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The Red Queen's Daughter PDF, ePub eBook Mary Seymour is the daughter of the great Katherine Parr--the last Queen of Henry VIII. Orphaned at a young age because of her mother's bad marriage to Thomas Seymour, Mary determines early on that love is a sentiment that causes foolishness at best, and death at worst. She is sent to be raised by Lady Strange, a mysterious noblewoman who informs her of her destiny: Mary i Mary Seymour is the daughter of the great Katherine Parr--the last Queen of Henry VIII. Orphaned at a young age because of her mother's bad marriage to Thomas Seymour, Mary determines early on that love is a sentiment that causes foolishness at best, and death at worst. She is sent to be raised by Lady Strange, a mysterious noblewoman who informs her of her destiny: Mary is to be a white magician who will join Queen Elizabeth's court and ensure her safe reign. After spending her early years honing her education and learning the arts of the white magician, Mary is indeed invited to join Elizabeth's court as a Lady in Waiting. There she is met with warm welcome from the Queen, but soon realizes that the court is also rife with ambitious men and women who are jockeying for power. The most dangerous of these is Edmund Seymour, Mary's cousin. The moment she meets the dark, mysterious courtesan, Mary is drawn to him despite herself. Edmund is a black magician--the mirror image of Mary's own powers. When Edmund becomes embroiled in a plot to overthrow the Queen, Mary has to risk everything she believes to fulfill her calling. But playing this dangerous game could cost her more than she ever imagined.

30 review for The Red Queen's Daughter

  1. 4 out of 5

    The Library Lady

    Here's a book with a great premise and that's about all. The writing is flat and often very awkward, even stilted. The characterizations are minimal. The "magic" doesn't seem magical. I was on to "Cordelia"'s identity the minute she came on the scene--anyone who's read "King Lear" would--and why does the author feel the need to drag that into her plot? And the ending is neither believable nor satisfying. While we're at it, what is the NEED for the whole magical thing? Just the idea of Katherine Pa Here's a book with a great premise and that's about all. The writing is flat and often very awkward, even stilted. The characterizations are minimal. The "magic" doesn't seem magical. I was on to "Cordelia"'s identity the minute she came on the scene--anyone who's read "King Lear" would--and why does the author feel the need to drag that into her plot? And the ending is neither believable nor satisfying. While we're at it, what is the NEED for the whole magical thing? Just the idea of Katherine Parr's orphaned daughter making her way in the court of Elizabeth I would have been story enough in the hands of a skilled writer. But sadly, Kolosov shows no proof of being such a writer here.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kristi

    Orphaned at an early age Mary Seymour’s life isn’t luxurious or pampered as you would think the daughter of a queen’s life would be. Her mother died shortly after she was born and her father was sentenced to death for betraying the crown, leaving Mary to become nothing more than a seamstress in a duchesses’s household. Soon after the death of her guardian, Mary discovers that she indeed has a destiny all her own. "Fetch the red queen’s daughter from the house of shadows. Bring her to your home b Orphaned at an early age Mary Seymour’s life isn’t luxurious or pampered as you would think the daughter of a queen’s life would be. Her mother died shortly after she was born and her father was sentenced to death for betraying the crown, leaving Mary to become nothing more than a seamstress in a duchesses’s household. Soon after the death of her guardian, Mary discovers that she indeed has a destiny all her own. "Fetch the red queen’s daughter from the house of shadows. Bring her to your home beside the dark wood. School her well in the white magician’s wisdom so that she may go forth into the world and fulfill her calling when the virgin queen ascends the throne." Lady Strange becomes Mary’s new guardian and she trains her in the ways of the white magicians. When Mary reaches the age of sixteen she is invited to court by Queen Elizabeth and is soon made a lady-in-waiting. The queen’s court, however is even more corrupt then Mary initially believed. And the person that may possibly be the most dangerous of all, is none other than her very own cousin, Edmund Seymour. The Red Queen’s Daughter is a perfectly blended masterpiece of historical fiction and fantasy. Although the real May Seymour, I found in research died in infancy, Kolosov’s story made me believe that she might have lived an extraordinary life. At times I thought the plot was becoming predictable, but it continued to surprised. The ending is very open, I would love to know more of the story. Perhaps there will be a sequel in the future, I can only hope! I immensely enjoyed this book, and I recommend it to all fans of historical fiction and fantasy.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lucy

    Mary Seymour, daughter of Katherine Parr, the sixth wife of Henry VIII, is determined never to be bound by love and marriage. With the example of her mother—a woman who was queen, who then was brought low when she fell in love with Thomas Seymour, who was executed a traitor—Mary is determined to keep herself free of love’s dangerous influences. So when her new guardian, the mysterious Lady Strange, tells Mary of her destiny—to serve as a white magician in Queen Elizabeth’s court—Mary is determine Mary Seymour, daughter of Katherine Parr, the sixth wife of Henry VIII, is determined never to be bound by love and marriage. With the example of her mother—a woman who was queen, who then was brought low when she fell in love with Thomas Seymour, who was executed a traitor—Mary is determined to keep herself free of love’s dangerous influences. So when her new guardian, the mysterious Lady Strange, tells Mary of her destiny—to serve as a white magician in Queen Elizabeth’s court—Mary is determined that it is the right course for her. But although she spends her formative years training in the art of magic with Lady Strange, nothing could prepare her for the intrigues and dangers of Elizabeth’s court—or for the temptations of the heart. Despite Mary’s ideals and her vow to serve and protect Elizabeth, she can’t deny the way she feels around one Edmund Seymour. Edmund is Mary’s cousin, but he is also her opposite—he is a black magician who stands to use magic for his own gain and against the Queen. It will take all of Mary’s determination to find her way through the intrigues of court and the temptations of the heart. The writing in this book is just lovely. Mary’s an engaging protagonist—one who so clearly belongs and lives in this tumultuous Elizabethan time period, but who has slightly modern feminist ideals. But unlike some feminist novels that take place during this time period, they feel rooted in reality and history. I love the historical detail, the way Elizabeth’s court really comes alive around Mary. Reading this book felt like stowing away in a time machine—I felt completely immersed in the past. I was so immersed in the details of Elizabeth’s court and Mary’s training as a white magician that I barely realized that it takes nearly three quarters of the book for the plot to get moving, and once it does, it barely feels complete. I am wondering if there is going to be a sequel, and that’s why things are left so up in the air. Almost nothing is concluded with any amount of satisfaction. And Mary, despite all her protestations against love, seems to topple to it without any resistance or reason at all. Despite these flaws, the writing is so good that I really did enjoy reading it. It’s only when I think about it objectively that I realize that the conclusion didn’t really conclude, the enemies set up in the book still feel like a threat, and the budding romance that seemed on the verge of coming to a head still feels—unfinished. I really hope that there’s more in store for us from Jacqueline Kolosov and Mary Seymour. I want to know what happens next. I'd like to give this book 3 1/2 stars, but I'll have to settle for 4.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    I was really excited to read this book simply because it combines my two favorite things: The tudors and magicians. Unfortunately, it became clear by page ten that this book and I would not see eye to eye. Although the characters discuss magic often, the book lacks any trace of "showy" magic, and so the characters work through potions and gemstones. As slow and unlikeable as I found the book, I was never disgusted enough to abandon it altogether, and so I've rated it two stars. The book had a fe I was really excited to read this book simply because it combines my two favorite things: The tudors and magicians. Unfortunately, it became clear by page ten that this book and I would not see eye to eye. Although the characters discuss magic often, the book lacks any trace of "showy" magic, and so the characters work through potions and gemstones. As slow and unlikeable as I found the book, I was never disgusted enough to abandon it altogether, and so I've rated it two stars. The book had a few things going for it,but honestly...I felt that the book led up to nothing of any value. Although the characters reference a "very real" threat, I just...didn't see it. To make matters worse, the ending offers little in the way of resolution and is ridiculously confusing, sudden, and unsatisfying. Although it wasn't terrible, I didn't grow attached to the characters, story or world Kolosov created. To put it plainly, I wouldn't recommend this book at all, because it is completely forgettable.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Collyn

    Spoiler alert: I can't recommend a book in which the girl is apparently justified in loving and believing she has reformed a serial rapist. Not cool.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mazohyst

    I'm not one to read fantasy, and I have never read any book with both history and fantasy elements (unless you count the Magic Tree House series). The Red Queen's Daughter was a pleasant surprise. I feel that the book does not deserve lower than a three, but it doesn't deserve more than a four. It was a great read with great promise, but a number of things hindered it from achieving it's highest potential. The prominent factor is the poor quality of the writing. It seemed like the author tried so I'm not one to read fantasy, and I have never read any book with both history and fantasy elements (unless you count the Magic Tree House series). The Red Queen's Daughter was a pleasant surprise. I feel that the book does not deserve lower than a three, but it doesn't deserve more than a four. It was a great read with great promise, but a number of things hindered it from achieving it's highest potential. The prominent factor is the poor quality of the writing. It seemed like the author tried so hard to be so flowery with her language. Sadly, it only turned out to be awkward. Even though some of her descriptions were enticing (such as Edmund Seymour's many appearances in the book), the rest of the writing was almost horrid. Another thing is the characterization, or lack of it. Mary is your typical Mary Sue. Typical, how ironic. There is nothing else to expect from her than to exceed in everything she does. Then there are the rest of the characters. They are all unbelievable, some of them too extreme in terms of personality. The only redeeming thing about this book was a certain charm it had. I can't put my finger on it, but maybe it's just the charm of the period in history. While I wouldn't say you would have to go out at grab the book, it was still an enjoyable book. If you ever find that you come across it in the library, might as well grab it. There's nothing to lose, but there is also nothing to gain in reading this book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Amy Bethke

    I have always been fascinated with the time surrounding Queen Elizabeth's court and all the deceit that took place. This books main character is Mary Seymour, who is Katherine Parr (Henry the Eighths sixth wife) and Thomas Seymour's daughter. She really existed though this book is a complete fictional account of her her life. No one knows much about Mary, and she disappears at some point from history. Thus, there is witchcraft and magic woven into the storyline. Mary goes to court to act as a sp I have always been fascinated with the time surrounding Queen Elizabeth's court and all the deceit that took place. This books main character is Mary Seymour, who is Katherine Parr (Henry the Eighths sixth wife) and Thomas Seymour's daughter. She really existed though this book is a complete fictional account of her her life. No one knows much about Mary, and she disappears at some point from history. Thus, there is witchcraft and magic woven into the storyline. Mary goes to court to act as a spy and protector of Queen Elizabeth. It is there that she meets her cousin Edmund Seymour, who is trying to harm the young Queen. Mary, who has sworn never to fall in love, must make Edmund fall for her in order to thwart his dark plans. In this book you never know who to trust because everyone circulates lies. The good guys are bad, and the bad guys are only sometimes half good. You never know who to really trust. If you find the Elizabethan time period at all interesting and don't mind some magic, then you will love every turn this book takes. Things to be aware of on a scale of 1-10 Sex 3- There is no sex in this book, but there is some scandalous touching and plenty of kissing. Violence 4- There are many acts of sabotage, a kidnapping, imprisonment and near death experiences. Most of the violence occurs in a sly and deceitful way. Language 1- Mild if any.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kylin Larsson

    Set in the sixteenth century during the early years of Queen Elizabeth's reign, Mary Seymour is the imagined character of Henry VIII's last queen, Katherine Parr. Though the real Mary died at the age of two, author Jacqueline Kolosov, created a life full of magic and court intrigue for her. Mary lives with her guardian, who teaches her white magic for the purpose of supporting the reign of Queen Elizabeth. This is the part of the story that I like, particularly the use of elemental magic and very Set in the sixteenth century during the early years of Queen Elizabeth's reign, Mary Seymour is the imagined character of Henry VIII's last queen, Katherine Parr. Though the real Mary died at the age of two, author Jacqueline Kolosov, created a life full of magic and court intrigue for her. Mary lives with her guardian, who teaches her white magic for the purpose of supporting the reign of Queen Elizabeth. This is the part of the story that I like, particularly the use of elemental magic and very particularly the use of gemstones in magic. Mary's motive, her utter abhorrence at falling in love -- it's ruined everyone around her, see? -- is so predictable in it's outcome that the reader can see if hundreds of pages away. There is something overwritten and uptight about the writing style and voice of the novel. Lots of things are told when they have already been satisfactorily shown (earning lots of big sighs and imagined red-penned edits from me). That said, I did finish the book & even looked forward to reading it as the baby napped beside me and I sipped tea. But I still think it would e better with a medium developmental edit.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jean Marie

    This was surprisingly a very good read. I'm always a little worried about fantasy mixed in with history especially when it's young adult. It was easy to read, as I expected, yet a lot of fun. Mary Seymour is one of those historical mysteries that intrigues a lot of us history buffs, so this was a fun story. The magical part of the books was subtle and clever enough so that it didn't over power the over all story. My only complaint was a oops on a name about mid book and that it went so fast! I kn This was surprisingly a very good read. I'm always a little worried about fantasy mixed in with history especially when it's young adult. It was easy to read, as I expected, yet a lot of fun. Mary Seymour is one of those historical mysteries that intrigues a lot of us history buffs, so this was a fun story. The magical part of the books was subtle and clever enough so that it didn't over power the over all story. My only complaint was a oops on a name about mid book and that it went so fast! I know it's young adult and it's supposed to be a quick paced, easy book, but I really wish it was a fully fledged adult novel because that would have made it even better. I also wish (hope) there's a sequel or a series to this book, that would be fantastic! Overall, this was a fun, quick read about a fantanized look of the ambigious life of Mary Seymour. I would recommend this to not only historical fiction readers but also fantasy readers, it's a great read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Krys

    This is a really weird read for me. On the one hand I enjoyed it: the exploits of Mary Seymour, a White Magician, in Queen Elizabeth's court are quite interesting... on the other hand there is so much of the book where not a lot happens. The author spends so much time establishing the world that the overall plot is a bit weak and simple. On the other hand I just finished it and I can't tell you much about what the book was about. Mary - Seymour, Queen Elizabeth, the Tudor court... all very very This is a really weird read for me. On the one hand I enjoyed it: the exploits of Mary Seymour, a White Magician, in Queen Elizabeth's court are quite interesting... on the other hand there is so much of the book where not a lot happens. The author spends so much time establishing the world that the overall plot is a bit weak and simple. On the other hand I just finished it and I can't tell you much about what the book was about. Mary - Seymour, Queen Elizabeth, the Tudor court... all very very good things... the author's handling of that world... less so. I don't think I would ever pick up this book twice... and I'm reluctant to pick up the sequel "A Sweet Disorder", although if I need a fluffy diversion it might be a bit of fun. If I had something more to latch onto this book would have been incredible. As it were it wa just so-so.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cassie

    This book was beyond fantastic. This book gave me by far a brand new look upon life. Mary was told never to fall in love. What she didn't know was the heart is far louder then the mind. Her dear cousin Edmund was the one to show the truth. I was expecting to cry. I knew the story wouldn't end well. I expect all love stories to end well. I atleast hope. When it comes to books involving the court, I know not to hope for the best. In a court everything is ruled and choosen for you. That can never e This book was beyond fantastic. This book gave me by far a brand new look upon life. Mary was told never to fall in love. What she didn't know was the heart is far louder then the mind. Her dear cousin Edmund was the one to show the truth. I was expecting to cry. I knew the story wouldn't end well. I expect all love stories to end well. I atleast hope. When it comes to books involving the court, I know not to hope for the best. In a court everything is ruled and choosen for you. That can never end well. Especially for a women in court. I gave this book five stars. To me, it deserves much more. I've learned one thing is important when you are among any group of people. Friends or enemy's. There is one person that can be responsible to hold the line "Video, et taceo." "I see all and say nothing."

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    I loved this book until the last ten pages. It combined the Tudors and magic very well and I learned a lot about reading auras, gemstones, and general readings/interpretations of magical ingredients. However, the ending of the book felt a little slapped together as though she realized that she needed to end it so that there isn't a second book. Not even that, she just realized that she needed to end it and wasn't sure how to do it without writing another 50 pages. Although I would have preferred I loved this book until the last ten pages. It combined the Tudors and magic very well and I learned a lot about reading auras, gemstones, and general readings/interpretations of magical ingredients. However, the ending of the book felt a little slapped together as though she realized that she needed to end it so that there isn't a second book. Not even that, she just realized that she needed to end it and wasn't sure how to do it without writing another 50 pages. Although I would have preferred a happier ending, the ending was one of those "unsatisfying yet oh so satisfying" endings that you love and hate, but could have been done better if she was just a little more motivated to write it out.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dannielle

    Well, I really am not sure how I feel about this book. First, I love historical novels, fiction or non, and will read just about any of them. I liked how Kolosov used her imagination and created a life for Mary Seymour, but I don't know if I loved the magic aspect. Which is odd, because that is usually what catches me. I liked the idea she had, and how Mary was a white magician, I just don't like how she wrote about it. I also was displeased with the ending. It was very sudden and didn't flow as Well, I really am not sure how I feel about this book. First, I love historical novels, fiction or non, and will read just about any of them. I liked how Kolosov used her imagination and created a life for Mary Seymour, but I don't know if I loved the magic aspect. Which is odd, because that is usually what catches me. I liked the idea she had, and how Mary was a white magician, I just don't like how she wrote about it. I also was displeased with the ending. It was very sudden and didn't flow as nicely as I would have liked. 3.5 stars.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Anne Osterlund

    An intriguing blend of Tudor era history, fantasy, and King Lear. Really quite fun! I am particularly fond of the sidekick/wise & helpful counselor, Perseus the dog, while the more ghostly advisor, Cordelia, with the hangman's mark around her throat gives the entire tale of Mary Seymour, a imagined version of Katherine Parr and Thomas Seymour's daughter, a dangerously haunting feel.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    This book was really difficult to get into to. I almost gave up on it. But, I'm glad I didn't because it's getting really interesting... The author seemed in haste to finish this book. It seems as though she forgot one major part of the plot; I don't know. I still liked the book but it could have been a lot better.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Valerie

    This was one of those books that made me go "Wow, cool premise!" only to horrify me in the first fifty pages. Bad, bad, bad writing. When I hit the one character's exposition on gemstones, crystals, zodiac signs, and auras, I knew I could go no further.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Angela Oberle

    The premise of this book had a lot of promise, the story of a real life person that history lost track of and many believe died at an early age, but no one knows for sure. The author could have taken this character anywhere and created a great story, but unfortunately that is not what she did. The writing is bad, the characters are flat and unlikable, and the first 25 chapters drag on unbelievably slow. Most of the entire plot happens in the last 7 chapters and the author shoves what could have The premise of this book had a lot of promise, the story of a real life person that history lost track of and many believe died at an early age, but no one knows for sure. The author could have taken this character anywhere and created a great story, but unfortunately that is not what she did. The writing is bad, the characters are flat and unlikable, and the first 25 chapters drag on unbelievably slow. Most of the entire plot happens in the last 7 chapters and the author shoves what could have been a couple hundred more pages of story into the last 50 pages.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Muriel

    I realize this is young adult fiction, but I was so very disappointed in this book. I don’t mind literary license, but this was just over the top. Don’t bother unless you really have nothing else to read.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lynette Lark

    The Red Queen was Katherine Parr.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Colleen Earle

    Not what I was expecting but a really interesting read Lots of court intrigue and an interesting look at QEI

  21. 5 out of 5

    Denise

    DNF. Unfortunately. I just lost interest in the story and there wasn't much to keep me hooked. I applaud myself for at least getting through 100 pages of it. But nope...

  22. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    Wow, there’s so much to say…I just hope I can remember all of the thoughts that were swirling around my head as I read this book. I will begin that I was very skeptical once I started this book. It takes place during the early part of Elizabeth I’s reign in the sixteenth century and the main character is Mary Seymour - the daughter of Katherine Parr, Henry VIII’s last wife and queen (the one who “survived”) and Thomas Seymour, the younger brother of Lord Protector Somerset (Edward Seymour) and un Wow, there’s so much to say…I just hope I can remember all of the thoughts that were swirling around my head as I read this book. I will begin that I was very skeptical once I started this book. It takes place during the early part of Elizabeth I’s reign in the sixteenth century and the main character is Mary Seymour - the daughter of Katherine Parr, Henry VIII’s last wife and queen (the one who “survived”) and Thomas Seymour, the younger brother of Lord Protector Somerset (Edward Seymour) and uncle to Edward VI through Henry’s third wife, Jane. The circumstances of Mary’s life (and more importantly, her death) are veiled in a thick fog. Katherine Parr died of puerperal fever (child-bed fever) six days after giving birth to Mary. After this unfortunate event, Thomas Seymour’s ambitions completely consumed him and he eventually paid for them with his life. Afterwards, Mary Seymour was lost to history. As was noted in the author’s note at the end of The Queen’s Governess and alluded to in the author’s note at the end of The Red Queen’s Daughter, many accounts say that Mary Seymour died in her second year while in the Duchess of Suffolk’s care while some hint that the Duchess fled to France with Mary during Mary I’s short reign. This is one of history’s great mysteries which can be maddening for us and our desire to know, but which is exciting fodder for our imaginations. Enter the fantastical. Jacqueline Kolosov’s Mary Seymour did not die at age two. She survived childhood in the Duchess of Suffolk’s care and then was given over to Lady Strange, a guardian who has much to teach young Mary, starting with the basics of reading and writing. Soon, Lady Strange tells Mary that she has a calling as a white magician and will serve the Virgin Queen when the time is right. In the mean time, she is taught to reason and deduce the meaning of what seem the most obvious things: birds, trees, herbs, flowers, stones…jewels. Throughout the book, Lady Strange (and later, Mary herself) stresses that as a white magician, Mary will serve Elizabeth I and greatly help her reign. This story, however, focuses on Mary growing into her capabilities and the firsts tests of her power - not only her magic, but her inner strength and will. Back to my skepticism: My first warning bell went off when I realized this book was about Mary Seymour and she lived past the age of two. Her death at this young age is the most popular view out there as far as I have seen. My second warning bell went off when I was introduced to Lady Strange. I don’t know the historical woman’s history, but for the time period, I found some of her mannerisms and actions anachronistic. My third warning bell clanged loudly when I learned that magic was involved. I have nothing against magic but for me, this was unbelievable. The overall speech and in particular, Elizabeth I’s speech, rang my fourth and final warning bell. The speech is pretty but not quite sixteenth century. And Elizabeth, like all other reigning queens and kings used the royal prerogative plural in real life: i.e. We are not amused rather than I am not amused. In this book she was all first person in her speech. I admit that, after the incessant clanging of bells in my mind, I was ready to rip into this book when I finished reading. Then I remembered a very important thing. The genre of this book is young adult. Not historical fiction. I am in no way against young adult reading material - in fact, it’s the first section I hit up in the bookstore (how can you resist those sparkly, shiny, beautiful covers?! I am their prey). But after all of my recent historical non-fiction and historical fiction reading, I lost sight of what a young adult novel is allowed to do that those other two genres are not allowed to do -use MAGIC! Insert inspired/awed hush sound. So I kept reading. Once I separated young adult and historical fiction, I found my reading very much enjoyable (much like how I find the Harry Potter movies enjoyable once I decide to banish all knowledge of the books from my mind while viewing them;) ). I really started liking it. I never hated it, oh goodness no. But I was liking it more and more and allowed myself to be sucked further into the story. Then somewhere in between pages 200 and 300 (I won’t spoil anything here but I am giving you a vague hint with page numbers), I was hooked. One character revealed some information about herself and a huge grin spread across my face. If you read this book and get to that part and know anything about English literature, you will feel super intelligent and praise your high school teachers and college professors. It is a very small reference but so cool for a dork like me. :) I really enjoyed this book. If you like young adult and magic, read it. If you like young adult and historical fiction, read it. I would not mind owning this book someday. You can read the original review/thoughts here.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jan

    From a young age Mary Seymour vows never to marry or never to succumb to romantic love with the impurdent marriage of her mother, Katherine Parr to her father, Thomas Seymour. But in a world where marriage, warfare, and alliance dominated the scope of things, Mary fears she cannot escape such a fate. But she is determined to, whatever the costs. Fortunately for Mary, her new guardian the magical, Lady Strange brings to Mary a whole other world. She gives Mary the alternative to marriage- to becom From a young age Mary Seymour vows never to marry or never to succumb to romantic love with the impurdent marriage of her mother, Katherine Parr to her father, Thomas Seymour. But in a world where marriage, warfare, and alliance dominated the scope of things, Mary fears she cannot escape such a fate. But she is determined to, whatever the costs. Fortunately for Mary, her new guardian the magical, Lady Strange brings to Mary a whole other world. She gives Mary the alternative to marriage- to become a White Magician and later ensure the success of Queen Elizabeth's reign. Lady Strange teaches Mary the virtues of different gemstones, as well as the ability to perform earthly spells. Now, at Mary's sixteenth birthday, it is time for her to enter Elizabeth's palace and make sure her reign is great as her destiny call it to be. With the companionship of only her magical dog, Perseus, Mary enters a world she never knew. But calling for success in such a world is very difficult. Mary learns that there are far too many people vying for power, both men and women. There is Vivienne Gascoigne, who sixth finger seems to interpret a sixth sense- perhaps something to do with her shifty, dangerous history... And there's Lord Dudley, Elizabeth's favorite of the Court- the man the calls "eyes." But amidst this is perhaps the most dangerous man of them all, the golden haired and beautiful, Edmund Seymour. Edmund may be a favorite of the Queen, but many don't trust him due to his seemingly voracious appetite for power, danger, and romantic affairs. He seemingly loves to ruin lives if he sees that they may be a threat to his rise for power. When Mary arrives, she realizes that the court is way more than she bargained. Her first task is to help a poor, pregnant girl, Frances who has been seduced by Edmund. Edmund saw her love, Anthony as a threat to his rise of power, especially if he marries Frances. Mary uses a spell to reverse many people's ideas of what is goin on, including Frances' knowledge that she is indeed pregnant. But know many people, including Alice Cavendish- a lady-in-waiting who was once Edmund's sharpest critic, into a strong ally of his. But Edmund knows...and Mary finds herself in a great dilemma. Edmund's immediate interest in his cousin leaves Mary on the edge. But however much she tries to keep true to her word of never falling in love, Mary can't stop her own attraction to Edmund. And she knows it has to stop, especially when she finds out that Edmund is in fact a Black Magician- a dark mirror of herself- and a very powerful one at that. But it seems that as much as Mary tries to stop herself, something betrays her growing attraction. And could it be that Edmund is falling for her as well... A quick read which is darker than Kolosov's second novel- "The Sweet Disorder," but nonetheless very enjoyable. In this story, Kolosov digs deeps into one of those big mysteries in history- what happened to Katherine Parr and Thomas Seymour's child after her mother's death. Mary is a spunky, red-headed heroine who readers will enjoy listening to. She is well-moraled and very keen on making sure that the Good Queen's reign is indeed great. It was definitely a wothwhile read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    ♥BookGeek♥

    Mary Seymour was abandoned at a very young age because of her father's execution as a traitor. Her mother died in child birth. Since then, Mary has been going from the Duchess of Suffolk's estate to a dreary orphanage after her death. Until she meets Lady Strange, who promises her to give her a new life. And she does. It is Mary's destiny to become a white magician, to ensure the reign of Queen Elizabeth I. When MAry is invited at court, she knows nothing of the backstabbing, even less what love Mary Seymour was abandoned at a very young age because of her father's execution as a traitor. Her mother died in child birth. Since then, Mary has been going from the Duchess of Suffolk's estate to a dreary orphanage after her death. Until she meets Lady Strange, who promises her to give her a new life. And she does. It is Mary's destiny to become a white magician, to ensure the reign of Queen Elizabeth I. When MAry is invited at court, she knows nothing of the backstabbing, even less what love she'll find there. But when she meets Edmund Seymour, her rogue of a cousin, she desperately tries not to fall in love, and entangles herself in her own mistakes. I actually give this book a 3 1/2. But since there's no such thing on Goodreads, and since this book is better than other historical fiction, I'm bent on giving it a 4. The POSITIVES: -Love the characters. Mary overreacts too much sometimes (like *gasps* OMG this brooch was given from the queen to my mother for her birthday! My heart is fluttering!) But they are all well developped, and you can't help but love both Peresus and Jack (the two dogs) to death. And thank god we don't have female characters who want to be men! THANK YOU JAQUELINE KOLOSOV FOR DOING THAT!!! -The writing at the beginning, is really amazing. After that, the writing gets bogged down the historical content (not surprising since most Historical fiction is like that.) Other than that, the end and the beginning, the writing is at it's strongest. -I love that the plot is mixed with magic. Unusual magic, not the kind you expect. It makes the plot more original. -Relation to King Lear...idk, I love King Lear... it made the story richer -Historical content is vivid, and great. I was LIVING in the time! It bogged down the writing but I still love that! -The relationship with Mary and Edmund, they just work as a perfect couple! -The plot pulled me in. And there is never a dull moment. Now, the NEGATIVES: -The dialogue is not so hot. -What happened to the amazing writing that Kolosov used for the beginning? -I don't think that this could be called a TRUE Romance book like some others I've read. (Not giving anything away) -And finally, the ENDING. Not bad, but the way it ends, you WANT a sequel. And Kolosov is not planning one yet. I'm not thinking of a series but a sequel would be nice. The ending is just too ambiguous and leaves too many questions unanswered. So, yeah. Don't know what to make of this book. But true, a lot of characters in regular historical fiction are downright predictable and have the SAME concept. They have the SAME plot and the SAME writing. I'll admit that this isn't the type of historical that's like that. But there are some of the same qualities that bad historicals have. Better, but I still recomend the AGTB series!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sanskriti

    See the post in my blog: http://sanskritibist.blogspot.com/ Her father, Thomas Seymour was executed for treason and her mother Katherine Parr, Henry VII’s last wife died of fever six days after giving birth to her only heiress Mary Seymour. Mary Seymour was under the guardianship of the Duchess of Suffolk’s and soon after her death another odd keeper Lady Strange. Instead of sewing and stitching Lady Strange teaches much to Mary to read and write and most importantly White Magic. As a dutiful Whi See the post in my blog: http://sanskritibist.blogspot.com/ Her father, Thomas Seymour was executed for treason and her mother Katherine Parr, Henry VII’s last wife died of fever six days after giving birth to her only heiress Mary Seymour. Mary Seymour was under the guardianship of the Duchess of Suffolk’s and soon after her death another odd keeper Lady Strange. Instead of sewing and stitching Lady Strange teaches much to Mary to read and write and most importantly White Magic. As a dutiful White magician its her destiny to serve under the Virgin Queen and protect her in every way possible during her reign. When she is invited at court in the age of Sixteen there is continuous back stabbing and envy from every corner of the palace, she realises she knows nothing about life in court. Her own philosophies start backfire, all the promises she made to herself about marrying fall and never to fall in love drifts apart as soon as she meets her cousin Edmund Seymour (a black magician) who has cunning plans made to thrash the Queen from her reign. MY OPINION: I cant give my opinions on this book, there were times in which I found it brilliantly written and other when I felt particularly childish reading it. I am a fan of magic and I do enjoy reading historical fiction (Young Adult as well). And true these two things are an important factor to like the book yet even though being a admirer of both does not eventually mean to adore the book. (but I admit I love the cover) The characters aren’t deep enough and neither is the plot or the basic theme to serve Queen Elizabeth. Most of the times the protagonist was saving herself or protecting her magical dog from evil ladies in court trying to take her position or Edmund Seymour. The magic was one the most unusual of types no wands, no bizarre spells to summon magic, no cloaks! Instead Kolosov made it different she used stones for defense and auras for describing peoples personalities. There was a change in the magic style which made it unique from other magical books. The writing the beginning was incredible, but Kolosov grew weary towards the middle of the book and continued being so in the end. The ENDING the most dreaded part: Huge topic to bothered about. She completed the ending in ten pages. Ten pages! Gosh she was in a hurry. The worrying bit comes now she wont be making a sequel well not likely cause her website and blog is outdated and there is no specific new whatsoever. That’s tragic now because the ending looks like it needs a sequel or at least 50 more pages.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sinai C.

    So, two stars is actually a very generous rating, but the author seems like a very nice person and her author's note at the end was very sweet, so...two stars. >.< Now...what the book did that was wrong...it told us EVERYTHING. Now, I'm not adverse to having a few hints here and there, but when everything is spelled out for us over and over again about this jewel or that or the other thing in almost the exact same wording, even from different characters...it's hard to really be very impres So, two stars is actually a very generous rating, but the author seems like a very nice person and her author's note at the end was very sweet, so...two stars. >.< Now...what the book did that was wrong...it told us EVERYTHING. Now, I'm not adverse to having a few hints here and there, but when everything is spelled out for us over and over again about this jewel or that or the other thing in almost the exact same wording, even from different characters...it's hard to really be very impressed with the writing. The romance. Now. I thought there would be some nice building up to the romance, through interaction where Edward or Edmund or whatever black magician's name is, would be shown to be a jerk with a heart of gold or something along those lines. BUT we spend the whole book with our hearts set against him because all he does is impregnate females and engage in sub-par romantic, dangerous conversation with our MC. I couldn't see any chemistry between them at all and I was very sorely dissapointed with the ending because it seemed much too rushed. I didn't feel like I got to know him well enough to really care at all about him. Ugh. Final thing it did wrong: King Lear. What. Why. WHY. *Facepalm* I love King Lear, but why is the story just...HERE? Thrown in and forced in? No purpose whatsoever. I think it would have been so much better if the book had just expanded on other things that I thought it did well. The spells were interesting, and understanding what the different components added was very intriguing. I liked Lady Strange a lot and I would have loved to see more time of Mary's training, her growing up, and maybe have her ACTUALLY contribute something to Elizabeth's reign? We have it all being set up for us in the first half of the book about her aiding the queen...and then in the second half, that all falls pretty much apart. It wasn't a terrible to read book...Amethysts are supposed to represent cheerfulness, and pearls are the tears of heaven--little fun facts like that and the beautiful imagery she sometimes comes up with, its fun to read sometimes...but...overall...I'm not going to really give the book more praise than it deserves, or more censure than it deserves. Eh. I wouldn't recommend it when there are better Tudor-era books out there.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    As soon as I saw that this book was about Mary Seymour, and included magic to boot, I knew I had to have it. Mary Seymour is, historically, a question mark. The daughter of former queen Catherine Parr and her fourth husband, Thomas Seymour, Mary was orphaned and taken in by the Duchess of Suffolk. There are no records of Mary's existence after the age of about two. Most historians believe she died in infancy, though rumors to the contrary have circulated. Here, Jacqueline Kolosov envisions a happi As soon as I saw that this book was about Mary Seymour, and included magic to boot, I knew I had to have it. Mary Seymour is, historically, a question mark. The daughter of former queen Catherine Parr and her fourth husband, Thomas Seymour, Mary was orphaned and taken in by the Duchess of Suffolk. There are no records of Mary's existence after the age of about two. Most historians believe she died in infancy, though rumors to the contrary have circulated. Here, Jacqueline Kolosov envisions a happier fate for Mary. When the Duchess dies, Mary goes to live with the enigmatic Lady Strange, who gives her an education both in the ordinary disciplines and in the arts of magic. Mary, like her late mother, becomes unusually learned for a woman of her time. This preparation eventually leads her to a career in Elizabeth I's court, ostensibly as a lady-in-waiting, secretly as a magician charged with protecting the queen. At court, Mary must navigate the complexities of intrigue. Most dangerously, she has her cousin Edmund Seymour to contend with: rogue, seducer, politician, and practitioner of the dark arts. Mary finds herself strangely attracted to Edmund even as she plots to thwart his political and amorous designs. This novel deals a lot with an issue that was at the forefront of many people's minds during the Virgin Queen's reign, and which still has relevance today: is it possible for a woman to surrender to romantic love without losing her autonomy? Mary is determined to resist all romantic emotions in order to avoid falling into the mistakes made by her parents. Coming to terms with the legacy of Catherine Parr, and of Thomas Seymour, takes her on a difficult coming-of-age journey. This story is engrossing, suspenseful, and touching. I also found it to be quite sensual, even without having so much as a single phrase that could be rated above PG-13. I very much liked the magic in this story. Powerful spells can be constructed from simple, everyday objects, but only if the magician has the knowledge and intuition to see many layers of meaning at once and understand the symbolism of every ingredient. Mary's dogs are wonderful; it's obvious that the author is a dog lover. The Red Queen's Daughter gives the reader an ending that is satisfactory yet leaves room for a sequel, which I definitely hope Kolosov decides to write.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Virag

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I noticed right away is that the plot seems strained, exaggerated, and even rushed at times. It gets worse the furthur along you read into it: Toward the ending, Mary's struggle to free Perseus from Vivienne was very dramatic, but then seemingly two seconds after she is at her worst state, Mary just "miraculously" turns everything around, gags Vivienne, and saves her dog/mentor. Then, she decides that she should seduce Edmund, her cousin, in order to prevent him from becoming dangerously powerfu I noticed right away is that the plot seems strained, exaggerated, and even rushed at times. It gets worse the furthur along you read into it: Toward the ending, Mary's struggle to free Perseus from Vivienne was very dramatic, but then seemingly two seconds after she is at her worst state, Mary just "miraculously" turns everything around, gags Vivienne, and saves her dog/mentor. Then, she decides that she should seduce Edmund, her cousin, in order to prevent him from becoming dangerously powerful. And all of a sudden, Mary and Edmund are in love. <-- I didn't really get that. Edmund seemed interested in her, but come on, he's seduced quite a few girls beofore turning his charms on Mary, and you (as a reader) are led to believe that he is trying to corrupt her for his own pesonal gain. But no, in an instant the author makes Edmund genuinely in love with Mary. Another thing - many of the characters did not seem all that realistic. And no, I don't mean the magic here, I'm talking about how open and readily trusting they were. I really doubt that Elizabeth would be so open towards Mary and allow her to speak so bluntly, that Dudely would tell her about his deepest secrets, so on and so on. It just does not seem realistic. Also, on the back description on the book it says something like "...despite the threat Edmund poses to Mary, he seems to be the only one to truly understand her." What?? Edmund and Mary never have heart-to-heart talks, except in the last 5 pages or something, which I don't really count since he was trying to convince her to marry him, and she had many doubts, even then. Apart from that, all he does is attepmt to pry her from her path with sweet words and kisses, and though Mary is tempted, she knows it is wrong. WHERE IS THE "TRULY UNDERSTANDING" there? I can not picture a lot of the people and actions like that, especially since this book is based on an actual historical time. In fantasy, this would not have bothered me because those people/places are probably very different from the "real" ones, and therefore the author has all the room he/she wants to build it. (as long as it is not too out o the ordinary, which this book would not have been if Kolosov hadn't based it on actual people in the 16th century.)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alanna Stefanek

    My book was called the Red Queen's Daughter, by Jacqueline Kolosov. Because of this book, my understanding of the time period (the 1500's) has increased. I have learned a lot about the struggles at court and about the Virgin Queen (Queen Elizabeth, Henry the V111's daughter). I do think that many 8th graders would like this book, because of the way it was written. Unfortunately, there were a few boring parts, and what was supposed to be the main plot was cut short to the ending quarter of the boo My book was called the Red Queen's Daughter, by Jacqueline Kolosov. Because of this book, my understanding of the time period (the 1500's) has increased. I have learned a lot about the struggles at court and about the Virgin Queen (Queen Elizabeth, Henry the V111's daughter). I do think that many 8th graders would like this book, because of the way it was written. Unfortunately, there were a few boring parts, and what was supposed to be the main plot was cut short to the ending quarter of the book. The writing was very unique, and it made almost every chapter interesting and fun to read. The Red Queen's Daughter was about an orphan girl named Mary. She was the daughter of the late dowager Queen Katherine (The Red Queen), and a treacherous traitor named Thomas Seymour. Soon she is taken in by a white witch named Lady Strange, who claims that Mary has a very important destiny. For many years in her life, Mary was taught by her. Her studies ranged from language to the meaning of stones. After that, Queen Elizabeth invites Mary to be one of her ladies-in-waiting. During her stay at Court, Mary learns more about her parents, her duty, and is involved with a dangerous plot- a lady-in-waiting named Vivienne, and her charming cousin, Edmund Seymour, who both use black magic. Then, Mary does a despicable thing, something she can't tell anyone... she has fallen in love with Edmund, who she is supposed to be wary of, and protect everyone from, for he has a very dangerous scheme.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Brooke

    I picked up this book because I love tudor England, and romance. However, the book seemed highly unrealistic, and did not even reach my expectations. The "magic" didn't seem like magic at all, and with no in-depth explanations, the character seemed daft, wandering around muttering spells. She was highly "innocent", at best, but I would argue inconsistent. She highly trusts her guardian without any doubt, but in court, she doesn't trust a word breathed by the royalty. And that brings me to the cou I picked up this book because I love tudor England, and romance. However, the book seemed highly unrealistic, and did not even reach my expectations. The "magic" didn't seem like magic at all, and with no in-depth explanations, the character seemed daft, wandering around muttering spells. She was highly "innocent", at best, but I would argue inconsistent. She highly trusts her guardian without any doubt, but in court, she doesn't trust a word breathed by the royalty. And that brings me to the court. It was highly unrealistic, compared to the real Elizabethan court. Mary gets swept up under the Queen's protection. Mary's falling in love, is so predictable, all the supposed "plot twists" are seen from miles away. And it's very confusing what Mary's sent to court to prevent. No real danger is ever presented in the story, and the characters are flat, even Mary is so predictable... and lastly, is that in Tudor and Elizabethan stories, you have to get the language just right. It sounded like Kolosov was writing for kindergarteners. She tried to make the language like old english by mixing in a few thees and thys, but that's not the only difference between the two language, and the story just fell flat. (view spoiler)[ANd when she falls for Edmund? It's entirely confusing, because she ultimately gives in to temptation, but at the end, he turns into a "good" guy, when he's been doing terrible actions all along the story. My only prediction is that he changed their minds with his "dark magic". But there's is no conclusion to this story, and it leaves you confused. (hide spoiler)]

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