could have had a hard time getting a pillar from anywhere. We didn’t really even need the pillar to be hard to get too, the whole 9/11 backstory is written in the past and didn’t really need to be there except for the whole “Secret histories” Arc. If we were told say, “The One has had an influence in past wars/terror attacks so that he could feast”, this would be more believable and fitting, rather than some huge terror plot, he could of just dug under the buildings and retrieved it, he has the time and resources. A much stronger plot point would of been; A scene where Weezy puts a photo collage together, where she realises that the “Missing Man” has been in the background of alot of terror meetings/wars/bombing sites. This would fit in with Weezy's conspiracy arc and would of been more interesting then some tawdry link to the towers. The only reason 9/11 was used is that it comes with a huge emotional background and is easy for a author to use without having to write a compelling story that makes us feel that the baddies are evil, I chalk this up to the author running out of steam.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    I love the Repairman Jack series. But as it comes to an end, I find it harder to enjoy them. Wilson writes them as if you are up to date with the series, and for me, it had been a year since I read the last one-so I was a little lost, trying to remember the events of the last novel. And as someone else posted, he talks about events in the young adult series, which I doo not plan to read. I almost put this down, not finished. But I kept going, and I did enjoy it, though it's not as action packed a I love the Repairman Jack series. But as it comes to an end, I find it harder to enjoy them. Wilson writes them as if you are up to date with the series, and for me, it had been a year since I read the last one-so I was a little lost, trying to remember the events of the last novel. And as someone else posted, he talks about events in the young adult series, which I doo not plan to read. I almost put this down, not finished. But I kept going, and I did enjoy it, though it's not as action packed as his others. I enjoyed "The Adversary Cycle" when I read them in the early 90's. I sense that Wilson wants us to 're-read' them.(And that he is re-writing them some what as well) I don't want to. Not sure if I will or not, yet...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    Another good book in the series.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Annette McKirdy

    Great read Another great read. I just can't put these books down! Can't wait to start book 14!!! F. Paul Wilson is such a good story teller.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Brett Grossmann

    Another swing and a miss. The Jack books have been replaced by the adversary cycle diaries. The small guy fixing things and getting caught in something bigger is gone. We get a characters history that keeps getting altered to fix the plot holes and solve story narrative. Jack seems to have forgotten everything in his childhood..conveniently. People he left behind easily he now will take a billet for? He never would get on a plane for 13 books. Now for s silly plot line he hops s flight to Califo Another swing and a miss. The Jack books have been replaced by the adversary cycle diaries. The small guy fixing things and getting caught in something bigger is gone. We get a characters history that keeps getting altered to fix the plot holes and solve story narrative. Jack seems to have forgotten everything in his childhood..conveniently. People he left behind easily he now will take a billet for? He never would get on a plane for 13 books. Now for s silly plot line he hops s flight to California. His girlfriend and ave are thrust into the background. I miss the old formula. This book wasn’t very different than the last one. The author is milking this finale for a buck. Glad I read this for free

  14. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

    Nearing the end of the Repairman Jack series. Ties up loose ends, introduces new characters and explains a lot. Onto the next. Thanks FPW.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    The saga to the end of the world continues...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Spurnlad

    The tension builds...

  17. 5 out of 5

    Gerhard

    Can't stop following Jack down the rabbit hole!! Excellent series.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    Well what can I say? ****(I will be assuming you have read the 12 books that precede this one)**** First I join another reviewer of one of Mr. Wilson's other series in saying, "yes we get it...there's no God. There's "something else" out there that's basically indifferent to "us" and then an "otherness" that is openly hostile to us and wants to make our world over into a "hellish place" (though using the word "hellish" might be cheating, you think? Oh well). That is basically one of the main plot Well what can I say? ****(I will be assuming you have read the 12 books that precede this one)**** First I join another reviewer of one of Mr. Wilson's other series in saying, "yes we get it...there's no God. There's "something else" out there that's basically indifferent to "us" and then an "otherness" that is openly hostile to us and wants to make our world over into a "hellish place" (though using the word "hellish" might be cheating, you think? Oh well). That is basically one of the main plot points in this series and also the Adversary series by FPL. The two are sort of complimentary and take place in a kind of side by side manner. I've always liked the Repairman Jack books better. Of course it's not quite as heavy handed in it's metaphysical overtones and not so much a downer. The Adversary series is (in my opinion) much more a horror series. If you've followed Repairman Jack this far (13 volumes) none of that is a surprise. In this book we get a somewhat more clearly defined look at some of the hidden facts of the "secret history" of the world. Some of you/us will probably have had some ideas about where the story is going and "who" certain characters are so at this point we get proved either right or wrong on a couple of points. We also meet another character/player in the "cosmic" warfare we've seen building up...and we reach a certain climax in a part of said war. And it's got to heat up even more from now on. Interest piqued? Dying to grab the book and start reading? Cool. I like the series (in spite of being a Christian and having to put up with FPL's continual harping on the lack of a God). It's a nice fast moving UF series and I can recommend it as action brain candy. Enjoy.

  19. 5 out of 5

    David

    At the beginning of "Ground Zero", F. Paul Wilson states that it is a "river novel" with no distinct beginning or ending, rather flowing from and into the books on either side of it in the Repairman Jack series. That is correct. If you plan on reading this as your first "Jack" novel, you will be hopelessly lost. On the other hand, if you have been dutifully following the series, series you will be, uh, less lost. "Ground Zero" begins with the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center. This is a bold At the beginning of "Ground Zero", F. Paul Wilson states that it is a "river novel" with no distinct beginning or ending, rather flowing from and into the books on either side of it in the Repairman Jack series. That is correct. If you plan on reading this as your first "Jack" novel, you will be hopelessly lost. On the other hand, if you have been dutifully following the series, series you will be, uh, less lost. "Ground Zero" begins with the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center. This is a bold move on Wilson's part, and I am still not sure how I feel about it. Part of me thinks that weaving that attack into a fiction/sci-fi series is fairly crass. On the other hand, it is part of history, and Wilson's premise for the series is that behind our history, there is a secret history playing out. I enjoyed reading this book despite the fact that not a whole lot happens. The Kickers are back, as are the usual characters in Jack's world. I understand that this is a "river novel", but there is no real thrust to the plot. It is all development, moving towards another book. That doesn't make it unpleasant to read, it just means that anyone would be hard pressed to say what exactly happens in this book. So, it is pleasant read. It furthers the series along. However, there is not much of a plot in this one. It does move us on to the next in the Repairman Jack series.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brent Ecenbarger

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Twelve books into this series (with only two to go, plus a handful of prequels) and I've finally given one of these books below four stars on Goodreads. This book follows Jack as he gets hired by a childhood friend to find Jack's own childhood best friend and uncover the conspiracy that is trying to silence her. *Spoilers Follow* The main thing that didn't work for me was the author tying in the events 9/11. I often say these next words jokingly, but even I thought the use of that event as a plo Twelve books into this series (with only two to go, plus a handful of prequels) and I've finally given one of these books below four stars on Goodreads. This book follows Jack as he gets hired by a childhood friend to find Jack's own childhood best friend and uncover the conspiracy that is trying to silence her. *Spoilers Follow* The main thing that didn't work for me was the author tying in the events 9/11. I often say these next words jokingly, but even I thought the use of that event as a plot device was too soon. The plans by the otherness in this book also felt more hokey than in past books, with the evil mechanism having a lame name, vague abilities and so-so payoff. The book routinely relies on nobody but Jack being able to use common sense (see Hank blindly following Drexler, or the old woman with her dog's reaction to danger). The entire ending is then saved by the equivalent of hitting the reset button on an old video game. Still, I'll give this book 3 stars for advancing the plot further in the series while tying in characters from the prequel novels and answering most of the big questions about the rules of this contest and who are the players are.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Ground Zero is the 12th installment in the Repairman Jack series about Jack, an "off the grid" Repairman who fixes situations not appliances. With his friend Abe supplying him an arsenal of weapons, Jack looks after those who need help. Pragmatic Jack also runs across some increasing unusual situations and begins to believe in the paranormal. As the series progresses, Jack experiences more and more unusual situations and learns more of the "secret history" of the world, which revolves around a b Ground Zero is the 12th installment in the Repairman Jack series about Jack, an "off the grid" Repairman who fixes situations not appliances. With his friend Abe supplying him an arsenal of weapons, Jack looks after those who need help. Pragmatic Jack also runs across some increasing unusual situations and begins to believe in the paranormal. As the series progresses, Jack experiences more and more unusual situations and learns more of the "secret history" of the world, which revolves around a battle between two supernatural entities. I have been a fan of this series forever. However, the last few books in the series have concentrated more upon the cosmic struggle and less upon Jack. I don't enjoy them nearly as much now. But my opinion might be biased...I've got a thing for the tough-guy Jacks: Jack Bauer, Jack Reacher, Repairman Jack. They are all action heroes with smarts, humor, and finesse. I want to follow their exploits, and there were just not enough action-man exploits in Ground Zero for my taste.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Yargeau

    I'm glad I picked this up right after finishing By the Sword, because it picks up right where that one left off with little preface to refresh your memory if you have waited in between books. Now that I have finished it, I can say it read very quickly. Introducing some new characters, such as "Weezy" Louise Connell Myeres, whom Jack knew as a teen, helps tie in even more of the "Secret Histories of the World." Again, as with "By the Sword" I feel I can't give this five stars only because it needs I'm glad I picked this up right after finishing By the Sword, because it picks up right where that one left off with little preface to refresh your memory if you have waited in between books. Now that I have finished it, I can say it read very quickly. Introducing some new characters, such as "Weezy" Louise Connell Myeres, whom Jack knew as a teen, helps tie in even more of the "Secret Histories of the World." Again, as with "By the Sword" I feel I can't give this five stars only because it needs to be continued into the next book, nothing is self contained at this point in the Repairman Jack series. But Mr. Wilson makes no excuses for that. I enjoyed the way he connected this story to the real 9/11 disaster and all the conspiracy theories out there, really helping suspend disbelief by questioning who was really behind this and why. Only 2 more "Jack" stories to go, then Nightworld. I just hope Jack, Gia and Vicky make it!

  23. 4 out of 5

    David

    Another great entry in the Repairman Jack series, #13 with only 2 direct books to follow. If you're a fan of the series who is wondering at what point you should read the Young Jack trilogy (starting with Secret Histories), I would say that at least by the time you read this book would be best. There are some hints to Jack's past earlier in the series as written in those books, but this is the one that reunites him with Eddie and Weezy, mentions Carson Toliver, and two mysterious adult figures w Another great entry in the Repairman Jack series, #13 with only 2 direct books to follow. If you're a fan of the series who is wondering at what point you should read the Young Jack trilogy (starting with Secret Histories), I would say that at least by the time you read this book would be best. There are some hints to Jack's past earlier in the series as written in those books, but this is the one that reunites him with Eddie and Weezy, mentions Carson Toliver, and two mysterious adult figures who now are shown to be major players on opposite sides. If there's a criticism for this otherwise fine book, it's that F Paul Wilson devises a plot that involves the weird and the deadly, but it plays out in a way that seems to be an easy way out. No spoilers other than that. It still makes one ready to continue with what's to come.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Todd

    Maybe 3.5 stars - a definite page turner, although some of the 9/11 stuff comes across as a little bit heavy-handed. Also, the regular referencing of events (which starts here but continues across the next couple of Jack books) from the YA Jack series Wilson wrote is understandable but also a bit of an annoyance. While I have no issues reading well-written YA fiction, it shouldn't be necessary to do so in order to keep up with a hugely long series that is written for adults. After the first hand Maybe 3.5 stars - a definite page turner, although some of the 9/11 stuff comes across as a little bit heavy-handed. Also, the regular referencing of events (which starts here but continues across the next couple of Jack books) from the YA Jack series Wilson wrote is understandable but also a bit of an annoyance. While I have no issues reading well-written YA fiction, it shouldn't be necessary to do so in order to keep up with a hugely long series that is written for adults. After the first handful of mentions I started to wonder if this stuff was really crucial to the plot or if Wilson was just using this book as free advertising space for his YA trilogy. Aside from those quibbles, though, hey, it's Jack. If you love him, this won't change that, and if you're not so into him, I'm not sure why you're still tagging along here on book 13 anyway.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Brian Palmer

    This is actually the first book in the Repairman Jack series that I've read, so I have to disagree with many other reviewers that new readers would be completely lost. This is a somewhat supernatural thriller with much more emphasis on the 'thriller' part than the supernatural. Although there are elements that clearly were fleshed out in greater detail elsewhere, all the important details were explained. On the other hand, if I didn't know that the series was leading up to a finale, I would have This is actually the first book in the Repairman Jack series that I've read, so I have to disagree with many other reviewers that new readers would be completely lost. This is a somewhat supernatural thriller with much more emphasis on the 'thriller' part than the supernatural. Although there are elements that clearly were fleshed out in greater detail elsewhere, all the important details were explained. On the other hand, if I didn't know that the series was leading up to a finale, I would have thought some parts were disappointing; some very important things occur here that are not explained, making certain bits feel very much like a deus ex machina is involved. This has made me intent on reading some more in the series.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    While I was a bit engrossed in the next Jack Repairman novel, I found it to be a bit breezy and so-so. I really liked the earlier novels for they really showed how his character progressed from being a simple bad assed dude in New York to the One as in Matrix, not as the bad guy, the One. This novel was a bit rushed and a little careless in terms of sentences, like Jack trained from this station to this. I got a bit confused and irritated because I thought Jack trained in this station when the a While I was a bit engrossed in the next Jack Repairman novel, I found it to be a bit breezy and so-so. I really liked the earlier novels for they really showed how his character progressed from being a simple bad assed dude in New York to the One as in Matrix, not as the bad guy, the One. This novel was a bit rushed and a little careless in terms of sentences, like Jack trained from this station to this. I got a bit confused and irritated because I thought Jack trained in this station when the author meant Jack took a train. But I really like the character Jack because he was very noble and witty, something that he seemed to fall short of in this book. I think it was a bit of an advertisment for his young adult novel, Jack's Secret History.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    What if the 9/11 attacks were not purely an act of terror against the US but rather part of an elaborate operation to gain access to an unspeakable evil buried beneath the foundation of the World Trade Center? This concept is the driving force behind the 13th book of F. Paul Wilson’s Repairman Jack series in which Jack must unravel these subterranean secrets to save those he loves most. I was not sure if I was ready for this particular very real factual event to be blended with a work of fiction, What if the 9/11 attacks were not purely an act of terror against the US but rather part of an elaborate operation to gain access to an unspeakable evil buried beneath the foundation of the World Trade Center? This concept is the driving force behind the 13th book of F. Paul Wilson’s Repairman Jack series in which Jack must unravel these subterranean secrets to save those he loves most. I was not sure if I was ready for this particular very real factual event to be blended with a work of fiction, but I was able to get through it and it was not as uncomfortable as I thought it might be. For those of you who have made it this far in the series, rest assured many of your questions will FINALLY be answered.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nate

    I wanted to like this more. I've been a fan of Repairman Jack since his first story. But the problem is... Well, 15 books in or whatever it is these days, the story is getting really repetitive. Jack tries to help someone. Most of the time he fails (which makes one wonder how he keeps getting clients). Even the ones he DOES help are outraged that he shoots bad guys in the back of the head. The virtually omnipotent bad guy prefers to keep Jack alive to suffer, instead of doing the smart thing and I wanted to like this more. I've been a fan of Repairman Jack since his first story. But the problem is... Well, 15 books in or whatever it is these days, the story is getting really repetitive. Jack tries to help someone. Most of the time he fails (which makes one wonder how he keeps getting clients). Even the ones he DOES help are outraged that he shoots bad guys in the back of the head. The virtually omnipotent bad guy prefers to keep Jack alive to suffer, instead of doing the smart thing and ripping his head off. In a day when the 'Evil Overlord List' can be found online, that's unacceptable from a villain. The moralizing is a bit much for me. That said, it was still an entertaining, decent summer read. Only recommended for hardcore Repairman Jack fans.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    No, this isn’t a book about the events of 9/11/01. It’s a Repairman Jack novel. The series is now no longer one of the individual adventures of the hero slowly building up to the events of the final book of the Adversary Cycle. Rather, this chapter is a full-force development of the story of Jack’s personal journey toward becoming the “Defender”… the main representative of good in the fictional world’s approach toward the coming of the “Otherness”. A good read, but in some ways seems to largely No, this isn’t a book about the events of 9/11/01. It’s a Repairman Jack novel. The series is now no longer one of the individual adventures of the hero slowly building up to the events of the final book of the Adversary Cycle. Rather, this chapter is a full-force development of the story of Jack’s personal journey toward becoming the “Defender”… the main representative of good in the fictional world’s approach toward the coming of the “Otherness”. A good read, but in some ways seems to largely be a means for Wilson to tie together, or off, various threads begun by the previous novels. With only two more Repairman Jack novels to be released, that’s very understandable.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Marissa

    As we barrel towards the end of Year Zero, Wilson is doing a really great job of weaving all the different threads of the Repairman Jack/Secret Histories world together. I'm so used to authors trying to fit too much in to one book, and ending up with important details feeling like they're out of place or spilling over the edges of the pages. By taking the long way around (since about book #11, Wilson has been very upfront that these stories bleed in to each other as part of a larger whole), I th As we barrel towards the end of Year Zero, Wilson is doing a really great job of weaving all the different threads of the Repairman Jack/Secret Histories world together. I'm so used to authors trying to fit too much in to one book, and ending up with important details feeling like they're out of place or spilling over the edges of the pages. By taking the long way around (since about book #11, Wilson has been very upfront that these stories bleed in to each other as part of a larger whole), I think we're getting not only a much more interesting version of storytelling, but also a very thorough, complete vision of how this world was built (and will unfold.)

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