Hot Best Seller

Heaven's Keep PDF, ePub eBook

4.6 out of 5
30 review

Heaven's Keep

Availability: Ready to download

File Name: Heaven's Keep .pdf

How it works:

1. Register a free 1 month Trial Account.

2. Download as many books as you like (Personal use)

3. Cancel the membership at any time if not satisfied.


Heaven's Keep PDF, ePub eBook You can’t keep Cork down, and in the next riveting novel in William Kent Krueger’s award-winning mystery series, Cork O’Connor again rises to the top as he investigates the disappearance of his beloved wife. When a charter plane carrying Cork O’Connor’s wife, Jo, goes missing in a snowstorm over the Wyoming Rockies, Cork must accept the terrible truth that his wife is gon You can’t keep Cork down, and in the next riveting novel in William Kent Krueger’s award-winning mystery series, Cork O’Connor again rises to the top as he investigates the disappearance of his beloved wife. When a charter plane carrying Cork O’Connor’s wife, Jo, goes missing in a snowstorm over the Wyoming Rockies, Cork must accept the terrible truth that his wife is gone forever. But is she? In Heaven’s Keep, celebrated author William Kent Krueger puts his intrepid hero through the most harrowing mission of his life. After many days filled with grief, two women show up at Cork’s doorstep with evidence that the pilot of Jo’s plane was not the man he claimed to be. It may not be definitive proof, but it’s a ray of light in the darkness surrounding Cork’s loss. Agreeing to investigate, he travels to Wyoming where he battles the interference of forces determined to throw Cork off the trail—permanently. At the center of all the danger and deception lies the possibility that Jo is not really dead and that, somewhere along the labyrinthine path of his search, Cork will find her alive and waiting for him. With deft plotting and writing that satisfies as much as it thrills, Heaven’s Keep gives readers an adventure not soon forgotten.

30 review for Heaven's Keep

  1. 4 out of 5

    Phrynne

    If you ever needed a reason not to read book blurbs this one is it! I am sure I would have got far more out of this book if I had not known what was going to happen! So just in case you don't know I will make sure this review is totally spoiler free. So overall I did enjoy Heaven's Keep although maybe not as much as some of the previous books. Cork is consistently himself, Stevie grows into a young man and the whole family bonds over some major issues. It is good to have read all the series in or If you ever needed a reason not to read book blurbs this one is it! I am sure I would have got far more out of this book if I had not known what was going to happen! So just in case you don't know I will make sure this review is totally spoiler free. So overall I did enjoy Heaven's Keep although maybe not as much as some of the previous books. Cork is consistently himself, Stevie grows into a young man and the whole family bonds over some major issues. It is good to have read all the series in order so far and to have seen all the family members grow. Krueger's writing is as beautiful as always. He has a talent for making you feel the cold and the snow and the countryside around you. My reason for losing one star - I was uncomfortable with Stevie's vision and how it eventuates. It was just a little too unrealistic for me. I had already struggled a bit with the contents of the plane and the vision was too much! No spoilers there but you will understand what I am referring to if you read the book. It is still a very good book and I am looking forward to finding out what the future holds for Cork:)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jonetta

    Jo O'Connor joins a coalition of representatives from several Native American groups for a trip to Seattle. Something happens en route over Wyoming and the plane disappears. A distraught Cork lends a hand to the search teams as they fight time and weather to locate the plane. The themes in this story resonated loud and strong as Cork encountered competing objectives, motivations and cultures in his quest to find his wife. As usual, the settings were just as much a part of the plot, this time the Jo O'Connor joins a coalition of representatives from several Native American groups for a trip to Seattle. Something happens en route over Wyoming and the plane disappears. A distraught Cork lends a hand to the search teams as they fight time and weather to locate the plane. The themes in this story resonated loud and strong as Cork encountered competing objectives, motivations and cultures in his quest to find his wife. As usual, the settings were just as much a part of the plot, this time the beautiful but treacherous mountains and foothills of Wyoming. I wasn’t looking forward to this one but it still managed to captivate me nonetheless. I’m still mulling over the ending, not sure if I’m content with it or needed more. Buck Schirner narrated this one again though I found his performance much better than the last. This series never disappoints.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    My heart went goes out to Cork O’Conner in this tragic tale, but this one disappointed me in a couple of ways. His wife Jo disappears with a charter plane with some Indian leaders in a snowstorm in Wyoming, and Cork, a PI and ex-sheriff in rural Minnesota, is compelled to help find the wreckage and understand what happened. The main problem for me is that it takes about half the book to pin down that there are bad guys, and we are tormented too long for my taste by the emotional wrenching of his My heart went goes out to Cork O’Conner in this tragic tale, but this one disappointed me in a couple of ways. His wife Jo disappears with a charter plane with some Indian leaders in a snowstorm in Wyoming, and Cork, a PI and ex-sheriff in rural Minnesota, is compelled to help find the wreckage and understand what happened. The main problem for me is that it takes about half the book to pin down that there are bad guys, and we are tormented too long for my taste by the emotional wrenching of his grief and fruitless searching. From the one other Krueger I read from this 14 book series, I appreciate his treatment of Native American issues and themes, which emerges out of O’Conner’s Ojibwe family heritage. But in this one, the main clue for the mystery lies too conveniently in vision by an alcoholic Arapaho elder and a dream by O’Conner’s thirteen old son. I did like the unlikely partnering of O’Conner with a wealthy Texas developer, a man he has been in legal struggles with over his condominium plans around Cork’s property on a beautiful lake. I also liked the coverage of the all too common conflict within tribal communities over the prospects and dangers of pursuing casino or oil production ventures on their land as a means to address their pervasive poverty. But with this story, the path of corruption taken by some of the characters was too extreme to be plausible. Regardless, I am hooked on Cork’s outlook and mission in life and am eager to pursue more of his efforts in the series to take on the evils of the world.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    This is an incredibly beautiful, suspenseful, and compelling story. I am still sitting here wondering how it’s possible that this, the ninth book in the Cork O’Connor series, could possibly be the best one yet, but that’s exactly what it is. Cork O’Connor has strong spiritual and blood ties to the Ojibwe Native American culture and he shares many of their beliefs, while also keeping his Catholic faith. Krueger plausibly weaves the Native mystical elements into all of his stories, creating the per This is an incredibly beautiful, suspenseful, and compelling story. I am still sitting here wondering how it’s possible that this, the ninth book in the Cork O’Connor series, could possibly be the best one yet, but that’s exactly what it is. Cork O’Connor has strong spiritual and blood ties to the Ojibwe Native American culture and he shares many of their beliefs, while also keeping his Catholic faith. Krueger plausibly weaves the Native mystical elements into all of his stories, creating the perfect setting in which the earth, the sky and the spirits are almost complete characters in themselves. In fact, it is a vision seen by his own son which propels Cork on the path that he must take in this book and it never once felt outlandish. What I always tell people who are considering reading these books is that Cork is a wonderful character about whom I love to read, well developed over the course of the series. This is a man who understands his limitations but does not let them define him. Who doesn’t suffer what other people think because he knows what is truly most important. Who always tries to follow the high road, even if not always successful. Above all, he will take care of his own, no matter what. If this is a person you would like to know, then you should try this series.

  5. 5 out of 5

    David Tindell

    I first saw Krueger's novels on the shelves of a local store. Small-town northern Minnesota sheriff/PI, I read. Well, how interesting could that be? I live near a small northern Wisconsin town, and while it's a very nice place, not much of interest to the outside world happens here (which is fine with us). But in early August I picked up the first volume in the Cork O'Connor series, "Iron Lake", for my wife, who enjoys mysteries. I picked it up after her, just for something to read. I was hooke I first saw Krueger's novels on the shelves of a local store. Small-town northern Minnesota sheriff/PI, I read. Well, how interesting could that be? I live near a small northern Wisconsin town, and while it's a very nice place, not much of interest to the outside world happens here (which is fine with us). But in early August I picked up the first volume in the Cork O'Connor series, "Iron Lake", for my wife, who enjoys mysteries. I picked it up after her, just for something to read. I was hooked. Two months later I've just finished #9 in the series, "Heaven's Keep". In this, Cork faces the most daunting challenge of his life, the search for the truth surrounding the disappearance and apparent death of his wife, Jo. Readers of the series know that things haven't always been terrific between Cork and Jo, but as the years passed and they faced great challenges together, from raising their children to facing down the bad guys, they grew ever closer. My wife refuses to read this entry in the series, but I jumped in. Krueger's writing has always been deft and deep, bringing to life the woods and lakes and small towns of northern Minnesota and the people who live there. I would imagine this novel was his biggest challenge. He decided to kill off one of his best-written, most popular characters and put the life and emotional well-being of his protagonist on the line. Something like this could have easily gone south quickly, but Krueger handles it well. Better than well. "Heaven's Keep" takes Cork about as far out of his comfort zone as he could get, pushes him to his physical and emotional limits, and takes him to a place no husband and father ever wants to go. As a stand-alone novel it would be a fine read, but do yourself a favor and start at the beginning. You won't regret it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    What a powerful book! Right from the beginning, with a gut-wrenching prologue, Krueger took me on an emotional journey to Wyoming, where massive snow storms are covering a desolate, bleak land, and questions arise with no easy answers. I was glad to see Stephen's maturity and hope to learn more of his time with Henry Meloux. I'm also glad Cork had a partner and friend in Hugh Parmer. If you're reading this series in order, this book will shock and astound you. I can hardly wait to read the next What a powerful book! Right from the beginning, with a gut-wrenching prologue, Krueger took me on an emotional journey to Wyoming, where massive snow storms are covering a desolate, bleak land, and questions arise with no easy answers. I was glad to see Stephen's maturity and hope to learn more of his time with Henry Meloux. I'm also glad Cork had a partner and friend in Hugh Parmer. If you're reading this series in order, this book will shock and astound you. I can hardly wait to read the next one.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    If you plan to read this series. Make sure you don't read the blurb on this book. I thought the blurb was quite a spoiler for the book if you use your powers of deduction. This was a pretty heartbreaking read when I've come to know and love the characters. I don't know where the story can go on from here. I know it will, but still I can't quite believe how events transpired overall in Heaven's Keep and I wonder why the author took the direction this books lays out for the future. All in all thou If you plan to read this series. Make sure you don't read the blurb on this book. I thought the blurb was quite a spoiler for the book if you use your powers of deduction. This was a pretty heartbreaking read when I've come to know and love the characters. I don't know where the story can go on from here. I know it will, but still I can't quite believe how events transpired overall in Heaven's Keep and I wonder why the author took the direction this books lays out for the future. All in all though, another good addition to the series. The mystery was compelling and it was a little harder to work out the culprits or the elaborate lengths that can be taken to hide the truth.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kris - My Novelesque Life

    RATING: 3 STARS (Review Not on Blog) Listened to on audio It has been 4 months or so since my last Cork O'Connor book. I have been trying to find this one on audio as that is the only way I can do this series now. I love the narrator and since I don't know how to pronounce some of the words it is nice to hear them said correctly. Warning you now, this is a book with lots of emotion. Jo's plan has gone missing and thought to have crashed. Her and all those on the plane are considered dead. Cork won RATING: 3 STARS (Review Not on Blog) Listened to on audio It has been 4 months or so since my last Cork O'Connor book. I have been trying to find this one on audio as that is the only way I can do this series now. I love the narrator and since I don't know how to pronounce some of the words it is nice to hear them said correctly. Warning you now, this is a book with lots of emotion. Jo's plan has gone missing and thought to have crashed. Her and all those on the plane are considered dead. Cork won't believe it till he sees for himself. I don't know if it was the plot or what but it's like I refused to connect with this book. I just wanted to get through it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I am very invested in this book and the series. I am so disappointed that Jo died in this book. I kept holding out hope that she would somehow be found alive. I realized that was unlikely, but it felt even more cruel to me for Cork and Stephen to discover that she survived the original massacre, only to die after being in a coma at a hospice in Mexico. What. The. Hell.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Harry

    William Kent Krueger's Cork O'OConnor series comprise a series of stories set in Aurora Minnesota, an area of the country of which I'm blatantly ignorant. Frankly, in reading the reviews of this setting I managed to barely stifle a yawn. Small town mysteries set in a frozen wasteland? With boring backgrounds that involve Indian supernatural folklore - I don't stomach mysteries that resort to such subterfuge, avoid beyond this world explanations when the genre is detective/mystery, decry irration William Kent Krueger's Cork O'OConnor series comprise a series of stories set in Aurora Minnesota, an area of the country of which I'm blatantly ignorant. Frankly, in reading the reviews of this setting I managed to barely stifle a yawn. Small town mysteries set in a frozen wasteland? With boring backgrounds that involve Indian supernatural folklore - I don't stomach mysteries that resort to such subterfuge, avoid beyond this world explanations when the genre is detective/mystery, decry irrational explanations of the crime which to me defeat the whole purpose of reading the damn book (unless of course you are Michael Gruber and you're reading the Jimmy Paz series - yeah, I'll read anything Gruber puts out there!) - boring red neck characters (is there such a thing as a Minnesota red neck?), small town corruption and politics, incompetent forensics and pathologists, petty motivations,and what not. Needless to say, I wasn't thrilled. And yet: In 2005 and 2006, Krueger won back to back Anthony Awards for best novel - a feat only matched by one other writer since the award's inception. Normally, as this essay so eloquently states, I don't ascribe to popularity, or the NYT Best Sellers list as those manuscripts inevitably disappoint but where it comes to mystery/detective awards, the final vote is usually something I can go for. And, as I was in a hurry and needed something to download to my Kindle, fully prepared to read yet another book full of flat characters, resigned myself to boring ethnographic descriptions, I said: "Screw it, let's give Mr. Krueger a try." I found myself marveling at this author's delicate handling and knowledge of the very thing that made me not want to read it: The spiritual undertones and affectations that guide human beings (which I am interested in) but that can come loose at the seams when bordering on superstition and surreal explorations. That he does this through the juxtaposition of Catholicism and the folklore and beliefs of the Anishinaabeg, or "Original People", and that he does so by fusing that carefully within the storyline so that it never seems gratuitous, over played, or cause the outcome to be dependent on irrationality is masterful. Nice! As Mr. Krueger says: "In the mysteries that I write, I often deal with the whole question of the spiritual journey. It’s always intrigued me. I’ve never believed in the Christian view of heaven. But I certainly believe in eternal life. It’s a belief that goes back to a black and white film I saw in a grungy movie theater when I was too young for all the esoteric considerations of the afterlife. It’s amazing, isn’t it, the things that can change your life." In terms of the Anishinaabeg Mr. Krueger is careful to not enforce the stereotype to which most have come to: [...]If you read my stories, please don’t read them as ethnography. The Anishinaabeg are far more complex culturally, rich historically, and textured spiritually, than I will ever be able to adequately portray in my writing. But if I’m able to give you a sense of the admiration I feel for them, then I’ve succeeded. This book reminds me of my boyhood heroes. In the Netherlands where I was born, it wasn't cops and robbers we played while kids:it was cowboy and indians; my fictional heroes were Winnetou and Old Shatterhand a YA series published in the Netherlands but not available in the states. Krueger manages to convey the Native American culture spanning centuries, on into modern day America, in such a way so as to recall my boyhood dreams. There are terrifying moments, men bound to trees and being tortured, honor among killers, and dishonor and deceit within ordinary people. As to Cork O'Connor the hero in this series. As most who read my reviews know, I thoroughly enjoy the loner as heroic, a man or woman who understands that despite social conventions (often designed to hide facing this) man is essentially alone, a creature running around on this planet with (hopefully) purpose. And, as most also know, I despise flat characters (Vince Flynn comes to mind - sorry, Leon!). Cork is the former, not the latter. As a father I understand the inexplicable guilt one feels towards one's children upon facing divorce. And as a father I have come to admire, as Cork does, the resiliency children have to overcome such a situation and make the best of it (far better managed than us adults!). Everything is about juxtaposition. Cork O'Conner is a man who believes in justice, not as meted out by often corrupt law enforcement, but the justice of not denying reality, the justice of truth. When Cork sets his mind to resolving a mystery that to others seems clear cut, ready to be put to rest, he is like a rabid dog unwilling to lessen the vice like grip of his jaws no matter what the consequences to himself and those he loves. We feel his struggle with morality, his disappointment with an almighty being, and yet feel his empirical longing for a peace that the world has consigned to other worldly systems. Cork is, forever, the man in between. The plot is superb. The writing carefully edited so as to give us a straight mystery detective while infusing us with a pleasurable knowledge of Aurora, it's inhabitants, and the evil that belies even the most tranquil of locations. Yeah, I liked it! And, the usual disclaimer, if you've read this review of one of the O'Connor series, you've read 'em all. Good reading!

  11. 4 out of 5

    LJ

    First Sentence: In the weeks after the tragedy, as he accumulates pieces of information, he continues to replay that morning in his mind. Cork O’Connor and his wife, Jo, parted in anger as she left on a business. He learns her plane has disappeared from radar over the Wyoming Rockies and, with his son, travels West to be part of the search, but to no avail. Months later, the wife of the pilot, who was said to have been drunk while flying, turns upon Cork’s doorstep saying it wasn’t her husband fl First Sentence: In the weeks after the tragedy, as he accumulates pieces of information, he continues to replay that morning in his mind. Cork O’Connor and his wife, Jo, parted in anger as she left on a business. He learns her plane has disappeared from radar over the Wyoming Rockies and, with his son, travels West to be part of the search, but to no avail. Months later, the wife of the pilot, who was said to have been drunk while flying, turns upon Cork’s doorstep saying it wasn’t her husband flying the plane. His investigation causes him to think the accidental wasn’t accidental. So where is Jo? There were things I loved and things I didn’t love about this book. Krueger creates interesting characters that seem very real. However, I don’t always feel he uses them to full advantage. Cork’s friend, Henry Meloux, is one of the most interesting recurring characters. Here, he had almost a cameo role. We see Cork’s son Stephen growing up. Henry sends him on a vision quest, but we have no idea what happened as it was all off-stage. At the same time, Krueger’s incorporation of the metaphysical is both interesting and well done, never overpowering the story. This descriptions are wonderfully evocative and his dialogue true to the ear. I would not have been appropriate to the story, but I missed the wry humor usually apparent in this books. What I didn’t love was the plot. Killing off the protagonist’s mate seems to be a popular theme these days and one that, to me, seems easier than keeping the relationship realistic and progressing; of which I felt Krueger had done a good job until now. I was, however, impressed by Krueger’s ability to convey emotion. The motives didn’t work for me. It seemed a bit over the top and lacking the usual suspense. Most of the book I felt was very good, but it did fall apart toward the end. Krueger is still an author whose style I very much enjoy. By no means is he off my buy list. I’ll be there for the next book as soon as it comes out. HEAVEN’S KEEP (Unl Invest-Cork O’Connor-Minnesota/Wyoming-Cont) – G+ Krueger, William Kent – 9th in series Atria Books, 2009, US Hardcover – ISBN: 9781416556763

  12. 5 out of 5

    Linda Branich

    Krueger hits another one out of the ball park with Heaven's Keep--all the way to Wyoming, and at the end, even further. Cork O'Connor's wife's plane disappears from the radar screen somewhere over Wyoming, when it is en route to a Seattle conference, carrying not only attorney Jo, but also several other prominent Native Americans. One plot twist after another keeps the reader guessing about motive, method, and reason behind the plane's disappearance. Although Krueger takes Cork and his son, Steve Krueger hits another one out of the ball park with Heaven's Keep--all the way to Wyoming, and at the end, even further. Cork O'Connor's wife's plane disappears from the radar screen somewhere over Wyoming, when it is en route to a Seattle conference, carrying not only attorney Jo, but also several other prominent Native Americans. One plot twist after another keeps the reader guessing about motive, method, and reason behind the plane's disappearance. Although Krueger takes Cork and his son, Steve, far from the northern parts of Minnesota, he sets a great stage that contrasts with Minnesota. Even the snow in the Wyoming Mountains is far more severe and dangerous than what is found in Minnesota. The reservation is stark compared to the one in Minnesota. Different tribes and different languages, yet still the same basic problems and discrimination that residents of the Rez face. Together, Cork and Steve search for wife and mother. Hope rises and falls. Father and son bond even closer during their quest. Steven skips carefree young adolescence when faced with a man-sized challenge. This is well worth reading. As always, Kreuger's style draws the reader right into the story, where one feels the bitter cold, the anger, the fear, the frustration, and the beauty, ruggedness and majesty of this part of the country. I especially enjoyed the sub plot and relationship between Cork and wealthy developer, Hugh--from enemy to supporter, and finally ally and friend.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alison

    This book never engaged me...the investigation details were too tedious; they bogged down the pace and overshadowed the personal elements. However, one of Krueger's other books, Ordinary Grace, is one of my favorites so I'll put in a plug for that one!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    This one tugs at your heartstrings. Cork refuses to give up finding the answers to the crash of the plane in which his wife dies. He searches along with Steven, who is following his vision concerning his Mom. Thanks to the help of new and old friends, cork and family find peace.

  15. 4 out of 5

    IslandRiverScribe

    There will be no scenes that contain happiness in this book – not a one. What you will read is page after page containing stress, tension, unmitigated sorrow and life-threatening danger. Weaving this all together will be the bold threads of dogged, unrelenting detective work. And on the very last page there will be tears – your own – falling onto the print of the page as Cork O’Connor, with his hand on his wife’s casket, speaks his final words to her. Now, those words just written do not constitu There will be no scenes that contain happiness in this book – not a one. What you will read is page after page containing stress, tension, unmitigated sorrow and life-threatening danger. Weaving this all together will be the bold threads of dogged, unrelenting detective work. And on the very last page there will be tears – your own – falling onto the print of the page as Cork O’Connor, with his hand on his wife’s casket, speaks his final words to her. Now, those words just written do not constitute a heartless spoiler meant to ruin your enjoyment of the book. Just reading the promotional blurb will tell even the most inexperienced of mystery readers that Jo O’Connor has been killed, along with five Indian tribal elders, in a plane crash during a Wyoming snow storm. The question is why they died. And this is a question unlikely to be answered quickly as not only did the plane disappear off radar, it disappeared off the face of the earth. Considering that Krueger’s Cork O’Connor series is a combination of the police procedural and private investigator genres, we can safely assume that the disappearance of the plane is not an accident. Perhaps the plane was sabotaged in flight and lies buried in a snow-filled crevasse. Or perhaps the final transmission from the pilot was a fake and the plane has been deliberately flown to a hidden destination. For us, the readers, it would seem that the natural progression of the novel at this point would be to find the plane, find the bodies, let the evidence onsite lead to the who and why of the matter, and have Cork pursue the perpetrators from that point. But Krueger’s Cork O’Connor is convinced, after 6 days of fruitless searching in the snow-driven mountains, that it will take ferreting out the "who" and the “why” in order to determine the “where.” And, on that point, the novel proceeds. Actually, knowing that Jo is already dead makes reading this entry far easier. You quickly find yourself totally wrapped up in trying to solve the mystery right along with Cork and his temporary partner, Hugh Parmer. And it’s not until all the pieces of the puzzle fall into place, and you feel mentally safe again, that the last page sneaks up on you and lays you out. When an author kills off a major secondary character, the purpose is usually to allow that author to turn the series in a different direction. Jo O’Connor’s death certainly opens the way, eventually, to a new romantic interest for Cork. However, this series has never placed much focus on sex, rather centering itself around family values and personal responsibility, particularly in the light of First Nation culture. Frankly, I do not believe we will have to worry about Krueger spinning us off to the romantic suspense or chick lit genre any time soon.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kenyon Harbison

    This is my first experience with this author. I was not blown away, but I would read another in the Cork O'Connor series. The basic premise is that a plane disappears in the Wyoming wilderness, carrying lots of tribal elders, and Cork O'Connor's wife. At first everyone including him believes it disappeared in a storm, but then a woman comes to him with a story that the pilot (who everyone had believed drunk the night before) was not actually her husband, and once Cork O'Connor realizes she may b This is my first experience with this author. I was not blown away, but I would read another in the Cork O'Connor series. The basic premise is that a plane disappears in the Wyoming wilderness, carrying lots of tribal elders, and Cork O'Connor's wife. At first everyone including him believes it disappeared in a storm, but then a woman comes to him with a story that the pilot (who everyone had believed drunk the night before) was not actually her husband, and once Cork O'Connor realizes she may be correct, the plot thickens. Let's start with the problems: 1) You never really buy Hugh Parmer. The transition is just too pat. (You'll see what I mean.) 2) Some of the dialogue is really unrealistic. 3) Too long is spent on the setup, and especially on the search for the plane -- long enough that it starts to read like a bad Anita Shreve novel rather than a mystery novel at all. 4) There are not enough links in the chain of the mystery. It all just spills out towards the end of the book, also in a somewhat pat fashion. 5) Not always a believable relationship between the local police and O'Connor. They let him do things a policeman would not allow a civilian to do, and he is after all not a policeman, he is retired. (This is a VERY common flaw in mystery novels where the detective is not a policeman, and is one of the reasons why Agatha Christie was so amazing -- she never succumbed to this that I can recall.) Now the good: 1) Beautiful evocation of the American West. 2) Wonderful descriptions of Native American culture and 3) Cork O'Connor is a great character. 4) Nice relationship between him and his son. 5) Compelling read, especially after about page 80 or so. 6) Lame Nightwind. Overall, a good book. Not the best mystery novel I have ever read or even the best I have read this year. But a more-than-serviceable mystery novel with a strong detective character, excellent descriptions, and some nice moral ambiguity. Recommended, with mild reservations.

  17. 5 out of 5

    E

    2.5* A book worth reading, but as a longtime Krueger reader and fan, I feel cheated by this book. I was disappointed in the way that this plot unfolded and in the handling of opportunities for character development. I understand that part of the "contract" between authors and readers is that we readers have to give authors some leeway to shape things in a certain perhaps less-than-realistic way or accept that authors may present characters doing somewhat outlandish things as though they were com 2.5* A book worth reading, but as a longtime Krueger reader and fan, I feel cheated by this book. I was disappointed in the way that this plot unfolded and in the handling of opportunities for character development. I understand that part of the "contract" between authors and readers is that we readers have to give authors some leeway to shape things in a certain perhaps less-than-realistic way or accept that authors may present characters doing somewhat outlandish things as though they were commonplace (e.g., isn't it convenient that Cork suddenly has a millionaire friend who can jet him back and forth to Wyoming?). However, I found myself in many places feeling like events or characters were forced and that I was seeing too much artifice and machination behind the wizard's curtain and not enough honoring of the characters that Krueger has painstakingly developed over a number of books in this series. **SPOILER ALERT HERE** I was particularly dissatisfied with the treatment of Jo's character and the depiction (lack thereof)of Cork's grief when he accepts that she must be dead. Since Jo dies in this book, and, I suppose, this will be her last chance to be a character of any substance plot-wise in the series, I felt that she had been cheated by there being so little of her in this book. I also found the skipping over of Cork's period of grief - suddenly it is six months later - to be a letdown. Here was a chance to develop more emotional depth for Cork in how he is affected by and how he handles his response to her death. Instead, just a fast-forward to figuring out the mystery of the plane's disappearance.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    A great murder mystery filled with indian lore, super detective work, the development of new unusual friendships for Cork O'Connor sadly driven by the death of Jo O'Connor the lawyer wife of Corcoran. Cork's wife is killed in a mysterious plane crash and disappearance while she is working with many native nations on programs to better the lives of the people that lived there. A long time after her demise two lady's approached Cork and told them they had evidence, or what they thought to be evide A great murder mystery filled with indian lore, super detective work, the development of new unusual friendships for Cork O'Connor sadly driven by the death of Jo O'Connor the lawyer wife of Corcoran. Cork's wife is killed in a mysterious plane crash and disappearance while she is working with many native nations on programs to better the lives of the people that lived there. A long time after her demise two lady's approached Cork and told them they had evidence, or what they thought to be evidence the plane crash was not a accident, the more he looked into it the more he became convinced they were right. A involved investigation spanning the US awaits the reader as they follow the trails of evidence uncovered by Cork and a new friend Hugh Parmer. The developing of this friendship is amazing in itself, but once can't give all the pieces of the puzzle away, the joy is in the reading and experiencing the journey. The joy in the journey is more in the travels than in the ultimate ending. To me this is the most outstanding book thus far in this series.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mike Kennedy

    #9 in the Cork O'Connor series. I started out not sure I would like this book, but by the end is was a solid 4.5 to 5 star read. I was worried that the premise of the book, Cork's wife Jo goes missing in a plane crash, couldn't engage the reader through a full length novel. I was wrong. While it started off a little rocky by the midpoint of the book, I was hooked. I couldn't put it down (thank goodness for a long holiday weekend. The pace of the story picked up as you moved along in the novel, a #9 in the Cork O'Connor series. I started out not sure I would like this book, but by the end is was a solid 4.5 to 5 star read. I was worried that the premise of the book, Cork's wife Jo goes missing in a plane crash, couldn't engage the reader through a full length novel. I was wrong. While it started off a little rocky by the midpoint of the book, I was hooked. I couldn't put it down (thank goodness for a long holiday weekend. The pace of the story picked up as you moved along in the novel, and did a good job of pulling the reader in. I am excited to continue this series. Overall this was a great book that anyone who loves a good thriller should enjoy.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Usually I give the books about Cork a review of 4 or 5 stars . . . this one fell a little short for me because of the way Jo's life ended. Murdered, a plane crash--those I could accept, but the added burden on Cork and his family to know that she survived the gunshot wound and was tended to by locals and then taken to a hospice in Mexico? Too much. Over the top.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Eadie

    This series is so good that I just want to keep devouring these books. I felt so sorry for Cork and his family when Jo went missing. All I know is that I have to start reading the next book very soon in order to see what's going to happen next. No spoilers from me - you must pick up these books and read them for yourself. You will not be disappointed!

  22. 4 out of 5

    🌹Rose☮️

    Wow that was damned unpredictable!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    This is the 9th offering in the Cork O’Connor murder/mystery series. Here we have Cork’s wife a victim of an airplane tragedy. She and several other Indian leaders were heading for a meeting to discuss Indian business interests. All were lost in the Wyoming mountains during a winter storm. The plane was not found at first, but Cork’s sleuthing eventually discovers where the plane ended up. I enjoy Krueger’s descriptions of the natural beauty of the mountains in the West and how he blends the reli This is the 9th offering in the Cork O’Connor murder/mystery series. Here we have Cork’s wife a victim of an airplane tragedy. She and several other Indian leaders were heading for a meeting to discuss Indian business interests. All were lost in the Wyoming mountains during a winter storm. The plane was not found at first, but Cork’s sleuthing eventually discovers where the plane ended up. I enjoy Krueger’s descriptions of the natural beauty of the mountains in the West and how he blends the religious traditions of the Christian faith and the mystical visions of the Ojibwe tribe in his storylines. The reader has gotten to know Cork’s family and friends in the small, rural town where he resides. Here, we are introduced to some interesting new characters that I suspect will find their way in future books of the series. However, Krueger has resorted to some pretty fantastical plot twists to move the story along in Heaven’s Keep. I am not sure they were all necessary in order to maintain the reader’s interest. On the other hand, I DO like an action-packed tale.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bonnieb

    Cork’s wife disappears on a plane with several Indian leaders in the mts. of Wyoming. The first half of the book is O’Connor looking for his wife. Not until halfway through the book do we know there are any ‘bad guys’ in the story. Interesting sidelight is the ‘sidekick’ Cork partners with in this story is a Texas Billionaire who had been trying to develop the land around Iron Lake, including Sam’s Place, the burger joint Cork owns. I will not ruin the story with any spoilers. Still loving this Cork’s wife disappears on a plane with several Indian leaders in the mts. of Wyoming. The first half of the book is O’Connor looking for his wife. Not until halfway through the book do we know there are any ‘bad guys’ in the story. Interesting sidelight is the ‘sidekick’ Cork partners with in this story is a Texas Billionaire who had been trying to develop the land around Iron Lake, including Sam’s Place, the burger joint Cork owns. I will not ruin the story with any spoilers. Still loving this series; hard to put down.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sherrie

    For a couple of reasons, this book, while still good, was not as 5 star as many of the previous Krueger novels I have read. The plot felt too tortured and contrived to really ring true, and the ending was extremely abrupt, although it seems to take forever to get to it. ("Stephen King Syndrome") Still worth the read, as Krueger is a wonderful writer, and even his bad books are beter than many authors', but not as great as I had hoped.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sandra

    This has been my favorite in the series to date. There was an unexpected plot twist about half-way through and a second twist in the final portion of the book. I like his writing and his word usage and characterizations remain excellent, including his new partner in crime, A Texas billionaire. Truly an enjoyable read.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I thought this would be a shark jump for the series but nope! I seriously enjoy these thrillers.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lola Schroeder

    Very good. I couldn't put it down. Intrigue, gripping, hard to believe an author can put so much into a story.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Katharine Kimbriel

    A friend, who loaned me her copy of the book, recommended this series to me. The question was, could I enter a series nine books in? I like mysteries that take me places I haven’t been before, and this tale of Cork O’Connor, Irish and Anishinaabe, former sheriff and now investigator, family man firmly rooted in his small community in the desolate reaches of Minnesota, definitely went places that were new. Heaven’s Keep begins with apparent tragedy. Cork’s lawyer wife, Jo, disappears when a charte A friend, who loaned me her copy of the book, recommended this series to me. The question was, could I enter a series nine books in? I like mysteries that take me places I haven’t been before, and this tale of Cork O’Connor, Irish and Anishinaabe, former sheriff and now investigator, family man firmly rooted in his small community in the desolate reaches of Minnesota, definitely went places that were new. Heaven’s Keep begins with apparent tragedy. Cork’s lawyer wife, Jo, disappears when a charter plane goes missing in a blizzard over the Wyoming Rockies. Not only Jo but important elders of several native American communities were on board, and this loss has not only personal but political implications. It’s a treacherous landscape, capable of swallowing up a plane for years, and little hope moves slowly but inexorably to no hope. Then, months later, two women bring to Cork evidence that the pilot of the plane was not the man he claimed to be. It’s a line of hope, and Cork takes hold of the thread and pulls. He is up against possible local law enforcement on the take, the open hostility of the Northern Arapaho (who have much to lose however events unfold) and continuing attempts on his life by unknown assassins. Helping his young son deal with events is only one of the personal problems dogging his trail. There is also a faint hope that somehow his wife might still be alive. Krueger has been called a writer’s writer, and he is gifted with strength in atmosphere and character, his words spinning a tale that is at once contemporary and yet timeless. His ability to capture a sense of place is formidable, and his work carries an emotional punch. With one hand he adds forensic medicine to his mix, and with the other, native visions -- and the results are very good, indeed. This was not a fast book, but it was well worth the trip. I’ll read other books by Krueger, and recommend this one, but I’d suggest starting earlier in the series, or even at the beginning. I’m sure there was nuance I missed by reading a book this far into the series.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Hagen

    Heaven’s Keep, by William Kent Krueger, A. Narrated by Buck Schirner, produced by Brilliance Audio, downloaded from audible.com. Jo, Cork’s wife, is going on a charter plane with other tribal leaders to a conference in Seattle to help in the presentation of a paper for the conference. Cork is suing a land developer who wants to build condos and ruin the shoreline of Iron Lake. Since Jo is an attorney, Cork wants her to help him. But she points out that he’s likely to lose the battle, particularly Heaven’s Keep, by William Kent Krueger, A. Narrated by Buck Schirner, produced by Brilliance Audio, downloaded from audible.com. Jo, Cork’s wife, is going on a charter plane with other tribal leaders to a conference in Seattle to help in the presentation of a paper for the conference. Cork is suing a land developer who wants to build condos and ruin the shoreline of Iron Lake. Since Jo is an attorney, Cork wants her to help him. But she points out that he’s likely to lose the battle, particularly since the land developer has such deep pockets for supporting such a lawsuit. Cork views this as a betrayal, and he and Jo have such a bitter quarrel about it that they go to bed mad, something they almost never do, and Jo leaves the next morning with the fight still unresolved. Then, the plane Jo is on disappears from the radar in the mountains. A raging storm keeps the searchers from beginning the search for the plane. Finally, they give up the search. Several months later, with Cork still grieving, he is approached by the pilot’s widow who convinces Cork that there is a possibility that her husband was not actually flying the plane at all. So who was flying the plane? Where did it disappear to? Are any of the passengers still alive? Cork involves himself in a desperate search which uncovers corruption and disputes between the Indian tribes regarding whether a casino should be built on the reservation. This is an intense book with several twists and turns, some wonderful characters, and a realistic portrayal of Cork’s and his son’s grieving process. The ending is totally realistic as well. One of the best mysteries I’ve read this year.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.