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ソードアート・オンライン 1: アインクラッド [Sōdo āto onrain 1: Ainkuraddo] PDF, ePub eBook

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ソードアート・オンライン 1: アインクラッド [Sōdo āto onrain 1: Ainkuraddo] PDF, ePub eBook 「これは、ゲームであっても遊びではない」 クリアするまで脱出不可能、ゲームオーバーは本当の“死”を意味する──。謎の次世代MMO『ソードアート・オンライン(SAO)』の“真実”を知らずログインした約一万人のユーザーと共に、その過酷なデスバトルは幕を開けた。 SAOに参加した一人である主人公・キリトは、いち早くこのMMOの“真実”を受け入れる。そして、ゲームの舞台となる巨大浮遊城『アインクラッド』で、パーティを組まないソロプレイヤーとして頭角をあらわしていった。 クリア条件である最上階層到達を目指し、熾烈な冒険(クエスト)を単独で続けるキリトだったが、レイピアの名手・女流剣士アスナの強引な誘いによって彼女とコンビを組むことになってしまう。その出会いは、キリトに運命とも呼べる契機をもたらし……。果たして、キリトはこのゲームから抜け出すことができるのか 「これは、ゲームであっても遊びではない」 クリアするまで脱出不可能、ゲームオーバーは本当の“死”を意味する──。謎の次世代MMO『ソードアート・オンライン(SAO)』の“真実”を知らずログインした約一万人のユーザーと共に、その過酷なデスバトルは幕を開けた。 SAOに参加した一人である主人公・キリトは、いち早くこのMMOの“真実”を受け入れる。そして、ゲームの舞台となる巨大浮遊城『アインクラッド』で、パーティを組まないソロプレイヤーとして頭角をあらわしていった。 クリア条件である最上階層到達を目指し、熾烈な冒険(クエスト)を単独で続けるキリトだったが、レイピアの名手・女流剣士アスナの強引な誘いによって彼女とコンビを組むことになってしまう。その出会いは、キリトに運命とも呼べる契機をもたらし……。果たして、キリトはこのゲームから抜け出すことができるのか。

30 review for ソードアート・オンライン 1: アインクラッド [Sōdo āto onrain 1: Ainkuraddo]

  1. 4 out of 5

    Diane ϟ [ Lestrange ]

    "A huge castle made of stone and steel floating in an endless sky. That was all this world was. Above, there were 100 floors stacking straight upwards; its sheer size was unbelievable. It was impossible to even guess how much data it consisted of. Inside, there were a couple of large cities along with countless small scale towns and villages, forests and plains, and even lakes. Only one stairway linked each floor to another, and the stairways existed in dungeons where large numbers of monsters roam "A huge castle made of stone and steel floating in an endless sky. That was all this world was. Above, there were 100 floors stacking straight upwards; its sheer size was unbelievable. It was impossible to even guess how much data it consisted of. Inside, there were a couple of large cities along with countless small scale towns and villages, forests and plains, and even lakes. Only one stairway linked each floor to another, and the stairways existed in dungeons where large numbers of monsters roamed; so discovering and getting through was no easy matter. However, once someone made a breakthrough and arrived at a city of the upper floor, the «Teleport Gates» there and of every cities in the lower floors would be connected making it possible for anyone to move freely through these levels. With these conditions, the huge castle had been steadily conquered for a long time. The name of the castle was «Aincrad», a world of battles with swords that continued floating and had engulfed approximately six thousand people. Otherwise known as... «Sword Art Online» Have you ever played video games? (Yes, I know, silly question given my (theoretical) audience out there.) How about an MMO RPG, like World of Warcraft, Ragnarok, RAN Online or Lord Of The Rings Online or any of half a dozen others? If your answer is ‘yes’ to either of the above – or if you’ve been one of the much-enduring folk who’ve sat and watched someone play – then you’ll empathize with the initial premise of SWORD ART ONLINE. A new Virtual Reality MMORPG has just come out, and naturally thousands of people bought it and "Full Dive". Full Dive is when humans connect to a realistic virtual world, such as inside a game, by an innovation known as “Nervgear”, which revolutionized in the gaming industry in May, 2022. Nervgear enables people to see, hear, taste, smell and touch in a virtual environment, so everything they experience in a game will become realistic to them. Nervgear can block signals from the brain and the user’s body will be immobilized so they don’t act it out (kind of like when you’re dreaming, you’re paralyzed). Nervgear uses a helmet that covers most of a person’s face inside it. Inside, there are millions of signal unites stimulating the brain and creating this virtual environment. Only one small problem: the creator decided to play God, and has changed the program so that it’s impossible to log out. Die in the game, and the VR helmets send an electric shock through your brain so you die in real life as well. The only way out? Beat the game, all the way up to Level 100. SWORD ART ONLINE is based on a series of light novels by Reki Kawahara, the translations of which are available for free at Baka-Tsuki. I went to read them, both because I am enjoying the TV series and because my experience is that novels tend to have lovely little details that fall by the adaptation wayside. Result: primarily good! I can now testify that the series is remarkably faithful to the original, and that the original novels are interesting in their own right, although I’d say they’re even more audience-focused on people who are familiar with MMOs. It is, however, a very different experience. To pick the most obvious, the first book skips straight from the confusion and panic of the first day in SAO to a point nearly two years later – in anime terms, from Episode 1 to Episode 8. The result is that Kirito’s maturation from a self-declared ‘selfish’ solo player to the person who falls in love with Asuna and freely gives information to people is somewhat more abrupt, to the point where I was confusedly trying to figure out if he was meant to be an unreliable narrator. On the other hand, the anime was able to take advantage of the second book, which contains all sorts of side stories and character development. Better? Worse? It depends on what you’re looking for, and to a certain extent, which one you encounter first. The bright side is that the two do go together so closely, so either is worth checking out.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Wart Hill

    FUCK THIS SEXIST PIECE OF SHIT

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alexandria Tale

    IT'S SUPER AWESOME! I watched the anime first, and I was instantly hooked. Thanks for my bro for showing me this awesome light novel, or more likely, the anime. The anime was well-made, with just a few scenes being omitted. I hope there would be second season of the anime! Anyway, the story is set in the future. On 2022, Japan had finally developed the first VRMMORPG (Virtual Reality Massive Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game), with the technology of Full Dive, which allowed the player to fully IT'S SUPER AWESOME! I watched the anime first, and I was instantly hooked. Thanks for my bro for showing me this awesome light novel, or more likely, the anime. The anime was well-made, with just a few scenes being omitted. I hope there would be second season of the anime! Anyway, the story is set in the future. On 2022, Japan had finally developed the first VRMMORPG (Virtual Reality Massive Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game), with the technology of Full Dive, which allowed the player to fully dive into the game as if it was reality. Sword Art Online, was the first VRMMORPG game. Aincrad, the floating castle inside SAO, had 100 floors with diameter of 10 km. The way to go up to the next floor was by defeating the boss in the current floor. Kirigaya Kazuto, known as Kirito as his ID, was one of the ten thousands of SAO players. At the first day, they were shocked by the ultimatum that they couldn't log out. Death in game, meant death in real life, since when you died (in game), the console would fried your brain (in real life). Removing the console was also unacceptable, since it would also triggered the program to fry your brain. The only way to be free was completing all 100 floors. With that, ten thousands people from all range of ages were imprisoned until someone completed the grand quest.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    I loved the anime when I first watched it and along with Ready Player One gave me a strong interest in LitRPG. So for me this was the starting path of that new genre, other much older books deal with similar subject matter but for me this is the best. 4 1/2 stars. I'm fortunate in that I have a copy of the audio book Peter Lucky, a professional voice actor released on Youtube before he forced to take it down. DreamstoryTheatre If you are a fan of the anime or just looking for a good solid advent I loved the anime when I first watched it and along with Ready Player One gave me a strong interest in LitRPG. So for me this was the starting path of that new genre, other much older books deal with similar subject matter but for me this is the best. 4 1/2 stars. I'm fortunate in that I have a copy of the audio book Peter Lucky, a professional voice actor released on Youtube before he forced to take it down. DreamstoryTheatre If you are a fan of the anime or just looking for a good solid adventure story you can't go wrong with this book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Grace the Book Queen

    So, I watched the anime first and I liked it. It wasn't the greatest anime ever as people claimed it to be, but I enjoyed it. Then someone recommended the books to me and said that the books were better. Now that I have read this one, I gotta agree that the books are better!!! I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book plus I really liked finally having some of the game mechanics better explained! It also helped answer some questions that I had that the anime just kind of glossed over. I will probab So, I watched the anime first and I liked it. It wasn't the greatest anime ever as people claimed it to be, but I enjoyed it. Then someone recommended the books to me and said that the books were better. Now that I have read this one, I gotta agree that the books are better!!! I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book plus I really liked finally having some of the game mechanics better explained! It also helped answer some questions that I had that the anime just kind of glossed over. I will probably be reading the rest of this series eventually and since I already have the second one, I will be starting that one next!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sammi

    Absolutely LOVED this light novel! If i could give more stars i would. What i like most about this story is it wasnt even written to be a published title. But it was written with 100% heart and imagination. Beautiful and sad tale of a large group of people being stuck together in a virtual reality world where they have to fight for their lives. It shows compassion, fear and love. The main characters are both very likable and all you can do is wish and hope that they escape the virtual living hell t Absolutely LOVED this light novel! If i could give more stars i would. What i like most about this story is it wasnt even written to be a published title. But it was written with 100% heart and imagination. Beautiful and sad tale of a large group of people being stuck together in a virtual reality world where they have to fight for their lives. It shows compassion, fear and love. The main characters are both very likable and all you can do is wish and hope that they escape the virtual living hell to be together back in real japan. Would recommend this even to people who havent read the shoddy manga version and the anime. Infact, i would urge people to read this first. I wish i had. *thumbs up* You can also find my reviews here: http://lilythenovelnerd.wordpress.com/ (tho they are alot more colourful)

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ilias

    The start of this series is really 5 stars. I really had high hopes for it, but as it goes on it really gets poor. That being said, I still enjoy it. Worth reading & watching

  8. 4 out of 5

    Vilde

    I'm a huge fan of Sword Art Online having seen the anime (both SAO and SAO II and SAO Ordinal Scale), and having read parts of the SAO manga. I still find it a bit difficult to navigate between the manga and light novels of SAO. I love the concept (regardless of how horrible it is) of SAO, seriously, it is so interesting. My favourite arc is definitely the Aincrad arc, as that arc is the most intriguing for me. I do want to acknowledge the criticism that SAO have received, a lot of it I agree wi I'm a huge fan of Sword Art Online having seen the anime (both SAO and SAO II and SAO Ordinal Scale), and having read parts of the SAO manga. I still find it a bit difficult to navigate between the manga and light novels of SAO. I love the concept (regardless of how horrible it is) of SAO, seriously, it is so interesting. My favourite arc is definitely the Aincrad arc, as that arc is the most intriguing for me. I do want to acknowledge the criticism that SAO have received, a lot of it I agree with; like how the characters are, the writing and pacing. But nonetheless, the concept of SAO and the Aincrad arc is just so fascinating, although it could have been executed in a better way. Having seen the anime, I pretty much knew everything happening, although the timeline to the anime makes more sense then the numbering of the light novel volumes. But, I will give the light novels the benefit that they provide more depth and background, although there are errors in the continuity (as the author is now backtracking SAO through SAO: Progressive). But those are minor when you look at the Sword Art Online light novels. However, if you're looking towards the Sword Art Online: Progressive light novels (expands the Aincrad arc), you should be prepared for a lot differences betweeen the "original" SAO and the expanded version of the Aincrad arc.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

    I really like the premise of this story. I am really loving the anime so far (my impatience to see more episodes is what led me do finding the light novel). I was surprised by how well done the translation seemed - for the most part reading this in English seemed really natural. For some reason that I just can't quite put my finger on, I can't give this more than two stars. The way Kirito and Asuna's relationship developed kind of annoyed me. It seemed a little rushed and forced. Perhaps it was I really like the premise of this story. I am really loving the anime so far (my impatience to see more episodes is what led me do finding the light novel). I was surprised by how well done the translation seemed - for the most part reading this in English seemed really natural. For some reason that I just can't quite put my finger on, I can't give this more than two stars. The way Kirito and Asuna's relationship developed kind of annoyed me. It seemed a little rushed and forced. Perhaps it was the order of events. We don't learn until the very end of the book why Kirito is so important to Asuna. In the anime we see these same events playing out chronologically and we see them drawing together. I think that works a little better. I also thought Asuna's character seemed a little forced at times - some of the things she said and did didn't actually seem to match her personality. The ending was really surprising and not what I expected at all. The beginning and end of the book were the best - the middle is what drops my rating down to two stars. I'm interested to see what happens next so I might skip volume 2 and go straight onto #3.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Alice

    Sword Art Online is one of those where I absolutely love the idea but am really disappointed by the execution. I probably should have known better because I didn’t really like the anime when I tried to watch that, but I thought maybe I’d get on better when the novel. The novel pretty much reads like a description of the anime (I know the novel came first), although I’ve not read anything Japanese before so I don’t know if that is the style to exaggeration emotions and psychical responses. I disl Sword Art Online is one of those where I absolutely love the idea but am really disappointed by the execution. I probably should have known better because I didn’t really like the anime when I tried to watch that, but I thought maybe I’d get on better when the novel. The novel pretty much reads like a description of the anime (I know the novel came first), although I’ve not read anything Japanese before so I don’t know if that is the style to exaggeration emotions and psychical responses. I dislike far more anime and JRPG games than I like (so far found two I only two I did like – Eternal Sonata and Tales of Vesperia) so I probably need accept that these are genres that aren’t for me! The idea of Sword Art Online is just brilliant! Gamers become trapped inside a virtual world (a VRMMORPG) by the insane creature of the programme, with their real life bodies held hostage in the outside world. The virtual world now becomes their reality as they must work to beat the game if they ever hope to escape alive. It’s just awesome, and the world of Aincrad is very well built as are all the mechanics of the game (which is pretty standard fantasy world just without magic). The author also does a good job of exploring the various reactions and emotions players experience as a result of being trapped in the game. The protagonist and narrator is Kiroto a sixteen year old gaming fanatic, he was a beta tester so had the advantage of prior knowledge of the game come release day (the day they got trapped) and he has trained to a very high level. He plays solo, not wanting to be part of a Guild or the Army. Then we also have Asuna, which is where things started to take a dive for me. Asuna is also a very high level player, incredibly skilled with a rapier sword (enough to earn her the moniker The Flash) and is supposedly a vice-commander in the best/biggest Guild in the game. So far so good… but then a lot of time is spent describing how beautiful she is, and how great her body is... and it is THIS that makes her special, not her skill. Apparently no attractive or thin girls play games (in fact hardly any girls, SOA is a bit of sausagefest), so as a pretty one in a sea of uglies she stands out is something of celebrity (I should point out that their avatars were turned off and their real life appearances revealed early on). Ok maybe I can see past the painful sexism in that… but then there are too many descriptions of her good looks, and coupled with the illustration of her in in underwear (actually the copy I have has two.. one in full colour. Note that all the illustrations of Kiroto show him being hero and fully clothed). She’s constantly sexualised and it makes me feel icky. I also don’t really understand her personality. I expected her to be a badass and as a vice-commander have ab it of authority, a bit of something about her. She seems to essentially be a trophy for the Guild, you don’t see her involved in it at all other than her wish to leave to be with Kiroto. She has armed escort all the time, and it seems like she is just kept locked away. When it comes down to it all she wants is to be Kirotos wife and live in a little cottage (she’s a master Cook too.. he loves her sandwiches *eyeroll*). They run off and give up the fight at one point to do this! I suppose Japanese society is still pretty male chauvinist, and this is fairly typical of the genre... but that doesn’t mean it didn’t deeply irritate me! This is a love story when it comes down to it... and once again one I didn’t believe in. They feel in love really fast, and ok yes they’re teenagers, but it was all a bit intense with very little foundation. It all comes to a bit of an abrupt end too which surprised me... I know this is series, so I don’t know how the timeline works on in further books. I think I’d rather have read about the early days than the two year leap forward that we get in this book. I also struggled a bit with the way it was written. Because it is an English translation of the original Japanese I found it overly descriptive, and often you get three or four words to describe something that if the original language would be conveyed with just one word. Everything is exaggerated too but I have a feeling that is part of the style. It is easy to read, but not to be personal taste. There are things to love about it but there as more I hated. Very disappointing because I am in love with the idea of being trapped in the VRMMORPG!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

    My recommendation would be to watch the anime first. I was surprised to find that this two volume story arc was really just one volume of the overall arc and then another volume of side stories and character development. So, this book covers the first episode, but then jumps to the 74th floor and finishes at the end. Kirito and Asuna already know each other and characters such as Silica and Lisbeth don't make any appearance in this volume. The most startling absence was Yui. It seemed strange fo My recommendation would be to watch the anime first. I was surprised to find that this two volume story arc was really just one volume of the overall arc and then another volume of side stories and character development. So, this book covers the first episode, but then jumps to the 74th floor and finishes at the end. Kirito and Asuna already know each other and characters such as Silica and Lisbeth don't make any appearance in this volume. The most startling absence was Yui. It seemed strange for her not to be introduced or on the minds of the main characters. Basically, this introduces and ends the main, interesting story, but lacks in the character development from all the other things going on in the world, which aren't covered until the next volume, so it's a bit disjointed. The anime combines them, so it makes more sense. Overall, since I've seen the show, I did enjoy reading this since I already knew the characters, it just wouldn't be what I'd recommend as a starting point for this story, even if this came first.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Overall The prologue was good in centering the reader in this YA/shonen world, but the explanations of in-game mechanics--which were for the most part basic for anyone who's played RPGs--could've been left out or shunted to an appendix. Lots of lackluster, static description of the game world. Great poetic description of (view spoiler)[Kirito's (hide spoiler)] game death, but overall there is not much characterization nor character background. Kawahara could've put Kirito's motivation for not joi Overall The prologue was good in centering the reader in this YA/shonen world, but the explanations of in-game mechanics--which were for the most part basic for anyone who's played RPGs--could've been left out or shunted to an appendix. Lots of lackluster, static description of the game world. Great poetic description of (view spoiler)[Kirito's (hide spoiler)] game death, but overall there is not much characterization nor character background. Kawahara could've put Kirito's motivation for not joining a guild earlier in the story--that was a really moving and important character motivation. Furthermore, the narrative is too dense w/minor emotions and mannerisms that interfere with the flow. Personal Notes This book was probably spoiled by the fact that I already watched the anime. On the other hand, maybe the characters are too young and the characterization is too shallow. I haven't yet found a light novel that I like out of the around 4 or so that I've read. Book Girl and the Suicidal Mime is next. Apparently, Kawahara's アクセル・ワールド 1 -黒雪姫の帰還- Akuseru Wārudo 1: Kuroyukihime no Kikan won the Dengeki Novel Prize grand prize for $1M ¥ in 2008, but I'm a little reluctant since to read it because I watched that anime too.

  13. 5 out of 5

    James F. Evans

    First off, have to say, that the Anime brought me here... anyone who wasn't draw to the light novels after the anime is either lazy/dumb or both... SAO #1 follows the story of Kirito inside a futuristic virtual game in which a person becomes the avatar in the game and is fully set inside the game, to the point in which a few software modifications can leave you trapped inside, without any way out, except the game's developer overwriting the code... *wink* The story develops beautifully and takes y First off, have to say, that the Anime brought me here... anyone who wasn't draw to the light novels after the anime is either lazy/dumb or both... SAO #1 follows the story of Kirito inside a futuristic virtual game in which a person becomes the avatar in the game and is fully set inside the game, to the point in which a few software modifications can leave you trapped inside, without any way out, except the game's developer overwriting the code... *wink* The story develops beautifully and takes you through the journey of Kirito as he meets friends and struggles with his own personality and decisions. We get to see as he encounters Asuna and thereafter develops a romantic relationship with her and at the same time fights for the survival of the one he loves, Asuna. Fighting for Asuna gives new light to Kirito, as before he fought... well... to fight... SAO give us everything from a great world and setting, to a great plot and back-story, to great characters and interactions, to an amazing adventure and romantic story. Fights, adventure, love, death, mind-blowing, human nature, human dream, and sex. (Chapter 16.5 might not be included in all version of this light novel.) All in all, SAO #1 is one of the best light novels I have read in my life and the reset of the series is also amazing!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nerdish Mum

    I had watched the anime first earlier this year and I wasn't aware that it was based on a book as I'm fairly new to the manga and anime scene. When I found out there was a book I needed to check it out to see if the anime had done it justice. Though the anime is absolutely excellent, I definitely preffeed the book. I feel that the whole story developed better and in a more natural way than it did in the show. The character development was more detailed and you learnt extra snippets of informatio I had watched the anime first earlier this year and I wasn't aware that it was based on a book as I'm fairly new to the manga and anime scene. When I found out there was a book I needed to check it out to see if the anime had done it justice. Though the anime is absolutely excellent, I definitely preffeed the book. I feel that the whole story developed better and in a more natural way than it did in the show. The character development was more detailed and you learnt extra snippets of information about the world and the characters in it. The idea of the story is both genius and terrifying as we are getting closer and closer to VMMORPG's being a reality. I do love the characters of Kirito and Asuna and I also love Klein and Agil, I feel this story is full of great and interesting people. I think the love story is also done very well and though yes it may happen faster than for some people in real life, this isn't a real life situation, it's a life and death situation. I really enjoyed this and I will be picking up the rest of the books to carry on with the adventure.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Shayan Kh

    3.5 stars. Like many others, I watched the anime first. I didn't even know there were such things as light novels. I thought there are manga and anime. And anime takes a lot of time, and I don't really like reading graphical novels, in fact, I didn't count any of the manga series I read in my "read" group on this site. But light novels are great in my opinion. So after I found out about this light novel, it only took me a couple of hours to start it. It was good. Nice characters, beautiful worl 3.5 stars. Like many others, I watched the anime first. I didn't even know there were such things as light novels. I thought there are manga and anime. And anime takes a lot of time, and I don't really like reading graphical novels, in fact, I didn't count any of the manga series I read in my "read" group on this site. But light novels are great in my opinion. So after I found out about this light novel, it only took me a couple of hours to start it. It was good. Nice characters, beautiful worlds, thought-provoking premise... I only had issues with romance in this story which felt a bit forced. It was better in the anime, it was more developed. But other than that, I have no complaints. This was a good read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    OMG, what a great story, it made me yell! I love how Japanese people are always so drastic with their stories, this is about a virtual game where people log in, and then they get stuck in there, no log out function... and the worst pad is that if they die in the game, they die in real life. Only way out is clearing out all 100 floors. It seems simple enough of a story, but I gotta give it to the author, it's an amazing story, with enough twists that kept me interested, made me yell and didn't se OMG, what a great story, it made me yell! I love how Japanese people are always so drastic with their stories, this is about a virtual game where people log in, and then they get stuck in there, no log out function... and the worst pad is that if they die in the game, they die in real life. Only way out is clearing out all 100 floors. It seems simple enough of a story, but I gotta give it to the author, it's an amazing story, with enough twists that kept me interested, made me yell and didn't see coming at all. I want more books!!!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sir Sorrow

    As a fan of the anime I was worried about reading it (I know the novel came first) in case my opinion changed and it did while its still mu favourite anime the book is intense and gives a broader scope of the story and world. The love story in the book is deeper and is explained well. The fights are intense and is funny all at the same time I cant wait for book 2!!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Elspeth

    I enjoyed the ending, but I enjoyed the anime much more. I will probably pick up book two because I hear it's better than this one, and it contains some of my favorite arcs from the anime.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Andreas

    Let me begin by saying I watched the anime first. Anyone who has seen the anime but hasn't read the light novels is obliged to start reading them now, in my opinion. The first light novel of SAO is all about the life of a player, Kirito, in a virtual world. The game is called Sword Art Online and it's a VRMMORPG (Virtual Reality Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game). An impossibly huge castle of rock and iron, floating in an endless expanse of sky. That is the entirety of this world. That Let me begin by saying I watched the anime first. Anyone who has seen the anime but hasn't read the light novels is obliged to start reading them now, in my opinion. The first light novel of SAO is all about the life of a player, Kirito, in a virtual world. The game is called Sword Art Online and it's a VRMMORPG (Virtual Reality Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game). An impossibly huge castle of rock and iron, floating in an endless expanse of sky. That is the entirety of this world. That's how the book starts, and that is essentially the world of SAO, called Aincrad. The problem is that the players are trapped inside the world, and if they die in this world, they die in the real world as well. The story is beautifully written and it shows the development of Kirito. He is struggling with decisions all the way through, but he is also still in the process of discovering his own personality. He wants to face SAO alone - but can he really do this? He meets new people, new friends on his way - and gets into a romantic relationship as well. This gives him a new power, a new will to fight. He has someone to fight for. I think the development that this book shows is simply magnificent. I loved it. The world that is described amazingly, the characters and their traits and quirks, the conversations, the developments - I loved every single word in this book. You might think some decisions are a bit strange, a bit hastily, but when you consider it's a life or death situation it is very logical and understandable. I would definitely recommend this book, especially to people who've already seen the anime, but also to people who haven't heard of this before.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 4/5..hard to say I am a huge lover and supporter of Sword Art Online so it was great to read the light novel that started it all. In the book you get to see a bit more behind the scenes, but not as much as I was hoping (the anime is such a faithful rendering that there wasn't much extra even in the way of dialogue.) The five stars is mainly because I couldn't rate something SAO less than 5/5 and also I'm glad to have read it, but I don't know how much I would love it if I wasn't already obsessed 4/5..hard to say I am a huge lover and supporter of Sword Art Online so it was great to read the light novel that started it all. In the book you get to see a bit more behind the scenes, but not as much as I was hoping (the anime is such a faithful rendering that there wasn't much extra even in the way of dialogue.) The five stars is mainly because I couldn't rate something SAO less than 5/5 and also I'm glad to have read it, but I don't know how much I would love it if I wasn't already obsessed with the anime. I'm most excited to keep reading to when the books go beyond where the show leaves off so that I can get all new adventures.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Francesca

    I've had this on my shelf for about 3 years because it was bought for me when I watched the anime. Reading the book brought back all the warm fuzzy feelings about Kirito and Asuna and I'm so glad I finally got around to it. The book is a bit light on the details and I would love to see more of Aincrad because it's my dream game but I'm looking forward to the next book and the next game.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    Never really gave the anime much of a chance, but this light novel was great. I'm definitely going to be getting more volumes.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Pigeon

    2.75 STARS When my friend begged me to watch the Sword Art Online anime prior to me purchasing this book, I was a bit sceptical. I've heard many great things about Sword Art Online, but the series has been criticised as well. I decided to buy the light novel first because in my experience, the manga/light novel has almost always been better than the anime. The premise of the story greatly interested me at first: thousands of hardcore games trapped in the very game they thought would help them esca 2.75 STARS When my friend begged me to watch the Sword Art Online anime prior to me purchasing this book, I was a bit sceptical. I've heard many great things about Sword Art Online, but the series has been criticised as well. I decided to buy the light novel first because in my experience, the manga/light novel has almost always been better than the anime. The premise of the story greatly interested me at first: thousands of hardcore games trapped in the very game they thought would help them escape from reality, fighting to get out. Set in the near future, Sword Art Online tells the story of how the VMMORPG (Virtual Reality Massively-Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game) genre has become a reality in Japan. Thousands of gamers buy the game, along with their very own NerveGear helmet, which basically connects them to the game. For a short while, those gamers enjoy exploring the game, oblivious to the fact that it's only the tutorial level. Once the tutorial is over, the log-out button disappears from the in-game menu and the gamers are all stuck. The aim? Beat all 100 levels of Aincrad and they're free. If they die in the game, the NerveGear fries their brain... and they die in real life as well! ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ I've got no complaints about the book itself. The cover is very beautiful, and the first few pages feature glossy full-colour art of some of the scenes in the book. Featured randomly throughout the book are black and white pages featuring art relating to the current scene, although there are only about 5 of these pages. It's quite short, being around 250 pages, and the font is neither big nor small. Now I'll talk about why I gave this book 3 stars. To tell you the truth, I don't think this book lived up to all the hype. I felt like the story was extremely rushed, and quite predictable, at some places. After the players are told that they cannot leave the game, the story jumps two years and they've already beaten 74 of Aincrad's levels, which left me confused. What truly happened in the aftermath? I know that 2000 or so players seemingly died, but how? I do realise that the Sword Art Online Progressive series covers this, but it did leave me feeling a bit "empty". The characters themselves are "OK" at average. I couldn't really connect to Kirito, the main character. He seemed to be good at everything, really. He has a unique skill (the ability to duel wield blades), is one of the most powerful players in the entire game and even catches the attention of the main female character! Still, I didn't really know much about him, so he felt a bit two-dimensional to me. Now let's talk about Asuna, the main female character. I don't think she was very well written. For a character that's supposed to be extremely powerful and a tough individual, she sure does spend most of her time crying and being vulnerable. One scene she's punching Kirito in the face, calling him and idiot, and the next she's crying in his arms. In other words, her personality isn't consistent, and the author doesn't show us how she's so tough and so bad-ass. We're told this by other characters. In fact, (view spoiler)[ her romance with Kirito seemed too rushed, because I just don't see their chemistry at all. What do they even see in each other? I don't know. In fact, I shouldn't even be tagging this as a spoiler because let's face it, it was obvious that they would get together. I was also bothered by how, after they married, all she wanted to do was cook for him and be the perfect submissive wife. Umm, sexist much? I get it if that's her choice, there's nothing wrong with that, but her priority in this book shouldn't be Kirito, it should be getting the hell out of this game! (hide spoiler)] There's quite a lot of fanservice in the book: some illustrations of her in her underwear, looking shy. I'll admit that I do realise this series is primarily aimed towards men, but I hate to see potentially good female characters being reduced to damsels-in-distresses or objects of lust for men. We get it that she's the most beautiful woman in Aincrad! However, that shouldn't be the main point. The storyline itself felt rushed and predictable to me. The ending went by so quickly I was left speechless, and not in a good way. It was also fairly obvious to me from the start of the novel that (view spoiler)[ the creator of the game would be the final boss battle. However, even that only lasted a few pages. (hide spoiler)] However, I'm going to contradict everything I just said by saying that I will be buying the next book. I have hope in this series. While the characters to me were a bit bland, I still love the idea behind this book. I did love learning about the world of Aincrad and, being a lover of MMORPGs myself, I loved reading a book full of characters like myself who love those games a bit too much! I'll be buying the next book in hope that the characters themselves will improve, despite the book's obvious flaws.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie M. Allen

    I didn't know what to expect when I picked up this book. I'm a huge fan of the anime series and I wondered if the novel would be better. I'm honestly shocked at how few details were in this first book in comparison to the show. However, after reading Reki Kawahara's explanation on how SAO came to be, it makes sense. I really enjoyed this.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. "There's nothing more boring than watching someone else play an RPG." For years I've been taught to dislike Sword Art Online. The first anime series wrapped itself up around the time I was stuck on /a/ for the continuous Evangelion threads anticipating the release of the third Rebuild film, and so I happened to see a lot of hate on my way to join the NGE shitposting. Pretty sure I actually downloaded a batch of the series to watch "ironically," but all the anti-SAO shitposting led me to just dele "There's nothing more boring than watching someone else play an RPG." For years I've been taught to dislike Sword Art Online. The first anime series wrapped itself up around the time I was stuck on /a/ for the continuous Evangelion threads anticipating the release of the third Rebuild film, and so I happened to see a lot of hate on my way to join the NGE shitposting. Pretty sure I actually downloaded a batch of the series to watch "ironically," but all the anti-SAO shitposting led me to just delete it from my external harddrive. And as the years passed by, more and more disdain toward the series began to pile up, not necessarily within my own mind (I was too detached to really know much about the series other than a simple thought that I should avoid it if it is so hated), but on those parts of the Internet I tended to frequent. Hell, even /v/ was exempt from glorification of SAO, and they are notorious for their basic, normie, Toonami-core tastes. So it was somewhat reluctantly that I came to ever read this novel. It was certainly in mid-2017 that I made my purchase, but I guess it was a bit earlier that I decided either a) the series, or at least its first installment, surely cannot be so dreadful, especially if I could push past the dreadful prose of Yen Press's No Game No Life translations or the so-bad-it's-good edginess ruining the otherwise decent harem comedy of PsyCome or b) it is perhaps unfair to judge a book, not by its cover, but by the dreadful specimens who cherish the supposedly not-so-good TV anime adaptation. It doesn't really hurt that /a/'s reception of the series seemed to mellow out a bit, coming to a consensus that it isn't so bad during the Aincrad arc, that one should just stop watching before one gets to the ALO stuff, and therefore it made sense to me that I could just read whatever of the novels covered the actual Sword Art Online game, before it starts covering shit not called "Sword Art Online" and becomes a series of Kirito getting himself stuck in virtual reality MMORPG after virtual reality MMORPG, none of which seem to have the stakes set out in the very original arc. It was pretty nice that I ran into a copy for like $3.97 at my local Books-A-Million™. The novel itself isn't so bad. The basic premise is interesting enough, as it was when I first learned of the series. Gaming studio Argus releases a virtual reality headset called NerveGear to the public, its primary focus being simple puzzle games which don't take full advantage of the VR and instead consist of rather boxed-in worlds. Akihiko Kayaba comes up with Sword Art Online, an MMORPG for NerveGear promising to make extensive usage of the "full dive" technique the console utilizes, connecting the gaming console directly with the players' central nervous system, linking their very thought processes to their character avatars' actions, allowing them to act more freely in the game than any controller or keyboard could allow, exploring the world of Aincrad, a floating fortress composed of 100 floors of near-high fantasy (there are monsters roaming dungeons and shit, but there's no magic). A small number of Japanese citizens are granted beta access to Sword Art Online, and everything goes more or less smoothly. The list of beta testers includes our protagonist Kazuto Kirigaya, a teenage boy of about 14 who spends too much time on MMOs, who is not only described to be rather bland-looking (he more or less says this in the first-person POV of the narration), but is also so uninspired as to shit out a rather lazy username, Kirito, combining elements of his given and family names. When the 10,000 players first log in to Sword Art Online on its official release day, Kayaba appears as a giant specter floating in the sky to inform the game's players that they are now trapped in the VR world of SAO, forced to beat the challenge of Aincrad's 100 floors, lest they remain trapped in the game forever. Death in SAO means death in reality, with the NerveGear headsets triggering some electrical impulse to fry the players' brains upon the depletion of their characters' life bars. Basically a pretty interesting premise for a light novel, even if the .hack games already did the whole "stuck in an MMORPG" thing (though of course SAO inspired its own fleet of imitators). The characters are a bit better than I was led to believe by /a/'s shitposting, but not really by much. I thought Kirito was meant to be a "Gary Stu" type character, his gaming skills making him hot shit in the world of SAO, so good at being a useless piece of shit playing vidya all day that it makes all the vidya-playing thots' 2D pussies gush like Niagara Falls. But he's actually the sort of beta you'd expect of a kid who's decided to spend his high school years playing an online RPG all day. In the beginning of his time on SAO, Kirito's character model is meant to resemble a stereotypical shounen fantasy anime hero, as Kirito narrates himself, with some self-deprecation. When Kayaba hijacks the game, everyone's avatar models are reconfigured to better resemble the players' bodies (the NerveGear somehow does a full-body scan to calibrate the movements necessary to play the game), and Kirito ends up with his same bland face. The issue, I guess, is that abec's illustrations make Kirito out to be too much of a bishounen, but then really most light novel illustrations make the characters out to look better than they should, so it's not really that bad since I'm used to this shit. And Kirito gets so flustered around Asuna that he comes across as any old love-comedy protagonist. So really Kirito is only a Gary Stu for his in-game abilities, drawn from his skill at playing fucking video games all day, which really isn't anything anyone should be remotely proud of. Yeah, Asuna seems stupid for loving Kirito for his skill at fucking grinding levels in an MMO, but whatever, she's a fucking nerd too. The book is kinda stupid for making it so that Asuna is supposed to be so incredibly attractive, but at least Kawahara has the balls to say several times throughout the novel that most people who play online RPGs are ugly, and that this certainly holds true for the women who play such games (or, frankly, any video games). But still, the hottest chick in the entire player-base of 10,000 people is attracted to our main character. The romance is actually decent. We don't actually see how Kirito and Asuna meet, because Kawahara skips over 70 floors of Aincrad's conquest, so their romance seems pretty rushed, moving from a somewhat close friendship to full-blown love and marriage quite suddenly after Kirito kills a dude who tries to kill him after he (Kirito) made him (the other guy) look like a bitch in a PVP duel in front of Asuna. The kids get married in-game shortly afterward, taking a two-week honeymoon instead of trying to beat the game and free themselves from SAO's hold on their brains, and it is only at the very end of this honeymoon, some 200 pages into the novel, that we learn how they met: Kirito was trying to take a nap in the middle of a town while Asuna was on her way to a dungeon raid, and his carefree nature showed her how someone may look away from the harsh reality of SAO and try to live life to its fullest. Or something. Kirito reveals shortly afterward how he probably just wanted to take a nap, and didn't mean anything profound. I made it seem lamer on purpose, but it was pretty cute, I guess. As were earlier scenes building on their romance, such as Kirito saying he wants to spend the night with Asuna (meaning he just wanted to literally sleep at her house), only for her to misunderstand and try to fuck him, with Kirito not knowing you can have sex in SAO, then almost questioning if she's done it, only for her to get all embarrassed and fumble over explaining she heard it from someone in her guild (which sounds like something a whore trying to pass as a virgin might say, but I'll suspend disbelief). Kawahara does kind of shit himself with the pacing of the novel, to a degree that it sometimes seems huge chunks of the story are outright missing. As stated above, the novel skips the vast majority of the conquest of Aincrad, blowing over a full two years of Kirito being trapped in Sword Art Online. We get a brief chapter of Kirito fucking around in the "death game" to begin the novel, giving readers a taste of the novel's fantasy world, then the next chapter covers release day for the SAO game, including Kayaba's appearance. Then we skip all the way the fuck to the 74th floor of Aincrad. On the first day of SAO, Kirito is too much of a friendless loser to join Klein and his friends in their journey, thinking he is way too above them with his experience as a beta tester, and that having to explain the game as they go would get in the way of his own enjoyment of playing a goddamn massive multiplayer online game on his own. Fastforward several dozen floors, and some mysterious event has happened discouraging Kirito from ever joining a guild. When he actually divulges the story, it comes out so fast, concerning a bunch of characters we've obviously not met, and the only real weight to it is that a handful of people died, when we've already had Kirito inform us much earlier that hundreds of other people have died in the two years of SAO, back in the beginning of the novel in a quick fucking paragraph detailing the world a little. So there's no reason to really give a shit about the deaths of anyone, unless in the odd event that Kirito or Asuna might die (*coughcough*). Anyway, I guess Kawahara's started the Sword Art Progressive spinoff to cover Aincrad floor-by-floor. I can't imagine he would actually write 70 novels, so he's either going to give up at some point, or otherwise start blazing through the novels with each one covering several floors at once. He's still doing Accel World and The Isolator, too, I think. And the Hollow Fragment game on Vita and PS4 allows you to play floors 76 and onward, so that's neat. The real issue with the novel's pacing is that the "twist" comes too soon, and the novel ends with the defeat of the antagonist and Kirito being freed from SAO - a fact I actually got spoiled on by starting the PS4 version of Hollow Fragment, as it was on sale on the PS Store for like $5, and I didn't expect it to begin immediately with the end of the novel/anime Aincrad arc. Basically what we have here is that one 250-page novel covers a whole two-year period of getting trapped in an online game, complete with the storyline's resolution, so the second volume is just a handful of short stories adding more girls to the series, giving the married man a pseudo-harem for some reason, then each subsequent set of novels just covers another game with lower stakes than this one, which is kind of a huge turnoff. And when I say the novel's "twist" comes too soon, I really mean it. Asuna's guild's leader, Heathcliff of the Knights of Blood, leads a raid on the 75th floor's boss, which proves to be exhausting for everyone involved, except Heathcliff himself (though the actual boss fight is kind of glazed over after the initial encounter and the first little while of fighting). Kirito notices Heathcliff is too calm and composed, and his health bar is just above 50%, still blue in color (it should become yellow if it drops below 50%). Kirito recalls his duel from earlier in the novel, when he got Heathcliff to about the same HP level before Heathcliff started doing some bullshit hax to win the fight. Putting two and two together, Kirito determines Heathcliff has something about his character preventing him from dropping below 50%, and his facial expression can only belong to either an NPC or a benign system admin. With most admins removed from the game, the only possible person left is the malign Kayaba. Kirito thus launches an attack on Heathcliff in an attempt to prove his theory, whereupon he finds Heathcliff's life bar cannot drop past 50% before revealing itself as an "Immortal Object" like the structure of an in-game house or other building. Heathcliff almost immediately reveals himself to have been Kayaba the whole time, setting himself to be SAO's final boss, to be fought on the 100th floor of Aincrad. He formed the Knights of Blood to train players to be able to get at least to the 90th floor so they might have a fighting chance to beat the game. And as it turns out, Kayaba is so fond of playing games he gives Kirito the chance to 1v1 him then and there to end the game prematurely. The quote with which I began my review comes from Kirito's revelation regarding why Kayaba would mask his physical appearance to turn himself into Heathcliff and play alongside his captives. Would it not have been more reasonable for the floating robed figure at the novel's beginning to just not say his true name, leaving Kayaba to appear in person at a much later time? Everyone playing SAO knows Kayaba's face from promotional materials for the game, so it doesn't really make sense for him to appear faceless at the beginning. Obviously it makes sense to masquerade himself as Heathcliff, especially after having wiped everyone's avatars to have faces more closely resembling those of the players' real-life appearances (so no one would expect Heathcliff to have another face in reality), but why let the game finish itself literally 75% through? Postscript: abec's art is kind of weird. Mostly it looks pretty great, particularly characters' faces and especially eyes during illustrations of intense battles. But then I noticed how fucked up Asuna's proportions are on the novel's cover. I get that she's supposed to be at an angle, but holy shit does it look like she's dreadfully thin. Spooky skelly doesn't even begin to describe it. And speaking of skellies, the Skullreaper boss's aesthetic was so interesting as to distract me from reading the adjacent page (207) but it was hard to ignore how asymmetrical the details of the skull were. I'll read the second volume. I might read the two ALO volumes as well, just to have read everything covered by the first season of the anime, and from there I'll decide whether to watch the adaptation and/or continue reading the series. It doesn't seem so bad, but I can't imagine it ever remains as decent as this single volume. Already I know Volume 2 is just a bunch of shit that occurs before Kayaba's defeat, which retroactively seems irrelevant for introducing a bunch of girls who aren't mentioned in this novel, as well as a girl who is mentioned as being fucking dead. And apparently Volume 3 begins with Asuna still being comatose, so Kirito has to play another fucking game (based on SAO itself) to find her and bring her back, but without the threat of dying in real life himself. And then he's going to have to play another game with a guy who can kill people in real life by killing them in the game, and so on, and so on. At least the Alicization arc seems edgy enough to ride by on the winds of its supreme chuuni-ness.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Moki

    This was the first light novel I read and I can honestly say that is one of the best books I have ever read. Yeah, I started reading it because of the anime like everybody else, and the anime is amazing but between the anime and the novel I can't possibly choose one over the other. Well, I'll start by telling you a little bit about the story: The story begins in the year 2022 when a new sort of game is released. It's a VRMMORPG (Virtual Reality Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game) calle This was the first light novel I read and I can honestly say that is one of the best books I have ever read. Yeah, I started reading it because of the anime like everybody else, and the anime is amazing but between the anime and the novel I can't possibly choose one over the other. Well, I'll start by telling you a little bit about the story: The story begins in the year 2022 when a new sort of game is released. It's a VRMMORPG (Virtual Reality Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game) called Sword Art Online or just SAO. This game gives the player the experience of actually being in the game by putting a sort of virtual reality helmet called the Nerve Gear that allows you to control your character with your mind. On November 6, of the same year, the gamers can log in for the first time and soon realize they can't log out. And in order to get out they must beat the game. However, if they die in the game they will die in the real life. Review: As I said before, I already knew the story because of the anime but still I was fascinated by this novel. The descriptions, the characters, Aincraid itself, everything is so well-written that made me want to be inside SAO (despite being a death game). And, hey, I don't even like games that much. I'm not a gamer and I completly loved this book. Reki Kawahara made me want to be a gamer just by writing about Aincraid and Sword Art Online. But, well, you might be asking what is so good about this book. I mean, the idea is not that original and there are plently of well-written books, so what makes this book so special? First of all, the characters. In the anime, I already liked Kirito (the main character) and loved Asuna due to her strength and strong personality, but in the book I could really connect with Kirito. I could feel what he felt and I could understand him better. He really his a complex character with interesting thoughts about both worlds. But what I really admire in him is his fighting capability. Not only he can fight in the game, but also he can fight with his mind. He is clever and he can find the best solution in a critical situation. He cares about his friends and tries everyday to clear the game (even when he feels like dying) so that everyone can be out of there as soon as possible. He is a loner but still manages to survive in the real world and in the virtual world. He has a really strong mind and fights for what he wants. That's why I like him so much. About Asuna, she is one of my favourite characters of all times. When she logged in, she had no experience in games but still she is one of the best fighters in SAO, only surpassed by Kirito and Heathcliff. She didn't know how to survive in that world so she worked hard and succeed. I just love her, she is such a lovely character: strong and determined but also sweet and caring. About the fights, they are just way too awesome. Amazingly written, make you feel like you can't stop reading, or else you will die. It envelopes you and makes you feel everything they are feeling starting with determination and ending with despair. The romance is beautiful. So sweet, so innocent and lovable, so perfect. You can see that Kirito and Asuna really love each other no matter what and that they would gladly give their life for each other if they knew the other one would survive and go back to the real world. Just the way he describes her, says everything. And it's not like every other love story, I think it's much more dynamic and doesn't have all that drama romance usually has (and thank god 'cause that is all you see nowadays). The ending. Without spoiling anything, I can say the ending is predictable but also a bit unexpected. I thought I would have a heart attack in the final scenes 'cause it's really intense and emotional. The writer managed for us to connect with the characters and live their fears and their agony while presenting us an ending that surprised me on the bright side and made me wanna read the next book. I really liked it, and again, it's not just an ordinary story, it is a great mix of old and new ideas that make this story everything but boring. Still about the anime, I thought Silica, Lizbeth and Yui would appear but guess not. Well, the light novel is still awesome even without them. In conclusion, this book is great and I would recommend it to everyone one who likes games and doesn't like games. Also to everyone who likes romance, fights, not-so-expectable endings and emotional scenes. And that's why I rated it 5 out of 5 stars.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sean O'Hara

    Sword Art Online: Aincrad (available in English through Baka Tsuki) Imagine that there's a revolutionary new VR game platform -- not one of those lame things from the '90s where you strapped a low-res LCD over your eyes and used a primitive motion controller to play. No, this is the real thing, a helmet that taps directly into your brain, giving you a fully immersive experience in a virtual world that stimulates all your senses. Now imagine that all the games for the platform suck -- it's a new sy Sword Art Online: Aincrad (available in English through Baka Tsuki) Imagine that there's a revolutionary new VR game platform -- not one of those lame things from the '90s where you strapped a low-res LCD over your eyes and used a primitive motion controller to play. No, this is the real thing, a helmet that taps directly into your brain, giving you a fully immersive experience in a virtual world that stimulates all your senses. Now imagine that all the games for the platform suck -- it's a new system, radically different from anything else on the market, so developers haven't had a chance to create any decent games. It's the Wii all over again. But then one developer announces that they're working on an VRMMORPG called Sword Art Online. The beta-testers rave about the game, saying it makes WoW look like Pac-Man. And so on the day of release, you skip work and stand in line to get a copy. You race home, pop it in the machine, and log on. Congratulations! You've just been screwed. After playing for a couple hours, learning how the game works and earning a few XP, you open the main menu and try to log-off -- but the log-off icon is missing. You consult other players but none of them can exit the game either and PMs to the sysadmins go unanswered. And because the machine paralyzes you while playing to prevent you from injuring yourself, you have no way of physically disconnecting yourself. Turns out the company that designed the game is owned by the next generation of Bond villain. Instead of hijacking nuclear missiles, he's decided to hold gamers hostage in this virtual world. Any attempt by outsiders to disconnect a player will result in the machine frying the player's brain. Luckily the machines have their own built in UPS which should be sufficient for players to be moved to hospitals for long term care. Because they're going to be here a while -- the only way out of SAO is for someone to defeat the final boss on the 100th level. And if you die on the way, the machine will fry your brain. Sword Art Online started as an online novel. After Reki Kawahara won the Dengeki Bunko Novel Award for Accel World (set in the same universe several decades later), his publisher decided to put SAO out as well and it quickly became a mega-hit, rising through the ranks of the "This Light Novel is Amazing" poll until it took the top spot last year, beating out perennial favorites like Haruhi Suzumiya, Baka and Test, and Index. Both SAO and Accel World have anime adaptations airing this year. The story isn't without its problem. In particular, the villain -- who is essentially committing a terrorist act greater than everything al Qaeda has ever done put together -- has no motivation beyond the lulz and exists mainly as an excuse for the story to take place, while the hero, who is of course the best player in the game, is a bit of a Mary Sue. However, it's easy to ignore these problems since they're coated over with sheer awesome.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kparker19

    Kevin J. Parker October 3, 2016 English 10 - 1 Sword Art Online book 1 He is a japanese novelist and is known for two books that now both have a anime for them or tv show they are sword art online and accel world. He also did the voice in accel world for the show. He doesn't plan we he writes he makes it up as he goes along so some of his books are time jumped. He has also wrote a book called the isolator The book i did mine on was sword art online book 1 this is in japanese and so is the book w Kevin J. Parker October 3, 2016 English 10 - 1 Sword Art Online book 1 He is a japanese novelist and is known for two books that now both have a anime for them or tv show they are sword art online and accel world. He also did the voice in accel world for the show. He doesn't plan we he writes he makes it up as he goes along so some of his books are time jumped. He has also wrote a book called the isolator The book i did mine on was sword art online book 1 this is in japanese and so is the book where he wrote it it has to do with gaming. VRMMO this means virtual reality massive multiplayer online. The book was released in 2009. This is when games are getting kind of big virtual reality wise. Japan was starting to get into the business. This book takes place in the year 2022 in the future when VR is real. In this book they are trapped in a game and have to beat all 100 floors to get out. In the real world not inside the game there body's are at hospitals and if they die in the game the system will fry their brain. The two main characters are Kirto that is the guy and Asuna. Kirito is the point of view from the story he is trying to beat the game to save everyone's life. He plays solo and don't like to talk to people. He also loves games. Asuna is a popular girl who in the story is a strong player in the game and soon falls in love with Kirito and then they both try to beat the game together. The theme is inside a game in the future. This is also in Japan. In this game they can't get out so they are trapped inside. Death is right around the corner for them. The plot of this story is to get out of the game and to become strong enough to beat all 100 floors. The only catch is that they cannot die since they will actually die. So they must live in this game forever and not be in the real world or beat the game and be in the real world. The first is that Kirito is a beta tester so he got to play the game before anyone else i think is is irony that he is good since he got to play it before anyone else got to. Another one is the fact that Asuna the first girl he meets falls in love with him I think this is also irony since that's how it is in every romance book. In this world a single blade can take you anywhere you want to go. He is saying this to a friend and telling him how to play the game. --Kirito There are limits of what a solo player can do. He has just beat the first boss by himself and is telling Asuna that she can't be solo to. --Kirito No matter what i promise i will protect all of you. He got some people killed by not helping them it really wasn't his fault he couldn't help them any other way but he blames himself for their deaths.--Kirito

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bruce Lee

    Sword art online or SAO follows the protagonist, Kirito, who is trapped with many others inside a massive multiplayer online role playing game. To free everyone who is trapped in the game, Kirito and his companions must clear all one hundred floors. However there is one important factor, dying in this alternate reality results in death in real life. Kirito meets a lot friends and enemies, falls in love and grows more mature everyday. A comparison I have to make with this novel is the 2003 movie, Sword art online or SAO follows the protagonist, Kirito, who is trapped with many others inside a massive multiplayer online role playing game. To free everyone who is trapped in the game, Kirito and his companions must clear all one hundred floors. However there is one important factor, dying in this alternate reality results in death in real life. Kirito meets a lot friends and enemies, falls in love and grows more mature everyday. A comparison I have to make with this novel is the 2003 movie, Spy Kids 3D. The movie also features a protagonist, who needs to beat a video game to save the ones he love. However the movie has a less depressing mood where one would not die in real life if died in the game. The author, Reki Kawahara, does an excellent job of pulling the reader into the game by putting them into Kirito's position. We experience everything that he experiences in the game like depression, excitement and even first love. We sometimes forget that Kirito is still in a virtual reality because of how well Kawahara describes Kirito's senses. One flaw I noticed in this novel is that the reader is left with many common plot holes. There are many questions that are left unanswered. Since this is only the first volume, I hope that Kawahara will answer those questions and leave the readers satisfied. To sum it up, Sword art online is a wonderful novel and the first japanese light novel I've ever read. The plot is interesting and the characters are well developed. I highly urge you to pick up this novel if you enjoy playing video games and ever wonder what it would be like to experience being inside the game. If you can not read Japanese then download an English translated version.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lucas Marr

    One of the best books I have ever read. Of course I read this book because of the anime ,but I still loved both the book and anime. Most people are complaining about how the story rushed Kirito and Asuna but that just means they have not read the second book in which Kirito goes on some of the adventures and quests in that were in the anime. I will tell you a little bit about the story now. The year is 2022 and a new game has come out the name of the game is "Sword Art Online" (SAO). The game is One of the best books I have ever read. Of course I read this book because of the anime ,but I still loved both the book and anime. Most people are complaining about how the story rushed Kirito and Asuna but that just means they have not read the second book in which Kirito goes on some of the adventures and quests in that were in the anime. I will tell you a little bit about the story now. The year is 2022 and a new game has come out the name of the game is "Sword Art Online" (SAO). The game is a VRMMORPG (Virtual Reality Massively Multi-player Online Role Playing Game) where 10,000 people are trapped in the game where if you die then you also die in the real world. In the world of Aincrad there are 100 floors that are needed to be cleared to have everyone in the world be released from the game. This book is so good to me because I like playing games but if I went to a place like "Sword Art Online" I would be scared. Even though I would not want to I would fight for my life everyday.This book is so good to me because even though Kirito knows he can die everyday he still decides to fight and not be afraid for himself. If I could do a full-dive (go into the game completely) I would because that is what I have dreamed of doing ever since I first saw it on SAO. If you at all like video games then this is exactly what you would want to do also. I would love if all gamers would read this book because then maybe we actually could make the full-dive system and we could all enjoy the new worlds that we make. For me and other people I would say this is a must read because it fits my interests perfectly to where I would not care if I had to survive in that game I would do it in a heartbeat.

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